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Plenary Talks

Abstract

The focus of the Bradley group is the application of the tools of chemistry to allow the manipulation, control and understanding of specific biological processes and functions and to address specific biological questions, problems and needs. One piece of work which forms the basis of my talk is polymer microarray technology which has been developed in the Bradley group for over 15 years. For example my group was the first to use polymer microarray technology to discover new polymers that prevent bacterial adhesion (see J. Mater. Chem., 2011, 21, 96). In my talk I will introduce polymer microarray technology; including our inkjet mediated fabrication methodologies (which allows over 7000 different substrates to be made on a single glass slide) and describe how this approach has been used in a large number of stem cell based applications, notably: (i). To discover a novel thermo-responsive chemically-defined hydrogel for long term culture of human embryonic stem cells, while deciphering its mode of operation (Nature Communication, 2013 and Biomaterials, 2014) and polymers for enriching and controlling cancer stem cell differentiation (Stem Cells, 2016). (ii). Polymer discovery that were able to support highly functional hESC-derived hepatocyte like cells (as active as primary human hepatoctyes) (with David Hay see: Stem Cell Res, 2011 and WO2010106345). (ii). The development of biodegradable polymer blends with a honeycomb structure that binds adult stem cells and then promotes the differentiation of these cells to bone. The material has been scaled-up and shown to have remarkable physical properties and biological properties and has, entered ovine trials (Advanced Functional Materials 2013). I will then discuss a number of newer applications of the team’s polymer microarray technology, specifically in the area of triggered release.

Biography

Dr.Mark did his PhD at the University of Oxford, followed by post-doctorial studies at Harvard Medical School before being appointed a Royal Society University Research Fellowship. He was awarded a Professorship in Combinatorial Chemistry in 1996 aged 34. He has been elected to fellowships of the Royal Society of Chemistry and Edinburgh, and awarded a number of prizes including the Novartis Lectureship and the 2015 RSC Tilden Prize. He has published >350 peer reviewed papers, filed some 25 patents and is co-founder of Ilika Technologies (IPO 2010) and Edinburgh Molecular Imaging. Mark is director of Proteus an Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration supported by major investment from the EPSRC (£11.3M) and the three partner universities (£3M) (20 post-docs and 20- PhD’s). Interdisciplinary is at the heart of Proteus - linking together disciplines such as optical physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. He holds an ERC Advanced grant in the area of polymer chemistry.

Speaker
Mark Bradley / University of Edinburgh
UK

Abstract

It is conventional and rather outdated to think of biomaterials as specialist functional metals, ceramics or polymers, and their composites. In fact, over the last decade or so, actual entities such as microbubbles, microcapsules, micro/nano-particles and micro/nano-fibres of a variety of soft materials have come to the forefront of biomedical engineering applications, and the development of these have taken the forefront. In parallel, the scale-up of producing these entities, that is the adaptation of a laboratory process to manufacturing, with benefits to industry, the clinical community and, most importantly, patients has been a significant driving force in biomaterials research. This plenary lecture will focus on research and development in this area, mainly in the last decade. It will elucidate how real manufacturing processes incorporating key engineering principles of microfluidics, electrohydrodynamics and gyration have helped to manufacture microbubbles, particles, capsules and fibres in novel scalable ways.

Biography

Professor Mohan Edirisinghe FREng holds the established Bonfield Chair of Biomaterials in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University College London (UCL) and has served as a University of London professor for over 20 years. He was appointed to this UCL chair in December 2005 and prior to this he was Professor of Materials at Queen Mary University of London. He has actively pursued advanced materials processing, forming and manufacturing research, for over 25 years publishing over 450 journal papers with a H-index of 61 and over 12000 citations. In addition, his research has led to many inventions and patents and he has also delivered over a 100 keynote/invited lectures at many different international conferences and meetings worldwide, particularly in the USA (major recent meetings include: TMS, MS&T and MRS). He has supervised over 200 researchers, graduating 100 doctoral students (36 to date at UCL), and has been awarded grants to the value of over £25 million, with 43 UK Research Council grants including two Platform Grants which have given him the opportunity to adventurously explore novel avenues of forming and manufacture of advanced materials for application in key areas such as healthcare. His research has won many prizes including the Royal Society Brian Mercer (Innovation) Feasibility Award an unprecedented three times (2005, 2009 and 2013), the 2010 Materials Science Venture Prize and the 2012 Presidents Prize of the UK Biomaterials Society to recognise outstanding contributions to the biomaterials field. In 2017 he was the recipient of The Royal Academy of Engineering Armourers & Brasiers prize for excellence in Materials Engineering and the Premier IOM3 Chapman Medal for his distinguished research in the field of biomedical materials.

Speaker
Mohan Edirisinghe / University College London
UK

Abstract

The emergence of nanotechnology has created innovations in various biomedical applications especially in the field of disease diagnosis, therapy and biosensing. Multifunctional nanoprobes for multimodal imaging and therapy can improve the diagnostic accuracy significantly. There has been tremendous advancement in the area of cancer research including early diagnosis and its effective treatment in the last few decades. But still it is an accepted fact that there is a huge gap in the management and treatment of cancer. This is mainly because of the limitations of conventional cancer treatment methods and in many cases the side effects associated with them. Similarly, brain disorders are also a major concern of the modern world in terms of economic cost and human suffering with increasing number of aged population as an outcome of the long life span. The main challenge in the treatment of many of the neurodegenerative diseases is the presence of a polarized layer of endothelial cells that comprises the BBB which precludes access of systemically administered medicines to brain tissue. Huge opportunities lie ahead for material science to contribute to this area. With the advent of nanotechnology, there were many attempts to use nanoparticles in the areas of cancer diagnosis, treatment, biosensing and imaging. Translation from single to multiple nano systems to suit varied applications is a promising field of nanotechnology. Hybrid nanosystems are the outcome of recent efforts to incorporate multiple functions into a single unit. But there are very few reports on the use of nanotechnology for the effective brain permeability. In this presentation, an overview of the works on the above applications using nanostructures like iron oxide nanoparticle, gold nanorods and gold quantum clusters, carbon and quantum dots will be discussed. The unique optical properties of size tunable emission properties of gold quantum cluster which originate due to the quantum confinement of electrons compared to widely studied metallic nanoparticles will be one of the highlight of the presentation. Modification of the nanosystems for target specificity for in vitro and in vivo demonstration of imaging and therapy will be presented. A major concern of the nanomaterial’s use in biomedical field is its toxicity and the their behaviour in physiological conditions. A good understanding of the nanomaterial- cell/tissue interaction and strong measures to reduce toxicity are to be taken care.

Biography

Dr. Jayasree is a senior scientist in Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala and heads the Division of Biophotonics and Imaging. She completed her Post graduation from CUSAT and PhD from Kerala University in Physics. She is a leading scientist with interest focused on the applications of Nanotechnology in the healthcare field. Specific areas include Biomaterials for imaging and therapy, spectroscopic techniques, nanophotonics and nanobiophotonics applied to health care field. Other than nano science, she also has high passion towards developing new methods of research and translate to clinics; like laser treatment for disc prolapse, osteoid osteoma, esophageal and bronchial tumor and varicose vein. Therapeutic aspects also include drug delivery, photodynamic therapy, photothermal therapy, hyperthermia etc. She also has exemplified flair in the design of biomaterials with desired properties for crossing BBB, drug delivery, cancer therapy and sensing. She is a fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry, London and Fellow of Academy of Sciences, Chennai. She is the recipient of MRSI Medal in 2017. She has also received PSN National Award for excellent R&D in rural technology in 2011, Endeavour Research Fellowship by the Australian Government, 2009 and was nominated as Australia Award Ambassador by the Australian High Commissioner to India during 2012 to 2015. She has more than 80 publications and 5 patents in the field of spectroscopy, material science and nanoscience.

Speaker
R. S. Jayasree / Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology,
India

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Metallic biomaterials can play an important role in the repair or replacement of bone tissue that has become diseased or damaged. However, the plates, screws and pins used to secure serious fractures must be removed by a second surgical procedure after the tissue has healed sufficiently. This repeated surgery increases the costs to the healthcare system and the risks to the patient. To overcome these problems, biodegradable materials can be used, which temporarily support the healing tissue, but then completely degrade over time. Fe-Mn alloys are promising candidates for biodegradable metallic materials because of their excellent mechanical properties, which are usually obtained during a multi-stage forming process. However, the biodegradability rate is usually not sufficient and lasts too long. To speed up material degradation in the human body some chemical modifications can be made to the Fe-Mn alloy as well as the introduction of a grain-boundary-engineering approach. In this way we can enhance the phase precipitation along the grain boundaries and thus increase the rate of corrosion. This can be obtained by subjecting the steel to severe deformation, so that many dislocations are accumulated, followed by a low-temperature heat treatment for a long time in order to achieve recrystallization, where the majority of the grain boundaries are less coherent. The degradation of the Fe-Mn surface can be increased by its laser ablation. After surface texturing with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser, the surface exhibited extreme super-hydrophilic wetting properties, since laser ablation led to micro-channels and chemical modification, resulting in nanostructured metal oxides. Laser ablation modified the surface, which mainly consists of Fe2O3 and FeO, with the content of Mn in the oxide layer being significantly higher than in the bulk. The results of the electrochemical measurements clearly demonstrate the superior biodegradability of the Fe�Mn alloy samples functionalized by laser ablation.

Biography

Matjaz Godec has completed his Ph.D at University of Ljubljana, Slovenia, at Faculty of Natural Science and Engineering, Metallurgy in 1997. Since 2011 he has been a director of Institute of Metals and Technology in Ljubljana Slovenia. He has published more than 100 original scientific papers in reputed journals and more than 200 reports and expertise for industrial partners. He is also first assistant chief editor of the journal Materials Science and Technology and the main organizer of International Conference on Materials and Technology. Currently, he is a head of European project MARTINA, financed by Structural Funds, which value is around 10 M� and brings together 16 partners from Slovenia. He is an expert member at the advisory body Steel Advisory Group within the Research Fund for Coal and Steel as the representative of Slovenia, which falls under the umbrella of the European Commission's Directorate general for Research and Innovation.

Speaker
Matjaz Godec / Institute of Metals and Technology
Slovenia

Abstract

The gold-standard of adult mesenchymal stem cells has been the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which have also dominated much of the literature describing the use of adult stem cells in tissue engineering. Nonetheless, by possessing trigerm layer potentials, adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) could be an excellent stem cell choice for a wide variety of translational applications. There is a stigma associated with a bone marrow harvest as the harvest is considered a relatively painful procedure. Second, while bone marrow aspirates yield on average 6 × 106 cells/ml, only 0.001 to 0.01% are stem cells. In contrast, the pain of the adipose tissue harvest is considered an acceptable tradeoff in light of the positive aesthetic effect that liposuction provides. Moreover, an adipose tissue harvest yields significantly more stem cells in comparison to bone marrow. One gram of adipose tissue can yield approximately 2 × 106 cells, with 10% of these cells being ADSCs. As such, ADSCs may be a more valuable tool as the stem cell source for regenerative medicine purpose and eventual lead to clinical applications. In this talk, I will present the mesodermal and ectodermal potentials of ADSCs from in vitro osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation using functional 3D microporous scaffolds manufactured by selective laser-sintering, cryogelation and electrospinning. The translational study combining ADSCs and those functional scaffolds for bone, skin and adipose tissue regeneration will be demonstrated in animal models.

Biography

Dr. Jyh-Ping Chen is working as a Professor at Chang Gung University since 1997 to present. He is also Head of Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at Chang Gung University from the year 2006-2014.Dr.Jyh-Ping Chen is Professor and Director at Graduate Institute of Biomedical and Biomedical Engineering at Chang Gung University in the year 2002-2006. He is a Research Associate at Molecular Biology Division, United Biomedical Inc., USA in the year 1988. Dr. Jyh-Ping Chen’s H-index was 52 and his citations were 13k+. He completed his PhD in Chemical Engineering at Pennsylvania State University, USA in the year 1988. His Research fields include Biomaterials, Tissue Engineering, Nanomedicine, Biomedical Nanotechnology and Biomedical Engineering.

Speaker
Jyh-Ping Chen / Chang Gung University
Taiwan

Abstract

Hydrogels are hydrophilic polymer with three-dimensional (3D) networks that have high water absorbing capacity from10 to 20% (an arbitrary lower limit) up to thousands of times their dry weight in water. In 1960s, Wichterle and Lim proposed the first hydrogel (poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)) in ophthalmometry application. As hydrogels are very similar to natural tissue, especially soft tissues. They possess excellent tissue compatibility and have emerged as potential candidates for various biomaterial applications, including tissue engineering and drug delivery for many years. From the consideration of chemical composition, hydrogels consist of two categories: (1) synthetic materials and (2) naturally derived materials. Synthetic materials such as polycaprolactone (PCL), poly (ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA), poly (lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) have been widely reported for tissue engineered constructs. As the excellent biocompatibility, cell encapsulating prowess and intrinsic ability akin to the complex tissue microenvironments, natural hydrogels such as alginate, gelatin, and collagen can be used as bioink. Due to the limited mechanical strength, natural hydrogels are usually prone to permanent breakage. For the broadened applications of hydrogels, advanced engineering techniques are required to manipulate the hydrogels’ physical and chemical properties and hence control their architectural precision. In this speech, the recent advanced engineering methods to fabricate hydrogels for biomedical applications with emphasis in wound healing is reported.

Biography

Jen Ming Yang is currently a Professor in department of Chemical and Materials Engineering at Chang Gung University, Research Fellow (joint appointment) of Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, and Council of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society-Asia-Pacific Chapter (TERMIS-AP). He has been serving as editorial board members of some journals. He has also presented keynote and invited speeches at many conferences and hosted international conferences.

Speaker
Jen-Ming Yang / Chang Gung University
Taiwan

Abstract

While polysaccharide-based nano-carriers have been recognized for their crucial roles in tumor theranostics, the industrial-scale production of nanotherapeutics still remains a significant challenge. Most current approaches adopt a postpolymerization self-assembly strategy that follows a separate synthetic step and thus suffers from subgram scale yields and a limited range of application. To address this challenging, herein we demonstrate the kilogram-scale formation of polysaccharide–polyacrylate nano-carriers at concentrations of up to 5 wt% through a one-pot approach – starting from various acrylate monomers and polysaccharides – that combines aspects of hydrophobicity-induced self-assembly with the free radical graft copolymerization of acrylate monomers from polysaccharide backbones into a single process that is thus denoted as a Graft copolymerization Induced Self-Assembly (GISA). Notably, by choosing a crosslinker that bears a disulfide group and two vinyl capping groups to structurally lock the nano-carriers, the products are rendered cleavable in the reducing environments encountered at tumor sites and thus provide ideal candidates for the construction of anticancer nanotherapeutic systems. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that the use of this nano-carrier for the delivery of doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) significantly decreased the side effects of DOX and improved the bio-safety of the chemotherapy accordingly. On this basis, the cleavable polysaccharide nano-carriers were used to co-deliver the negatively charged siRNA and hydrophobic/hydrophilic chemotherapeutics, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel. The resultant multi-drug loaded nano-carriers displayed great potential in fighting drug-resistant tumor cells. Therefore, we envision that these nano-carriers will contribute to the development of tumor nanotheranostics that combine the biological functionalities of polysaccharides with the unmatched application-specific flexibility of nano-carriers.

Biography

Will be updated soon..

Speaker
Hongjing Dou / Shanghai Jiao Tong University
China
Sessions:Scientific Session 1

Abstract

Bioinspired, biomimetic and nanobiomaterials are emerging as the most promising research fields in biological materials science and engineering for medical applications. Following the results of the same team in previous studies, the paper treats the combined use of new nanodiamond-based hybrid materials and 3D printed Titanium micro-trabecular structures developing and testing in animal models new biomimetic dental implants able to restore the masticatory functions being readily integrated in bone tissues. A multidisciplinary research strategy combining parallel clinical and engineering investigations was aimed to further implement the use of new coating biomaterials and to develop new dental implants targeted to reach specific mechanical and biological properties able to stimulate bone growth and organization while guaranteeing bone micro (implant interface) and macro (bone biomechanics) stimulations in the range of physiological strains. Intelligent manufacturing by electron/laser beams has been applied to obtain 3D Titanium sintered micro-trabecular implants with specific targeted orthotropic characteristics. The scientific significance is critical for the development of medical applications as tissue engineering and new biomimetic prosthetic systems. The new "prosthetic system" to develop is composed by a low bio-mechanical invasiveness Titanium micro-trabecular structural core, which will be especially designed to have orthotropic mechanical characteristics matching those of the receiving bone, coated by a nano-diamond filled biodegradable hybrid material that will create a bone-metal bioactive interface finalized to quantitatively and qualitatively increase perimplant bone healing.

Biography

Dr. Antonio Apicella is currently working as a Professor of Materials Science and Technology and acting President of the specialized degree course in “Design for Innovation” since 2011. He is a member of the teaching staff of the new Doctorate in Architecture. He is an author of 200 and more publications in international journals also in international conference proceedings. He completed his graduation in the department of Chemical Engineering in 1977. He worked as a researcher at the Institute of Principles of Chemical Engineering, University of Naples. He also has international collaborations. He included in the register of experts MAP for the evaluation of precompetitive development projects since 2004. Dr. Apicella is holding the session keynote position for Biomaterials-2019 who is going to present a talk on “Customized Biomimetic Dental Implants for Early Bone Regeneration: combined use of nano-diamond modified biodegradable hydrophilic polymeric coatings and 3D sintered Titanium elasto-progressive trabecular structures”.

Speaker
Antonio Apicella / University of Campania
ITALY

Abstract

Cellulose and chitin hydrogels made of agro-industrial bagasses of sugar cane and crab shell are applied for biomass polymer hydrogels which are fabricated by phase inversion gelation. These are quietely novel applications of sustainable natural polymers originated with natural plant bagasses from a food industry for useful utilization in hydrogel materials made of the pure cellulose source. To obtain such biomass hydrogels, firstly cellulose or chitin having enough molecular weights was regenerated from bagasse waste or snow crab one by chemical pretreatments and bleaching for hydrogels. The renewable cellulose or chitin was converted to hydrogels by phase inversion process under ethanol vapor. To evaluate the biocompatibility the hydrogel was implanted in the intraperitoreal of mice. The results were shown as small influence of the implanted hydrogel on the growth of mice. In addition, hydrogels are excellent in re-generation of cytotocompatible property for tissue regeneration. In acceptable biocompatibility and durability in the body, such hydrogel could be applied for drug delivery matrices. Especially, ultrasound supported deliver technology was effective for targeted drug release from such biomass hydrogels medicine. This is a purpose in the agro-industrial waste polymers occurring as new strategies for producing engineered tissue and hydrogel medicines on sustainable natural materials as a scaffold.

Biography

Takaomi Kobayashi has received his PhD in Osaka University, Faculty of Science. (1988). He worked in Nagaoka University of Technology (NUT) as research associate (1991). In 1995, he was visiting researcher in Emory University, USA and then associate professor and professor (2006) in NUT at Department of Materials Science and Technology and also Department of Science and Technology Innovation. Intelligent materials and their chemistry relating with bio-sustainable and environmental science and technology are his research interests. He has published more than 190 papers in reputed journals and serving an editorial book and book chapters.

Speaker
Takaomi Kobayashi / Nagaoka University of Technology
Japan

Abstract

The cell/material interaction is a complex, dynamic process in which the cell and the material synergistically influence the fate of the cell. Indeed, both materials intrinsic (i.e. topography, charge, ζ-potential, and contact angle) and extrinsic properties (i.e. surface functionalization, crystallinity, etc.) played a pivotal role in dictating the type and strength of the biological responses. Nowadays, there is very limited knowledge available on how functionalized polymers control cell-cell interactions and/or intracellular signal transduction. Our recent research demonstrated a functional role of charged polymers in altering or supporting the osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) through the modulation of the ephrinB2/EphB4 interaction. Indeed, cell-cell signaling pathways that lead to efficient differentiation of stem cells include the interaction of Ephrin ligands (ephrinB2) with Eph receptors (EphB4). For the first time we have shown that high charged polymers can affect the Eph/ephrin interaction between neighboring cells inhibiting the MSCs osteogenic differentiation via the perturbation of the bidirectional signaling. In contrast, low charged polymers modulate the differentiation of MSCs into an osteocyte lineage via cell-cell ephrinB2/EphB4 signaling. Our results highlight that rationally designed materials, which exploit specific, and tunable surface characteristics, can give rise to biomaterials able to modulate functional aspects of biological signaling. Furthermore, understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external stimuli could be a successful strategy i.e. in cancer therapy, regenerative medicine, etc.

Biography

Prof. Gianfranco Peluso graduated magna cum laude and special mention in Medicine at the University of Naples, Italy. He has been Director of the Department of Experimental Oncology at the National Cancer Institute. Currently, he is Research Director at Italian National Research Council. His scientific activity and areas of interest include: nanoscience and nanotechnology applied to biomedicine, life science and food security, for: a) development of nanostructured polymers as novel delivery platform to minimize drug degradation upon administration, prevent undesirable side effects, and sustain and/or increase drug's bioavailability in a targeted area, and b) synthesis of biodegradable polymers for innovative food packaging to improve shelf life, microbiological safety and sensory properties of foods without affecting their organoleptic and nutritional characteristics.

Speaker
Gianfranco Peluso / IRET-CNR
Italy

Abstract

Nanoscience has focused in the area of drug delivery by utilization of materials at the level of atoms, molecules, supramolecular structures and their distinctive features at nanoscale. Several reports have been published that biosynthetic preparation of nanoparticles (NPs) is shows better anti-tumor response as compare to chemical synthesis nanoparticles. In the traditional system, several plants have been reported for the treatment of diseases and parts such as leaves, stem, flower, root, seeds and even whole plant use for the treatment of diseases such as of bronchitis, malaria, diarrhoea, dysentery, arthritis, insect bites, skin disease and so on. Nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical and leaf extract and anti-tumor potential was evaluated on DL cell and MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. The results showed that synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles by leaf aqueous extract of Ocimum sanctum and Carica papaya leaf extracthave anti-cancer activity on cancer cell line at low dose as compare to chemically synthesized nanoparticles and it was confirmed by MTT assay. Further, to confirm anti-tumor potential of the synthesized nanoparticle, cell viability assay, nuclear morphology, DNA fragmentation assay, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) analysis, cell cycle analysis assay was done using cell lines. Cells treated with the NPs showed reduced cell viability, altered nuclear morphology, typical apoptotic DNA ladder and apoptosis. From the above finding it can be concluded that the NPs have potential to decrease the proliferation of tumor cells and it must be used in cancer diagnosis/treatment are mainly in preclinical stages of cancer development and needs more investigation to explore nanoparticles.

Biography

Dr.Pramod Kumar Gautam had completed his Ph.D. And Post-Doctoral studies form Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India. He has awarded DST Inspire faculty award in 2016. He is currently working in the reputed organization AIIMS, New Delhi as an Assistant Professor. He is working in the Immunology, and drug discovery. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer board member of repute. He has supervising 2 Ph.D. student and running 3 project.

Speaker
Pramod Kumar Gautam / All India Institute of medical science, New Delhi
India

Abstract

It is a common practice that the bearing capacity of subsurface soil is enhanced through addatives in order to provide a stable supporting layer for road construction. These treatments are classified as soil stabilisation to enhance the strength properties of the existing low-quality (in situ soil) materials to meet the desired performance criteria. In recent years, a new method of stabilisation has been proposed known as microbial geotechnology which uses bacterial derivatives and/or metabolites to stabilise weak soils. In this study Bacillus derived macro-components (aqueous and non-aqueous fractions) were evaluated as potential stabilising agents for selected soils (i.e. dolerite and weathered granite). Eighteen bioderived components/fractions obtained from various stages of the fermentation were tested in an in vitro devloped screen that was specifically designed for high-throughput selection. The screens involved an assessment of strength characteristics, using miniaturised test equipment i.e. erosion, water absorption, abrasion, and compression load tests to measure the criteria of interest regarding structural stabilization of biostabilised soil. The preliminary evaluation suggests that bacterial treatment is a potential viable alternative compared to a commercial prodcut and untreated material. The final selection resulted in product prototypes that displayed good overall performance and this reseacrh is a novel approach for soil stabilisation. The current forcus is to demonstrate efficacy at large scale in order to further evaluate and verify improvemnets in strength characteristics for the potential use of this bio-stabilizer in the construction industry.

Biography

Dr. Santosh Ramchuran has over 20 years of experience in the Biotechnology sector having held positions at African Explosives and Chemical Industry (AECI), SA Bio-products, CSIR, the Biotechnology Regional Innovation Centre - LIFElab and CellRx in the UK. He is a successful leader in science and technology with proven abilities in developing, implementing and commercializing innovative technologies, products and bio-processes in South Africa and internationally. He is also the Founder of JVS BioTech (PTY) Ltd a company which focuses on Bioprocess Development and Bio-manufacturing of high-value recombinant proteins. Santosh holds a PhD in Biotechnology from Lund University in Sweden and is currently completing a MBA. He is the author and contributor of several peer reviewed papers in the fields of applied microbiology, bioprocessing and recombinant proteins. He has expertise in developing and implementing strategic and operational plans, developing and nurturing key industry, academic and public strategic technology innovation and business partnerships that deliver value to the organization and stakeholders. His expertise in innovation management include: technology transfer, technology innovation investment, technology & business incubation, and project & portfolio management. He is adept at building and motivating high performing teams, enhancing operational effectiveness and leading cross-functional projects and teams to achieve organizational goals. He serves as a chairperson, moderator and assessor on various research and evaluation panels at the National Research Foundation in South Africa and was appointed as a Mentor for Biotech Start-ups at the Innovation Hub in 2015. He is currently the Research Group Leader for the Bioprocess Development Group at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research which focuses on the development, optimization and bio-manufacturing of various disruptive bio-based products and technologies for adoption and implementation in South African industries. He also holds a Research Fellow position at the University of KwaZulu Natal and is a member of the South African Council for Natural Scientific Professions.

Speaker
Santosh Ramchuran / University of KwaZulu Natal, Durban
South Africa

Abstract

Label free bio detection has gained huge interest recently as it eliminates the requirement of the biomarkers or biomolecules with enzymatic, fluorescent or radiochemical reagents which makes the system complicated and difficult to implement. In recent years, the research focus on to AlGaN/GaN HEMT based nano and micro-electronic sensing platforms. HEMT’s, both GaAs based and GaN based showcases performance excellence over the conventional Si based systems because of the high stability and the presence of two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) channel which is the heart of the device performance and provides high sensitivity to the device for chemical and bio detection. In this work we present sensitivity analysis of dielectric modulated MOS-HEMT fabricated for pH sensing application. The device dimensions in terms of gate length (LG), gate width (WG), gate spacing from source and drain (LSG and LGD) has been varied and the effective variation in device sensitivity has been analyzed. The minimum gate length used in this work is 3µm and the passivation scheme used includes a double layer passivation (Si3N4 and Al2O3). The device shows enhanced sensitivities compared to the existing gateless and Schottky gated HEMT sensors which can be attributed to the higher transconductance and lower gate leakage in the device due to the introduction of gate dielectric Al2O3. High sensitivities ranging from 1.5 to 3mA/pH can be attained with careful optimization of the device this makes the device suitable for sensing the pH ranges in human blood which requires high resolution.

Biography

C. Periasamy received B.E degree in ECE from Periyar University, Tamilnadu, India in 2002 and Ph.D. degree in Electronics Engineering from IIT-BHU, Varanasi, India, in 2011. He is now working as Assistant Professor in the Department of ECE, MNIT, Jaipur, India. He has published more than 65 papers in various international journals and conference proceedings. His research interest covers nano material based electronic and piezoelectronic devices.

Speaker
C.Periasamy / Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, Rajasthan
India

Abstract

In this research a therapeutical film from biopolymer and iodine elemental is prepared with different weight percent iodine (24.6). In the average thickness was 0.1mm. Several tests are carried out on the film which is suitable for treatment and its effectiveness in healing wounds, burns and infected areas by exposing the infected mice and human and the results are compared with the using medical treatment Celavix (present ointment). The antibacterial activity is examined by exposing film to Escherichia Coli (Gram negative) and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram positive) microorganism, the results show that the antibacterial ability increases with iodine percent. The healing power increases also as iodine percent increases and complete healing obtained within eight days.Jalil K. Ahmed has completed his PhD at the age of 37 years from Baghdagd University and Martin Luther University, Germany. I have over 50 publications and eight patents were registered with 3 books. 2016 reviewer for John Wiley & Sons .2015 a Member of the American Scientific Publishing Group. 2012 My name appeared in the Encyclopedia of Chemistry Scientists. I received the Science Day Award for the years 2009 -- 2012. 2013 I received the Medal of Scholars from the Government of Iraq on my research "Using of chlorophyll as absorbent Gamma radiation to protect the children of Iraq from cancer." 2014, I became a member of the Who is Who Network. 2016, 2017 and 2018 Participated in the QS World University Rankings (QS) for world universities. 2018 Qualified for Marquis Who is Who Award in America. 2018 Received a high honor certificate from the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (OHCHR) for my Bioresearches in the service of humanity

Biography

Jalil K. Ahmed has completed his PhD at the age of 37 years from Baghdagd University and Martin Luther University, Germany. I have over 50 publications and eight patents were registered with 3 books. 2016 reviewer for John Wiley & Sons .2015 a Member of the American Scientific Publishing Group. 2012 My name appeared in the Encyclopedia of Chemistry Scientists. I received the Science Day Award for the years 2009 -- 2012. 2013 I received the Medal of Scholars from the Government of Iraq on my research "Using of chlorophyll as absorbent Gamma radiation to protect the children of Iraq from cancer." 2014, I became a member of the Who is Who Network. 2016, 2017 and 2018 Participated in the QS World University Rankings (QS) for world universities. 2018 Qualified for Marquis Who is Who Award in America. 2018 Received a high honor certificate from the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (OHCHR) for my Bioresearches in the service of humanity

Speaker
Jaleel K. Ahmed / University of Babylon, Babylon
Iraq

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Orthopedic tissue defects arising due to accidental traumas, sports injuries and congenital diseases and disorders often lead to severe pain, joint deformity and loss of joint motion. Tissue Engineering has emerged as a promising technology and presently is in great demand for solving such clinical problems without inducing donor site morbidity, host immune responses and disease transmission that are associated with the current clinical treatment. In this technique, requirement of biomaterials with ECM mimicking properties are of prime importance for developing scaffold that provides 3D environments for cells to grow, proliferate and differentiate into proper tissue lineages. Despite the great advances that have been achieved in biomaterial field in the last decade, most current biomaterials have shown poor biological effect thus limiting their use for tissue scaffold development. The speech will cover innovative engineered biomaterials that can be derived from promising biocompatible and biodegradable natural biopolymers and their derivatives including biopolymeric blends, biopolymer/bioceramic composites & nanocomposites and metal-oxide nanoparticles incorporated composite biomaterial with particular emphasis on articular cartilage, subchondral bone and osteochondral tissue disorders.

Biography

Prof. Krishna Pramanik is Professor in the department of Biotechnology & Medical Engineering. Her research interests are Nanobiotechnology/Nano medicine, Fermentation, Bioprocess Engineering, Biomaterial & Tissue Engineering,Reaction Engineerin,Bio energy Modeling & Simulation of Biological Reactions,Environmental Biotechnology.Working at National Institute of Technology, Rourkela as Professor since July 2007.

Speaker
Krishna Pramanik / National Institute of Technology
India

Abstract

The repair and regeneration of large musculoskeletal defects has remained a major clinical challenge for orthopaedic surgeons. This presentation will describe 1) our strategies for developing a family of novel engineered patented biomaterials platform and/or biologics to develop cell-free therapeutics to promoting bone healing in load bearing challenging situations. 2) Our engineering solution to develop synthetic tendon and ligament prostheses that mimic the hierarchical structure of the native human tendon. The presentation will also describe our approach in using biologics such as cell-secreted nanoparticles as a promising approach to replace direct stem cell transplantation for bone repair and regeneration. Our technologies open avenues for skeletal and soft tissue regeneration in various clinical applications.

Biography

Dr. Hala Zreiqat is a professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Sydney and both a National Health and Medical Research Council Senior Research Fellow (2016-2020); Director of the Australian Research Training Centre for Innovative Bio-Engineering; Co-Director of the Shanghai-Sydney Joint Bioengineering and Regenerative Medicine Lab at Shanghai JiaoTong; Honorary Professor Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Adjunct Professor Drexel University. She is the 2018 New South Wales Premier’s Woman of the Year. The King Abdullah II Order of Distinction of the Second Class - the highest civilian honour bestowed by the King of Jordan (2018). Her research is on the development of novel engineered materials and 3D-printed platforms for regenerative medicine, particularly in orthopaedic, dental, and maxillofacial applications. She has established national and international industry collaborations to translate her discoveries into approved medical devices. Her pioneering development of innovative biomaterials for tissue regeneration has led to one awarded (US) and 7 provisional patents, and several collaborations with inter/national industry partners. She has been awarded more than $17 M in competitive funding including from the NHMRC, ARC and the NSW Medical Devices Fund. She is the past president of the Australian & New Zealand Orthopaedic Research Society.

Speaker
Hala Zreiqat / University of Sydney
Australia

Abstract

Nanoparticle size, surface chemistry and shape are known to affect cell activities. However, whether the core material of a nanoparticle also plays a role remains a long-standing question in the field of nano-bio interactions. Here, we studied a combinatorial library of 36 nanoparticles and showed that cytotoxicity depended on the ability of the core material to regulate reactive oxygen species in cells. Three types of core materials (Au, Pt, and Pd) in two sizes (6 and 26 nm), each conjugated with one of six different types of surface ligand were examined. We show that core material affects the hydrophobicity of a nanoparticle and its subsequent uptake by cells. Furthermore, different core material induced varying levels of free radicals and H2O2 reduction activities, resulting in different levels of cytotoxicity. Our results show that nanoparticle core material is as important as surface chemistry in nanoparticle-cell interactions, making them a necessary consideration when designing nanomedicines

Biography

Dr.Bing Yan got his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1990 and carried out postdoctoral research at University of Cambridge, U.K. and University of Texas Medical School in Houston from 1990 to 1993. From 1993 to 2005, he was working on drug discovery research at Novartis, Discovery Partners International, and Bristol-Myers Squibb. He was a Full Professor and Director of High-Throughput Analytical Chemistry Center at Department of Chemical Biology and Therapeutics, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee from 2007 to 2012 and Changjiang Scholar Professor at Shandong University, Jinan, China since 2005. He served as Co-Editor-in-Chief for “Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety” and Associate Editor for “NanoImpact” both published by Elsevier. He has published 11 books and more than 230 peer-reviewed papers

Speaker
Bing Yan / Shandong University
China

Keynote Talks

Abstract

New approaches for tissue regeneration aim to recover the original tissue functionality, particularly related to degenerative pathologies affecting bone and osteochondral tissues. Advances in this field are strictly related to progress in materials science aiming to develop new smart bio-devices able to instruct cells with chemical-physical, structural and morphological signals. Biomineralization and biomorphic transformation processes are relevant examples of new nano-technological approaches to obtain nanostructured and nanocrystalline materials in the 3-D state, which is a great challenge to obtain porous scaffolds retaining physico-chemical-mechanical cues relevant for activation of the correct cascade of biological events that lead to tissue regeneration. In fact, thermal consolidation of bioceramics destroys the bioactivity and bio-resorbability of nanocrystalline, multi-doped apatite (HA). Biomineralization process induces and directs the self-assembling of collagen by pH variation, and the simultaneous mineralization with quasi-amorphous apatite crystals, occurring under several control mechanisms exerted by the collagen macromolecule. The process generates hybrid bone scaffolds with high mimicry of osteochondral regions and showing excellent regeneration of critical tissue defects, demonstrated in several preclinical and clinical studies. Biomorphic transformation process consists in a sequence of heterogeneous reactions at the interface between a natural porous template and a reactive gas, generating a highly reactive precursor which can then be transformed into 3-D biomimetic apatite with excellent bioactivity and damage-tolerant mechanical performance. Implementation of these smart materials with remote magnetic activation is made possible by controlled substitution of Ca2+ ions with Fe2+/3+ ions in the HA structure, to obtain a superparamagnetic, bioactive and bioresorbable apatite phase (Fe-HA). These magnetic devices, either as nanoparticle or as bioactive hybrid scaffold, are capable of remote magnetic activation and controlled delivery of bioactive factors. New biocompatible guiding systems for cells can be established by enabling selective internalization of Fe-HA by mesenchymal cells and magnetic guiding. The use of nature-inspired synthesis approaches is an elective way to generate smart scaffolds with innate cell-instruction ability, fueling new improved and personalized therapies for tissue regeneration.

Biography

Dr.Anna Tampieri, Chemist, 30 years of experience in Material Science, particularly addressed to biomimetic materials and devices for regeneration of hard and soft tissues and organs. She authored more than 200 scientific papers published on peer-reviewed Journals and about 20 book chapters (H index = 45 based on Scopus). She is inventor of 16 National and International patents, several of which are licensed to companies acting in the biomedical fields and translated to 7 commercial products. She is the tutor of 11 PhD, 14 M.Sc students, and more than 20 National and International fellowships. Coordinator of 8 EC-funded Projects belonging to the 6th and the 7th European framework programmes, and WP Leader in 6 EC-funded Projects. Coordinator of several national projects. Since 2009 she is member of the “European Technology Platform for Nanomedicine”. Since 2011 is Senior Affiliate Member at the Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, U.S.A. Associated Professor in Medical Science and Applied Biotechnology, since 2014. Founder of the company FINCERAMICA Biomedical Solution S.p.A, she was the Idea-woman, then President and today is the Head of the Scientific Advisory Board. Awarded by the TIME Magazine for “from Wood to Bone” as the 30° research among the most important 50 researches in 2009. Awarded from Massachusetts Institute of Technology Review for the project GreenBone (biomimetic bone implants).Founder of the Start UP GreenBone Ortho Srl in 2014.

Speaker
Anna Tampieri / ISTEC-CNR
Italy

Abstract

Since half a century, scientific research was increasingly devoted to new biomaterials for bone substitution. Bone is an extremely complex tissue, with different morphology and function in respect to specific anatomical sites. When critical size bone defects, i.e. not able of spontaneous healing, have to be treated, the implantation of 3-D scaffolds is required, as a support for new bone ingrowth to replace the diseased tissue. In past times biomaterials were prevalently intended as a physical support to re-fill bone defects. In the last two decades increasing awareness of the need to regenerate, rather than substitute, diseased bone parts, to restore the life quality in patients, is pushing material scientists to develop 3-D bioactive materials showing cell-instructing composition and structure for formation and integration of the new bone in the implanted device, to restore biomechanical functions. Hence, porous calcium phosphates biomaterials are today the main target of biomaterial scientists, designing biodevices with composition, shape and structure targeting biomedical application in different anatomical regions. In this respect, the talk illustrates the recent advances in the development of biomimetic hydroxyapatite nanomaterials and their processing into porous devices by means of several approaches, such as replica, foaming method, freeze casting, or the use of self-hardening mechanisms by which calcium phosphate precursors convert into 3-D scaffolds useful as bioactive bone cements.

Biography

Dr. Simone Sprio, Born on 1970. M.Sc. in Physics, Ph.D. in Chemistry, Senior Researcher at the Institute of Science and Technology for Ceramics, National Research Council, ISTEC-CNR. Responsible of the research activity on Bioceramics for Regenerative Medicine at ISTEC-CNR. Main fields of investigation are: Nanomaterials and Nanotechnologies: ceramic-based biomaterials, nanoparticles and 3-D porous scaffolds with cell-instructive properties. Author of >100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. Inventor of 9 funded international patents, related to new materials and devices for medicine. More than 100 communications including 20 Invited Lectures at International Conferences. Scientific Responsible or WP Leader in several national and EC-funded projects.

Speaker
Simone Sprio / ISTEC-CNR
Italy

Abstract

Over the past decade, stimuli-responsive biomaterials have been extensively studied due to their excellent applications in various fields ranging from drug delivery, tissue engineering, 3D printing, heart repair, and molecular switches. Such materials indicate reversible or irreversible changes in physical properties or chemical structures in response to environmental stimulus such as temperature, pH, electric field, and ionic strength. Therefore, such unique properties allow us to design diverse types of self-regulated and stimuli-responsive systems. Recent advances and applications of biomolecule-responsive hydrogels in medicine via emphasizing this research area with novel biomaterials technology have shown great interest in medical applications. We will further show the recent application of these modified hydrogels in drug/gene delivery, diabetes, biosensor, tissue engineering, and cell and cancer area.

Biography

Dr. Hossein Hosseinkhani has broad experience in life sciences and is expert in nanotechnology, biomaterials, drug delivery, 3D in vitro systems, bioreactor technology, and bioengineering stem cells technology. He has long experience in both academia and industry in biomedical engineering research and development, which includes several years of basic science research experience in a number of premier institutions related to the structure and function of biomaterials, and in polymer-based and mineral-based medical implants development in the medical device industry.

Speaker
Hossein Hosseinkhani / Innovation Center for Advanced Technology, Matrix, Inc.,
New York, USA

Sessions:

Scientific Session 2

Abstract

This work is focused on the physicochemical and biological behaviour of synthetic and natural biomaterials. Synthetic Bioactive glass is one of the promising synthétic biomaterial. Silicate glass (SiO2-CaO-Na2O-P2O5) has been synthesized pure and doped with chemical elements. Natural biomaterials from maine origin has been shaped by using 3D process. Several physicochemical methods were employed to investigate their chemical reactivity and bioactivity in the gaol to highlight their effects on the apatite layer formation after the “in vitro” assays. In vivo experiments have been carried out in the femoral sites of rabbits. Concerning the in vitro assays, biomaterials have been studied before and after immersion in the SBF- solutions. The cytotoxicity has been evaluated by using the MTT tests. The variations of ionic concentrations in the SBF solutions were studied versus time after immersion. Concerning the in vivo experiments, bio implants have been studied after sampling at different times after implantations. Biological and physicochemical techniques such as XRD, FT-IR, SEM and ICP-OES have been employed to conduct this study. Obtained results show different kinetic of bioactivity. Comparisons between synthetic and natural biomaterials highlght the complementarities between them. This result presents important advantages to surgeons because it offers a wide field of applications adapted to many parameters like the bone metabolism, the age, the pathology and the implantation sites. In vivo results show a good biocompatibility and the control of the kinetic of ossification.

Biography

Hassane Oudadesse graduated from the Blaise Pascal University of Clermont-Ferrand France. Since 2001, he works in the University of Rennes 1 as Full Professor in the ISCR UMR CNRS 6226. His works concern the conception, synthesis and physicochemical studies of new biomaterials for applications in orthopaedic surgery. He is author of more than 150 papers published in international journals and 70 international conferences. Professor Hassane Oudadesse is a Head of the research unit on Biomaterials since 2001, Vice President of University of Rennes 1, human resources 2008-2012, Director of Master 2 Solid Chemistry and Materials since 2006. He was the President of the Chemical Department from 2002 to 2004 and the President of the specialists commission CNU 33 (Materials Chemistry) 2003- 2008.

Speaker
Hassane Oudadesse / University of Rennes1
France

Abstract

Scaffold design is important in regenerative medicine and has several uses such as to direct stem cells (SCs) differentiation, to support three-dimensional tissue regeneration as well as being able to mimic the extracellular matrix, allowing SC attachment and growth. Moreover, SCs cultured on nanofiber (NF) scaffolds differ in morphology, viability and migration behaviour compared with SC cultures grown on traditional substrates. NFs can be engineered from materials such as polymers, using nanofabrication methods including electrospinning. Electrospinning is a well known nanofabrication method that uses electrostatic forces to produce fine micro/nano- fibres from polymer solutions or melts. There is growing interest in the preparation of fibres from compounds of low molecular weight such as cyclodextrins (CDs), cyclic olygosaccharides derived from starch, due to their benefits over drawbacks polymers can have, such as: induce an immune response, toxicity, use of non-environmentally friendly solvents. The aim of our study was to generate polymer-free CD based electrospun NFs with applications in regenerative medicine. We explored the spinnability potential of native versus modified CDs and solution parameters, such as concentration and solvent, which influence the resultant fibre properties. CD NFs generated were characterised to understand their physicochemical properties using Synchrotron Raman Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Cell viability and cytotoxicity studies of Caco-2 cells in the presence of CD was assessed and proved the low toxicity of CDs on living cells, confirming their potential as biocompatible molecules.

Biography

Dr. Bahijja Raimi-Abraham is a pharmacist and Lecturer in Pharmaceutics at King’s College London where her research group focuses on drug development and molecular pharmaceutics in Ageing and Global Health. Prior to her current position at King’s College London, Dr. Raimi-Abraham held positions at University College London (UCL) as an EPSRC postdoctoral researcher and at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) as a seconded Quality National Expert.Dr. Raimi-Abraham is the first graduate of the University of East Anglia School of Pharmacy to be awarded a Ph.D and more recently won the Outstanding Woman in STEM Precious Award.

Speaker
Bahijja T Raimi-Abraham / King’s College London
United Kingdom

Abstract

Tissue engineering scaffolds prepared out of mammalian organs/tissues have excellent regenerative medical applications. These scaffolds are essentially extracellular matrices of variable purity depending on the source organ, donor species and the method of preparation. Extracellular matrices have been recovered from bovine/porcine/equine organs and tissues including small intestine, skin, urinary bladder, liver, lung, tendon, cartilage and muscle by optimised decellularisation techniques for various biomedical applications. The laboratory prepared cholederm, a cholecyst-derived scaffold (CDS), by a non-detergent and non-enzymatic method rich in collagen, elastin and glycosaminoglycans. It contained only permissible level of nucleic acid for a tissue engineering scaffold, demonstrating the adequacy of the decellularisation protocol used for the preparation. It had excellent cytocompatibility when tested by protocols consistent with ISO10993 standards. When used for graft assisted healing of full thickness skin excision/burn wound in rabbits, the CDS induced faster healing with lesser collagen deposition compared to similar scaffolds. Further, under veterinary clinical settings, it was used for graft assited healing of lacerated wounds in dogs. The potential use of cholederm as sub-cutaneous, skeletal muscle and epicardial grafts is being explored. Preliminary experiments for preparing porcine cholecyst extracellular matrix gel and powder forms were also promising. The cholederm may have several biomedical uses

Biography

Dr Thapasimuthu V Anilkumar is a registered veterinarian in India specialized in Pathology, (Diplomate ICVP), Laboratory Animal Medicine (Cert LAM) and Toxicologic Pathology (Fellow, IATP). He works for Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology which is an institution of national importance under the Government of India and an internationally accredited testing facility (ISO17025) for biomaterials and biomedical devices. He holds a PhD of the Imperial College School of Medicine at Hammersmith (1996, University of London) and the research interests include the use of mammalian cholecystic extracellular matrix for tissue engineering and regenerative medical applications.

Speaker
Thapasimuthu Anilkumar / Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology
India

Abstract

In recent decades, there has been growing interest in applying nanomaterials to cancer treatment due to their appealing features for drug delivery, diagnosis and imaging. However, there have been only a few successful translations of nano-materials into clinical applications so far, namely a handful of liposomes, polymeric micelles and albumim nanoparticles (NPs).1 In the meanwhile, we have also gradually realized the challenges that frustrate the clinical translation, typically low biocompatibility and biodegradability of nano-materials, diverse physiological barriers in vivo and the relatively complex scale-up of the manufacturing process.2 In our research, we managed to employ biocompatible and biodegradable proteins to fabricate NPs for applications in drug delivery systems in order to tackle the problems mentioned above. Using a straightforward and scalable self-assembly method, human serum albumin (HSA) could form hydrophobic drug-loaded NPs. HSA-paclitaxel NPs greatly increased the in vivo and in vitro antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel, which earned the patents granted in U.S., China and Japan, as well as the approval of clinical trials in China.3 Moreover, to expand the material resources of NPs, we made use of suckerins, recently discovered proteins from squid sucker ring teeth. By tuning the parameters in salting-out of suckerins including the protein concentrations and temperature, we achieved tailorable particle size from ~2 µm to 200 nm. Doxorubicin-loaded suckerin NPs displayed significant in vivo tumor-targeting and inhibition with the absence of systematic toxicity.4 In conclusion, our findings in protein-based nanomaterials open promising avenues for cancer nanomedicine, which provide easy and scalable industrial manufacturing and good biocompatibility and biodegradability due to the merits of proteins.

Biography

Dr. Dawei Ding obtained his master degree in pharmaceutics at Nanjing University in 2011, and his Ph.D. degree in Materials Science and Engineering at Nanyang Technological University in 2016. His research interests are to engineer biocompatible materials and explore their applications in biomaterials and drug delivery systems. He has published 13 scientific papers in the related fields, with some first-authored or co-first-authored ones appeared on Advanced Materials, ACS Nano, and Biomacromolecules.

Speaker
Dawei Ding / Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology
Singapore

Abstract

Bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on Ti implant surfacescould result in the implantation failure. The use of antibacterial coatingto mitigate the risk of bacterial adhesion and enhance the bioactivity onto the surfaces of dental and orthopedic prostheses has attracted considerable attention. The purpose of this study was to load metallic ions with high antibacterial ability onto the Ti substrate. The polydopamine (PDA) was coated on the Ti substrate as a bond coat because of its adhesive properties. Afterwards, Ag, Cu orZn ions was individually doped onto the PDA layer. Their antibacterial efficacy was evaluated against Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in vitro. The results showed that metallic ions were successfully incorporated into PDA bond coat. Furthermore, the antibacterial tests showed that Zn-doped or Cu-doped samples had excellent antibacterial activity against E. coli and S. aureus, which was similar to the Ag effect. Although excellent antibacterial efficacy, the Ag and Cu appreciably increased the cytotoxicity of the coating. By contrast, the viability of the cells grown on the surfaces of Zn-doped Ti implants was as high as that of the cells grown on the Ti implant surfaces. It is concluded that antibacterial activity was significantly enhanced by the metal ions loaded. However, excellent antibacterial efficacy and biological activity on the Ti implant can be optimized by tailoring the dosage of Zn.

Biography

Shinn-Jyh Ding has completed his PhD from Department of Materials Science and Engineering at National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. He is the director of Institute of Oral Scienceat Chung Shan Medical University, Taiwan. He has published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed internationaljournals.The research interests include syntheses of bioceramics, development of biomimetic bone grafts for bone repair and regeneration, and surface modification of titanium and zirconia implants.

Speaker
Shinn-Jyh Ding / Chung Shan Medical University,
Taiwan

Abstract

Development of an experimental nanohybrid composite from rice husk is an alternative to the commercial products available in the world of dentistry. It becomes potentially to be competitive to other products because of its strength of using agricultural biowaste. As for the globalization, it is very essential to have composite restoration that is biocompatible, superior translucency and long lasting. For that reason, nanosilica powder has been produced from the extraction of rice husk throughout many steps including purification in order to obtain the perfect texture and mixture of composite. Various tests have been performed for physical, mechanical and also genotoxicity properties. These tests are necessary to achieve the standardization of composite restoration before clinical application.

Biography

Dr. Noor Huda Ismail is a specialist and lecturer at Prosthodontics Unit, School of Dental Sciences, UniversitiSains Malaysia (USM). She started as a Dental Officer at USM following her graduation with Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS) at University of Malaya. Then, she became a trainee lecturer before continuing her studies at University of Dundee in prosthodontic and graduated in 2012. She is a member of Malaysian Association of Prosthodontics (MAP). She is also a member of Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow for Introductory Module since in 2013. She has been actively participating in various national and international prosthodontic conferences and had published papers in local and international journals. The field of her main clinical interest and research includes fixed and removable prosthodontics, endodontically treated teeth and dental biomaterials. Currently, she is doing research on nanocomposite reinforced by zirconia and also nanohybrid composite luting cement from rice husk.

Speaker
Noor Huda Ismail / Universiti Sains Malaysia
Malaysia

Abstract

Biography

Dr. Amany Mohamed Abbas work as a researcher in Veterinary serum and vaccine research institute as a quality Assurance Manager, technical manager deputy and head of virology unit in Quality Control Laboratory. Researcher of virology Department till now. Professional experience includes Preparation of tissue culture BHK21 ,VERO, MDBK cell lines and primary cell culture MDCK ,CEF,OS, Preparation and evaluation of attenuated and inactivated bovine viral disease Vaccines, Evaluation of different viral disease vaccines according to international protocols, Evaluation of post vaccinal immune response by using different serologicaltests, preparation of some nano- adjuvants, molecular RT-PCR, Formulating program of training courses in virology and immunology for veterinarians and technicians, training on Principals of Bioinformatics and Biological Data Analysis, ISO 17025: 2005- 2017, ISO 22000 lead auditor, Trained on molecular diagnostic at the Vector and Vector Borne Disease Research Institute, Tanga-Tanzania.

Speaker
Amany Mohamed Abbas / Researcher at Quality Control Laboratory
Egypt

Abstract

Polyamidoamine(PAMAM) dendrimers are well-defined, regularly branched macromolecules with particular advantages, including nanoscale 3D spherical architecture, multivalent bonding surface with tailoring possibility of biological or chemical property, as well as intramolecular cavity serving as a host-molecule encapsulation. Based on these excellences, PAMAM dendrimers have been widely utilized in the fields of imaging diagnosis, tissue engineering, target delivery, bionic design, surface modification of materials and others. Considering PAMAM’s applications in biomedical field, the “Biocompatibility” must be defined. Interacting with biological circumstance, proteins are attracted onto the surface of PAMAM dendrimers due to electrostatic or van der Waal’s forces, hydrophobic interactions or hydrogen bonds. So it is crucial to monitor the effects of G3 PAMAM dendrimers on proteins. This work aimed to conduct an inquiry into the impacts of G3 PAMAM dendrimers with –NH2 or –COOH terminal groups on serum proteins (including albumin, Fibrinogen, and globulin).We revealed that G3 PAMAM can affect the conformation of proteins. Taking the BSA as an example, interacting with G3 PAMAM, the content of α-helix decreased, and the α-helix conformation partly changed into β-sheet and Random coil. Moreover, we investigated the way that G3 PAMAM interacts with proteins. In this result, we found that the binding interaction between BSA and G3 PAMAM with –COOH outside groups was a spontaneous process, and there was a strong affinity between PAMAM and protein. Understanding the interactions taking place at a bio-nanointerface will broaden the application potential of PAMAM as macromolecular vectors in biomedical field.

Biography

Li Li is PhD from Southwest Jiaotong University, majoring in material science and engineering. My research mainly involves the surface modification of cardiovascular materials, multifunctional microenvironment construction and in-situ endothelialization.

Speaker
Li Li / Southwest Jiaotong University
China

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