Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)is a pregnancy biomarker. The protein shuttles essential nutrients to AFP receptor (AFPR)-positive embryonic cells. For majority of cancers AFPR is a biomarker and it is also expressed by host myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs).AFP delivers selected nutrients to MDSCs that suppress innate and adaptive immunity during cancer, inflammation, hemopoiesis and regeneration.AFP loaded with a medicine can be helpful in treating autoimmune diseases and inflammation, in transplantation, etc. On the other hand, AFP loaded with a toxin can destroy cancer cells and MDSCs. MDSCs depletion unleashes innate and adaptive immunity to remove cancer cells. In addition to traditional use as a pregnancy and tumor biomarker AFP obtains the new immunotherapy drug use.

Biography

Vladimir N. Pak has completed his PhD from Moscow Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russia and has over 30 years of post-doctoral experience in virology, immunology, biotechnology, pharmacology and oncology. He has published 7 patents related to API research and medicines manufacturing. He is the inventor of the anti-cancer medicines based on alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-toxin non-covalent complexes that acts as a targeted chemotherapy and MDSCs-immunotherapy. As a freelance researcher I need to know what kind of discount you can provide to me.

Speaker
Vladimir N. Pak / Biotechnologist

Abstract

Adaptive designs have been developed as an alternative to traditional well-conducted randomised controlled trials which have been recognised as the gold standard for assessing efficacy of clinical interventions design. Adaptive designs can make clinical trials more flexible by utilising results accumulating in the trial to modify the trials course in accordance with pre-specified rules. Trials with an adaptive design are often more efficient, informative and ethical than trials with a traditional fixed design since they often make better use of resources such as time and money, and might require fewer subjects. Adaptive designs can be applied across all phases of clinical research, from early-phase dose escalation to confirmatory trials. In adaptive trials, patient outcomes are observed and analysed at predefined interim points and predetermined modifications to study design can be implemented based on these observations. In late 2016, the US Congress passed into law the 21st Century Cures Act, which instructs the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to update its guidance on adaptive designs for sponsors of investigational drugs and biological products. The legislation refers to adaptive designs as modern and novel methods. The use of biomarkers allows adaptations to trial design based on interim analysis of the treatment responses of biomarkers, such as genomic markers. This design can be used to select patient populations for subsequent trials, identify the natural course of a disease, achieve early detection of a disease and/or help in developing personalised medicine.

Biography

Dr. Aruna Dontabhaktuni is pharmaceutical professional with 21 years of experience across all phases of drug development from preclinical & clinical PK/PD, Clinical Pharmacology & Pharmacometrics, and DMPK. Broad experience in Clinical drug development for Biologics, Small molecules, and Antibody-drug conjugates as an individual contributor and in a leadership role; in broad range of therapeutic areas including immuno-oncology, oncology, immuno science and rare diseases. Served as Clinical Pharmacology lead for 10+ assets in early, and late-stage, in Oncology & Immunology, including BLA submissions of ramucirumab (CYRAMZA), necitumumab (PORTRAZZA) and Breakthrough Therapy Designations application for Olaratumab (LARTRUVO). Extensive experience in regulatory document preparation (briefing books, clinical pharmacology summaries, biopharmaceutical summaries, pharmacometric reports for BLA and NDA filings, PIP, PSP), active participant in face-to-face meetings and responses to written questions with regulatory agencies across the world like FDA, PMDA, SFDA, EMEA, KFDA etc. Responsible for setting up a state of the art and very successful Clinical PK/PD Pharmacometics department ground up, comprising of Data Management for implementing CDISC standards in preparation of regulatory submission. Framing project goals, estimating resource needs, working with large clinical data sets, directing advanced analysis, interpreting results for decisions, directing reports and communication with non-technical professionals. Has experience serving in several internal and external committees, and in due-diligence for in-licensing opportunities; subject matter expert in Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology, Extensive peer-reviewed publication and conference presentation at national and international professional conferences.

Speaker
Aruna Dontabhaktuni / President & CEO at PharmaPro Consulting

Abstract

Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common non-skin cancer in men and third most common cause of cancer deaths in men. Black men experience a higher burden of incidence and mortality from CaP compared to White men. The Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test, a commonly used biomarker for early diagnosis and management of CaP, cannot alone accurately predict the presence of CaP, its aggressiveness, or the risk of post-treatment recurrence. The widespread use of PSA testing in CaP screening is controversial partially because patients with benign enlargement of the prostate often have elevated levels of PSA and many men with diagnosed CaP have a normal PSA. Consequently, a search for more effective prostate tumor biomarkers is overdue. Our studies thus far show that concurrent measurements of the levels of serum cytokines such as IL-8, TNF-α, and sTNF-R1 (KAPS biomarker) provide a significant advantage as a CaP biomarker over PSA measurements alone in differentiating men with CaP from men without CaP.Our working hypothesis is that both Black and White men with CaP have altered circulating levels of KAPS biomarker compared to men without CaP. Further, the extent to which these levels arealtered will vary according to CaP risk factors and can be used as a tool to improve the early detection of CaP and CaP treatment decision-making.We tested our hypothesis in a retrospective study of men with elevated PSA but a negative prostate biopsy, patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and patients with castration resistant CaP (CRPC). The predictive accuracy of the markers was described using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. In our analysis, AUC values greater than 0.8 were considered as useful in predicting CaP outcomes for individual patients. All the comparisons for KAPS biomarker were statistically significant at the p<0.05 level.The AUC for each of marker alone was statistically superior to PSA alone (p<0.01 for each pairwise comparison). Each of the KAPS-marker combination AUCs was significantly better than PSA alone (p<0.01 for all), but not statistically different from each other. Combining TNF-α with PSA resulted in a 3.0-fold decrease in the PSA-Alone False Positive Fraction (FPF), and a 3.7-fold decrease in the PSA- Alone False Negative Fraction (FNF). The PSA+sTNFR1 combination had a 5.9-fold decrease in the FPF, and a 2.5-fold decrease in FNF. Ability of KAPS-biomarker was also effective at distinguishing between localized CaP and metastatic CaP patients. AUC results (with 95% confidence intervals) for additive combinations of these biomarkers will also be discussed. The best predictor of localized CaP vs. metastatic CaP was KAPS combined with PSA 0.999 (0.998 to 1.000). Due to the reported significant racial differences in the diagnoses of and mortality from CaP, future CaP biomarker studies should include a racially diverse sample of men, especially Black men.

Biography

Willie Underwood, III, MD, MSci, MPH, was appointed to the faculty at Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) in 2008. He serves in the Department of Urologic Oncology, he is a robotic surgeon who provides clinical care to prostate cancer, kidney cancer, and adrenal tumor patients and their families. His research focuses on improving the early detection, treatment and survival of all men and more specifically his research serves to improve health and healthcare outcomes of the medically underserved. Dr. Underwood came to RPCI from Wayne State University and Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, where he served as Assistant Professor in the Department of Urology. Prior to his tenure at Wayne State University, Dr. Underwood completed his fellowship and was on staff at the University Michigan Health System where he served as Chief of the Urologic Service at the Ann Arbor VA Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI. Dr. Underwood earned his Doctor of Medicine and Masterísof Science degrees (M.Sc.) in 1994 from the State University of New York- Upstate Medical Universityat Syracuse, Syracuse, NY and completed residency training in General Surgery in 1996 and Urology in 2000 at the University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT. He completed the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program in 2002 at the University of Michigan. He earned a Masterís in Public Health (MPH) in Health Management and Policy in 2004 from the School of Public Health at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and then served as Assistant Professor in Urology from 2002 to 2005. Dr. Underwood is certified by the American Board of Urology since 2004. His research has been funded by the National Institute of Health / National Cancer Institute. He has also received funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the American Urological Association. He has been selected for the 2006 "Rising Star" in Urology Award by the American Urological Association Foundation and the State University of New York- Upstate Medical University at Syracuse 2009 Outstanding Young Alumnus Award. Dr. Underwoodís efforts to improve the health and direct clinical care of the poor and disenfranchised extends beyond his highly funded research. Dr. Underwood works to improve the health and the quality of healthcare for all Americans through his clinical care, research, and public policy advocacy efforts. He serves on the Love Canal Medical Board. He is currently the President of the Erie County Medical Society. He is also a member of the American Medical Associationís Council of Legislation, The National Medical Associationís Council on Medical Legislation. He is on the Board of Directors of HealthNow (Blue Cross and Blue Shield) of Western and Northeastern New York and is the Chair of the Health Care Services and Quality Initiatives Committee. He is the Chair of the Medical Society of the State of New Yorkís Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Committee.Dr. Underwood work is also international when he was on the Board of IVUmed and he performed the first reported radical prostatectomy in Nigeria.

Speaker
Willie Underwood / President of the Erie County Medical Society

Abstract

Briefly describe the history of medical marijuana including the negative stigma Identify parts of the medical cannabis plant and basic information about the different strains Discuss Medical Cannabinoids as a growing area for drug development Discuss the types of clinical research studies and clinical trials that would be beneficial in the study of medical cannabis. Explain how to conduct medical cannabis clinical trials from regulatory approval, study conduct including identifying the challenges

Biography

sabrinaresearchslayer 20 years of experience in the Health Care and Clinical Research Industry with 13+ years of management experience leading diverse interdisciplinary teams of up to 150 employees. Industry experience in various settings including academic institutions, hospitals, private clinics (including sleep medicine clinics and a medical cannabis clinic), contract research organizations, and pharmaceutical companies. Clinical research experience in Phase I to IV clinical trials. Research specialty areas include early phase studies, Bioequivalence/Bioavailability, Biologic/Biosimilar, Device studies, Vaccine studies, Drug Abuse Liability studies, Drug/Drug interaction, and Medical Cannabis Studies. Complimented by Nursing experience in various areas including Critical Care, Pediatrics, Mental Health, and in the Community. Experience with adult education and teaching primarily healthcare and clinical research related programs. In addition, interested in continuing to be involved in non profit initiatives, event planning & fundraising activities.

Speaker
Sabrina Ramkellawan / Vice President of Clinical Affairs at TerrAscend Acting President-Clinical Research Association of Canada

Abstract

Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common non-skin cancer in men and third most common cause of cancer deaths in men. Black men experience a higher burden of incidence and mortality from CaP compared to White men. The Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) test, a commonly used biomarker for early diagnosis and management of CaP, cannot alone accurately predict the presence of CaP, its aggressiveness, or the risk of post-treatment recurrence. The widespread use of PSA testing in CaP screening is controversial partially because patients with benign enlargement of the prostate often have elevated levels of PSA and many men with diagnosed CaP have a normal PSA. Consequently, a search for more effective prostate tumor biomarkers is overdue. Our studies thus far show that concurrent measurements of the levels of serum cytokines such as IL-8, TNF-α, and sTNF-R1 (KAPS biomarker) provide a significant advantage as a CaP biomarker over PSA measurements alone in differentiating men with CaP from men without CaP.Our working hypothesis is that both Black and White men with CaP have altered circulating levels of KAPS biomarker compared to men without CaP. Further, the extent to which these levels arealtered will vary according to CaP risk factors and can be used as a tool to improve the early detection of CaP and CaP treatment decision-making.We tested our hypothesis in a retrospective study of men with elevated PSA but a negative prostate biopsy, patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and patients with castration resistant CaP (CRPC). The predictive accuracy of the markers was described using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. In our analysis, AUC values greater than 0.8 were considered as useful in predicting CaP outcomes for individual patients. All the comparisons for KAPS biomarker were statistically significant at the p<0.05 level.The AUC for each of marker alone was statistically superior to PSA alone (p<0.01 for each pairwise comparison). Each of the KAPS-marker combination AUCs was significantly better than PSA alone (p<0.01 for all), but not statistically different from each other. Combining TNF-α with PSA resulted in a 3.0-fold decrease in the PSA-Alone False Positive Fraction (FPF), and a 3.7-fold decrease in the PSA- Alone False Negative Fraction (FNF). The PSA+sTNFR1 combination had a 5.9-fold decrease in the FPF, and a 2.5-fold decrease in FNF. Ability of KAPS-biomarker was also effective at distinguishing between localized CaP and metastatic CaP patients. AUC results (with 95% confidence intervals) for additive combinations of these biomarkers will also be discussed. The best predictor of localized CaP vs. metastatic CaP was KAPS combined with PSA 0.999 (0.998 to 1.000). Due to the reported significant racial differences in the diagnoses of and mortality from CaP, future CaP biomarker studies should include a racially diverse sample of men, especially Black men.

Biography

Kailash C Chadha is an Associate Member, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology Roswell Park Cancer Institute Buffalo NY 14263 Associate Research Professor, Department of Cellular and Molecular Biology University of New York at Buffalo Roswell Park, Associate Professor of Oncology, Roswell Park Cancer Institute Buffalo, Research Professor Niagara University, New York 14109 and Research Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Medicine School of Medicine State University of New York at Buffalo Buffalo NY 14214, USA.

Speaker
Kailash C Chadha / Associate Member, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology Roswell Park Cancer Institute Buffalo

Abstract

Epidemiological studies have suggested that regular intake of some non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a preventative effect against several types of tumours including breast cancer in humans. This present study aims to investigste the effect of both ibuprofen and aspirin on DNA damage using lymphocytes obtained from breast cancer patients and comparing the result with lymphocytes from healthy females as a control. Lymphocytes are useful surrogates for cancer cells. Nanoparticles (NPs) and bulk sizes were used in the Comet and micronucleus assays. Two hundred and fifty ng/ml of ibuprofen (NPs and bulk) and 500 ng/ml of aspirin were used as non-toxic doses to treat the lymphocytes. Aspirin, both bulk and nano sizes, showed a significant reduction in DNA damage in the Comet and micronucleus assays. However, the effect of aspirin nano (P≤0.01) was more significant compared to aspirin bulk (P≤0.05). Ibuprofen, in contrast, showed a significant reduction in micronucleus (MNi) frequency in the micronucleus assay with the nano form (P≤0.001) being more significant than the bulk form (P≤0.01), whilst its preventative effect with the Comet assay was insignificant. These observations suggest that NPs have better penetration through the nuclear membrane due to their smaller sizes compared to their bulk size. Aspirin was more effective than ibuprofen in the reduction of DNA damage and MNi formation in the Comet and micronucleus assays. NPs were more effective than bulk sizes. The results are consistent with the view that NSAIDs, particularlyaspirin and ibuprofen, could have a promising role in cancer treatment including breast cancer.

Biography

Professor Anderson holds the Established Chair in Biomedical Sciences at the University of Bradford. She obtained her first degree in the University of Wales and second degrees in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manchester. She has 460+ peer-reviewed papers, 9 books, has successfully supervised 30 PhDs, and been a member of editorial boards of 10 international journals. She has been or is Editor in Chief of a book Series on toxicology for J. Wiley and sons and the Royal Society of Chemistry respectively. She gives key note addresses at various international meetings. Sheis a consultant for many international organisations, such as the WHO, NATO, TWAS, UNIDO and the OECD. Her H index = 59

Speaker
Diana Anderson / University Of Bradford

Abstract

As Parkinsons Disease (PD) patients and research advocates, we remain hopeful that the whirlwind of research and translational studies which flood the pages of journals around the world will result in treatments that significantly improve quality of life for people with PD within our lifetime. While the Parkinsons community continues to wait, however, we must acknowledge a growing element of scepticism: the pace of novel advances seems to be slowed down by a system that cannot move fast enough to keep up with our own neurodegeneration. The longer we wait, the more we wonder whether our hopes have been misplaced. Questions arise as to whether the current clinical trial model is suitable for a condition where no two cases are quite the same. While other fields such as oncology are pressing forward with targeted and individualized approaches, neurodegenerative research is languishing. The question of what treatment for which patient? seems to be lost in large multicenter trials designed to ask the overly simplistic and inappropriate question of what works beyond placebo for the average PD patient The average PD patient is a statistical construct rather than a physical entity. This clinical trial model built largely on conservative incremental refinements of current drugs to treat large groups of people seems ill-equipped to tackle PD where etiological heterogeneity is the rule rather than the exception. Also, as regulatory burdens grow at an increasing pace, and research-associated costs balloon, most phase III clinical trials are left in the hands of large pharmaceutical companies. These entities inherently consider not only therapeutic advance, but also the consequences of research on their revenue stream. Too often, these clinical trials seem to be conducted to support new patents rather than patients. For too long we have stood by and watched infighting between scientists and their funders over control, lack of funding for replication studies, potential for data hoarding, or money wasted on studies in which the clinical significance is unclear. We have seen trials that are considered successful even though they offer little meaningful benefit to patients, while witnessing the scientists driving research and novel discovery forward being forced to spend an increasing proportion of their time securing grants and, if successful, addressing the administrative requirements of funding agencies and regulatory bodies rather than their science. We need to reform incentive structures to enable research scientists to work towards bigger goals than simply getting their names in high impact journals. We want editors and reviewers to support replication studies and negative results so that excitement is not driven by chance-level findings. We need a system that can empower scientists to pursue ambitious research, that enables them to spend more time on their science and less on securing their next grant renewal, that does not force them to kowtow to flawed metrics like impact factor and H index, and that encourages them to work more closely with patient advocates to understand our priorities regarding appropriate assessments beyond the Unified Parkinsons Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and beyond motor function. We need patient-scientist teams to work together to maximize the likelihood that studies are designed in a way that will ultimately best inform patient and clinician treatment decisions. As a first step towards ameliorating these problems, patients should become part of the clinical trial design process. Rather than just being told which hoops to jump through they should be recognized as partners in research. We remain hopeful that, through collaboration, outreach, mutual education, and ongoing communication, we can work together to bring us closer to the treatments we so desperately need. As the fastest growing neurological disease a Parkinson Pandemic increased efficiency of the research infrastructure is more important than ever. We ask that the scientists, publishers, charities, and public funding institutions committed to advancing research in PD join us in a push to adapt to the changes we need to embrace if we are going to make meaningful progress towards treating this disease.

Biography

Speaker
Benjamin Stecher / Education Consultant as well as Writer and Parkinsons disease patient advocate at tmrwedition.com

Sessions:

Drug Delivery

Abstract

Up till now, China has not enacted any legal mechanisms governing certification or supervision for ethics committees. This article analyses deficiencies in the protection of subjects in clinical drug trials under Chinas current laws and regulations; it emphasizes that investigators, as practitioners who have direct contact with subjects, play significant roles in protecting and safeguarding subjects rights and interests. The paper compares the status quo in China in this area to that of other countries and discusses ways China might enhance the protection of rights and interests of trial subjects, such as enhancing the ethical awareness of investigators through training, improving laws and regulations, and strengthening the communication between investigators and ethics committees.

Biography

Lu Zhang has completed her M.D. majored in pharmaceutics and pharmacy from College of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Zhejiang University, Peoples Republic of China. She is now working as a quality controller in the Office of Drug Clinical Trial Institution of the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University. She has published more than 5 papers in reputed journals and the total impact factors were above 11.2 as the first author.

Speaker
Lu Zhang / Office of Drug Clinical Trial Institution The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University

Abstract

In the standard model for the development of climbing and mossy afferent pathways to the cerebellum the ingrowing axons target the embryonic Purkinje cell somata (E13-E16 in mice). Perinatally and early postnatal (E18-P15) the climbing fibers translocate to the Purkinje cell dendrites, and as the granular layer develops the mossy fibers translocate from the Purkinje cells and synapse with granule cell dendrites. In this report we describe a novel earlier stage in afferent development. Immunostaining for a neurofilament-associated antigen (NAA) reveals the early axon distributions with remarkable clarity. Axons from the trigeminal system enter the cerebellar primordium as early as embryo age (E)9. By using a combination of axon tract tracing, analysis of neurogenin1 null mice which do not develop trigeminal ganglia and mouse embryos maintained in vitro we show that the first axons to innervate the cerebellar primordium are direct projections from the trigeminal ganglia. The data show that the early trigeminal projections are in situ before the Purkinje cells are born, and double immunostaining for NAA and markers of the different domains in the cerebellar primordium reveal that they first target the cerebellar nuclear neurons of the nuclear transitory zone (E9-E10), and only later (E10-E11) extend collateral branches to the Purkinje cell plate.

Biography

Dr. Marzban received his Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) degree in Physiotherapy from Iran University of Medical Sciences, followed by a Master of Science degree (M.Sc.) in Human Anatomy from Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. He then obtained a Philosophy of Doctoral (PhD) in Anatomical Science from the Department of Human Anatomy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Dr. Marzban was recruited as an Assistant Professor at the Medical School in Tehran University of Medical Sciences. He joined Dr. R. Hawkes' laboratory as a Visiting Scientist and subsequently was recruited as an Assistant Professor (research) at the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, University of Calgary. Soon after, Dr. Marzban joined the University of Manitoba as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Science. Dr. Marzban research interests focus on understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the developing cerebellum, specifically the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorders and neurodegenerative disease using mouse models

Speaker
Hassan Marzban / Assistant Professor, University of Manitoba

Abstract

A clinical trial can be defined as a study comparing the effect and value of an intervention against a control in human beings. As part of the drug development a new compound will pass through 3 rigorous phases of clinical trials prior of being commercialized. Once in the market phase 4 studies will take place mainly for surveillance of unwanted side effects. Consequently the drug development process can last anywhere from 7 to 12 years in average. The cost to create a drug could be up to $1,700M, depending mainly of the scope of the treatment, patient participation and duration of the study. The length of a clinical trial is often determined by endpoints. Common endpoints used are survival and disease progression. They are often measured 5 to 10 years from the start of the study. On the other hand a biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker is a biological marker in response to an internal process which can be measured accurately and reproducibly. Ideally using biomarkers in clinical trials have advantages because of the possibility of measure an effect efficiently. When classic end-points are replaced by validated surrogate endpoints (biomarkers) the efficacy of a drug is discovered earlier and the study end up being less costly and more customized for precise set of patients. In consequence new drugs are commercialized quicker for patients in need.

Biography

Alejandra Ragone holds a MD degree from the University of Tucuman, Argentina. She is now working in oncology clinical research as a Clinical Development Associate Manager at AstraZeneca, Canada. Previously she worked in the management for Early Phase Clinical Trails and in Oncology with the Familial Breast Cancer Research Group in Toronto. She has published several clinical research papers. She had been traveling to conferences for Genetic Breast and Ovarian Cancer Research where she served as speaker. Alejandra Ragone will be no representing AstraZeneca Canada on this conference.

Speaker
Alejandra Ragone / Global Study Associate Manager at AstraZeneca

Abstract

Tashkent Medical Academy, –Ę–įshkent, Uzbekistan. Abstract. Breast cancer (BC) is the most frequent tumor worldwide. Triple-negative BCs are characterized by the negative estrogen and progesterone receptors and negative HER2, and represent 12-18% of all BCs. Breast cancer (breast cancer) is the most common oncological disease in women in the Uzbekistan. Data from epidemiological studies show that TNBC is more common in young women (up to 50 years) before menopause. In addition, the likelihood of TNBC is higher in women with early menarche, the first pregnancy at an earlier age, a short period of breastfeeding, and an increased body mass index. It should be not that the prognosis for TNBC does not depend on the degree of differentiation of the tumor, the presence of lymph node metastases, the size of the tumor or the treatment performed. The aggressiveness of TNBC was also confirmed by the maximum risk of recurrence during the first three years after surgical treatment with a maximum mortality within the first 5 years. TNBC is a subtype of tumors with a special character of metastasis. Based on the above, we have undertaken the present work, having set ourselves the following goal: to improve immediate and long-term results of treatment of patients with locally advanced thyroid cancer by using the most effective diagnostic methods and comprehensive treatment. Keywords: Triple negative BC, neo adjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic chemotherapy, paclitaxel, docetaxel, gemisitabin. Introduction Triple-negative breast cancers have a relapse pattern that is very different from hormone-positive breast cancers: the risk of relapse is much higher for the first 3‚Äď5 years but drops sharply and substantially below after that hormone-positive breast cancers. In this review, data on the use of gemsitabini in metastatic triple-negative BCs are analyzed, concluding they are effective in any clinical setting (neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic). The available data show the clinical potential of based combinations in terms of long-duration response, increased survival, and better quality of life of patients with triple-negative metastatic BC. The ongoing trials will give further information on the better management of this type of tumor.In 2016, 1,380,000 new cases and 458,000 deaths for BC were reported worldwide, of which there were 332,000 new cases and 79,000 deaths in Asia. BC in the territory of the Republic among urban and rural population by determining the average annual intensive and standardized incidence rates for the years 2008-2010. The highest standardized incidence rates registered in Tashkent city (22,5%x>00), Navaiy (12,4%00), Bukhara (11,1%00) and Tashkent regions (11,0%00) and lowest in Surkhandarya (6,3%00) and Kashkadarya (7,5%00). On the territory of the Republic those in urban areas more often suffer from cancer of the breast (13, 2%x>00) than rural (8,5%00)[2,3]. The highest incidence was within the age intervals 50-59 - 18,0%00, 60-69 - 31,2%00, 70 years and older -19,3%00. In the structure of mortality of the female population of Uzfrom malignant neoplasmsThe greatest proportion is malignant breast tumors (20.4%) [3, 6]. According to Cancer Registry of the Republican Oncology scientific center (RONTS), in 2012 in the general structure of cancer of malignant neoplasms of women forpatients with breast cancer (24.6%) occupy the 1st ranked place, ahead of patients with cervical cancer (12.4%),(5.9%), ovaries (5.0%) and the uterus body (4.4%). According to the Ministry of Health of Uzbekistan, the most common cancer in the country is breast cancer. This type of cancer is diagnosed in 9.1 cases per 100 thousand of the population. According to experts, the hereditary factor is important in the development of breast cancer in women, it is on the maternal line. It is transmitted in 45-75% of cases, if there are mutations of BRSA 1-2 genes. To prevent breast cancer, women under the age of 50 years should undergo ultrasound of the breast. Women aged 50 years and older should undergo mammogram of the breast. Also, all the representatives of the fair sex need to conduct self-examination of the breast every month. At any suspicion of the presence of compaction in the mammary glands, consultation of a mammologist is necessary, noted in the Ministry of Health %) [4,5,8]. Despite the improvement of the methods of diagnosing this pathology, more than 50% of primary patients annually turn to the oncologist in the III and IV stages of the disease. Purpose of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness of various chemotherapy regimens for neoadjuvant, adjuvant and palliative polychemotherapy (metastatic) in patients triple negative breast cancer with improved long-term treatment outcomes. Materials and methods of research. The object of our study will be patients with breast cancer with a triple negative phenotype. In total, retrospective and prospective groups of patients treated in 2012-2017 will be studied. in Tashkent City oncology in the department of oncology and chemotherapy (n = 99), patients with triple negative breast cancer. Thus, the patients included in the study were characterized by a set of unfavorable signs: in 93% of cases the tumors were characterized by high Ki-67, in 53%- 87.7% of cases - by II-IV grade of malignancy. Criteria for selecting patients: Progression of breast cancer was detected in the period from 12 to 60 months after the operative removal of the primary tumor (metachronous metastases); ECOG 0-1. The age of patients older than 18 years. The presence of the result of immunohistochemical analysis of the primary tumor, and in the experimental group a comparative analysis of the primary tumor and distant metastases. Functional status according to ECOG (FS) was from 0 to 2. All patients had measurable normal kidney and liver function, satisfactory parameters of general and biochemical blood tests (leukocytes> 4.5 x 109 / L, neutrophily> 2.0 x 109 / L, hemoglobin> 9 g / d L, blood transfusions were not tolerated for the last two weeks, platelets> 100 x 109 / L, creatinine

Biography

Speaker
Almuradova DM / Tashkent Medical Academy, Tashkent Uzbekistan

Abstract

The Diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders requires extensive and often invasive investigations including colonoscopy and histology and places a heavy burden, both on healthcare resources, because of the cost, and on the individual, in times of disease-related disability and poor quality of life. Recently, there has been increasing interest in non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose different GI diseases and to monitor the disease activity. There is growing scientific interest in the investigation of volatile metabolites and numbers of studies have focused on the utilization of non-invasive biomarkers in the diagnosis of GI disease. The development of sophisticated analytical techniques has enabled the study and interpretation of changes in the faecal and breath volatile organic metabolites (VOMs) and its correlation with the pathophysiological mechanisms in the GI diseases. VOMs are the chemicals that are the products and intermediates of metabolism and may be altered during the diseases process. Changes in the signature of VOMs could potentially provide diagnostic information about health and disease. Multiple studies have reported the differences in VOM profiles of healthy controls vs. patients with liver and other GI disorders. VOM profiles have been used to segregate patients by disease activity and the type of disease. The correlation of VOMs with microbiota is interesting and supports the hypothesis of gut microbial dysbiosis in the etiology of liver disease. This provides an important platform to explore the role of dysbiosis in liver and other GI disorders pathogenesis and development of novel therapeutic targets. In future, further understanding of faecal VOMs may lead to the development of a rapid and simple point of care diagnosis and monitoring of Liver.

Biography

Dr Ahmed is a consultant gastroenterologist at Aldara Hospital & Medical Centre Riyadh KSA and visiting consultant at East Sussex Hospitals NHS foundation trust Eastbourne UK. He is Senior clinical lecturer at the University of Southampton UK. His research interests include investigating the changes in the smell of faeces and breathe in order to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of GI disorders and to develop a non-invasive biomarker. Through formal laboratory research, Dr Ahmed studied the faecal volatile metabolomics profiles of patients with Liver disease (NAFLD), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in comparison with healthy individuals, and was awarded the degree of Doctorate of Medicine (MD) by University of the Bristol in 2012. Dr Ahmed received several awards and grants for his excellent work presented both nationally and internationally. Dr Ahmed has collaborative research experience with international colleagues, presented his work at both national and international conferences, and was awarded travel grants and prizes for the best abstracts and oral presentations on various occasions. Dr Ahmed is on the reviewer panel of several national and international journals, including Gut, PLoS One, Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease and BMJ.

Speaker
Iftikhar Ahmed / Consultant gastroenterologist at Aldara Hospital & Medical Centre Riyadh KSA

Abstract

Aim of this study was to determine the chemical characteristic of remaining dentine after caries removal with eitherexperimental chemomechanical caries removal agent (ECMCRA) or Carisolv. Materials and Methods: Twenty extracted human third molars were embedded individually in slow curing epoxy resin,the teeth were decoronated and ground flat the occlusal surfaces. A 280,20 m thick layer of partially demineralized dentine was created on the occlusal dentine surface by pH cycling. After that, the teeth distributed to two groups and sectioned longitudinally. The first half caries was excavated and a thin layer of dentine was gently scraped off with surgical scalpel blade and subjected to FTIR analysis which is considered as a remaining dentine without any CMCR agents. The second halves were obtained after carious tissues removal with either ECMCRA or Carisolv (MediTeam Dental. Sweden) respectively according to the manufactures instructions and this is considered as a remaining dentine after caries removal with either agents. The FTIR spectra of each sample was obtained by ALPHA FTIR spectrometers (Bruker, Germany) with 4.0 cm resolution, with the range of 500-4000 cm . To evaluate the integrity of the collagen triple helix, peak absorbance ratios of 1235 cm/1454 cm −1 were considered. Results: No disappearance or shift of bands were evident with regard to the mineral and organic content of remaining dentine. ECMCRA did not promote collagen denaturation.

Biography

Amer A. Taqa done PhD in Inorganic Chemistry awarded in 2001. Dissertation Title Preparation and study some of complexes that can be used as dental restorative. Advisor: Tahani Al-Sandook and I.M.Ahmed. M.Sc in inorganic Chemistry awarded in 1991. Dissertation Title Preparation and study some of uranium complexes with nitrones Advisor Wiseman Aziz. B.Sc in Chemistry awarded in 1985.

Speaker
Amer A. Taqa / Dental Basic Science, College dentistry, Mosul University, Iraq

Abstract

David Cyranoski (1 December, 2017)1 reported in Nature (news) that Bat cave solves mystery of deadly SARS virus and suggests new outbreak could occur, based on a paper (30 November, 2017)2 of some Chinese scientists in PLoS Pathogens. However, I dont agree with their conclusion that Yunnan bat is the culprit of SARS-CoV duo to their many doubtful points, logic errors and disregarding some existing evidences. The animal origin of SARS-CoV is a cosmopolitan difficult question. Its solution must meet all suspicion, evidences and logic simultaneously. A wrong scientific conclusion can lead to terrible behavior, for example, leading the masked palm civets (Paguma larvata) to be massacred during 2002-2003 in China, as the culprit of SARS. For this reason, I make important comments and clarifications on their above conclusions and provide an alternative way of thinking for the academic community to discuss. Here I show: (1) the animal origin of SARS-CoV might be a flying fox, whose crucial genes of SARS virus - for a protein that allows the virus to latch onto and infect cells had been activated by an underground uranium mine in the Panxi Rift 1,000 km away from Guangdong; (2) unless so complex process above is repeated, another SARS-CoV event will not erupt again within Guangdong; (3) SARS was a much extremely accidental event. Finally, I restore the entire process of SARSCoV event, using all the evidence chain and whole logic, from the point of view of system theory, based on the correlation between biology and geology. That might provide an impetus to similar investigation elsewhere.

Biography

Mr. Tianxi Sun is a Professorial Senior Engineer of China. He was born in Suzhou City, Jiangsu Province, China on Nov. 4, 1945, and graduated from East China Normal University in Shanghai in 1968. He previously worked for East China Hydroelectric Power Survey and Design Institute and now Suzhou Environmental Protection Bureau.

Speaker
Tianxi Sun / Professorial senior engineer, Environmental Protection Bureau, Suzhou 215002, China

Sessions:

Cancer Biomarkers and Cancer Pathology

Abstract

A singularity was a term first described by the science fiction author VernorVinge and it refers to a technological advancement that has the potential to so dramatically alter society that it is impossible to linearly connect events prior to the singularity to those after it. One such example of a singularity would be the development of artificial general intelligence and its capability of realizing the Skynet nightmare scenario envisioned in the Terminator movies. The advent of massively parallel sequencing, which is otherwise known as Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), is another dramatic example of a technological singularity. Prior to NGS output from DNA sequencing was measured in base pairs orkilobase pairs. When NGS began in 2006 it was capable of producingmegabases of DNA sequence per run, but now today machines are capable of producing multiple terrabases of sequence output per run. In this talk I will discuss the history of NGS and describe the various sequencing platforms that are available today. I will then describe how these platforms can be used to characterize DNA and RNA sequences and how this will transform our society. In addition, I will discuss where this technology is heading and attempt and most likely fail to describe where we will be with this technology five to ten years in the future.

Biography

David I Smith completed his PhD from the University of Wisconsin in Madison and then did his Post-doctoral studies at the University of California in Irvine. Since 1996, he has been a Professor at the Mayo Clinic in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology. He is also the Chairman of the Technology Assessment Group for the Center for Individualized Medicine at the Mayo Clinic. His laboratory studies include the common fragile sites and the role that these regions of instability play in the development of cancer. His group also studies the different ways that HPV can contribute to the development of different cancers. He has published over 200 papers in reputed journals and serves on the Editorial Board of a number of journals.

Speaker
Smith David I / Mayo Clinic,Rochester, Minnesota,United States

Abstract

The foremost intention of this article is to develop a newly hybrid powerful meta-heuristic to be integrate the Sine Cosine Algorithm with Salp Swarm Algorithm called HSSASCA for the purpose of improved the convergence performance. Firstly, we studied and analyzed the all merits of these algorithms, after that, we presented this approach to enhance the exploration and exploitation performance. The position update equations of salp swarm algorithm has been updated by using position equations of sine cosine algorithm, hence, the best and possible optimal solutions have been tried to updates based on the sine or cosine function. The existing algorithm has been tested on twenty two standard mathematical optimization functions and some engineering applications, to examine and confirm the valuable behaviours in searching the best optimal solutions for optimization functions. The experimental results reveal that, HSSA-SCA algorithm has achieves the highest accuracies with least runtime in comparison with others. Furthermore, the accuracy of the newly hybrid algorithm has been verified on a five dataset bio-medical functions i.e. i) XOR (ii) Balloon (iii) Breast Cancer (iv) Iris and (v) Heart. For the verification, the experimental solutions of HSSASCA algorithm have been compared with comparative algorithms. Basis of these functions we have discussed and identified the reasons for poor and strong accuracy of other algorithms. The optimal solutions of these function revealed that the newly hybrid algorithm provides high competitive solutions in terms of improved local optima avoidance and high level of accuracy in mean, standard deviation, classification and convergence rate as comparison to others.

Biography

Narinder Singh is an Scientists at Department of Mathematics, Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, INDIA. Dr. Singh has obtained his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Department of Mathematics, Punjabi University, Patiala. He has reviewed several articles of the Hindawi and Scientia Iranica Journals, and as well as the reviewer of seven International well reputed Journals. Recently he will be organizing the special session in SOFA-2018: 8th International Workshop on Soft Computing Applications 13-15 September, 2018, Arad, Romania and has received invitation for a speaker talk in Advanced focus on Clinical Research and the Future of Biomarkers, September 17-18, 2018 at Toronto, Canada. He has also been invited to present his paper in the conference going to be held in Zordan, July 2018. He has the member of several Association and Professional Bodies. His Primary area of interest is Nature Inspired Optimization Techniques. He has published more than 25 research papers in various international journals/conferences. He has also received Gold Medal at M.Phil level.

Speaker
Narinder Singh / Scientists/Researcher Department of Mathematics Punjabi University, Patiala, Punjab, INDIA

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