Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Natural gas liquids (NGLs) are the main contributor to the profitability of natural gas processing plants. During the recent period of relatively low gas prices, NGLs spot prices have experienced a slower drop, with ethane prices being relatively steady. As a result, driving operating plants towards higher production of NGLs is expected to achieve a more profitable position. One way to achieve this is through a model-based optimization study on the entire plant. However, such studies are meaningful only when based on sound, high-fidelity models of the plant, thereby ensuring that the “optimal” solutions obtained satisfy all the important safety and operability constraints. In this keynote speech, we will use the example of a study of a NGL Plant in Abu Dhabi to explain the practical benefits of Advanced Model-based Optimization. We will describe how the key first step in such a study is validation: ensuring that model predictions of key results are matching the actual plant behavior. We will describe how the model is used to understand the best operational strategies for the facility through model-based optimization (avoiding the need for trial and error simulations). Finally we will show how this leads to the set-up of operating guidelines to allow operators to drive the plant towards optimal operation; giving them the ability to respond to changes in the plant or economic conditions quicker and with more confidence than previously possible.

Biography

Dr Abdallah Berrouk has completed his PhD from The Manchester University, UK and postdoctoral studies from Hong Kong University, Hong Kong. He is an Associate Professor at The Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi. He published two books, three book chapters and more than 90 papers on his ongoing research work in peer-reviewed international journals and conference proceedings. Dr Abdallah is member of the technical committee of ADIPEC (the largest oil and gas exhibition and conference) since 2013. His domain of expertise covered Computational Fluid Dynamics as applied for multiphase turbulent flows and Computational Flow Modeling for Chemical Reactor Engineering. He is recipient of many industrial awards from the local oil industry.

Speaker
Dr Abdallah Sofiane Berrouk University of Science and Technology, Petroleum Institute, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Abstract

In the actual context of global warming there is an important need for innovation in technology solutions promoting low carbon emissions. This paves the way to new research area with cross-cutting applicability relevant to chemical-to-chemical reactions and chemical to-power processes. Engineering of efficient catalysts exhibiting high performance at lower operating temperatures, will help saving significant amounts of energy and reducing the carbon emissions. Special attention is devoted to the development of non-noble metal catalysts material taking advantage of the available minerals such as clays with respect to their physicochemical and textural properties suitable for applications in catalysis. In recent years, clays attracted significant interest as support to transition metal oxides for efficient contaminants removal from drinking water. Clays served successfully as catalysts due to their chemical composition consisting mainly of aluminosilicates that might act as catalyst support as well as mixtures of several common compounds such as Fe2O3, MgO, K2O, usually considered as active phases and promoters contained in material available locally. Recently, we demonstrated the interesting intrinsic catalytic performances of clays toward complete oxidation of air pollutants such as CO as well as saturated, unsaturated, oxygenated and aromatic hydrocarbons. Furthermore, we highlighted also an innovative aspect associated with the easy extrusion of clays based catalyst and related advantages over conventional packed bed reactors allowing not only reducing pressure drop but also preventing hot spots/cool zones within the reactor. This is beneficial with respect to heat transfer in case of energy sensitive reactions and could be of interest with respect to methane reforming with CO2, considered both as constituent of biogas and major greenhouse gases. This study has been carried out using an easily extruded honeycomb monolith catalyst based on appropriately modified and promoted local clays. The primary results are promising and might be considered as starting point paving the way to valorization of low cost local resources in chemical processes with low carbon emissions.

Biography

Speaker
Tarik Chafik Professor University Abdelmalek Essadi Tangier, Moroocco

Abstract

The development of increasingly selective and sensitive methods for the determination of chemical, biochemical analyte species currently receiving considerable attention. Fluorescence spectroscopy has become a commanding tool for sensing and imaging trace amounts of species because of its simplicity and high sensitivity. The fluorescence method has obvious advantages in sensitivity, selectivity and real-time in situ detection. FONs of the low molecular weight materials exhibit improved photo stability and enhanced emission. It is worth noting that FONs have high stability in aqueous solution, thus providing convenience for chemical and biological testing in aqueous solution. These organic materials have certain advantages of well-defined molecular structures, easier preparation and purification, amenability to large-scale production, and better batch-to- batch reproducibility. The design and synthesis of fluorescent organic nanosensors with high selectivity and sensitivity of detection continue to grow in the research field. The organic nanoparticles will be characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope), Infra-Red (IR) spectroscopy and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods. The studies on photo physical performance of the nanoparticles will help to explore the binding ability of fictionalized nanoparticles with analyte of interest. Mechanism of binding could be proposed on the basis of fluorescence change, Zeta potential, anodic and cathodic peak potential obtained on cyclic voltammetry.

Biography

Prof. S. R. Patil has made significant contribution in Bio-analytical Chemistry and Material Science by publishing 75 articles in the research journals of national and international repute. In addition, he has also contributed in teaching, curriculum and extracurricular activities of the home university and other universities of Maharashtra State. Dr. Patil was visiting Professor to Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, South Korea during March 2010 to June 2010. The analytical methods based on Fluorescence off-on approach developed for determination of Drugs, Biomolecules like Vitamins, components of DNA etc and molecular interaction studies between Drug and Bio-molecules have received appreciating citations. The work on organic nanoparticles (NPs) for development of Bio-analytical technique and bio- chemical imaging is of interest. Dr.Patil is reviewer for international journals and currently Member of the Editorial Board of “Journal of Luminescence and Applications” a Journal of Columbia International Publishing USA.

Speaker
Patil Shivajirao Raghunath Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur-416004, Maharashtra(India)

Abstract

The work presents numerical evaluation of the effect of the activation method and the used activator on the formation of the microporous structure of the activated carbons. The computer calculations were carried out based on of the adsorption isotherms of nitrogen and benzene on activated carbons. On the basis of the research and analyses, a significant effect of the type of the activating agent used and activation method applied on the formation of the microporous structure and, consequently, on the adsorptive properties of the produced adsorbate was observed. The right choice of the raw material and the conditions for the production of carbonaceous adsorbents can result in obtaining materials with a complex microporous structure suitable for a particular technological process, provided that the optimal activating agent is applied and the preparation conditions are suitable for the raw material in question. Still, finding the activating agent and production conditions requires detailed research, which cannot be carried out without access to precision tools with which to evaluate the microporous structure produced. The new adsorption models with the unique numerical procedure of the fast multivariate fitting of theoretical models to adsorption isotherms applied in this work prove highly advantageous when compared with popular methods of microporous structure description by providing a wider range of information on the analysed microporous structure and offering unique possibilities of evaluating reliability of the obtained information on the analysed structure.

Biography

Dr. Mirosław Kwiatkowski in 2004 obtained Ph.D. degree at the AGH University of Science and Technology in Krakow, currently he is working as an assistant professor. His published work includes more than 45 papers in reputable international journals and 75 conference proceedings. He is the editor-in-chief International Journal of System Modeling and Simulation (UAE), a member of the eleven editorial board of internationals journals and a regular reviewer in a reputable scientific journals as well as a member of the organizing and scientific committees international conferences in Europe, Asia, Australia and United States of America.

Speaker
Mirosław Kwiatkowski Faculty of Energy and Fuels, AGH University of Science and Technology

Abstract

Fluid lubricants are used in almost every field of human technological activity in order to ensure longer durability and to reduce equipment maintenance during the moving mechanical systems of machines, particularly transmission and rotational bearings components that require effective lubrication for the reduction of friction and wear in ordrer to achieve higher energy efficiency. Thus, one of the challenging tasks is the preparation of the lubricant with the adequate and appropriate additive which permit to overcome the lack of inherent basic fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at Higher temperatures []. Among these additives, MoS2 remains the most widely used and whose its use dates back several decades []. After the discovery of spherical MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles in 1992, the studies were oriented towards the preparation of new lubricant generation based on nanoparticles to exploit the enormous benefits that they arise []. In this contribution, we present our research work concerning the synthesis of MoS2 nanospheres using a mild solvothermal method and their chemical surface modification and stabilization in comercial wind turbine oil (PAO). The as-prepared MoS2 nano-additives were deeply characterized by XRD, SEM, EDX, AFM and FT-IR. The viscosity of the obtained suspension (oil+ modified nano-additives) was mesured by a viscosimeter rheometer, the agglomeration phenomena and the stability of nanomaterials in oil were quantified based on the zeta potential absolute value and the Dynamic and Static Light Scattering (DLS, SLS). The obtained results revealed that the dispersibility of MoS2 nano-additives was greatly improved by the chemical surface modification. Explain how you modify the surface…. The as modified nanoparticles prevent their agglomeration which help enhancing their long term stability in oil medium. This finding was likely associated with alkyl-silane group affinity towards the available defects on MoS2 surfaces. This behavior will help to improve the tribological performance of these oil lubricant based on nano-additives.

Biography

Speaker
T. Chafik FST of Tangier, Abdelmalek Essaadi University, BP 416, Tangier, Morocco

Sessions:

Abstract

Recently, the pollution problems of ground water were taken a serious trend due do the diffusion of leached heavy metals into the ground water with high concentrations that could terminate the human life of at least destroy the human health. Synthesize of a particular martials that highly selective and efficient for the sensing and removal of some kind of heavy metals exist in ground water is not so easy. In this work we succeed to synthesize a new kind of hybrid materials have the ability to selectively sense and remove most heave metals in polluted ground water. The new materials are durable, resistant to attrition and reusable for unlimited number of treated water cycles. The production of these new materials are not complicated and considered as costless materials beside the higher capacity that lasts for long time.

Biography

Speaker
Medhat Mohamed El-Moselhy Lailah Jazan university, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Noncatalytic heterogeneous reactions include Liquid-Liquid, Liquid-Gas, Solid-Gas, Solid-Solid and Solid-Liquid systems. Solid-Liquid system involving liquid phase as product is of considerable industrial importance and readily found in chemical and hydrometallurgy industries: Acidic leaching of raw phosphate, oil recovery using sodium hydroxide, lixiviation of metal ores, etc. The properties of solid reactants change continuously as the reaction progresses and a successful optimization and design of the reactor depends greatly on acknowledge of the evolution of the solid reactant surface namely adsorption, diffusion and heat transfer through its porous section. New experimental techniques will allow us to follow in-situ this evolution and several semi-empirical approaches can be used to perfect these phenomena: Unreacted shrinking core model, volumetric reaction model, pore model or grain model. Also, it is important to take a careful study of the electrostatic interactions and speciation of the reactant liquid. The speciation of liquid phase is meaningful parameter to evaluate the diffusion towards the surface. In general, the liquid phase is a concentrated solution of strong electrolytes and the thermodynamic modeling involves the use of electrolyte activity coefficient models such as PITZER model, Wilson model, NRTL model, etc. Our researches and similar other investigations show that the modeling of thermodynamic properties play essential roles in engineering of chemical products and in the processes that manufacture them.

Biography

Pr Arbi MGAIDI has completed his PhD from Higher National School of Mines Paris, France in the area of chemical Engineering and doctoral thesis from EL Manar University, Tunisia. He is actually the director of Chemistry Department at Taibah University (Al Ula) KSA. He has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and he is an editorial board member of International Journal of NonFerrous Metallurgy (IJNFM). He has participated in numerous European research projects. He has directed several theses in area of chemical and chemical engineering.

Speaker
Arbi Mgaidi Taibah University Chemistry Department Al Ula KSA

Abstract

Self-assembled microgel functionalized with peptides was developed and applied to regenerate neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Collagen (COL), hyaluronic acid (HA), and alginate (ALG) were modified with methacrylic anhydride (MA), photocrosslinked for patterned particles, grafted with GRGDSP and Ln5-P4, and self-assembled to integrate the microgel into three-dimensional scaffolds. Physicochemical assessments revealed that the ternary microgel scaffolds had an optimal chemical composition at COLMA:HAMA:ALGMA = 1:2:1. In fabricating cell-laden constructs, modified GRGDSP/Ln5-P4 in linear self-assembled scaffolds could significantly improve the entrapment efficiency and viability of iPSCs. In addition, GRGDSP/Ln5-P4 in the microgel constructs triggered the differentiation of iPSCs toward neurons, since the percentage of neurite-like cells could be higher than 98% after induction of nerve growth factor. Self-assembled microgel comprising COLMA, HAMA, ALGMA, and GRGDSP/Ln5-P4 may be promising in producing mature neural lineage from iPSCs, to provide better treatment for damaged nervous tissue.

Biography

Dr. Yung-Chih Kuo is a professor at National Chung Cheng University. His research interests are focused on biomaterials, nanomedicine, tissue engineering, blood–brain barrier, cancer therapy, nerve regeneration, spinal cord injury and stroke treatment, and Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease therapy. He has authored over 140 SCI journal papers. He is a fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry (UK) and an honor member of Phi Tau Phi Society. He won Best Paper Award in 2016 and 2008, Prof. Tsai-Teh Lai Award in 2015, Special and Talented Scholar Award in 2013-5, Outstanding Research Award in 2013, and Young Scholar Award in 2003.

Speaker
Dr. Kuo Yung-Chih National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan

Abstract

The aim of the presented study was an estimation of zinc bioavailability derived from amino acid chelate with glycine, lysine and methionine in growing lambs. 20 lambs at age about 10 weeks and average body weight of 20 kg were randomly divided into 4 groups. Control contain basal diet and 40mg/kg ZnSO4 DM. the 2nd,3rd and 4th groups contain basal diets and 40mg/kg Zn glycine chelate, 40mg/kg Zn lysine chelate and 40mg/kg Zn methionine chelate, respectively. At the end of the experiment, average body weight of lambs fed zinc methionine chelate showed significant improvements than control, zinc lysine and glycine chelate. The blood samples were taken, in tissue samples from liver, kidney and pancreas the content of zinc was determined. Absorption and retention of zinc were higher(p<0.05) in lambs receiving amino acid chelate (glycine, lysine and methionine chelate) than control (ZnSO4). The higher content of zinc in soft and hard tissue of lambs which received organic form of zinc might indicate better assimilation and bioavailability of zinc than sulphate form. Among tested organic forms of zinc, the zinc methionine complex was characterized as having the most advantageous property.

Biography

Ghada elashry have Ph.D in chemistry 2007. I am associated professor in chemistry and its application in nutrition. I am interested in biometal and chelated minerals and its application as food and feed additives. I published many papers explain the role of biometal and chelated mineral in animal nutrition and production.

Speaker
ghada ashry Agriculture Research Centre Ministry of Agriculture, Dokki, Giza, Egypt

Abstract

Au(III) ions were selectively extracted from aqueous media using Au(III) ion-imprinted bio-adsorbent based on modified chitosan (Au-CMB). First, 2-mercaptobenzaldehyde-chitosan Schiff base was prepared and interacted with Au(III) ions. The obtained polymeric Au(III) complex was then cross-linked by epichlorohydrin (ECH) before leaching the template Au(III) ions out of the cross-linked matrix. During the synthetic procedures, the obtained chitosan derivatives were characterized by Elemental analysis, FTIR and NMR spectra. Moreover, the crystalline structures along with surface morphology of the fabricated polymeric materials were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The Au(III) ions uptake studies indicated that the adsorption process was greatly influenced by pH and followed the pseudo-second-order kinetic mechanism. Furthermore, the adsorption was endothermic and the isotherms showed the best fit with Langmuir model with qm 370±0.5 and 195±0.5 mg g-1 in case of Au-CMB and NI-CMB, respectively.

Biography

Speaker
Dr. Mohamed Monier Taibah University, Yanbu Branch, Yanbu El-Bahr, KSA

Abstract

The design of environmentally friendly methodologies has been the driving force of scientists in recent years. In particular, the use of biomass-derived materials, green solvents and alternatives techniques has been investigated. In thisconference, several green chemistryapproachesthattargetadvancedsynthesis and processeswillbepresented. Fewapproacheswillbe described: (i) green synthesis of quinoline and phenanthrolinederivatives in sole water usingmicrowave irradiation and hightemperature/pressure;(ii) production of furfural fromD-xylose, xylane and hemicelluloseviahomogeneous and heterogeneouscatalysisusingmicrowave irradiation and hightemperature/pressure; (iii) conventionalmicellarcatalysis and magicphotochromicmicellarcatalysis. Conception, synthesis and physico-chemicalpropertieswillbedetailed.

Biography

Speaker
Christophe LEN Sorbonne Universités, Université de Technologie de Compiègne, Centre de Recherche de Royallieu, France

Abstract

The α-NiS nanocrystals have been the subject of considerable interest because of their properties as a metal-insulator and paramagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase changing material, and its number of applications in various fields such as infrared (IR) detectors, electrode in photo-electrochemical (PEC) storage devices, solar storage and hydro-sulfurization catalysis. Various techniques have been adopted, in the past, to synthesize NiS nanocrystals with anisotropic shape and tunable structures. In the present study, pure and Fe/Cd/O doped (2.5 and 5.0 wt.%) α-NiS nanocrystals have been prepared by a simple solvothermal route using a domestic microwave oven and characterized chemically, structurally, optically, electrically, and magnetically. X-ray diffraction patterns and energy dispersive X-ray analysis spectra confirm the phase purity of all the seven samples prepared. Atomic force microscopic analysis shows the average particle sizes within the range 19-20 nm. Transmission and scanning electron microscopic analyses indicate the spherical shape and homogeneity of the nanocrystals prepared. Doping increased the optical absorption and photoluminescence yield. Also, it has been found that Fe/O doping decreases whereas Cd doping increases the optical band gap energy value. Results of magnetic measurements made at room temperature indicate significant changes in the ferromagnetic ordering due to doping. The results of electrical (DC and AC) measurements made at various temperatures (40-150 °C) and frequencies (102-106 Hz) indicate a normal behavior and increase of conductivity and dielectric constant due to doping. The present study indicates that oxygen (anionic) doping makes α-NiS nanocrystals a better electrochemical sensing performer.

Biography

C.K. Mahadevan (the speaker) has acquired his Ph.D. and D.Sc. degrees respectively from I.I.T. Madras and Madurai Kamaraj University located in India. Currently, he is a Professor of Physics at PSN College of Engineering and Technology. He has about 30 years teaching and 35 years research experience [Guided 2 Postdocs and 40 Ph.D. Scholars; Availed 10 Funded Projects; Published 213 Articles in International Journals and 139 Articles in Proceedings; Delivered 71 Invited Talks in Conferences]. His major research area is Solid State Materials. He is a winner of several coveted awards and honors for his teaching, research and related activities.

Speaker
C.K. Mahadevan Center for Scientific and Applied Research, PSN College of Engineering and Technology, Tirunelveli-627152, Tamil Nadu, India

Abstract

Biosurfactants also called bioemulsifiers are amphipathic compounds produced by many microorganisms that allow them to exhibit a wide range of biological activities. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant and antiproliferative potential of biosurfactants isolated from Lactobacillus casei and to assess their anti-adhesive and anti-biofilm abilities against oral opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus strains. The antioxidant activity of biosurfactant was evaluated using the in vitro scavenging ability on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical. The antiproliferative activity was determined on epithelial cell line (HEp-2) by the Methylthiazole tetrazolium (MTT) reduction assay. The anti-adhesive and antibiofilm activity against S. aureus strains were achieved using crystal violet staining. Our results revealed that the DPPH scavenging activity of biosurfactants at 5.0 mg/mL concentration is between 74.6 and 77.3%. Furthermore, biosurfactants showed antiproliferative potency against studied epithelial cells as judged by IC50 and its value ranged from 109.1±0.84 mg/mL to 129.7±0.52 mg/mL. The results of the growth inhibition indicate that biosurfactant BS-LBl was more effective against oral S. aureus strains 9P and 29P with an IC50 of 1.92±0.26 mg/mL and 2.16±0.12 mg/mL respectively. Moreover, both biosurfactants displayed important antibiofilm activity with eradication percentages ranging from 80.22±1.33% to 86.21±2.94% for the BS-LBl, and from 53.38±1.77% to 64.42±2.09% for the BS-LZ9. Our findings demonstrate that biosurfactants from L. casei strains exhibited considerable antioxidant and antiproliferative potencies and were able to inhibit oral S. aureus strains with important antibiofilm efficacy. They could have a promising role in the prevention of oral diseases.

Biography

Abstract

Improved heat transfer fluids (HTFs) are critical formaking radical improvements in making electricity by concentrating solar power (CSP). Molten chloride heat transfer fluid can allow clean and sustainable production of electrical power with no consumption of water. In a CSP system,mirrors focus sunlight to heat metal pipescontainingtheHTF. At this time, the HTFis heavy petroleum or a molten nitrate salt, which carries the heat to a heat-exchanger to generatesteam, whichspins the turbine in a magnetic-induction generatorto make electricity. Hydrocarbon oil or molten nitrate salt are expensive, complicatethe system design and limit system efficiency, because hydrocarbons are flammable and only stable below 250oC and alkali-nitrate salts decompose above 550oC. Furthermore, neither petroleum nor nitrate HTFs can are stable between 550 to 700 C, which is important because this is where the Brayton generator operates using carbon dioxide instead of water to spin a turbine, eliminating the use of water in electricity production. On the other hand, molten chloride salts are abundant, inexpensive and stable to over 900oC, which allow water free electricity generation. Design rules will be discussed for makingmolten chloride heat-transfer fluids from a mixture ofhigh-boiling (>1300oC) ionic chloride salts, like NaCl and KCl,and low melting (90 to 200oC) covalent metal halides, such as AlCl3 or ZnCl2. The resulting chloride salt HTFs are eutectic mixtures which arelow melting (m.p. < 250oC) andstable at high temperatures (>900oC). An important question is, “Are eutectic chloride salt HTFs compatible with a metal pipes made from nickel alloys?” The design rule for selecting a metal pipeto contain molten chloride salt, isthat the metal pipe is stable if the metal ions in the salt component have electrochemical reduction potentials more negative than the metals making up the pipe. The corrosion rates of metal pipes containing molten salt in the presence or absence of air have been experimentally determined at different temperatures. Corrosion of pipe metal containing molten salts was notfoundto be due to the interaction of pipe metal with the molten salt itself, but is due to the presence of impurities, like water and oxygen,dissolved in the salt.Since the pipe containing the heat transfer fluid is a closed loop, we conclude that once the water and oxygen impurities are removed, the CSP system is expected to be stable for years, as long as water and oxygen are kept out of the loop.

Biography

Abstract

Velocity profiles were measured and simulated by laser doppler velocimetry (LDV) and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software, respectively. Results showed that there exist channel flow, swirl flow and severe back mixing between the stages of rotating disc contactor (RDC). A new rotating disc contactor (NRDC) was then invented. The NRDC was constructed with additional perforated rotor discs installed inside stator rings. The LDV measurements and CFD simulations revealed that the NRDC could effectively inhibit channel and swirl flows. Mass transfer and hydrodynamic experiments illustrated that back mixing could be suppressed and mass transfer efficiency of the NRDC was 20%-40% higher than that of the RDC while the flooding throughput was nearly the same. The NRDC was successfully applied in revamping commercial caprolactam extraction column and in designing new NRDC for the last 20 years. Recently, a multi-stage optimized NRDC has been invented and applied to caprolactam extraction column design.

Biography

The State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing 100084 China

Speaker
Yundong Wang Beijing China

Abstract

Aims and objectives. There is a paucity of published data on the effect of TB chemotherapy on nitric oxide(NO) status in patients with or without multi-drug resistant TB(MDR-TB). Methods. The pattern of NO response in 140 patients with pulmonary TB, including 74 with MDR-TB(1stgroup) and 66 without MDR-TB(2ndgroup) has been studied and compared to the NO status of 30 healthy donors (3rdgroup).The NO status was assessed by measuring inducible NO synthase(iNOS),nitrites and nitrates levels.This was measured prior to treatment initiation and two months after the prescribed chemotherapy. Results. Increased levels of NO indices were found in patients with TB when compared (1stgroup (iNOS-231.6±6.65pmole/min/mgB,nitrites-5.626±0.15μmol/L and nitrates-62.89±1.42μmol/L) and 2ndgroup (iNOS-286.3±5.92, nitrites-6.747±0.17 and nitrates-72.02±1.43)) to 3rdgroup(iNOS-81.03±2.36, nitrites-3.83±0.093 and nitrates-37.98±1.30).After two months of chemotherapy a significant decrease in NO indicators was observed in the patients with TB,particularly in those without MDR-TB(1stgroup (iNOS-114.9±3.2, nitrites-4.21±0.13 and nitrates-46.65±1.04) and 2ndgroup(iNOS-91.4±2.53,nitrites-3.67±0.09 and nitrates-35.65±1.06)). Conclusion. In patients with MDRTB, significantly lower levels of NO indicators were observed by comparison with patients without MDR-TB. After two months on chemotherapy, a significant decrease in iNOS activity and NO metabolites was observed in patients with pulmonary TB, but the decrease of NO indicators was manifested mostly in the patients without MDR-TB as opposed to patients with MDR-TB, which suggests lower levels of immunologic and reparative processes in such patients. Therefore, the levels of nitrites and nitrates aswell as iNOS activity may serve as additional diagnostic criteria to differentiate MDR-TB from and non-resistant TB.Easily assessed NO-related markers can also serve as predictors of treatment outcome since patients with drug-susceptible strains had lower NO output approaching levels found in controls. Keywords: tuberculosis, MDR-TB, nitric oxide, iNOS, nitrites, nitrates

Biography

Dr. Dmytro Butov MD, PhD, DSc, specialist in biochemistry of lung diseases and in tuberculosis. Associate Professor, Senior Consultant of the Department of Phthisiology and Pulmonology, Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine. He has published more than 55 research papers in reputed journals, inventor on 7 Ukrainian patents and has been serving as an editorial board member of 15 journals.

Speaker
Dmytro Butov Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine

Abstract

Engineering the chemical reactivity of organic molecules is among the most exciting scientific challenges of our time. Chemical reactivity is conventionally engineered and tuned by chemical functionalization or by varying the reaction environment. More recently, low energy electron (LEE) sources have aroused great enthusiasm as a versatile competitive quantum tool for engineering the chemical reactivity. The LEE promoted chemical reactivity is induced when the molecule resonantly captures a LEE of particular kinetic energy to form an electronically metastable electronmolecule transient adduct. The kinetic energy of the LEE can be tuned to create potential energy surfaces electron-molecule compound states of different reactivity. In fact, the LEEs are able to trigger, drive, promote and catalyse chemical reactions which otherwise may not be attainable by current chemical methods and for inducing site specific chemical reactivity[1, 2, 3]. In my talk, I shall present a new direction for the LEE induced chemical reactivity. Our idea relies on the use of Coulomb repulsion between the resonantly captured LEE and the electrons of the target molecules for inducing chemical reactivity.

Biography

Speaker
SAJEEV YESODHARAN Bhabha Atomic Research Centre

Abstract

Isotactic Polypropylene (Marlex HLN-120-01 from Philips Sumika Polypropylene Company; iPP) has been loaded by various amounts of Vapor Grown Carbon Nanofiber (VGCNF; PR-24AG; Pyrograf Products, Inc). Nanocomposites were obtained by high-shear mixing of iPP with various amounts of VGCNF by utilizing a HAAKE Rheomix at 65 rpm and 180 oC for 9 min followed by an additional mixing at 90 rpm for 5 min. The as obtained nanocomposites were gamma irradiated in air, at room temperature, at a dose rate of about 1 kGy/h and various integral doses ranging between 0 and 28 kGy by using a 60Co source. Wide Angle X-Ray Spectroscopy has been used to quantify the changes in the crystalline structure and the degree of crystallinity of iPP-VGCNFs nanocomposites. The measurements have been carried out by using a Bruker Discover 8 spectrometer.

Biography

Abstract

Steven P. Nolan his Ph.D. from the University of Miami where he worked under the supervision of Professor Carl D. Hoff. After a postdoctoral stay with Professor Tobin J. Marks at Northwestern University, he joined the University of New Orleans in 1990. In 2006 he joined the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) as Group leader and ICREA Research Professor. In early 2009, he became Chair in Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis at the University of St Andrews. In 2015, he moved to Ghent University. He has published more than 550 papers and has a h-index of 101.

Biography

Recent advances in the use of well-defined gold complexes enabling the activation of C-H bonds and CO2 will be discussed.1-3 The specific gold systems investigated in this study bear the now ubiquitous N-heterocyclic carbene ligands. Ligand properties will be addressed in the context of the propensity of gold to activate C-H bonds. The synthesis of digold complexes whether gem-digold or  diacetylide complexes will be presented. Furthermore the reactivity of these species and their role in organogold catalysis will be discussed. More recent advances using well- defined gold-NHC systems will also be presented and discussed in terms of sustainability

Speaker
Steven Nolan Ghent University, Belgium

Abstract

Clinical diagnosis is essential for the identification of infectious diseases like malaria, hepatitis, etc. Effective clinical diagnosis depends on the experience of the clinician as well as the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic tools and protocols used. In case of biosensors, which are devices that couple biological sensing elements to transducers to generate a signal in response to a specific analyte, such qualities, especially specificity, may be achieved with suitable design. The rapid progress in the microfabrication technologies, driven by demand for smaller and cheaper electronics, has aided in the advancement of technologies to miniaturize sensors as well, particularly since some of the microfabrication methods have been adopted for use with polymers and other materials besides silicon and its derivatives. This research describes one such configuration which may be suitably adapted for use in sensing biological molecules. The objective of this work was to design and develop a label-free optical biosensor based on the principles of Guided Mode Resonance Filters (GMRF). Although some effort has been made towards development of such sensors elsewhere, they rely on expensive material like quartz as a substrate. This study was aimed at establishing new, cost effective sensing schemes to detect antigen-antibody interaction on the surface of the sensor (i.e. develop a GMRF based immunosensor). The research includes the selection of the material, fabrication of the nano dimensional optical GMRF device, surface modification, protein immobilization, theoretical analysis and characterization of the fabricated biosensor for detection.

Biography

Gajanan D. Nagare, received his Bachelor, Master degree in Instrumentation & Control from North Maharashtra University, Jalgaon & Government College of Engineering, Pune in 2000 & 2013 respectively. He Joined IIT Bombay in 2004 for his PhD research on “Guided Mode Resonance Filter Based Optical Biosensors”. He also worked as a Student Lab-in-Charge for MEMS laboratory & Centre of Excellence in Nano-electronics. He was also involved in the IEEE activities at IIT Bombay. It involves site preparation for new instruments, installation of newly arrived instruments, maintaining clean room discipline in the lab, updating the policies for the lab users (internal and external), training newcomers in the laboratory, maintaining equipment and arranging for repairs and managing the man power to accomplish tasks. In 2009, He worked as Project associate for Indian Nano-electronics User’s Programme (INUP) at CEN, IIT Bombay. It involved process development and scheduling fabrication processes for the completion of time bounded research in different fields. He also worked as Post-Doctoral Fellow at University of Alberta, Canada in 2010. During his PDF, he worked on Development of Biosensor for the detection of Lysteria in collaboration with Industry, AQL Inc., Canada. He applied for the patent at University Alberta, Canada along with Industry partner. He joined Vidyalankar Institute of Technology in 2011 as Associate professor. He then promoted as a Professor & Head of the Department of Biomedical Engineering from 2013. His primary work includes teaching UG & PG students and R & D activities at VIT Mumbai. He has active collaboration with Department of Biomedical Engineering, IIT Bombay. He is research project reviewer by Manipal University, Dubai Campus, UAE, January 2014. He is Board of studies Member for BCUD Solapur University, February 2015. He is involved in Syllabus setting of Biomedical Microsystems for Mumbai University as Chairperson of the committee, 2014. He is reviewer for Biomedical Engineering Research (BER), Nanoletters, Springer publication, Journal of Material Science and IJBCE. Nominated as “Active Researcher” in nanoscience and technology by Department of Science and Technology, Govt. of India, November 2012. He is a Life time membership of ISTE (LM 80988), Biomedical Engineering Society of India- LM1079, International Association of Advanced Materials-78961911372 & Red Cross society.

Speaker
Dr. Gajanan D. Nagare Vidyalankar Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India

Abstract

Innovation requires vision, leadership and architecture. The myth that innovation is expensive, takes a lot of people, must be big, and takes a lot of experience are excuses that keep us from innovating. Innovation leaders not having enough time to think is a disaster. The key elements of innovation and how to create breakthrough, innovative capabilities are addressed. There are only 2 questions that matter: Is this disruptive and why? Marginal innovation is expensive, while breakthrough innovation is much cheaper. The leadership’s role is to move the firm from its present status to a strategically desirable future. The innovation architecture needs seekers, market readers, and technology drivers. Innovation happens at the boundaries of disciplines, where silos break down. Breaking down silos can spark innovation in unexpected ways; however, not all silos need to be broken down as not everybody need to innovate. Trends in the Biotech Industry are: immunotherapy, antibody drug conjugates, gene and cell therapies, drugs for CNS diseases, drug re-purposing, innovative routes of administration, faster and more reliable DNA and pathology tests. Biotechnology hubs will expand. They need to be close to universities (intellectual proximity, internships) where (1) academia can learn entrepreneurship and successful business development, (2) the industry revitalizes its innovation platform with new ideas from young talent, (3) the local economy grows and shares prosperity.

Biography

Andrei Blasko is a Senior Fellow at Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. working in Inhalation Technical Development. He is Editor-in-Chief at Journal of Applied Pharmacy and member of the Editorial Board of the American Journal of Advanced Drug Delivery. Previously Dr. Blasko was Director of Analytical Method Development and co-lead a Drug Discovery & CMC Development program at Pain Therapeutics, Inc., where he managed projects in drug discovery, structural biology, and analytical method development. Other companies include Celera, Pfizer/Pharmacia/Sugen and Roche Bioscience. Dr. Blasko is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a member of ACS, AAPS and FIP.

Speaker
Blasko, Andrei Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation San Carlos USA

Abstract

The photocatalytic hydrogen production of Pd doped CdS photocatalyst was tested using an effective mixing batch photocatalytic reactor (EMBPR). The catalyst was characterized for X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscope and it was found that the catalyst has 3.7µm. The feasibility studies were carried out by varying the treatability parameters and it was found that maximum hydrogen production occurs at their respective optimum values. The maximum hydrogen achieved was found to be 6250 μmol/h at optimized sulphide ion, sulphite ion concentrations, pH, catalyst dosage, recycle flow rate and light irradiation of 0.2M, 0.2M, 10.5, 0.5g/L, 30 mL/min and 220 W/m2 respectively. Close investigation revealed that this high production is due to the optimization of parameters coupled with batch process with passive mixing. The catalyst also has proved to be photo stable for up to 5 trials.

Biography

Dr.V.Preethi is an Associate Professor in Hindustan University, Chennai, India. She received her Ph.D. degree in Environmental Engineering from the Anna University, Chennai. She completed her MS in Environmental Technology from Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), Spain. Her main research activities concern about Advanced oxidation Technologies for Water, Waste gas, Wastewater Treatment and Hydrogen Production, Air Quality Modelling and Waste Gas Treatment by Biofilteration. Biogas production from Waste, Photocatalysis for environmental, energy and health applications, and the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials for photoconversion purposes. She is the author for 7 publications in peer-reviewed journals with high impact and more than 25 oral communications in international conferences and symposium. She is also the author of 2 patents. In 2015 she was awarded the Young Scientist Award for Hydrogen Energy and Advanced Materials (HEAM) by National Institute of Technology, Bhopal and Indian Association of Hydrogen Energy and Advanced Materials. Apart from that she also received 6 other awards for her innovative research findings. She has worked as a researcher for two years in Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, UAB, Spain. Also she has five years of teaching experience and totally 11 years of experience in both research and academics. She organized and conducted an International Conference on Sustainable Environment and Energy (ICSEE 2017) funded by DST, Government of India. She is the principal Investigator for a project titled ‘Recovery of Hydrogen from Industrial Waste Streams’ funded by DST, Government of India.

Speaker
Preethi V Hindustan Institute of Technology and Science, Chennai, India

Abstract

Effect of interparticle force (IPF) on the bubble dynamics in a gas-solid fluidized bed was investigated numerically by a combined method of computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method (CFD-DEM). The model was validated by experimental results in terms of the probability density distribution of instantaneous local bed voidage and Eulerian solid velocity field. The results showed that the 2D Cartesian model can satisfactorily predict the hydrodynamics of a gas-solid fluidized bed in the presence of IPF. Effects of IPF on the bubbles diameter and bubble velocity were investigated. It was shown that by increasing the IPF in the bed, emulsion voidage increases and holds more gas between particles. Also, results indicated that presence of IPF in bed causes increase in the bubble size. In addition, bubble rise velocity increased while the average velocity of particles decreased by the presence and enhancement of the IPF.

Biography

Speaker
mostoufi Process Design and Simulation Research Center, School of Chemical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

PAK1 is the major oncogenic/ageing Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by p21 (RAC/CDC42) and several other signal transducers such as PIX, three distinct Tyr-kinases (ETK, FYN and JAK2) and CK2 (casein kinase 2) in cells. PAK1 is essential for robust growth of almost all solid tumors which require PAK1-dependent angiogenesis. Besides this kinase is required for many other diseases/disorders such as NF (neurofibromatosis), AD (Alzheimer’s disease), PD (Parkinson’s disease), depression, epilepsy, autism, schizophrenia, a variety of infectious and inflammatory diseases, diabetes (type 2), obesity, and even hyperpigmentation. Thus, the potential maket value of PAK1-blockers is enourmous. However, so far only a few PAK1-blockers are available on the maket, such as FK228, Gleevec, and the old antibiotic called minocycline (MC) but with a very limited FDA approval for cancer therapy. Thus, for a last decade, we have taken a great effort for identifying PAK1-blockers among natural or old (generic) products as well as the robust potentiation of their anti-cancer/anti-PAK1 activity mainly by increasing their cell-permeability. Here in this lecture, we shall introduce a few successful examples including 1,2,3-triazolyl esters of natural or generic COOH-bearing PAK1-blockers such as UA (ursolic acid), ARC (artepillin C), CA (caffeic acid), Ketorolac and MPA (mycophenolic acid), in which esterization by a simple reaction called CC (Click Chemistry) boosts their anti-cancer potential by 100-5000 times, depending on target cancer cell lines and the final chemical products. Some of them have been proven to suppress the embryonic angiogenesis in ovo (fertilized chicken eggs) IC50 around 1 nmol/egg, and extend significantly the healthy lifespan of C. elegans by 30% at 50 nM, strongly suggesting that they could cure most of solid tumors without any severe side effect.

Biography

Speaker
Hiroshi Maruta PAK Research Center, Australia

Abstract

Nature itself has complete substance and process to control the diseases. It has much process like clean air ,clean water, exercise , seeming ,eating the natural and adequate food , drinking the requirement of water with good process, clean the body, live in clean environment, do the physical exercise then the life of a man become healthy wealthy and wise . when we went to research journey (Shod Yatra ) we see very few people live in hundred years then we asked people the reason of your long life then they told us that I have simple life and we expand our life in nature .We can see that all substance require for our body present in the nature Like Iron,maganise,sulpher,Boran,maladium ,zink,chromium, and other many substance. These substances also present in fruits vegetables and different grains. As we know that the land of different places is different color, smell, and structure. I found that every place have different kind of water test if it is not purified .water is very necessary for our metabolism. We see that many people not drink outside water they always prefer sterilize water in some extant it is good. But when our body needs water then they not get sterilize water its gets bad affect in our metabolism and our endocrine gland gets depress. Many people not drink water on the traveling time and office hours because they not want to go toilets many times. So. My advice to every people of the world they must drink enough water that their urine not go in yellow color and not try to control the urine because we control urine that time our metabolic system gets disturb and we feel uneasiness in body, mind and blood circulations. Many times we get pain during urinations that time we need medicine.

Biography

Speaker
PRAMOD STEPHEN INNOVATOR

Abstract

I will focus on the study of a thermosensing molecular rheostat that modulates immune evasion by Neisseria meningitidis, a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and septicemia. The bacterium evades the host complement system by upregulating expression of three immune evasion factors in response to changes in temperature. RNA thermometers within mRNAs control expression of bacterial immune evasion factors; of which the best studied is CssA, located in the 5-untranslated region of the operon necessary for capsule biosynthesis. Recently, I solved the structure of the CssA thermometer and dissect the molecular mechanisms of thermoregulation. I showed that the thermometer acts as a rheostat, whose structural stability is optimized to respond within a relatively small temperature range around 37 °C such as occur within the upper airways during infection. Small increases in temperature gradually open up the RNA structure to allow progressively increased access to the ribosome-binding site for the initiation of protein synthesis. Even small changes in stability induced by mutations of imperfect base pairs, as observed in naturally occurring polymorphisms, shift the thermometer response outside of the desired temperature range, suggesting that its activity could be modulated by pharmacological intervention, a future goal of my lab.

Biography

RPB has completed his PhD from Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai India and postdoctoral studies from University of Washington, Seattle, USA. He was appointed acting instructor at University of Washington in 2015. He is currently working as Assistant Professor in Department of Biophysics, Panjab University Chandigarh India, a premier research cum teaching institution/university in India. He has published more than 26 papers in reputed journals such as PNAS, Elife and Nucleic Acids Research; has been serving as an editorial board member of International Journal of Biotechnology and Biochemistry and reviewers to various journals and grant proposals.

Speaker
Ravi Pratap Barnwal Panjab University, Chandigarh

Abstract

The modern food industry is based on application of different approaches in ensuring the food safety, combining well establish practices and new technologies. Complexity of treatment of pathogenic bacteria includes not only application of different preservatives, buy looking for application of combination of several approaches, including bacteriocins produced by LAB or producers himself.

Biography

Svetoslav Todorov has completed his Ph.D at ENITIAA, Nantes, France and Sofia University, Sofia, Bulgaria and postdoctoral studies from Stellenbosch University, Matieland, South Africa. In last 9 years he was researcher and invited lecture at University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (SP), Brazil and Federal University of Vicosa, Vicosa (MG), Brazil. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and serving as a member of the editorial board. He is reviewer for more than 80 international journals.

Speaker
Svetoslav Todorov Food Research Center Brazil.

Abstract

Chitosan derivatives have gained significant interest as effective adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals due to outstanding characteristics such as the presence of amino and hydroxyl groups, non-toxicity, low cost and available in large quantities. In this present study, chitosan was degraded into two kinds of low molecular weight chitosan (CS8 and CS11), modified with pyruvic acid (PA), and then cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GLA) to obtain cross-linked low molecular weight chitosan pyruvic acid derivatives (CS8PA-GLA and CS11PA-GLA). The prepared CS8PA-GLA and CS11PA-GLA were characterized with Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetic/ Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG/DSC), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) methods. From all the characterization methods, the prepared sorbents exhibited excellent physical and chemical characteristics for heavy metal removal

Biography

Speaker
Peter Osei Boamah Department of Ecological Agriculture, Bolgatanga Polytechnic, Bolgatanga, Ghana

Abstract

The study included 137 women from Kharkiv region of Ukraine including 30 patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) (1st group), 34- arterial hypertension (AH) of 2-3 degrees (2nd group), 42-T2DM and AH of 2-3 degrees (3rd group ) and 31 healthy donors (4th group). Serum levels of estradiol were evaluated by ELISA. Investigations of estrogen receptor gene alpha (ESR1) were performed using restriction analysis of the amplification products of specific regions of the genome, i.e., promoter region T397C.

Biography

Tetiana Butova MD, specialist in Internal Medicine. Assistant professor of the Department of of Internal Medicine, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv, Ukraine. She has published more than 27 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Tetiana Butova Department of Internal Medicine, Kharkiv National Medical University, Kharkiv, Ukraine

Abstract

DEVELOMENT is a very slow process, we cannot see it but we recognize it after some time .We can see the tree is growing but we cannot see the process, We can only feel it or see it. In the world the population of other creature is day by day becoming less, but only human population is increasing instead of reproductive problems in human. Because God had given human wisdom and other have no this kind of wisdom thinking power and communication skill. Now days we are seeing that many places wheat plant have no grains many tree have no fruits. It is due to lack of micro substance in the soils. Now days we can see the deficiency in soil every part of the world. And we are facing this problem .we know that most of the country have more populations .but many people have reproductive problems male and female both. There are several reasons for it. (1) Lack of micro substance in the body.(2)Metabolism disorders (3) Air pollutions (4)Lack of sexual knowledge (5)Excess use of reproductive organ before the maturity stage (6) Diseases (7)Blood Disorders etc. (8) Hormonal disturbance (1) Lack of micro substance in the body:-Now days we see that due high yielding crops and only use of fertilizers and not using of organic manure in the land. Land lack micro substance like Zinc, Sulpher, Boran, Iron, Magneze Copper and lime etc. If this substance is lacking in the soils then Fruits, Vegetables, Grains, Leafs also lacking these substance and human utilize this things that means human have also deficiency of this substance. This affects our reproductive systems. (2) Metabolism disorders: - Now days we see that Diabetes, Thyroid, cancer, anemia and other metabolic disease taken a epidemic process. Due to unhealthy and unnatural way of human life. (3) Air pollutions:-now a day’s every part of the world Air Pollutions is a big problem and it is verse in big cities. Its affect the health like Tuberculosis, Asthma, and other respiratory disease metabolic disorders and reproductive organs. (4) Lack of sexual knowledge:-Our teen agers have no good knowledge for harm of UN time sex in this time they want to know more for about opposite sex and many of them disturb the social order. (5) Excess use of reproductive organ before the maturity time:- according to The health guide maturity age for male is 21 years and for female is 18years but male begin the sex after 13years and it is found that many 10to12 years old girls given a birth to a child. The use of excess reproductive system in females become weak and male lose the sperm. (6) Diseases;-Many diseases and bacillus disturb the male and female reproductive system. (7) Blood disorders: - Many times our blood gets disturb due to excess eating of one kind of food and we gets savior illness and many organs eternal and external glands become ill. (8) Hormonal disturbance:-we find hormonal disturbance from the time of birth and many cases it’s develop at the age of 10 to 15 and it is one cause of reproductive problems. _It is on the base of my personal findings

Biography

Speaker
PRAMOD STEPHEN INNOVATOR

Abstract

State-of-the-art nanomaterials are at the forefront in emergent arenas of nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Controlled synthesis, unique properties and tranquil surface modification with chemical or biological moieties make engineered nanomaterials appropriate for a variety of biomedical applications (1). Moreover, designer made nanomaterials display distinctive therapeutic potentials with improved sensitivity, efficiency and specificity; and, these are due to modified distinctive physicochemical and surface properties of nanomaterials (1-4). In addition to above, the designer made nanomaterials has prospective to produce a series of interactions with different biological entities including DNA, proteins, membranes, cells and organelles (1, 5,6). Such nano-bio interfacial communications are motivated by colloidal forces and primarily depend on the dynamic physicochemical and surface properties of nanomaterial. Nonetheless, contemporary progress and atomic scale tailoring of various physical, chemical and surface characteristics of nanomaterial is promising to dictate their interactions in expected manner with biological units for biomedical applications. Therefore, wisely designed nanomaterials are in extensive demand for a range of applications such as bio-molecular detection and diagnostics, therapeutics, drug and gene delivery, fluorescent labelling, tissue engineering, biochemical sensing and other pharmaceuticals applications (1-6). Conversely, the toxicity and hazards concomitant with engineered nanomaterials is rather vague or not well understood. This sort of concerns is gaining considerable attention and the field of nanotoxicology is progressing quickly (1). Therefore, in this overview lecture, Dr. Daima will reconnoitre current knowledge of articulate engineering of nanomaterials for biomedical applications with special attention on their potential toxicological perspectives.

Biography

Dr. Hemant Kumar Daima is working as Assistant Professor at Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Rajasthan, Jaipur, India. He has over nine years of research and teaching experiences in various international organizations. Prior to joining Amity University Rajasthan, he has worked as Asst. Professor of Nanomedicine at Department of Biotechnology (Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Tumkur, India); Research Associate at NanoBiotechnology Research Laboratory (RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia); Tutor at School of Applied Sciences (RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia)and Research Fellow at Centre for Converging Technologies (University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India). Dr. Daima obtained BSc degree in Life Sciences & Chemistry from MDS University, Ajmer, India; MSc degree in Biotechnology from University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India; PhD degree in Applied Biology & Nanobiotechnology from RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. Dr. Daima was lead for Major Research activities and coordinated research component program at Department of Biotechnology, SIT, India. He has also established Nano-Bio Interfacial Research

Speaker
Dr. Hemant Kumar Daima, PhD Assistant Professor, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Rajasthan Kant Kalwar, NH-11C, Jaipur Delhi Highway, Near Achrol Village Jaipur-303002, Rajasthan, India

Abstract

Actually in the processes the DNA tests assumes a dogmatic power. But, doing so, can happens that a "static forensic element" be overestimated. This involves a set of clues that the judge will have available to form his own conviction. However, judges need scientific evidence (cross-examinated) and repeatable systems for their evaluations, thus overcoming the so-called "processoindiziario", or trial based just on clues. To overcome this and to increase the impact of science in the process, is proposed the theory of "Dynamic Criminology" where Judges and forensic scientists are co-authors. Dynamic criminology requires the strict answer to the questions: “Quis, quid, ubi, quibusauxiliis, cur, quomodo, quando and quantum”. That literally means "who, what, where, by what means, why, how, when and how much”. Judges need to have scientific information about the person acting (quis); the action it does (quid); the place where it is executed (ubi); the means he uses to execute it (quibusauxiliis); the intended purpose (cur); the way it does (quomodo); the time it takes you and where it does it (when). For the purposes of efficient justice, the parameters indicated with exhaustive scientific answers must be used. This connects the theory of "Dynamic Criminology" to a process of strong scientific evidence, cross-examinated together, whose demonstration is based on repeatability criteria. The basic idea of the new theory is to develop a “rewind” of what happens through the observation of the spatial disposition and the quantity of the biological evidences (in singulo first and in toto then). DNA tests give to the judges just the possibility to answer to the question “who”; in order to get answers to the other questions is foundamental a deep focus on the biological evidences (area, size, number, quantity, quality, relative distance, etc.). For this reason is absolutely necessary to improve the field of the detection of latent biological evidences from items; a research study from University of Copenhagen shown that with two new protocols of Alternative Light Source is possible to detect biological evidence up to 1µl of stain and, tools like this one, are fundamental for the properly reconstruction of the dynamic of crime through the pattern of the biological stains.

Biography

Eugenio D’Orio, MSc forensic biology, is a researcher of the University of Copenhagen and has been Professor “aggiunto” of forensic biology at the UNISED in Milan (in 2017). Many collaborations as researcher in forensic biology and genetics and as professor (especially with the University “Federico II” of Naples). Part of the official list of the Consultant of the Ministry of Justice (in Italy).Author of several articles on the DNA-evidence and its courtroom evaluation.

Speaker
Eugenio D’Orio Researcher in forensic biology, University of Copenhagen

Abstract

The clean conversion of reactant(s) to high value product(s) is an imperative for 21st century chemical processes. Catalysis holds the key where sustainability demands atom efficiency that eliminates by-products. Escalating costs, diminishing supply and the environmental impact of fossil fuels have led the drive for alternative chemical feedstock. Prior work has established 100% selectivity for nano-scale gold catalysts in the continuous hydrogenation of biomass derived platform chemicals at ambient pressure. Reactions are conducted in excess H2 that must be recovered. Hydrogen is not a naturally occurring feedstock and production, storage and transport are sustainability constraints. The work under consideration represents an innovative coupling of catalytic dehydrogenation (as a source of reactive hydrogen) with hydrogenation. Gold is inactive for dehydrogenation and a second catalytic metal (copper) is required in the coupled system. The model system used to illustrate the benefits of this approach is the coupling of 2-butanol dehydrogenation (to 2-butanone) with furfural hydrogenation with the simultaneous production of two high value products. The coupled process circumvents use of compressed H2 with important safety implications for large scale production. Comprehensive catalyst testing has established: (a) significantly higher reaction rates in the coupled process relative to standard hydrogenation; (b) orders of magnitude enhanced H2 utilisation. Under optimum conditions, all the H2 generated by dehydrogenation is used to produce furfuryl alcohol. The catalytic synergy between Au and Cu in the coupled system is step changing and closes the sustainability gap in conventional hydrogenation processes.

Biography

Mark A. Keane is Professor of Chemical Engineering at Heriot-Watt University. He was Professor of Chemical & Materials Engineering at the University of Kentucky and Senior Lecturer at the University of Leeds. Author of over 190 publications, his research deals with the synthesis/characterization of new generation catalysts with application in cleaner processing and environmental catalysis. He is Executive Editor of the Journal of Chemical Technology and Biotechnology.

Speaker
Mark A. Keane Heriot-Watt University, UK

Sessions:

Abstract

Gas hydratesare non-stoichiometric solid inclusion compounds formed under low temperature and high-pressure conditions, in the presence of suitable guest molecule within hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The advancement of recent hydrate based applications encompasses– e.g. gas separation, gas storage, and transportation, energy recovery – has lead researchers towardsexploring more in-depth studies in thedistinctarea of gas hydrates. Addition of chemicals (promoter) recognized asa leadingmethod for enhancing the gas hydrate formation. This communicationenlighteda brief reviewof thepotential application of Ammonium based compounds (ACs) as gas hydrate promotors. Therefore, this study recaps the recent advancements achieved in the field of ACs, highlighting the vigorous prospects of ACs as potentchemicalsin gas hydrate applications.

Biography

Speaker
Bhajan Lal Chemical Engineering Department, UniversitiTeknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 32610, Perak, Malaysia.

Abstract

Among the dietary lifestyle changes over the years is the rising consumption of fat rich food including trans fatty acids. Intake of these fatty acids is known to have detrimental effects on serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The purpose of the present study was to determine the fatty acid (FAA) profiles of various fat rich food products including cooking butter, margarine, gee and shortening collected from Giza and Qalyubiah Governorates, Egypt. One hundred and twenty random samples were collected in their natural packages containers from dairy shops, supermarkets and street vendors, Fat were extracted via the modified Bligh and Dyer method, and the fatty acid profiles were assessed using gas chromatography (GC). The mean values of saturated fatty acids were 67.22±3.74, 56.44±1.04, 66.36±7.72 and 51.29±2.44 respectively. Palmitic acid (C16:0) was the most abundant saturated fatty acids (SFA ) in the examined cooking butter, margarine, gee and shortenings. Monounsaturated fatty acids were determined with a mean values of 30.23±1.59, 36.63± 0.75, 29.35±2.24 and 38.06±0.67 respectively with highest proportion of Oleic acid in the examined products. The polyunsaturated fatty acids content was present with a mean values of 2.31 ± 0.19, 6.88 ±0.30, 4.37 ± 1.8 and 10.59 ± 0.88 respetively. There was a significant difference between cooking butter and the other food product (P<0.05). Trans fatty acids were estimated with a mean values of 0.58±0.048, 0.19±0.015, 1.01±0.17 and 0.23±0.022 respectively. The economic and public health significance of the obtained results were discussed.

Biography

Speaker
Salwa A. Aly Department of Food Hygiene & Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Cairo University

Abstract

Aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) is an important mycotoxin frequently found in milk and dairy products. In the present study, 250 samples (fifty each) of raw milk, soft, hard, processed cheese, yoghurt collected from Cairo and Giza governorates, Egypt were examined for aflatoxin M1 by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method (ELISA). AFM1 was found in 52%, 46, 42, 25 and 18% respectively of all samples by the average mean level of 1.21 ±0.24, 2.75 ±0.54, 3.51±0.82, 1.82±0.68 and 1.3 ±0.12 ug/kg respectively. The highest mean concentration of aflatoxin M1 was registered in hard cheese samples and about 20%, 26%, 24%, 16% and 8% of the examined samples were higher than maximum tolerance limit accepted by International European union/Codex legislation (0.05-0.5 ug/kg). Keywords: Aflatoxin M1, Milk, Cheese, yoghurt, ELISA.

Biography

Speaker
Salwa A. Aly Department of Food Hygiene &Control, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt

Abstract

Neem is a tree that grows in tropical and semi-tropical regions and products made from neem have been used in India for over two millennia for their medicinal properties, selectively in controlling pests in plants, and also for curing skin diseases. Neem trees are one of the famous and well known trees in UAE, the products are cheap, easy to obtain and not poisonous to animals and friendly insects. The gum was collected from locally grown neem tree,physical and chemical characterization was carried out. Physical and chemical properties of local neem gum such as color, solubility; and effects of different parameters such as temperature, acidity, organic solvent. Modified neem gum solution was applied on selected museum collections, after exposure to different environmental factors of light, heat, UV light relative humidity, pollutants, pest and insect control used commercially

Biography

Speaker
Ideisan I. Abu-Abdoun University of Sharjah Chemistry Department P.O. Box 27272 Sharjah - UAE

Abstract

With the rapid growth of efficiency in recent years, polymer and perovskite solar cells have drawn significant attention of researchers from both academia and industry. These solar cells have shown the potential advantages in practical photovoltaic applications due to their highly tunable electronic and optical properties. In this talk,I will discuss and review our recent progress in the field of polymer and perovskite solar cells.We demonstrated that side chain modification and inclusion of different number of fluorine atoms in polymers and morphological changes in thin films enhance the efficiencyof polymer solar cells. Similarly, additives and UV treatment substantially increase the efficiency in perovskite solar cells.

Biography

Speaker
Bhoj Gautam Fayetteville State University

Abstract

Production of cereals in World is around 2536 million tonnes (MT) and our country produces around 257 MT as on 2012-13. 720 MT of paddy is produced in World and India produces around 150 MT. From this, ~10% (15 MT) goes for the production of rice products like rice flakes, expanded rice and popped rice which are generally prepared or manufactured in small scale industries. Around 67.5 MT produced is used as raw rice and balance ( ~ 67.5 MT) is used for the production of parboiled rice. World rice have been classified into 8 groups based on some of their physico-chemical properties Importance of brown rice along with manufacturing large scale brown rice as well as nutri rice will be highlighted. Importance of Tiny rice mill will be highlighted. Parboiling, a method of improving the technological and nutritive values of rice will also be highlighted. Medicinal rice Njawara, a pigmented variety, having high nutrients compared to other normal pigmented and non-pigmented rice varieties, its various physicochemical properties, protein and lipid profile in comparison with non-medicinal rice will be touched upon. Usage of cereals, millets, legumes in the preparation of multi grain ready to cook (RTC) and ready to eat (RTE) products will also be touched upon.

Biography

Speaker
Dr. Vasudeva Singh Former Head, Chief Scientist (Retd), Dept. of Grain Science and Technology, CSIR-CFTRI, Mysore , Karnataka India.

Abstract

Among the naturally occurring oxygen heterocycles, Flavones (2-pheny-4H-1-benzopyran-4-ones) are important and abundant group of Falvonoids. These are substances endowed with a wide number of pharmacological activities.Preliminary studies of natural flavones have shown that 4 – hydroxyl groups are important for potent antiviral activity. These compounds exhibit diverse biological activities like antiviral antihepatotoxic, anti-inflammatory and retardness of lipoxygenase depending upon their pattern of oxygenation. Several flavones are known to be agents of oxygenation. Several flavones are known to be agents that reduce the induction of cancer in animals by functioning as MFO (mixed function oxygenase) systems. Keeping this in view a series of heterocyclic Flavones have been synthesized with biologically active Chalcones. These chalcones were prepared by the condensation of substituted 2'-Hydroxyacetophenones and Pyridine / Pyrrole 2-carboxaldehyde, further the solution of chalcones in DMSO and few crystals of iodine was irradiated in a microwave oven for few minutes produces Flavones.It is an easy way to get high yield of product without intermediacy of O-aroylated intermediates. The structure of the synthesized compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H-NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopy and a microbial study. The compounds were screened for antibacterial activity against various bacteria like E coli, S. typhi, S. aureus, B. subtilis at various concentrations such as 20, 50 and 100 μg /ml, Similarly the same compounds were screened for the antifungal activity against different organisms like P. chrysogenum, A. niger, F. moniliformae, and C. albicans. All compounds show potent biological activity.

Biography

Dr. Seema Habib undertook her Ph.D. at the Swami RamanandTeerth Marathwada University India, and is currently a Fellow of the International Association of the Science Impact. She has Published more than 43 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member on both National and International Journals. Her Primary area of research interest lies in organic synthesis and its application to inorganic synthesis.

Speaker
SEEMA HABIB G. M.Momin Women’s College, Bhiwandi-421302, Dist. Thane University of Mumbai, India

Abstract

Tuberculosis (TB) is a global health problem and it continues to be the most important infectious disease threatening the human population. In the diagnosis of TB, culture still remains the gold standard for isolation of mycobacteria after effective decontamination. The aim of the work is to determine the culture yield, recovery rate and contamination rate in term of mycobacterial growth between 0.7% chlorhexidine and NaOH-NALC decontamination method. Materials and Method The study was carried out on a total of 68 sputa samples, (42 smear positives and 26 smear negatives) in which 46 samples were collected from male and 26 from female with an approximate average age of 27 years. All the sputum samples were decontaminated using the standard NaOH-NALC and 0.7% chlorhexidine method. The concentrates were cultured in parallel onto LJ media in which reading of the slope for mycobacterial growth was done daily for the first two week and weekly till the eight week. The mycobacterial recovery rate, time to detection and contamination rate were compared.

Biography

Speaker
Ensa Gitteh TB Diagnostic Laboratory: Medical Research Council, the Gambia

Abstract

Medicinal plants represent a primary source for the pharmaceutical industry. About 25% of all available modern drugs are derived directly or indirectly from plants. Understanding the basic processes by which plants thrive, the sequence of processes of secondary metabolism work together to elicit the products of a particular pathway, for example, morphine biosynthesis; obtaining selected enzymes for the particular reproduction of secondary metabolic processes on more diverse array of substrates. Such biosynthetic studies are now an extremely important component of synthetic and Natural Products Chemistry. The two concepts of selectivity in organic synthesis and plant / fungal enzyme knowledge are intellectually and practically fused in realm of biocatalysis. The recent studies using locally available vegetables may offer an alternate opportunity for scientists to investigate their local resources for the key synthetic transformations with significant economic and ecological (green Chemistry) implications. Because of the great need of chiral drugs derived from prochiral precursors increased the interest in using enzymes for such transformations has increased steadily as agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries have grown. Consequently a number of major companies Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck, Pfizer and Glaxo SmithKline have dedicated research efforts for the exploitation of use of biocatalysts to improve their drug synthesis processes. Our current research findings on Chemistry, processing and structural modification of some of the plant derived lead therapeutic molecules such as artemisinin, its synthone-artemisinic acid (Artemisia annua), phenolics-liquiritigenin, isoliquiritigenin and glabridin derivatives (Glycyrrhiza glabra) ……will be discussed in the presentation.

Biography

Dr. R. S. Bhakuni, presently Professor of Academy of Scientific & Innovative Research, Sr Principal Scientist and Head, Chemical Sciences Division, Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants (CSIR-CIMAP), Lucknow, India, PDF at University Florida, USA (1993-95) has 36 years wide research interest in basic and applied research of several important medicinal plants. Developed processing and structural modification of several lead therapeutic molecules such as antimalarial artemisinin, anticancer taxol & antibacterial phenolics. As key role, received FICCI Award 2005, Ist Nina Saxena Excellence Technology Award -2007 by IIT, Kharakpur & CSIR Technology Award 2012 for development and commercialization of artemisinin / Artemisia Annua. He has over 80 SCI research papers, 27 international/ national patents, supervised 24 Ph D / MSc & delivered 47 invited lectures /presentations.

Speaker
R S Bhakuni Central Institute of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Lucknow

Abstract

UCS1025A is a novel polyketide-nonribosomal peptide (PK-NRP) hybrid fungal metabolite with a decalin-like structure. UCS1025A isolated from Acremonium fungus KY4917 (FERM) and exhibiting antibacterial and antiproliferative activities. Although it is known for a decade, its biosynthesis has not been elucidated. The gene cluster for USC1025A was predicted by bioinformatics analysis and its PKS-NRPS deletion mutation validates its essential role in UCS1025A biosynthesis. Heterogonous engineering of the gene cluster into Aspergillus nidulance (AN) using yeast recombination-based cloning strategy, was successfully performed. Only the gene cluster transformed without transcription factors (AN#2) was able to produce the compound. Activation of the UCS1025A gene cluster in the FERM fungus by over-expressing each transcription factor separately increased the compound production up to 4 times. Similarly activation of the gene cluster in A. nidulance transformed with the UCS1025A gene cluster containing transcription factors (AN#1) was able to detect affordable amount. Two transcription factors would work as activator and one as repressor. The UCS1025A gene cluster (1759) with another gene cluster (1590) comprised a branch of a phylogentic tree close to lovastatin gene cluster indicating similar compound could be produced by this cluster. This work will help in genetic manipulation and investigation of the UCS1025A biosynthetic

Biography

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, UOS, UAE.

Speaker
Sameh Soliman, PhD (2) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, USA

Abstract

A bacterial strain Bacillus spp. with remarkable ability to decolourize the reactive azo dyes such as reactive red, reactive yellow, reactive brilliant red and reactive brilliant blue was isolated from the textile effluent contaminated site. The effluent sample was collected from local text textile industry, Ankleshwar, Gujarat, India Static conditions with 10 g/l glucose, pH 9, 37°C, 20% inoculum concentration, 50 mg/l of dye concentration, 3 g/l of NH4NO3, were considered to be the optimum decolourizing conditions. Bacillus spp. grew well in these optimum conditions, resulting in 82% decolourization extent 7 days of incubation. Phenotypic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA sequence indicated that the bacterial strain belonged to the genus Bacillus. UV (Ultra Violet) analysis of bacterial isolate suggested that it exhibited decolourizing activity, rather than inactive surface adsorption. This decolourization extent and facile conditions show the potential for this bacterial strain to be used in the biological treatment of textile effluent or dyes.

Biography

His laboratory is trying to assess the impact of industrial pollution on microbial diversity of waste water following cultivation dependant and cultivation independent analysis. His major work involves isolation, screening, identification and Genetic Engineering of high impact of Microbes for the degradation of hazardous materials. Dr. Maulin P Shah has more than 150 research publication in highly reputed national & international journals. He is Editor-in-Chief of Research Journal of Microbiology, Journal of Biotechnology & Bio materials.

Speaker
MAULIN P SHAH Industrial Waste Water Research Laboratory, Division of Applied & Environmental Microbiology, Enviro Technology Limited, India

Abstract

We have recently focused on the computational modeling of heterogeneous catalysts including modified poly (styrene-co-maleic anhydride) palladium and copper nanocatalyst, copper(I) and (II)-aminated KIT-5 and N-sulfamic-aminated KIT-5 catalysts and copper(I) functionalized Halloysite nanotube (HNT). Armed with these experiences, we assessed quantitativly the description of immobilization behavior of Ag NPs on HNT support functionalized by 1H-1,2,3-triazole-5-methanol via quantum computational approaches. In this route, we first modeled an effective structure for functionalized HNT ligand as 1:1 layered aluminosilicates and its complex with silver atom with two coordination modes. The solvent effects have been examined from the electronic viewpoint on the basis of a continuum representation of solvent surrounding the substances via polarized continuum model (PCM) and density functional theory (DFT) methods at . The computations have been performed at M06-2X/6-311G** level of theory using GAMESS suite of programs. In the case of silver atom, LANL2TZ effective core potentials (ECPs) were used together with the accompanying basis sets to describe the valence electron density. The calculated values of bond order of C-OH and C-N1 decrease from 1.08 and 1.33 in HNT ligand to 0.83 and 0.98 in Ag@HNTs-T complex indicating the coordination of 1H-1,2,3-triazole-5-methanol species to the metal. This behavior is further supported with our FT-IR spectroscopic observations. The frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory calculations on Ag@HNTs-T complex reveal that silver atom primarily coordinates to nitrogen and oxygen of ligand through interactions between filled non-bonding orbitals(HOMO) on N and O atoms and an empty dσ orbital (LUMO) on metal atom. Moreover, PCM calculated Ag-N and Ag-O bond order values in Ag@HNTs complex have larger calculated values in water solution compared with those obtained in toluene. It should be mentioned that the effective immobilization and smaller size of silver NPs on functionalized HNTs have been experimentally elucidated in water solution in comparison with toluene.

Biography

Tayebeh Hosseinnejad was born in 1979 in Tehran, Iran. She received his B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from University of Tehran in 2001, 2003 and 2007, respectively. She completed his doctoral thesis under supervision of Prof. Hassan Behnejad. She joined as an assistant professor to Alzahra University, Tehran, Iran. Her research interests focus on computational organic and organometallic chemistry and computational thermodynamics. She has published more than 28 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as the guest editor of Current Organic Chemistry.

Speaker
T. Hosseinnejad Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Physics & Chemistry, Alzahra University, Vanak, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

Photoelectrochemical (PEC) reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) with a p-type semiconductor electrode is one of the solar energy conversion technologies and is important from a viewpoint of the global environmental problems. The method can be regarded as an artificial model for photosynthesis in natural plant and is interesting and motivation for researchers. The electrochemical conversion of CO2 into energy-rich fuels and chemicals has gained significant interest as a potential strategy for simultaneously mitigating increasing global CO2 concentration and effectively storing intermittent renewable energy from sources such as solar and wind. This process recycles CO2, permitting a carbon-neutral, closed-loop of fuel combustion and waste CO2 reduction to help prevent a rising concentration of this greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Photoelectrochemical conversion of CO2 into formic acid, is desirable as a hydrogen carrier and a chemical feedstock. SnOx is one of the few catalysts that reduce CO2 into formic acid with high selectivity but at high overpotential and low current density. We show that an electrochemically reduced SnO2 porous nanowire catalyst (Sn-pNWs) with a high density of grain boundaries (GBs) exhibits an energy conversion efficiency of CO2-into-HCOOH higher than analogous catalysts. HCOOH formation begins at lower overpotential (150 mV) and reaches a steady Faradaic efficiency of ca. 65 % at only 0.4 V vs. RHE. A comparison with commercial SnO2 nanoparticles confirms that the improved CO2 reduction performance of Sn-pNWs is due to the density of GBs within the porous structure, which introduce new catalytically active sites. Produced with a scalable plasma synthesis technology, the catalysts have potential for application in the CO2 conversion industry.

Biography

Speaker
Ramchandra Rao K Crystal Growth and Nano Science Research Center, Department of Physics, Government Autonomous College, Rajamahendravaram, Andhra Pradesh, INDIA 533103

Abstract

The aim of this article is to present the effect of external action of air-borne ultrasound (US) upon biological wet materials subjected to drying. The study allows to determine the drying effectiveness of such products like fruits and vegetables by convective drying with ultrasound enhancement. The vibration and heating effects induced by power ultrasound are considered. The mathematical model of drying is developed and validated experimentally using the data obtained from the experimental tests carried out on the hybrid dryer equipped with ultrasonic generator. The obtained results prove that the vibration effect induced by ultrasound has a great impact on the acceleration of mass transfer without significant elevation of product temperature, and thus on the drying efficiency with respect to energy utilization and the quality of dried products like fruits and vegetables. The Graphics and Synopsis is inserted here, which illustrate the work briefly but completely.

Biography

Speaker
Stefan Jan KOWALSKI Poznań University of Technology Department of Process Engineering, Poland

Abstract

Drug therapies for various diseases are developed based on their biological targets. The process involved in the development of new drug molecule with their desired biological properties is time consuming and expensive. In order to enhance the efficacy of drug discovery process, rational drug design along with combinatorial chemistry has emerged to speed up the lead identification and optimization during drug discovery process. So, it is thought of interest to compliment the technologies with novel approaches for rapid synthesis and screening of chemical substances to identify lead compounds with suitable potency and less toxicity. In view of this, microwave accelerated drug synthesis (MADS) is an emerging green technology with environmental friendly chemical processes in medicinal chemistry. When compared to conventional heating methods, microwave irradiation offers faster synthesis along with higher yields. Microwave technology possesses several advantages such as high efficiency, yield, selectivity, easy separation and purification.

Biography

Speaker
Vaishali M. Patil KIET School of Pharmacy, KIET Group of Institutions, Ghaziabad, UP, India

Abstract

Biogas from biomass appears to have potential as an alternative energy source, which is potentially rich in biomass resources. This is an overview of some salient points and perspectives of biogas technology. The current literature is reviewed regarding the ecological, social, cultural and economic impacts of biogas technology. This article gives an overview of present and future use of biomass as an industrial feedstock for production of fuels, chemicals and other materials. However, to be truly competitive in an open market situation, higher value products are required. Results suggest that biogas technology must be encouraged, promoted, invested, implemented, and demonstrated, but especially in remote rural areas.

Biography

Speaker
Abdeen Omer Energy Research Institute (ERI) University of Nottingham Nottingham, United Kingdom

Abstract

Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering which processes raw material by physical, chemical or biological means into different products. Today chemical engineers work in a range of industries designing, building and operating processes that transform crude oil into gasoline and plastics, produce a range of specialty products from raw milk and capturing carbon from the smoke stacks of coal-fired power stations. Unfortunately, the diversity of the engineer does not represent the diversity of industries a Chemical Engineering curriculum can provide preparation for. In spite the efforts to promote diversity within the Chemical Engineering field the numbers indicate there is still a lot of work to be done. According to a report by the American Chemical Society in 2012 the graduation rates for women and African Americans stood at 33% and 8% respectively. These are both well below these groups representation in the general population. The future will require more diverse engineers in addition to creating an education system designed to increase the chances of those studying to become practicing engineers. Engineering solutions are more likely to more relevant for all the groups of population when the entire population is represented in their design.

Biography

Tony Green enjoys using his technical background to help people solve problems in fascinating applications which he hopes will make the world a better place in the long run. His career has included roles in application/project engineering and sales/marketing in the alternative energy, environmental, and utility industries. Tony has worked as a Water Treatment Sales Engineer for sustainability focused water treatment company who worked with Commercial and Industrial Clients to reduce their water consumption, optimize their energy usage all while being sustainable. Tony holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware and is currently a science teacher where he teaches chemistry to hig

Speaker
Tony Green Green Communications United States.

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