Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Connectivity studies using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) data have enhanced our knowledge on the organization of large-scale structural and functional brain networks, which consist of spatially distributed, but functionally linked regions that continuously share information with each other. Brain's energy is largely consumed at rest during spontaneous neuronal activity (~20%), while task-related increases in metabolism energy are minor (<5%). Spontaneous low-frequency correlated fluctuations in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) rsfMRI signals at the level of large-scale neural systems are not noise, but orderly and organized in a series of functional networks that permanently maintain a high level of temporal coherence among brain areas that are structurally segregated and functionally linked in resting-state networks (RSNs). Some RSNs are functionally organized as dynamically competing systems both at rest and during task-related experiments. The default mode network (DMN), the most important RSN, is involved in realization of tasks like memory retrieval, emotional process, and social cognition. Cortical connectivity at rest was reportedly altered in several neurological and psychiatric disorders. Most recently, human brain function has been imaged in fMRI, and thereby accessing both sides of the mind-brain interface (subjective experience and objective observations) has simultaneously been performed. As such, functional neuroimaging moves onto new potential applications like reading the brain states, brain-computer interfaces, lie detection, aso. The present contribution aims to highlight the fundamentals and review the up-to-date findings in imaging modalities dedicated to brain connectivity and, more generally, to connectomics on the basis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for white matter (WM) and rsfMRI for grey matter (GM) studies, respectively.

Biography

Radu Mutihac is Chair of Medical Physics Section, University of Bucharest, and works in Neuroscience, Signal Processing, Microelectronics, and Artificial Intelligence. As postdoc/research associate/visiting professor/full professor he run his research at the University of Bucharest, International Centre for Theoretical Physics (Italy), Ecole Polytechnique (France), Institut Henri Poincare (France), KU Leuven (Belgium). Data mining and exploratory analysis of neuroimaging time series were addressed during two Fulbright Grants in Neuroscience (Yale University and University of New Mexico). His research in fused biomedical imaging modalities was carried out at the Johns Hopkins University, National Institutes of Health, and Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, MD, USA. Prof. R. Mutihac is member of the ISMRM, ESMRMB, OHBM, Romanian US Alumni Association, and fellow of Signal Processing and Neural Networks Society IEEE, as well as referee for several journals of the Institute of Physics (London, UK), Neural Networks (Elsevier), IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, and evaluator/expert for the ISMRM, OHBM, ARACIS, CNCSIS, UEFISCDI, The Romanian – U.S. Fulbright Commission. and the European Commission (FP7, H2020). He published over 100 scientific papers, 12 monographs, and contributed with chapters in other 10 text books. He participated to more than 150 scientific meetings with posters and oral presentations, seminars, invited and plenary lectures, as well as acting as organizer, chairman, and keynote speaker. Following his scientific activity, Prof. Radu Mutihac was nominated member of the Editorial Board of six journals in the field of Neuroscience: Journal of the Romanian College of Medical Physicists, Epilepsy Journal, Journal of Childhood & Developmental Disorders, Journal of Neurology and Clinical Neuroscience, Medical and Clinical Reviews, The Neurologist - Clinical and Therapeutics Journal.

Speaker
Radu Mutihac Professor
University of Bucharest
Romania.

Abstract

Despite decades of investigations in both laboratory and clinic, the pathophysiological mechanism of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) still remains unknown. Current problem of developing AD research is that many treatments have been found to be very effective in AD animal models but they failed show significant effects in clinical trials. Thus, establishment of an effective treatment in a model, which represents pathophysiology of AD is needed. Previously, we were able to show improved cognitive function of aged, memory-impaired animals through the implantation of human neural stem cells (NSCs), which produced much excitement throughout the research world and the overall medical community; given the implication that this could lead to a cure for all neurodegenerative diseases, including AD. However, when we transplant NSCs to a transgenic animal model produces Amyloid-β (Aβ) plaque formation in the brain by expressing familial AD mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP), mimicking the pathological condition of AD, we did not find any new neuronal development formed from the donor cells. This indicates that transplantation of NSCs by itself may not be a cure for AD. Here we show that the combination drug therapy therapy of Posiphen (reduce APP level) and NBI-18 (increase endogenous neural stem cell) increased neurogenesis and significantly improved memory in the transgenic AD mouse model. This combination therapy could bring us an effective treatment for AD.

Biography

Sugaya is a professor in University of Central Florida. He have interests in treating neurodegenerative diseases by stem cell technologies, and his work at UCF has been introduced by Wall Street Journal and other media. He is a Director of the Stem Cell Laboratory and Director of the Neuroscience Consortium for Central Florida. He is also serving as a Council member of the Florida State organization, the Center for Universal Research to Eradicate Disease. His laboratory, which consists of 26 people in the Biomolecular Science Center, College of Medicine, is very active. His team published 16 papers, and filed 31 patents since he moved to UCF. Now they are conducting totally new research in the animal to treat neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease and stroke in animal studies using adult human stem cells, which eliminate ethical issues and many other concerns associated with embryonic stem cells. One of the research goals is to produce brain cells from the patients own adult stem cells, and another is to increase endogenous stem cells by systemic administration of a drug. The research teams also recently succeeded in producing retina and inner hair cells from adult human stem cells to treat blindness and deafness. Dr. Sugaya is collaborating with many institutions including the National Institutes of Health, Florida hospital and the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and is aggressively investigating cures for diseases associated with aging.

Speaker
Kiminobu Sugaya Head of Neuroscience
University of Central Florida
USA

Abstract

Will be update soon...

Biography

Rajendra D. Badgaiyan is a psychiatrist and cognitive neuroscientist. He is Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Richmond University Medical Center, and Professor of Psychiatry at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. He received formal training in psychiatry, psychology, cognitive neuroscience, molecular imaging and neuroimaging. He was awarded the prestigious BK Anand National Research Prize in India and Solomon Award of Harvard Medical School. His research is focused on the study of neural and neurochemical mechanisms that control human brain functions. He developed the single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique (SDMIT) to detect, map, and measure neurotransmitters released acutely in the human brain during task performance. This technique is now used in laboratories all over the world. Using this technique, he studies dopaminergic control of human cognition and behavior. He is also interested in learning the nature of dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission in psychiatric and neuropsychiatric conditions. His research is funded by NIMH, NINDS, VA, and various foundations. Previously he served in the faculty of Harvard Medical School, SUNY Buffalo and University of Minnesota. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals.

Speaker
Rajendra D. Badgaiyan Chairman
Richard University Medical Center
USA

Abstract

Will be updated soon...

Biography

Janna GLOZMAN is a full professor at Psychology Department of Moscow State University (Russia). Disciple of A.R. Luria she works there from 1970 till now, teaching neuropsychology, neurogeriatrics, neurolinguistics, learning disabilities, communication disorders. Scientific Director of Moscow Research Center of Developmental Neuropsychology, named after A.R. Luria. President of the International Society of Applied Neuropsychology (ISAN). Honorary Member of Polish Neuropsychological Society. Janna Glozman is the author of 40 books and 450 articles and abstracts of reports in Russian, English, German, Polish, Spanish, French, and Portuguese. J. Glozman took part more than in hundred international congresses. Emerite Scientist of Moscow University.

Speaker
Janna Glozman Professor
Moscow State University
Russia

Abstract

The book, The Intuitive Rational-Choice Theory: Schizophrenia, Criminal Inanity & Neuroses, presents a new theory which explains the development and treatment of schizophrenia and criminal insanity as rational coping mechanisms. Based on the strong relationships between schizophrenia and neurological impairments, medical models took for granted that all cases of schizophrenia result from neurological impairments, even when there was no evidence, as in the case the Unabomber and John Nash. The new theory, termed also Psych-Bizarreness Theory, demonstrates that it can explain all cases of schizophrenia, regardless whether they suffer from neurological damages or not, as well as criminal insanity and neurotic disorders, by conscious-rational terms. According to the new theory, when individuals are confronted with extreme levels of stress, irrespective of whether the source of the stress is neurological or environmental, their behavioral options become limited: They can commit suicide, develop a drug abuse, use aggression to eliminate the stressor, or intuitively choose certain mad/bizarre behaviors diagnosed by five empirical criteria (Rofé, 2000, 2016), that suite their coping demands. Madness is seen primarily as a repressive coping mechanism, which individuals intuitively choose when confronted with unbearable levels of stress. Thus, contrary to psychoanalysis, madness cause repression rather than visa versa. The choice of a specific mad behavior is determined by the same three principles which guide the consumer's decision-making process when purchasing a certain product. The major principal is the need controllability: The specific mad behavior must increase the patient's ability to exercise control over the stressor and\or provide certain desired privileges. The second guiding principle is availability: The choice of the specific symptom is affected by various channels of information, such as the media, personal experiences, genetic predispositions, family and peers that increase the saliency of certain suitable behaviors. The third principle is cost-benefit analysis: The mad behavior is chosen only if the individual intuitively feels that it will reduce the level of his or her emotional distress. Although the decision to implement the intuitive/unconscious choice is conscious, patients become unaware of the Knowledge of Self-Involvement (KSI) through a variety of cognitive processes that disrupt the encoding of this knowledge and a number of memory inhibiting mechanisms that cause its forgetfulness. Subsequently, utilizing their socially internalized beliefs regarding the causes of psychological disorders, patients develop a self-deceptive belief which attributes the cause of their symptoms to factors beyond their conscious control. The new theory proved its ability to integrate all therapeutic methods pertaining to neurosis into one theoretical framework (Rofé, 2010), explaining all data relevant to the development and treatment of conversion disorder, including neurological findings, which seemingly support the medical explanation of this disorder (Rofé & Rofé, 2013), and resolves the theoretical confusion regarding the explanation of phobia by distinguishing between bizarre (e.g., agoraphobia and chocolate phobia) and non-bizarre phobia, such as dog phobia (Rofé, 2015). Robert Aumann, the Nobel Prize-winning economist, noted in a letter of recommendation to publishers of the present book (2017), Rofé's theory is as "revolutionary as it sounds, fits well into the frameworks of economics, game theory, and evolution".

Biography

Yacov Rofe is a professor of psychology and former chair of the Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences at Bar-Ilan University in Ramat Gan, Israel. He taught for the Department of Psychology at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, and was a visiting professor at Rutgers Medical School in New Jersey. He has published many articles in leading academic journals of psychology, including a theory entitled “Stress and Affiliation: a Utility Theory”, published by Psychological Review in 1984. An additional influential article, published in Review of General Psychology, 2008, is a review that refutes the existence of repression and the Freudian Unconscious.

Speaker
Yacov Rofe Professor
Bar-Ilan University
Israel

Abstract

Cdk5 is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that is increasingly implicated in various nervous system functions during nervous system development and function. It is a multifunctional kinase, however, upon deregulation due to neuronal insults induces neurodegenerative diseases such as, AD, PD and ALS. Cdk5 is a member of cyclin-dependent kinases. It is unique among its family; it is not activated by cyclins but is regulated exclusively by the brain-specific activator proteins p35/p39, p25, p67. Emerging evidence suggests that abnormal and hyper Cdk5 activity is implicated in the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in AD, synuclein in Lewy bodies in PD, and in inclusions of aberrant phosphorylation of neurofilament and Tau proteins the hallmarks of AD patients. Our recent studies have shown that a modified truncated 24-aa peptide (TFP5/TP5), derived from the Cdk5 activator, p35, penetrates the blood-brain barrier upon i.p. injections, inhibits abnormal Cdk5 hyperactivity, and significantly rescues AD pathology (up to 70–80%) in 5XFAD and P25Tg AD model mice. In this study, the mutant mice were injected with TFP5 and exhibited behavioral rescue and reduced pathological markers significantly; decreased inflammation, amyloid plaques, NFTs, cell death, and extended life by 2 months. However, no toxic side effects were observed. Interestingly, Cdk5 has been also demonstrated to exhibit a critical role in mitochondrial function, autophagy induction and neuronal loss in MPTP and other neurotoxic reagents-mediated neuronal toxicity mitochondrial dysfunction. These results point to TFP5/TP5 as a potential therapeutic, toxicity-free neuroprotective drug candidate. Cell biological neuroprotective protective and restoratives role of TP5/TFP5 will be presented and discussed.

Biography

Pant received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Physics from Agra University, Agra, India. His postdoctoral studies were conducted on the mechanisms of electron and ion transport in model membrane systems at the Department of Biophysics at Michigan State University. He joined the Laboratory of Neurobiology in the NIMH as a senior staff fellow in 1974 with Dr. Ichiji Tasaki where he studied the function of the axonal cytoskeleton in the squid giant axon. In 1979 he moved to the NIAAA extending his studies on the neuronal cytoskeleton and the effects of alcohol on its regulation. Dr. Pant moved to the NINDS, Laboratory of Neurochemistry in 1987 where he is presently chief of the section on Cytoskeleton Regulation. His laboratory is studying the mechanisms of topographic regulation of neuronal cytoskeleton proteins by post-translational modification, including the role of kinase cascades in normal brain and during neurodegeneration.

Speaker
Harish C. Pant National Institute of Health
USA

Sessions:

Abstract

The calorie sensitive gene Sirtuin 1 (Sirt 1) determines nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis and immunosenescence relevant to the induction of various chronic diseases in human and other species. Appetite control is essential to Sirt 1 function for preventing adipose tissue transformation (adipocytokine release), non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the development of epilepsy. The global antimicrobial and epileptic drug market is expected to cost 80 billion dollars by the year 2020 with the critical role of Sirt 1 in the maintenance of immunocompetence. Sirt 1 repression by bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) leads to delayed hepatic clearance of anti-microbial drugs with relevance to mitophagy, neuron apoptosis and interference with antimicrobial/antiepileptic drug therapy. Increased absorption of LPS from food/water induces magnesium deficiency with inactivation of antimicrobial/antiepileptic drug therapy. Heat and cold stress alters Sirt 1’s role in cell cholesterol dyshomeostasis associated with increased heat shock proteins (HSP) involved with inactivation of antimicrobial proteins such as amyloid beta and promotion of the cytotoxic immune response.

Biography

Ian Martins is a Reveiwer for international journals. Chief Editor for International Journal of Diabetes Research (2014-2017), Research and Reviews: Neuroscience (2016-2017), Journal of Diabetes and Clinical Studies. BIT Member (BIT Congress. Inc) with H-index of 43, (ResearchGate STATs (23), Mendeley STATS (20). Scientist for Science Advisory Board (USA)/Academic with Academia.edu. Citations > 3000. ResearchGate’s analysis available on google, Tweet, Facebook, Lindekin under Ian James Martins’ name > 96% of the international SCIENTISTS. Lifetime Membership by International Agency for Standards and Ratings as Fellow for Diabetes, Medical Science (Nutrition). Conferred with the RICHARD KUHN RESEARCH AWARD-2015 ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM

Speaker
Ian Martins Edith Cowan University
Australia

Abstract

We report the use of random walk theory (DRW) to assess autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Rett syndrome. The ASD is not a degenerative disorder, characterized by brain disorders that influence the communication skills and social interaction: deficiencies in verbal and non-verbal communication; the development; the maintenance and understanding of relationships. The detriment of communication skills and social interaction are accompanied by the restriction of interests in a particular topic, activity, academic interest, etc., and may present repetitive patterns of behavior. All of these restrictions are aspects that are part of the spectrum of symptoms which identify individuals with ASD in routine neurological exams. Another disorder that promotes neurodevelopmental damage - Rett syndrome, has a genetic cause qualified by mutations in the MECP2 gene, located on the X chromosome. Rett syndrome consists of the fact that the mutation in the MECP2 gene encodes a defective protein - it does not have the capacity to exercise its biological function adequately. Consequently, genes that should remain inactive during specific phases of neuronal development are conveyed to the active state, resulting in impairments in the development of the central nervous system. From the perspective of the development of new diagnostic tools, we report the use of discrete random walks (DRW) as a diagnostic mechanism for degenerative disorders that characterize autism and Rett syndrome. These disorders are analyzed in two different contexts. In the first context, for autism, we aim to use DRW for the analysis of social behavior, when it has restricted interests or not, with impact on the diffusive regimes, characterizing the different levels of autism. To analyze the Rett syndrome, we used a different context, we sought to understand the mechanisms of translation of defective proteins, indirectly, by means of discreet random walks. We chose mRNA sequences related to Rett syndrome and used them to characterize the dynamics of random walks, besides obtaining measurements of physical observables, analyzed in the representation of the Shannon entropy.

Biography

Thiago Rafael da Silva Moura holds a PhD in Physics from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte. He is currently a professor of physics at the Federal University of Para (UFPA) in Salinopolis-PA. He is a Research Associate at the Laboratory of Interdisciplinary Innovation - LabX, Federal University of Para. He carries out research on the following topics: electronic transport in DNA / RNA, magnetic systems, epidemic processes, random walks and non-Markovian processes.

Speaker
Thiago Rafael da Silva Moura Federal University of Para
Brazil

Abstract

Acute subdural haematoma is the most lethal condition among the traumatic brain injury patients. Associated with more severe generalized brain injury, these often occur with cerebral contusions. ASDH are seen in 10-20% of all TBI cases and occur in upto 30% of fatal injuries. Mortality ranges from 50-90% if not operated in indicated cases. Favourable outcomes are expected in patients with GCS score 5 and above, reactive pupils, young adults and time-honoured intervention. Bangladesh is a very densely populated area having 170 million people. We, about 150 Neurosurgeons serve this whole population. A major share of our daily workload is to manage TBI patients. 96 cases of acute subdural haematoma patients were surgically treated in Medical College Hospital (Government) and other private hospitals in Chittagong from January 2009 to December 2016. Male were 70 (73%) while female were 26 (27%). The age incidence ranges from 20 years to extreme ages. Morbidity and mortality were assessed using GCS and GOS scales. 28 (29%) out of 96 patients died postoperatively. Internists and physiatrist were parts of our management team.

Biography

Anisul Islam Khan is graduated from Rangpur Medical College, Bangladesh in 1986. During Under graduate period he was the Founder President of Shandhani of his college as a voluntary Blood and Eye donation organization run by the medical students. After compulsory 2yrs duty in rural area he was posted as a lecturer of Anatomy at Chittagong Medical College, then he was posted as Assistant Registrar and Registrar in the Department of Neurosurgery in Chittagong Medical College and Hospital. After completion of his MS in Neurosurgery in 2009, Now he is working as Associate Professor till date. He presented scientific papers in many national and international conferences and took part in a good number of workshops. He was the past member of executive committee of Bangladesh Society of Neurosurgeons.

Speaker
Anisul Islam Khan Chittagong Medical College Hospital
Bangladesh

Abstract

Alzheimer disease (AD) and Alzheimer disease-related dementias (ADRD) are the major causes of disability and dependency among older people worldwide. Despite extensive research, the molecular mechanism underlying the development and progression of the AD/ADRD in aged population is poorly understood. CDKN1A interacting zinc finger protein 1 (CIZ1), a nuclear protein, plays a critical role in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression at the G1/S checkpoint. Recently, we have reported that germline knock-out of Ciz1 in mice is associated with behavioral, and hematological abnormalities in young adult mice. However, it remains unknown whether CIZ1 deficiency is involved in age-related neurodegenerative disease, particularly in AD. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Ciz1-/- mice showed abnormal sensitivity to the effects of γ-irradiation with persistent DNA breaks, aberrant cell-cycle progression, and apoptosis. Aged (18-mo-old) Ciz1-/- mice exhibited marked deficits in motor and cognitive functioning, and, in brain tissues, overt DNA damage, NF-κB upregulation, oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, inflammation, and cell death. These findings indicate that the deleterious effects of CIZ1 deficiency become more pronounced with aging and suggest that defects of cell-cycle control and associated DNA repair pathways in post-mitotic neurons could contribute to global neurological decline in elderly human populations. Accordingly, the G1/S cell-cycle checkpoint and associated DNA repair pathways may be targets for the prevention and treatment of age-related neurodegenerative processes.

Biography

Khan is a Staff Scientist in the Department of Neurology at University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis USA. Over the past 10 years, Dr. Khan is working on regulation and resolution of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in broad spectrum of human neurodegenerative diseases. Dr. Khan has published more than 45 research articles in preclinical CNS models. His research work has been recognized both at national and international levels and has received over 2,000 citation scores with h-index 27 by other scientists. Dr. Khan’s works has been highlighted by Editorial commentary and captured by several electronic media. Dr. Khan been served as Academic Editor for several manuscripts submitted for the peer review process. He is an active member for several professional societies related to neuroscience and officially review the manuscripts, case reports, and Data sheet for several journals of high impact and international repute. He has been enlisted as Lead editor and editorial board member of many journals in his field.

Speaker
Mohammad Moshahid Khan University of Tennessee Health Science Center
USA

Abstract

This preliminary study has examined ways in which social media may help cause stalker murder by individuals with personality disorders and a strong sense of sexual propriety. A public display on social media by the intended victim was felt to be a trigger that instigated interpersonal violence. To identify behavioural paradigms, case studies of intimate partner murders were explored using news media sources and documentaries. In all of the case studies social media interaction and social media postings occurred shortly before the murder. The evidence suggested a preponderance of correlations between the social media postings, stalking behaviours, personality disorders, and the murder of an intimate partner. In addition to this, a profile for of Facebook/social media murder was gleaned from the paradigms of behavior found in the case studies. The evidence showed a complex relationship between severe violence, stalking, borderline personality, and intimate partner violence was identified through the study. The struggle clients have in dealing with the: public, ambiguous and unrelenting nature of social media postings was also observed. The murderers anguish and rage appeared to be further intensified by attitudes of sexual propriety and entitlement. These attitudes were evident in all the case studies. The study concluded with further research on how the public can protect themselves from entering situations where social media postings might trigger a violent response. Further to this, psychological approaches were identified that might support client’s with personality disorders to cope with perceived provocative and distressing data on the internet. Thus, the findings of this study will be of interest to: therapists, psychologists, nurses, criminologists and social workers.

Biography

Will be update soon

Speaker
Amanda Maitland Eisner Institute for Professional Studies
China

Abstract

Although suicide cases are subjected to underreporting in Lebanon, it is apparent from available statistics, that suicide is a public health issue in Lebanon. Data from the Internal Security Forces show that 1 person dies of suicide every 3 days and 1 person attempts suicide every 6 hours. In response, Embrace, a Lebanese NGO and mental health awareness network, has established the first national suicide prevention and emotional support helpline, Embrace Lifeline. Embrace’s helpline provides over-the-phone emotional support and referrals to necessary community resources and treatment programs. Methods: The helpline was established in 2017, within a framework of a non-interventionist approach, under the guidance of the Centre for Research and Intervention for Suicide and Euthanasia in Canada (CRISE). Results: Phase I of the helpline establishment, consisted of planning and partnering with key-stakeholders in Lebanon and worldwide. Phase II focused on training telephone operators and trainers in Suicide Risk Assessment and Crisis Intervention, and establishing structured protocol to evaluate suicide risk, develop hope, engage the caller in collaborative problem solving, and refer to appropriate community resources when needed. Phase III, in September 2017, saw the soft launch of the helpline, operating from 12 pm till 2 am, and receiving a total of 50 calls. Preliminary data was used to improve services, and develop electronic data-capturing plan. We expect to launch Phase III in January 2018. Social and clinical implications will be discussed.

Biography

Mia Atoui holds a Master degree in clinical psychology and a Master degree in public health from the American University of Beirut (AUB). As a psychologist who is continuously engaged in patient care, Mia has always appreciated the need to practice psychology not only in the private setting of the clinic and hospital, but also to be immersed in the community and bring direly needed psychological services into the community. Founding Embrace has been an opportunity to reach out to the community, spread awareness where it is needed, and allow others who are in need to reach out to us as well.

Speaker
Mia Atoui Co Founder and Board member of Embrance
Lebanon

Abstract

The article discusses the hypothesis of possibility of a model for prognosticating a text based on the field of emergence. It is assumed that on the base of a communicative situation there caused a field of emergence, which denotes the boundary of structural and semantic models, prognosticated as verbal forms of the communicative situation. The cause of the field of emergence is observed in the analysis of different translations of the same text, because any text that should be interpreted verbally can be assumed as a model of the communicative situation. The main task, which is placed in the article, is an attempt to determine a fuzzy model, which is capable in maximal degree of probability to calculate the volume of linguistic fuzzy sets potentially useful as language material for a communicative situation within the field of emergence.

Biography

1988-1993 - Department of Romano-Germanic Philology of the Chechen-Ingush State University, specializing in Teaching English and French. Qualification by diploma is "Philologist, Teacher of English and French". 2009 - defense of the thesis for the degree of Candidate of Philology on the topic: "Emergence as a component of invariantly-variable structures of translated texts" (10.02.19). Work experience: 1993-2003. - Worked in different organizations. 2003-2006 - Assistant Professor of General Linguistics chair philology department of Chechen State University. 2006-2009 - Senior Lecturer of General Linguistics chair, 2009-2015. - Associate Professor of the of General Linguistics chair. From 2015 to present day - Dean of the Foreign Languages department of Chechen State University.

Speaker
Albekov Nurvadi Chechen State University
Russian Federation

Abstract

Tau protein plays a crucial role in many neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau inclusions and amyloid beta (AB) deposition have been described in the post-mortem retina exams of AD patients. Cryo- electron microscopy ( Cryo- EM ) was recently used to detect the detailed structure of Tau filaments. Methods and Result : We examined the retinas of PET-proven live AD patients by spectral domain optical scanning tomography ( SD- OCT ) and fundus autofluorescein ( FAF ). The hyper or hypo- fluorescent lesions in the retina were scanned by OCT and images that completely corresponded with the histopathological and Cryo- EM shapes of Tau filaments were observed. Conclusion : Retinal Tau is a very promising target to detect early changes in AD and retinal imaging may be an exciting and trustable technique to predict and monitor the disease.

Biography

Umur Kayabasi is a graduate of Istanbul Medical Faculty. After working as an assistant in Ophthalmology, he completed his clinical fellowship program of Neuro- ophthalmology and electrophysiology at Michigan StateUniversity in 1995. After working as a consultant neuro- ophthalmologist in Istanbul, he worked at Wills Eye Hospital for 3 months as an observer. He has been working at World Eye Hospital since 2000. He has chapters in different neuro- ophthalmology books, arranged international symposiums, attended TV programs to advertise the neuro- ophthalmology subspecialty. He has also given lectures at local and international meetings, plus published papers in neuro ophthalmology

Speaker
Umur Kayabasi Uskudar University
Turkey

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