Scientific Program

Sessions:

Applied Science-2018

Abstract

Abstract: Efficient luminescent materials hold great promise for high-tech applications in optoelectronics, chemosensing, bioimaging, etc. Light emission of traditional luminophores is often weakened or quenched when the molecules are aggregated, which is notoriously known as aggregation-caused quenching (ACQ). Considering that luminophores are commonly used as solid or aggregate, strong solid-state emitters are highly desirable. In 2001, we found that some propeller-like molecules showed luminescence behavior that was exactly opposite to the ACQ effect: the aggregate formation turned on their light emissions, changing them from weak fluorogens into strong emitters. We termed this novel phenomenon as aggregation-induced emission (AIE). Through detailed mechanistic study of the photophysical processes, restriction of intramolecular motion (RIM) was identified as the main cause for AIE effect. Under the guidance of the RIM mechanism, we have developed a great number of new fluorescent and phosphorescent AIE luminogens (AIEgens) with emission colors covering the entire visible, extending into UV and near-infrared (NIR), spectral region. We have also utilized the AIEgens to tackle problems in the areas of energy, environment and health, the grant challenges faced by the contemporary society. In this lecture, I will share the excitement in studying this group of advanced materials and in exploring their exotic applications which are difficult, if not impossible, to achieve with the traditional ACQ luminophores.

Biography

Ben Zhong Tang is Stephen K. C. Cheong Professor of Science, Chair Professor of Chemistry, and Chair Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). His research interests include macromolecular chemistry, materials science, and biomedical theranostics. He is spearheading the research on aggregation-induced emission (AIE), a topic ranked no. 2 in the areas of Chemistry and Materials Science by Thomson Reuters in its report on Research Fronts 2015. Tang received B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from South China University of Technology and Kyoto University, respectively. He conducted postdoctoral research at University of Toronto. He joined HKUST as an assistant professor in 1994 and was promoted to chair professor in 2008. He was elected to the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) in 2009 and 2013, respectively. Tang has published > 1,200 papers. His publications have been cited > 58,085 times, with an h-index of 118. He has been listed by Thomson Reuters as a Highly Cited Researcher in both areas of Chemistry and Materials Science. He received Scientific and Technological Progress Award from the Ho Leung Ho Lee Foundation (2017), National Natural Science Award from the Chinese Government (2007) and Senior Research Fellowship from the Croucher Foundation (2007). He is now serving as Editor-in-Chief of Materials Chemistry Frontiers (RSC & CCS).

Speaker
Ben Zhong Tang / The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China

Abstract

HELMUT CÖLFEN is full professor for physical chemistry at the University of Konstanz. His research interests are in the area of nucleation, classical and non-classical crystallization, Bio mineralization, synthesis of functional polymers, directed self-assembly of nanoparticles and fractionating methods of polymer and nanoparticle analysis – especially Analytical Ultracentrifugation. His group has made contributions in high resolution particle size analysis with Angstrom resolution in solution, Microcrystals, Nonclassical Nucleation and Crystallization, CaCO3 crystallization, bio-inspired mineralization, synthesis of double hydrophilic block copolymers and additive controlled crystallization.

Biography

HELMUT CÖLFEN is full professor for physical chemistry at the University of Konstanz. His research interests are in the area of nucleation, classical and non-classical crystallization, Bio mineralization, synthesis of functional polymers, directed self-assembly of nanoparticles and fractionating methods of polymer and nanoparticle analysis – especially Analytical Ultracentrifugation. His group has made contributions in high resolution particle size analysis with Angstrom resolution in solution, Microcrystals, Nonclassical Nucleation and Crystallization, CaCO3 crystallization, bio-inspired mineralization, synthesis of double hydrophilic block copolymers and additive controlled crystallization.

Speaker
Helmut Coelfen / University of Konstanz, Germany

Abstract

Abstract. Nanostructured materials are becoming increasingly important because of the wide variety of properties available by controlling structure at the nanoscale. This is illustrated by the increasing prevalence of 2-dimensional materials such as graphene amd MoS2. Organic materials such as polymers and liquid crystals have played a significant role in the development of technology. Synthetic organic materials are also recognized for the potential high degrees of structural control that can be applied in the preparation of nanostructured materials especially by using self-assmbly techniques. Here we will present and discuss several examples of organic materials whose nanometric dimensions and properties make them of current relevance. These include materials for sensing, solar energy conversion, nanostructuring and other applications. Processing of hybrid organic nanostructures will also be discussed.

Biography

Jonathan P. Hill is Chief Scientist at the Supermolecules Group, National Institute for Materials Science, Japan. His main research interests are the synthesis and assembly of organic molecular and nanostructures for potential applications in molecular electronics, sensing and related fields. He is coauthor of more than 350 published papers and 20 patents on these subjects. He is also author of more than 300 invited and contributed presentations at international conferences and university seminars.

Speaker
Jonathan Hill / national institute for material science,japan

Abstract

This work demonstrates the production of activated carbon (AC) from oak tree wood. Different techniques for instance X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were utilized to characterize the prepared adsorbent. The one parameter at a time method was used to estimate the impact of diverse parameters for example initial concentration, dosage of adsorbent, pH, contact time and particle size on the uptake of SY dye from water. The optimal conditions were the following: initial concentration=10 mg/L; adsorbent dose=0.25 g; pH =1; contact time= 35 min and particle size=150-250 µm. The adsorption isotherm study at different adsorbent dosage of 0.05- 0.25 g indicated that data fitted well into the Langmuir isotherm with a maximum adsorption capacity of 5.8377- 30.1205 mg/g. The pseudo-second order model was selected as the best kinetic model to fit experimental data. In this paper, Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) model was also compared with the multiple linear regression (MLR) model to forecast of the removal percent of SY dye. for the testing data points of optimal GMDH and MLR models the determination coefficient (R2) and mean squared error (MSE) values were found to be 0.9702, 0.780 and 3.4078, 26.839 respectively. It was specified that the GMDH model revealed a high performance than MLR model for forecasting removal percentage.

Biography

Vinod Kumar Gupta obtained his Ph.D. degree in chemistry from the University of Roorkee (now Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee) Roorkee, India, in 1979. Since then has published more than 600 research papers, many reviews and 4 books which fetched him more than 60,000 citations with h-index of 144. Prof. Gupta is an elected Fellow of the World Innovation Foundation (FIWF) since July 2004, Fellow of the National Academy of Sciences (FNASc) since 2008 and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) since 2017.

Speaker
Vinod Kumar Gupta / University Of JohannesBurg, South Africa

Abstract

Tall and slender structures together with long-span bridges are often susceptible to wind or seismic induced vibrations. Mitigation of such structural vibrations has been a challenging task for engineers and in this regard many studies have been carried out. Considering this fact that the low damping ratio of structures makes them more susceptible to ambient vibrations, auxiliary damping devices have been invented and employed by engineers to enhance the energy dissipation of structures. Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD), Tuned Liquid Column Dampers (TLCD) and Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD) are among the widely employed damping systems in buildings. However, because of the low maintenance and operation costs, the ease of installation and design, and relatively good performance, TLDs have been a more popular damping system for vibration mitigation of structures. TLDs are composed of a rigid tank filled with water and are among the passive damping devices which do not need an external supply of power for operation. TLDs dissipate the applied external energy through intrinsic friction of the liquid, wave breakage, and liquid boundary layer friction. In this paper, the recent advancements in the design and application of TLDs are presented and discussed. In addition, a new type of TLDs will be introduced and its effectiveness for vibration mitigation of structures will be demonstrated though the experimental tests conducted on a 3-story single-bay scaled structure.

Biography

Mohammadreza Vafaei (PhD, P.Eng., M.ASCE, M.EERI, M.SSA) is currently a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM) in Johor, Malaysia. He has completed his PhD from UTM and postdoctoral studies from the same university. As a Professional Engineer previously serving many consultant companies he has led structural design of many projects including tall residential and office buildings, airport terminals, air traffic control towers, telecommunication towers, bridges and water reservoirs. He has also published many papers in refereed journals and conferences. His research interests are structural control, structural health monitoring and seismic design of structures.

Speaker
Mohammadreza Vafaei / university of technology Malaysia

Abstract

Metals mechanical and physical properties improvemetn is of a high interest in modern materials industry, especially non-ferrous alloys. The majority of works describe non-ferrous alloys properties improvement by the means of alloying process, heat treatment, or mechanically affecting applying techniques such as ultrasound or vibration during solidification process. In current work we present a novel approach of nanocompounds (ceramic nano-powders, carbon nanotubes and inorganic nanotubes) influence on non-ferrous alloys such as aluminum and copper. It was found that addition up to 0.1wt.% of nanocompounds cause to the properties significant improvement in those alloys. Microstructural, chemical and phase composition changes and their influence will be presented and discussed in the work. The obtained promising results would lead metallurgy industry to produce economically beneficial metals for advanced applications in industries such as automotive and aerospace.

Biography

Dr. Konstantin Borodianskiy is a head of Metallurgy and Applied Nanoscience Research Lab at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Materials in Ariel University, Israel which he established after his postdoctoral studies at the University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. He is a member of organizing committees of international conferences in Material Sciences, a reviewer of some high quality scientific journals in the field and serves as a scientific consultant of Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. His research focuses in metallurgy of non-ferrous alloys, mechanochemistry, synthesis of intermetallic materials, Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) processes and he is an expert in X-ray diffraction investigations.

Speaker
Konstantin Borodianskiy / Ariel University Israel

Abstract

Nano-structure influences strongly the surface stress. Silicon reconstructed surface has unique nano-structure based on dangling bond reduction and adatom formation. The complex arrangements of the surface atoms, such as adatoms, dimers, and stacking faults are formed on Si(111) 7×7 surface, and pairs of pentagons are formed on Si(110) 16×2 surface. Despite importance of the surface stress for nano-structure formation, experimental knowledge on the impacts of reconstruction on the Si surface has been quite limited. We focused on real-time stress measurement during hydrogen desorption and adsorption process on the reconstructing surfaces. In order to obtain information on both the surface stress and the surface structure simultaneously, we combined the surface-curvature and the reflection high-energy electron-diffraction instrumentations in an identical ultrahigh vacuum system.

Biography

Nano-structure influences strongly the surface stress. Silicon reconstructed surface has unique nano-structure based on dangling bond reduction and adatom formation. The complex arrangements of the surface atoms, such as adatoms, dimers, and stacking faults are formed on Si(111) 7×7 surface, and pairs of pentagons are formed on Si(110) 16×2 surface. Despite importance of the surface stress for nano-structure formation, experimental knowledge on the impacts of reconstruction on the Si surface has been quite limited. We focused on real-time stress measurement during hydrogen desorption and adsorption process on the reconstructing surfaces. In order to obtain information on both the surface stress and the surface structure simultaneously, we combined the surface-curvature and the reflection high-energy electron-diffraction instrumentations in an identical ultrahigh vacuum system.

Speaker
Hidehito Asaoka / Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan

Abstract

The increasing of popularity of implant treatments and the increasing number performed methods in recent time opens the new possibilities to use together the decontamination and adhesion of implant surface to the organic tissue. These studies are stimulated by a lot of incidence of short-term and long-term complications which took place in the last time. It is proposed a set of modern effects in the bimolecular interaction of radiation with the human tissue on implant surfaces. Taking into consideration the advance equipment in photonics like photonic crystals and photonic-crystal fibre we are interested to use this optical systems in modern implants in order to treat the surface infection, formed on the surface between the implant and cellular tissue in the process of poor adhesion. Considering the advanced equipments of modern photonics such as photonic crystals or photonic crystal fibers, we propose to use these optical systems in the controlling and managing of modern therapeutic implants. Such metamaterials like photonic crystals, each can be deposited on the implant surface and can be used as a dispersion of UV radiation on the large surface to treat infection on the surface between the implant and adhesion tissue. Our approach is based upon the increased transfer of UV radiation via evanescent waves of metamaterials into contaminated tissue. We made a series of estimations of the decontamination rate of this type of metamaterials vs. ordered metamaterials consisting of spherical elements. Experiments have conclusively convincingly demonstrated that both quartz and fiber metamaterials can effectively annihilate Coliform (including Escherichia coli), or Enterococcus, bacteria, as well as yeast and Kombucha cultures. The decontamination efficiency was assessed both in dynamic and static treatment regimes. Control experiments were performed in the absence of metamaterials and/or UV-C irradiation.

Biography

From 1981 to 1985 N.Enaki becomes a post-graduate student of the radio-physics department, Physics Faculty of Lomonosov State University from Moscow. Here he was focused on the subject of PhD dissertation “Quantum Statistics of superradiance in an extended system of radiators”. After that he continues the studies of the quantum statistical properties of radiation in “Single- and two-photon cooperative processes in optics” (Dr. Habilitatus dissertation, 1993). Scientific advisor of Quantum Optics and Kinetic Process Lab in Institute of Applied Physics, Chishinau, R. Moldova. As a professor in physics, his lessons are reflected in the monograph ”Nonlinear Cooperative effects in open quantum systems: entanglement and second-order coherence”, Nova Science Publishers, NY, USA, 2015, 325 pp.

Speaker
Nicolae A. Enaki / Institute of Applied Physics, Moldova

Abstract

Halogenated hydrocarbons (HHCs), which are priority chemicals, have been used extensively in a number of industrial processes. However, it was discovered that many of these HHCs are carcinogens, including chlorophenols, and have serious negative impacts on the ecosystem. Moreover, HHCs are generally resistant to treatment by conventional biological, physical, and chemical methods, together with the stricter restrictions imposed by new legislation, have caused many researchers to look for alternative treatment processes. Ionic liquids (ILs), a new class of solvents, have many favorable characteristics over conventional organic solvents, such as low vapor pressure, non-flammability, ability to dissolve polar and non-polar compounds, and thermal stability. Thus, it is important to investigate the solubility of HHCs in ILs for the potential use of ILs as green solvents in the extraction of HHHCs from wastewater. In this study, the solubility of 3-chlorophenol (3-CP), 2,5-dichlorophenol (DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in six hydrophobic bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide based ILs at 25, 35, and 45ºC was investigated. It was found that 3-CP is miscible with all tested ILs. The solubility of chlorinated phenols increased with the increase in temperature, but the degree of increase depended on the structure of both the IL and chlorinated phenol. In general, it was found that the tested chlorophenols have substantial solubility in pyridinium and imidazolium-based ILs. In addition, the nonrandom two-liquid model (NRTL) model was applied to correlate the experimental data. There was a good agreement between experimental and modeling solubility data in most of the cases.

Biography

Dr. AlNashef received his Ph. D. from the University of South Carolina in 2004 and joined KSU/Saudi Arabia as assistant prof. In 2011, Dr. AlNashef was promoted to Assoc. Prof. He is very active in research related to green engineering and sustainability, especially the use of ionic liquids and deep eutectic solvents in different engineering applications. In June 2014, Dr. AlNashef joined the Dep. of Chemical Engineering at Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi, UAE as an Assoc. Prof. Dr. AlNashef has more than 100 publications and 7 patents.

Speaker
Inas M. AlNashef / Khalifa University of Science and Technology, United Arab Emirates

Abstract

Noteworthy progress with regards to underground construction engineering has occurred in the past few decades, however, a number of fundamental shortfalls still persist regarding the recognition, prediction, and mitigation of underground construction hazards associated with complex geological conditions in rock and soil tunnelling. Many of these shortcomings could be addressed by i) improving the numerical models and analyses associated with tunnelling, ii) better geological model development and, iii) improve the design and performance of rock support. These concepts are all interrelated. Improving geomechanical models would provide more realistic frameworks for determining input parameters for design analysis. In addition, this would improve predictions of construction efficiency for tunnelling and the formulation of more accurate modelling techniques required to optimize the design of tunnels constructed in weak rock or soft ground. Fiber optics can be used in combination with ground support in order to aid in the characterization of the geological conditions past the face (and around the annulus) of the tunnel excavation while also determining the performance and unique contribution of each support element within a tunnel / ground support regime. Within this context, this research describes the lessons learned from the development and implementation (on international tunnelling projects) of a novel application of a distributed optical sensing technique. The technology has been developed specifically for monitoring the continuous strain profile along rock / ground support elements with a view to optimize the overall support configuration and also provide valuable input and validation data for numerical models.

Biography

Dr. Vlachopoulos is an Associate Professor of Civil Engineering at the Royal Military College of Canada. He also holds a Cross-Appointment with the Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Department as well as the School of Environmental Studies at Queen's University. He is a Professional Engineer in Canada and in Europe with over 22 years’ experience in geotechnical / geological, geo-environmental engineering and project management on construction and research projects. He has worked at over 100 locations nationally and internationally and has authored 200 peer-reviewed publications and reports. He is currently the Engineering Geology Divisional Chair for the Canadian Geotechnical Society.

Speaker
Nicholas Vlachopoulos / Director, RMC Green Team, canada

Abstract

Composite materials are becoming even more popular and ever more widely used in the transport industry as well for the fabrication of objects for use in daily life. Their success is mainly due to their high strength-to-weight ratio and easy formability. In particular, it is possible to create a material of given characteristics by changing either the type of matrix, or reinforcement; in this way a multitude of materials can be created. Of course, any new material, before entering the market, requires characterization for an appropriate exploitation. In this context, infrared thermography (IRT) represents a viable means since it is non-contact, non-intrusive and can be used to monitor the entire existence of a product, from its manufacturing process to completion as well as in-service life. This presentation is concerned with the use of infrared thermography to investigate composite materials; this research was done at the University of Naples Federico II with the cooperation of the materials group at the CNR Italy. IRT is used with a twofold function: non-destructive evaluation and inline monitoring of materials while they are under mechanical tests like impact and bending. In particular, it is demonstrated that the thermal signatures developing under mechanical stresses can be exploited for understanding more about composites materials and help understanding some complex aspects.

Biography

Dr. Carosena Meola, aeronautical engineer, is senior research staff member at the Department of Industrial Engineering/Aerospace Division - University of Naples Federico II. Level III in infrared thermography and licensed instructor for personnel training and certification. Member of UNI, CEN and ISO Technical Committees. Member of the Editorial Board of some International Journals and of the Scientific Committee of some International Conferences. Chair of Conference sessions, Editor and co-authors of three of books and one Journal special issue. Author and co-author of about 200 papers in well recognized journals, books and proceedings. Referee of about 50 International Journals.

Speaker
Carosena Meola / University of Naples Federico II, ITALY

Abstract

Nowadays, surgical transplantation of tissue is the main method for replacing or repairing damaged tissue in the body. The developing field of tissue engineering (TE) aims to revolutionize regeneration of damaged tissue by implantation of cells. In this way, a high population of healthy cells are transferred to injured site through loading them on scaffold biomaterial. Hence scaffolds are one of the basic tools in TE and regenerative medicine. Any scaffold for use in TE should has the following properties: 1) Biocompatibility; cells to be able to adhere, function normally, migrate and proliferate, and do not produce immune reaction. 2) Biodegradability; to allow body's own cells replace the implanted scaffold and by-product of degradation should be non-toxic. 3) Mechanical properties; strength of scaffold allow its handling during surgery. 4) Architecture; to have interconnected pores to ensure cellular penetration and diffusion of nutrients and waste products. Typically, the biomaterials are used for fabrication of scaffolds for TE are: Ceramics, such as hydroxyl apatite (HA) and tri-calcium phosphate (TCP) for hard tissue. Synthetic polymers, such as poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA), polyglycolic acid (PGA), poly-dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA). Natural polymers, such as collagen and hyaloronic acid. Future directions: In spite of having numerous advantages, for using of a scaffold, surgical procedure is required. Therefore, one of the main concerns in fabrication of scaffold focuses on producing injectable gel-like scaffold to provide a method for cellular transplantation with no need for open surgery. However, the gelatinous scaffold should have all the criteria needed for a suitable scaffold. Key words: tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, scaffold

Biography

Jafar Soleimani Rad was born in Iran, he is awarded a scholarship to do his postgraduate study in Canada. He is received a PhD degree in Histology and Embryology from Ottawa University- Canada in 1989. Since then, is served as professor for Histology and Embryology at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Prof. J.S.Rad served as head of the Department of Anatomy for many years and currently is head of the Department of Tissue Engineering at the same University. Prof. Rad has published more than 200 papers in Reproductive, Biomedical, and Stem cell journals, and is author of several books related to Histology and Embryology. His research interests include: Reproduction, Tissue engineering, and Regenerative Medicine.

Speaker
Jafar Soleimani Rad / Tabriz University of Medical Sciences ,Iran

Abstract

The demand for highly sophisticated and advanced electronic products has pushed the boundaries of several engineering disciplines to miniaturize components to be smaller. This is including the discipline of microwave and radio frequency engineering that has spent decades in the art of microwave resonator miniaturization. Pioneering microwave technology such as waveguides and dielectric resonator filters are too heavy and bulky for most applications. As technology advances, the demand for mobile communications systems presents a considerable challenge to design RF filters that both meet the performance and level of miniaturization. This is especially true to Ultra High Frequency, L-band (1-2 GHz) and S band (2-4 GHz) applications where resonators tend to be large due to long electrical wavelengths. In Low Frequency up to Very High Frequency applications, passive lumped elements such as inductors and capacitors are typically used to form a tuned circuit that are widely used in filters, voltage-controlled oscillators and amplifiers. At microwave frequencies and beyond, smaller values of lumped elements are difficult to obtain, thus the reason microstrip resonators and cavities are used instead. Over the years, there has been plenty of successful methods explored to reduce the size of microstrip resonators such as hairpin filter, ladder microstrip line filter, slow-wave resonators, multilayer/multisize filters and split-ring resonator filters. One research utilizes a surface mount capacitor on a loaded open-loop resonator to reduce resonant frequency. This work will be discussed along with other adaptations that can be implemented using the surface mount capacitor.

Biography

Dr. Nor Muzlifah Mahyuddin is a Senior Lecturer in Electronic (Communications) under School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia. She received a Master’s degree in Electronics System Design Engineering in USM (2006) and a PhD degree in Microelectronics System Design in Newcastle University, UK (2011). She has published 29 academic papers including peer-reviewed journals as well as conference proceedings. She has graduated 1 PhD student, 3 Master (Research) and 15 Master (Mixed Mode) students. She has reviewed various international academic papers. She is currently a member of IEEE, IET and is registered under Board of Engineers Malaysia (BEM).

Speaker
Nor Muzlifah Mahyuddin / Universiti Sains Malaysia,Malaysia

Abstract

The rise of big data analytics, the recent intense attention to artificial intelligence applications, the wide-spread of Industrial Internet of Things (IIOT), and the emergence of Cyber-physical systems have changed the landscape of how manufacturing systems should be operated and how factories of the future will look like. Factories of the future are more connected, more responsive, more autonomous, and more productive. The term industrie 4.0 has been coined in Europe, while the term smart manufacturing is more common in the United States. FactDesign is an ultra-modern manufacturing systems analysis and design platform. It has been created in 2015 by Dr. Ismail with the help of his research team at the Systems Engineering Lab at the University of Regina. The new platform is a host of several modules that address several core areas in manufacturing systems analysis and design. The first generation of those modules addressed several challenges in both academia and industry. The second generation shows how big data analytics will be an instrumental tool for operating, managing, and dynamically optimizing factories of the future. Several innovative FactDesign artifacts, some successful sorties, and a handful of conceptual models will be presented.

Biography

In 1998, Dr. Ismail graduated from Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University. He got a bachelor of science from the Mechanical Design and Production Department. He earned a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering from Cairo University in 2004 and a Master of Business Administration (MBA) in Finance and International Business in 2005. In 2011, he earned Ph.D. in Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE) Department, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. From 1998 to 2005, he held many industrial positions as a Research and Development Engineer, Operations and Purchasing Engineer, and Operations Manager. From 2006-2011 he worked as a research assistant at the Intelligenbt Manufacturing Center, University of Windsor. At that time, he created a new system modeling and optimization approach called “Progressive Modeling” and applied it to the design and optimization of Reconfigurable Manufacturing Systems. In 2012, he joined the University of Regina, SK, Canada as an assistant professor. He has contribution in three main research streams: 1) Manufacturing Systems Analysis and Design 2) Healthcare Engineering Applications 3) Outcome-based Assessment Systems. Dr. Ismail is the creator and the developer of the “too industrial” FactDesign, a manufacturing systems analysis and optimization Windows-based platform; the “ground-breaking” OBACIS, a Web/Windows/Excel outcome-based assessment and continuous improvement integrated platform for Engineering and Higher Education, and HEDAL, a healthcare engineering and big data analytics lab and software

Speaker
Mohamed Ismail / University of Regina, Canada

Abstract

We live a smart life. All electrical and electronic products are connected to each other mainly with iOT, and smart mobile technology exists at the center. We are living on cell phones for more time than before, and we are using mobile phones in more environments. We also want to integrate various existing media through mobile phones, and enjoy brighter and clearer images. As the culture changes, mobile phones are changing very rapidly and are developing by converging all the surrounding industrial technologies. There are technologies such as flexible display technology /high brightness display technology/high durability waterproof system for such technology convergence. Pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) plays a very important role in the introduction of these technologies. PSA is not only used for assembling the system, but is used for imerging functions and simplifying the process. PSA is regarded as an essential element for stable display of flexible display and it is regarded as a core material of heat dissipation system for realizing high brightness display. In addition, PSA is actively employed in waterproof system design and high durability housing. PSA is devoid of its role in the process and is regarded as a core material in the next generation mobile industry and is attracting attention as a technology indispensable to the future challenges of the mobile phone industry. PSA has been regarded as a core material of the next generation mobile industry, deviating from its existing role, and is attracting attention as a technology indispensable to the challenges of the mobile phone industry in the future.

Biography

Hyun-Joong Kim has completed his PhD from The University of Tokyo, Japan and Research Scientist work from State University of New York at Stony Brook, USA. He is the professor of Seoul National University. He holds the Lifetime Fellow Members from International Academy of Wood Science (IAWS) and the Korean Academy of Science and Technology (KAST), and also, Honorary Associate Editor-in-Chief of Research Journal of Chemistry and Environment, Editor-in-Chief of Open Journal of Organic Polymer Materials.

Speaker
Hyun-Joong Kim / Seoul National University, Republic of Korea

Abstract

Urea is a nitrogenous organic compound which is widely used as a fertilizer and in the agricultural industry. On an industrial scale, urea can be manufactured from the reaction of carbon dioxide and ammonia. The goal of this research is to design a plant that produces 46.84 ton /hr. urea from the raw materials carbon dioxide and ammonia. The quantities of carbon dioxide and ammonia consumed in the process were 37.32ton/hr. and 28. 84 ton /hr. respectively. The carbon dioxide is obtained using a sustainable approach from the waste products, the flue gas, of a nearby power plant. In the first step of the process, carbon dioxide is extracted in an absorption column that uses ammonia and stripping columns from the flue gases emitted from a power plant. This ensures that the whole production process is environmentally sustainable and contributes in the reduction of carbon dioxide that causes of global warming.

Biography

Omar Chaalal is an Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at Abu Dhabi University (ADU). Chaalal is an internationally renowned expert in the separation technologies. He is the inventor of the EnPro Process that deals with the sequestration of carbon dioxide and global warming reduction. He has undertaken several successful research related to CO2 cleaning in Natural Gas and subsequently two patents applications have been filed for the use of this technology. The benefits of these patents were, in addition to the environmental benefits, used in the treatment of large quantities of desalinated formation water in the oil field. Chaalal has pioneered among others the use of seawater and ammonia to reduce the effect of carbon dioxide on the environment. August 2017, Dr. Chaalal was honored with a prestigious IAAM scientist medal of year 2017 for notable and outstanding research in The Advanced Material Science and Technology during award ceremony held in Stockholm Sweden in the 23 of August.2017. Chaalal was an associate professor of Chemical Engineering at Ibn Khaldun University Algeria, as well as at the United Arab Emirates University. He was the Chief Scientist of Enpro As. Norway, a member of Al Mobdioon Center of Excellence and innovation of King Abdul Aziz University (Saudi Arabia), an Advisory Board of IIB environmental Company in Japan and a member of the board of the Journal of Nature Science and Sustainable Technology (Nova Science Publisher). He has authored 50 refereed publications, 2 European patents, 1 US patent pending and 200 presentations.

Speaker
Omar Chaalal / Abu Dhabi University, UAE

Abstract

The global space cooling industry has been estimated to be about US$100 billion with nearly 100 million units of chillers/coolers being manufactured and sold annually. Air conditioning in buildings has transformed our human lives greatly with work efficiency in commercial buildings and improved lifestyle in all weather. However, these improvements are accompanied with the negative effects from the emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), both directly via refrigerant emissions and indirectly through electricity generation by the burning of fossil fuels. In a recent report from the Building Technologies Office (BTO, EERE) of DoE, there is an imperative need for engineers, scientists and industry professionals to innovative cooling technologies that substantially improve the efficacy of chillers, reducing both the energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in all buildings. In this presentation, the author focuses on the electrical energy consumption for air conditioning in a tropical Singapore island state with a high urban population density (> 7400 people per km2). Over the past 3 three decades both countries have similar electricity annual growth rates in excess of 6% per annum whilst the demand for electricity for air conditioning annually is 17 TWh, about 36% of the total electricity consumption (47 TWh, 2015). Should these energy demand trends in cooling is not abated, the future energy and environmental sustainability in both developing countries may be untenable. The discussion emphasizes on the shares of district cooling systems (DCS) to overall cooling is presently 30±5% and how DCS could be exploited for future sustainability in cooling. Although there were significant improvements in the efficacy of chillers over time but since 2000, the kW/Ron of chillers for cooling for electrically driven DCS have reached an asymptotic level of 0.85±0.03 kW/Rton for the tropics and a 20% higher for the hot and dry arid climate. The levelling-off phenomenon of chillers’ energy efficiency is attributed the improvements limits on the development of compressor and refrigerant technologies. Thus, an out-of-box solution to improve energy efficiency by is urgently needed and an innovative cycle is highlighted which can be the cooling cycle with a quantum efficiency savings up to 60% can be achieved.

Biography

Professor Kim Choon NG obtained his BSc. and PhD from the Strathclyde University (UK) in 1975 and 1980, respectively, and joined the ME Dept. of NUS in 1981. In July 2015, he moved to the Water Desalination and Reuse Centre of the King Abdullah University of Science & technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia as a full-time faculty. His research interests are in adsorption cooling and air conditioning, seawater desalination, co-generation power systems analysis and testing. He is keen reader of energy efficiency and its thermodynamics relation to unit cost of resource. He has over two hundreds peer reviewed journals and conference publications. He is active in professional services, serving as associate editors in three international journals and a sub-committee member of the examination sub-committee of the Professional Engineers Board of Singapore. He is a visiting professor to the World Class University (WCU) programme of Jeju National University, Korea from 2008-2013. He has published 3 books, 7 book chapters and 13 patents. Based on his patents, he has started 3 spin-off companies with licenses from NUS and KAUST. His H-index factor is 49, total citations in publication is 7438.

Speaker
Kim Choon Ng / King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

The inevitable escalation in economic development have serious implications on energy and environment nexus. The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) predicted that the Non Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (non-OECD) countries will lead with 71% rise in energy demand in contrast with only 18% in developed countries from 2012-2040. In GCC countries, about 50% of primary energy is consumed for cogeneration based power and desalination plants. In the past, many studies were focused on renewable energies based desalination and cooling processes to accommodate 5 fold increase in demand by 2050 but they were not commercialized due to intermittent nature of renewable energy such as solar and wind. We proposed highly efficient energy storage material, Magnesium oxide (MgO), system integrated with innovative hybrid desalination and cooling/heating cycle for future sustainable cooling/heating production and desalinated water supplies. The condensation of Mg(OH)2 dehydration vapor during day operation with concentrated solar energy and exothermic hydration of MgO at night can produce 24 hour thermal energy without any interruption. Combined system mathematical model was developed and simulation was conducted in System Advisory Model (SAM) and FORTRAN. It was showed that, Mg(OH)2 dehydration vapor condensation produce 120oC and MgO hydration exothermic reaction produce 140oC heat during day and night operation respectively correspond to energy storage of 81kJ/mol and 41kJ/mol. The produced energy can be utilized to operate desalination and cooling/heating cycle to reduce CO2 emission and to achieve COP21 goal. The simulation results has been also verified with pilot facility at KAUST, Saudi Arabia. Keywords: Thermal desalination, Hybrid desalination, Renewable energy, solar energy, energy storage material.

Biography

Dr. Wakil is working on thermal systems for cooling and desalination and their hybridization (Multi-effect Desalination, Absorption Chiller, Adsorption Chiller and Desiccant Dehumidifier) for overall system performance improvements. He is also working on heat transfer improvement specially for falling film evaporators at low temperature operation (<50C). He developed a correlation for falling film heat transfer coefficient. He is also working on economic analysis of single and hybrid systems. He developed a model for primary fuel cost apportionment in dual-purpose plants based on exergy analysis. He is also involves, system design, P & ID and P & FD development, system installation and its integration. He also has expertise on complex system modelling and simulation.

Speaker
Muhammad Wakil Shahzad / King Abdullah University of Science & Technology, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Maximum flow and minimum cut problems arise in a wide variety of applications in theoretical and applied science. Sometimes the maximum flow problem occurs as a subproblem in the solution of more difficult problems, such as generalized flow problem. However, it can be used in some applications directly, such as rounding of census data to obtain the confidentiality of individual households, sheduling problem, preemptive scheduling on machines with different speeds, multi facilities rectilinear distance location problem. On the other hand, minimum cut problem has many applications in computer vision and graphics. Indeed it works as a powerful tool for energy minimization in a wide variety of binary and nonbinary energy that occur in computer vision. It has also many applications in wide range of science, such as network connectivity, biology data analysis, social network analysis, web page segmentation, assignment of modules to the computer processors, analysis of medicine images. Maximum flow and minimum cut are a pair of dual problems, therefore, every algorithm for solving each of them solves the other one. Accordingly, we consider these two problems as "graph cut". It is devoted to invesigate the graph cut in both algorithimc and application-related aspects.

Biography

Dr. Ardeshir Dolati is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Shahed University of Iran. He received his PhD degree from Amirkabir University of Technology in 2006. His researches focuses on combinatorial optimization, inverse optimization and graph theory. He has experience in applied projects related to transportation network design and scheduling including public transportation network design, flammable liquids transportation. He has also published many papers in refereed journals, national and international conferences.

Speaker
Ardeshir Dolati / Shahed University, Iran

Sessions:

Applied Science-2018

Abstract

Every new generation of wireless networks delivers faster speeds and more functionality through our smartphones; 1G brought us the very first cell phones, 2G let us text for the first time, 3G brought us online (Mobile Internet) and 4G delivered the speed that we enjoy today. In the last decade, the world has seen a spectacular growth in the traffic carried by the telecom community. Internet traffic is roughly multiplied at regular intervals which entails the requirement of fast, reliable network infrastructure to cope with the large increment and motivates us to push for higher speed connectivity with low latency network. Therefore, we’re headed towards 5G the next generation wireless technology which is going to handle a thousand times more traffic than today’s networks approximately up to 10 times faster than 4G LTE, just imagine downloading an HD movie in under a second. 5G will be the foundation for virtual reality, autonomous driving, the Internet of Things etc. One of key features of 5G will be small cells which are portable miniature base stations that require minimal power to operate and can be placed every 250 meters or so throughout cities. To prevent signals from being dropped, telephone operators could install thousands of these stations in a city to form a dense network that acts like a relay team, receiving signals from other base stations and sending data to users at any location. Traditional cell networks have also come to rely on an increasing number of base stations because in order to achieve 5G performance will require an even greater infrastructure. Therefore, we need high-capacity links between base stations to hold user traffic and need to move to higher-frequency spectrum mm waves of links up to 60 to 100 GHz or use FSO technology. Delivering gigabits of capacity requires multiple gigahertz of spectrum via frequency reuse. Although 60 GHz has traditionally been avoided due to its high absorption of oxygen and water. Another major problem with the 60GHz frequency is that it is weak when it comes to penetrating walls and structures, which is the main reason it’s not generally used. Solving backhaul connectivity is critical before any 5G small cell deployments can scale up. There is no way to even consider adding wired backhaul drops to thousands of sites in an Urban environment. Therefore, we require a kind of Wi-Fi network that utilizes multiple nodes across an area to create a kind of air fiber network. Instead of laying down fiber lines – which in rural areas can be incredibly costly and in urban areas can shut down entire city blocks. The terrestrial connectivity system needed will improve the speed, efficiency and quality of internet connectivity around the world at only a fraction of the cost of fiber deployments. In summary, absorption of oxygen and water, penetrating walls and structures, path loss, maintaining LOS are some of major issues where gap need to be filled. Overall, challenges and possible solutions will be discussed to achieve high speed connectivity proposed in 5G.

Biography

I am Working as Researcher at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, and studied Telecommunication Engineering under the project of by the European Commission i.e. INTACT Erasmus Mundus. PhD Research Work: - Designed a synthetic attenuation predictor (simulator) for different weather conditions [Fog and Rain] across the terrestrial free space optical (FSO) link path for short range communication on terahertz frequencies. Targeted Applications: - The research could be implemented in upcoming next generation technology i.e. 5G which is basically a service as it is based on 5 main technologies. One of them is small cells technology which is used to avoid the signal drop ratio due to the interaction of millimeters wave signals with the buildings or under bad weather conditions. Therefore, mini base stations are being proposed at a short range of few 100’s meters to get high data rate which could be done by FSO links considering some limitations. Since 2014, I am involved in research activities related to Applied Electromagnetics, Channel Modeling, Outdoor propagation, Optical Wireless Communication, propagation through the atmosphere at optical frequencies. Currently, finalizing my Ph.D. thesis on Terrestrial Free Space Optics majorly on outdoor channel characterization to build an attenuation time series generator for fading accruing through the atmosphere due to extreme weather conditions.

Speaker
Kapal Dev / Polytechnic of Milan, Italy

Abstract

Shape memory effect is a peculiar property exhibited a series of alloy system called shape memory alloys. Two successive structural transformations, thermal and stress induced martensitic transformations govern this phenomena in crystallographic basis. Shape memory effect is performed thermally in a temperature interval on heating and cooling after deformation in low temperature phase condition, whereas superelasticity is performed mechanically by stressing and releasing at a constant temperature in the parent austenite phase region. Thermal and stressing processes in physical basis, and twinning and detwinning processes govern shape memory effect in crystallographic basis. Thermal induced martensite occurs as multivariant twinned martensite in self-accommodating manner on cooling, and twinned martensite structures turn into detwinned martensite by means of stress induced martensitic transformation on stressing. The materials are deformed in superelasticity, and shape recovery is performed simultaneously upon releasing the applied stress. Superelasticity is performed in non-linear way; stressing and releasing paths are different in the stress-strain diagram, and hysteresis loop refers to energy dissipation. The elementary processes involved in such martensitic transformations are essentially shear deformations, lattice invariant shears, and shuffling of atomic planes. These deformations occur with cooperative movements of atoms on close packed planes of ordered parent phase lattice in displacive manner. The atomic plane shuffling and shearing can be considered as elementary processes activated during displacive martensitic transformations. Atomic plane shuffling and lattice shearing is not uniform in copper based shape memory alloys, and cause to the formation of long-period layered complex martensitic structures with lattice twinning on cooling. Electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction studies performed on two copper based CuZnAl and CuAlMn alloys show that these alloys exhibit super lattice reflections in martensitic condition. Critical transformation temperatures of these alloys are over room temperature, and they are in fully martensitic state at room temperature. A series of x-ray diffractions were taken duration aging at room temperature. Diffraction results show that diffraction angles and peak intensities change with aging. This result refers to a new reaction in diffusive manner and leads to the martensite stabilization. Keywords: Shape memory effect, martensitic transformation, thermoelasticity, superelasticity, lattice twinning, detwinning.

Biography

Dr Adiguzel graduated from Department of Physics, Ankara University, Turkey in 1974 and received PhD- degree from Dicle University, Diyarbakir-Turkey. He studied at Surrey University, Guildford, UK, as a post doctoral research scientist in 1986-1987, and his studies focused on shape memory alloys. He worked as research assistant, 1975-80, at Dicle University, and moved to Firat University in 1980, and became professor in 1996, and He has already been working as professor. He published over 50 papers in international and national journals; He joined over 100 conferences and symposia in international and national level as participant, invited speaker or keynote speaker with contributions of oral or poster. He served the program chair or conference chair/co-chair in some of these activities. In particular, he joined in last four years (2014 - 2017) over 30 conferences as Keynote Speaker and Conference Co-Chair organized by different companies. He supervised 5 PhD- theses and 3 M.Sc- theses. Dr. Adiguzel served his directorate of Graduate School of Natural and Applied Sciences, Firat University in 1999-2004. He received a certificate which is being awarded to him and his experimental group in recognition of significant contribution of 2 patterns to the Powder Diffraction File – Release 2000. The ICDD (International Centre for Diffraction Data) also appreciates cooperation of his group and interest in Powder Diffraction File.

Speaker
Osman Adiguzel / Firat University, Turkey

Abstract

Compared to conventional methods used in synthesis of metal nanoparticles, Microwave-assisted synthesis represents a unique approach that could be used for the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials including metals, semiconductors, bimetallic alloys, and metal oxides with controlled shape and size without using high temperature or high pressure reaction conditions.[1-3] Carbon monoxide (CO) is a potentially fatal gas that is produced as a result of incomplete combustion of a hydrocarbon such as petroleum or natural gas. Luckily, carbon monoxide removal is possible through the process of catalysis. We have developed a facile microwave assisted reduction technique to prepare active Pd/Fe3O4 nanoparticles for the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide. The method involves simultaneous reduction of the corresponding Pd (NO3)2 and Fe (NO3)3.9H2O under the microwave irradiation conditions using a microwave flow reactor.[4, 5] Hydrazine hydrate was used as the reducing agent under flow reaction conditions. The Pd/Fe3O4 nanoparticles have shown to exhibit high catalytic activity for CO oxidation catalysis. The catalytic activity of these materials can be attributed to the high degree of dispersion and concentration ratio of the Pd nanoparticles deposited on the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) with a small particle size of 5-8 nm due to the effective microwave assisted reduction method. These nanoparticles are further characterized by variety of spectroscopic techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The catalysis data revealed that palladium supported on iron oxide catalysts showed remarkable high catalytic activity towards CO-oxidation.

Biography

Dr. Hany Elazab is an assistant professor and program director at British university in Egypt (BUE). He was awarded his Ph.D from (VCU) in USA. He participated in several research projects in Nanotechnology, Catalysis, and Micro Reactor Technology funded from (NSF) in USA and also awarded Young Investigator Research Grant (YIRG) from BUE. He has published several research contributions to international journals, proceedings and international conferences. He is also participating as a reviewer and editorial board member in several international journals in catalysis, nanotechnology, chemical and environmental engineering

Speaker
Hany Elazab / British University in Egypt, Egypt

Abstract

Oil recovery after water flood, by surfactant-polymer flooding at different percentages of clay content, has been studied for July oil field. Formation water (72000 ppm) and crude oil of the July field have been used; the study was performed on Mesh to represent the porous field. Bentonite, colloidal sand packs media of clay from Wyoming Company, dispersion into USA, has been used as sand-packs. Dowell EZEFLO and polyacrylamide were used. This study concentrates on clay surfactant, F-75, this study effect of sur-in the various percentages of clay content (0%, 3.5%, 5%, tertiary oil 10%, 15% and 20%) on recovery. The effect of secondary and of surfactant concentration on tertiary oil recovery at the mentioned clay content values has been also studied to determine the maximum ultimate oil recovery for each case. The experimental results show that, the major factor affecting tertiary oil recovery by surfactant-polymer method is the surfactant concentration; the recovery is improved as the concentration increased; for any clay content, as the surfactant concentration increases the oil production starts sooner (earlier breakthrough) and sustains at higher level; for clay content less than 10 % it is more efficient to use a large pore volume of surfactant slug with low concentration. For oil value of clay content more than 15%, the recovery increases with increasing surfactant concentration up to the value of 4% and after that, the recovery decreases. Thus this value (4%) is taken as the optimum value of surfactant concentration in this case and for any slug concentration, as the clay content increases, the oil breakthrough is delayed.

Biography

Atef Abdelhad is an Academic Staff in Petroleum Department in British University in Egypt. He was an Operations Manager in BP/Gupco Company. He holds a Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Enhanced Oil Recovery by Chemical Water Flooding. He holds a PhD degree in the specialty of Petroleum Production Engineering. He has 24 years of field operation experience for all activities associated with processing of oil and gas onshore and offshore locations. He is an SPE active member for more than 27 years. During his career, he has authored several technical papers in Egypt and USA. He has been selected as a qualified candidate for inclusion in the 1998 edition of International Who’s Who Membership. He has training skills and experience inside and outside Egypt.

Speaker
Atef Abdelhad / British University in Egypt, Egypt

Abstract

Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a surface treatment process for obtaining oxide coating on valve metals such as Al, Ti or Mg. PEO process usually done in an aqueous solution electrolyte which limits the size of the treated workpieces due to the system heating-up. In presented work an alternative approach of PEO treatment conducted on aluminum 1050 alloy in nitrate molten salt is presented. The microstructure, phase and chemical compositions, and micro-hardness were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and micro-hardness tests. The obtained results illustrated that created coating contains from outer sub-layer made of α- Al2O3 phase and the inner made of γ- Al2O3. Additionally, the formed coating is free of any contaminants originated from the electrolyte and has no cracks and through pores.

Biography

Alexander Sobolev has completed his M.Sc. from Ural Federal University in Yekaterinburg, Russia. Currently he is a Ph.D. student in Ariel University, Israel. Alexnders intersts in the field of metals coating technology, especially Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation. He has already published 2 reviewed articles in the topic of his Ph.D. thesis.

Speaker
Alexander Sobolev / Ariel University, Israel

Abstract

This paper develops a new measure of total factor productivity growth in agricultural Production which incorporates Bio Economic components effects.The new measure is called the Bio Economic-Oriented Total Factor Productivity (BTFP) index, and incorporates components of Bio Economic as liquid biofuels. BTFP measure changes in Bio Economic efficiency and can be decomposed into bio economy efficiency change (BEC), and Bio Economic technological change (BTC) components.An empirical analysis, involving 7 Central American countries-level during 1980-2007, is provided using DEA methods. The results have shown a positive annual growth in bio economy total factor productivity of 1.1 percent. This change is explained by 0.03 percent per year in the bio economy efficiency change (or bio economy catch-up) and bio economy technical change (or bio ethanol frontier-shift) is providing 0.09 percent.

Biography

Zuniga-Gonzalez has completed his PhD from American World University Centroamérica, USA. He is the director of Researching Centre for Agrarian and Economy Applied Sciences, a premier Bio-Soft service organization. He has published more than 71 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Carlos Alberto Zuniga-Gonzalez / National Autonoumus University of Nicaragua, Nicaragua

Abstract

In a relatively short time, 3D technology has become a new method for manufacturing prototypes and is occuping a first place in terms of research in multiple universities across the world, as well as the searching of new materials with advanced properties suitable for the development of prototypes with 3D printing. In this sense, layered graphene represents one of the most impressive materials for this purpose, due to the combination of its properties like high electrical and thermal conductivity or high mechanical strengh. The main objective of the present research work is to study the impact that graphene has over the properties of the selected polymer when they are integrated in a unique compound forming a nanocomposite. In order to facilitate the integration of both components, graphene and polymer, it has been necessary the chemical modification of the layered graphene. These modifications of the graphene lead to an improvement in the dispersion of the graphene into the polymer structure, which has shown to be a critical parameter for the stress transfer from the nanoparticles to the matrix. In this way, modified graphene has been synthesized through different chemical processes, what first includes the synthesys of graphene oxide (GO) from graphite and its subsequent chemical reduction with different chemical reducing agents to obtain the reduced graphene oxide (rGO), which has similar properties to graphene. Two different strategies has been carried out for the synthesis of the nanocomposites: direct integration of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into the matrix of the polymer throught solution in proper solvents (DMF and THF), and reduction in situ of the graphene oxide already integrated into the polymer structure. In both cases it is necessary the complete elimination of the solvent to ensure that the electrical and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite are not affected by the presence of traces of solvent. Polymers most commonly used in 3D printing have been used in this work, including ABS, PCL and PLA. Characterization techniques employed in this work, like XPS, Raman, SEM and TGA, have shown that the reinforcement of the polymeric structures is possible by addition of both GO and rGO. It also been stablish that a well dispersed rGO into the matrix not only improves properties in relation to strength and fracture toughness, but also electrical conductivity of the nanocomposite, which is not possible to get by adding only GO.

Biography

Dr. Maria Soria Sánchez is a research scientist at the Institute of Material Science of Barcelona (ICMAB) – UAB, under a prestigious european Marie Curie Grant. In 2011 she received her PhD in Chemistry Science at the National Distance University of Spain, obtaining outstanding doctorate award. Between 2012-2016 she has been working as a posdoctoral researcher at the Laboratory of Materials, Surfaces and Processes for Catalysis of the National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Strasbourg (France) and at the IMDEA Nanoscience Institute of Madrid. Her research interest has been focused on the development of novel materials with application on many different fields: carbon nanotubes based structures as heterogeneous catalyst, or more recently graphene based nanocomposites for the developing of new graphene nanocomposites for 3D printing.

Speaker
Maria Soria Sánchez / Institute of Material Science of Barcelona, Spain

Abstract

Fracture phenomenon of concrete plate under projectile impact is the target of this research. Depending on the momentum of the projectile, different types of fracture phenomena are observed. In this research, to capture fracture phenomenon of concrete plate due to projectile impact, we give minimum parameter such as shape, mass and initial velocity to projectile, and use PDS-FEM (Particle Discretization Scheme Finite Element Method). PDS-FEM has been developed by one of the authors, to deal with fracture phenomena in rigorous manner instead of FEM and other methods. In PDS-FEM, we use a conjugate geometry pair to discretize displacement and its spatial derivative. In PDS-FEM, displacement field is discretized by characteristic functions. However, due to discretization with conjugate geometry pair, stiffness matrix in PDS-FEM coincides with that in conventional FEM. To reproduce the whole process of the fracture of concrete plate under projectile impact, we particularly focus on the momentum transmission process of this fracture phenomena from a projectile to a concrete plate. We consider momentum balance of the system including projectile and concrete plate, and use the equation of momentum conservation. In addition, we use coefficient of restitution to express the collision fracture phenomena more accurately. Actually, according to the difference of coefficient of restitution, we get various simulation results. We compare the simulation results with experiment results in terms of fracture state, collision time and intrusion depth. As a result, we can obtain agreement between simulation result and experiment result to some extent.

Biography

Boyang Zhang is a graduate student at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University. He is in the 1st year of the Master course in Science for Open and Environmental Systems. His current research interest is modeling and numerical analysis of fracture phenomenon.

Speaker
Boyang Zhang / Keio University, JAPAN

Abstract

When a large-scale disaster strikes a metropolitan area, the various functions of the city would be lost. Deactivation of the transport infrastructure forces people to get home on foot. The necessity of the information around pedestrians on their way home or to evacuation facilities increases. If people could obtain the information about the relief goods inventory and the capacity of the nearby evacuation facilities, the situation would be easier. The smartphones is a prominent tool for communication even under disastrous situation. However, the communication by smartphone strongly relies on the back bone communication infrastructure, which could be damaged and would be unavailable right after a large-scale disaster hits a city. This could be a problem because many people may not be able to obtain any information via smartphone because of the breakdown of communication infrastructure due to concentration of communication or damage itself. To solve this problem, we developed a smartphone application for sharing information via P2P communication even under a large-scale disaster. It communicates with other mobile devices by using Bluetooth basically loaded in smartphone, and without relying on communication infrastructure. Users can exchange information in walking and passing each other. By introducing an automatic communication algorithm to this application, we enable users to obtain information from other users without any operations. Furthermore, information handled in this application includes not only text messages but also images with location information etc., so users can simply recognize various disaster information.

Biography

Koichiro Midorikawa is a graduate student at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University. He is in the 2nd year of the Master course in Science for Open and Enviromental Systems. His current research interest is mobile communication under disaster.

Speaker
Koichiro Midorikawa / Keio University, JAPAN

Abstract

In large cities, it is very important to select a route in a road network or railway network. In daily life, we choose the most accessible route to the destination. The local authorities also make disaster prevention plans based on the road network and allocate people to the evacuation facilities. However, when strong earthquakes hit on large city, many roads will be blocked due to road defects or building collapse. This means that the usual route cannot be used. This may cause further problems. To mitigate these problems, we must predict the availability of evacuation routes under disaster situation. For this purpose, we developed a simulator to find the evacuation route under disaster situation. In this simulator, first, we consider an undirected graph with node set and edge set. The node represents an intersection or corner and the edge represents a road line. As a case study, this graph is made by the geographical information of 23 Ward of Tokyo metropolitan road network. Next, we describe the damage situation after disaster by deleting the edge of the graph. In this research, we are attempting to express damage level by changing which edge is deleted and how much to delete. Finally, we calculate the shortest route to the evacuation facility. Using this calculation result, it is possible to predict the movement of the people after the disaster. This may reveal the vulnerability of urban road network. This provides us with a new insight on making a realistic evacuation plan.

Biography

Honami Yamamoto is a graduate student at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University. She is in the 2nd year of the Master course in Science for Open and EnvironmentalSystems. Her current research interests are urban planning and disaster mitigation.

Speaker
Honami Yamamoto / Keio University, JAPAN

Abstract

The Maxwell’s equations are the governing equations of the electromagnetic phenomena. The current standard method for the numerical analysis of the Maxwell’s equations in time domain is Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) method. Since FDTD method is based on the finite difference approximation, FDTD method is almost inseparable from the structured mesh. To overcome this limitation on FDTD method, some attempts for developing numerical analysis methods (e.g., Finite Element approximation based methods, Finite Integration Method (FIM) based on integral form of the Maxwell’s equations, etc.) have been made. However, the existing methods are not general and rigorous enough for analyzing highly unsteady electromagnetic phenomena such as lightning. In this presentation, we show a finite element method in the time domain based on the differential form of the Maxwell’s equations. The idea of this discretization is based on the geometric interpretation of the structure of the Maxwell’s equations through Stokes’ theorem. This interpretation gives us a unified viewpoint of the numerical analysis for the Maxwell’s equations and results in the time domain Finite Element Method for Maxwell’s equations applicable to the unstructured meshes. In practical point of view, the proposed method applied to the structured mesh yields the identical set of the discretized equations to that of FDTD method. In this sense, the proposed method can be regarded as the generalized FDTD method.

Biography

Satoshi Noguchi is a graduate student at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University. He is in the first year of the Master course in Science for Open and Environmental Systems. His current research interest is numerical analysis of electromagnetic fields.

Speaker
Satoshi Noguchi / Keio University, JAPAN

Abstract

Knot theory is widely applied to various fields other than mathematics, such as the isomeric structure of DNA and protein. There are many unsolved problems about knot theory, and one of them is the following: “Is a given knot the unknot?” The unknot can be converted into a simple loop by Reidemeister moves that is a most representative method to solve this problem. However, this method is impractical for identifying the unknot because of the extremely large number of operations. To unknot within fewer operations, algorithms for unknotting without increasing the number of crossings (monotonic simplification), furthermore, for unknotting by reducing the number of crossings on every operation (strictly monotonic simplification) have been sought. This strictly monotonic simplification algorithm makes it possible to detect the unknot easily. This study aims to unknot the unknot with N crossings by less than N operations. We proposed a set of the generalized moves for the strictly monotonic simplification as a global operation. It is performed by picking up a rope (part of a knot) from the diagram, moving and putting. This global operation is expressed as repeatedly applied manipulations on the matrix expressing the structure of the knot. This matrix shows the hierarchical structure of the knots not only as a set of local crossings but also as a set of the global layers. We implemented a strictly monotonic algorithm as a computer code. This algorithm successfully unknots the various types of knots with N crossings by less than N operations.

Biography

Satomi Yoshimoto is a graduate student at the Graduate School of Science and Technology, Keio University. She is in the 2nd year of the Master course in Science for Open and Enviromental Systems. Her current research interest is computer based algorithms for the problems in knot theory.

Speaker
Satomi Yoshimoto / Keio University, JAPAN

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