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Scientific Program

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) face a set of challenges due to effects of climate change, small size, many populations, vulnerabilities due to natural and anthropic environmental impacts, absence of a legal framework to face coastal risk, sea-level rise, among other problems associated lack of strategies about sustainable management of resources, and to the difficulties in coordinating adequate environmental management with public participation. The aim of the present study was to design different tools to improve the current territorial planning in the SIDS. Quantitative and qualitative methods are combined in the methodologies of public participation proposed which was validated in diverse countries. Our results indicated Several advantages and learned lessons were obtained during the stages of tools design and implementation. The methodologies and studies with public participation applicate resulted in a useful local management tool for coastal management, economic and urban developing activities, strategic ecosystems recovery, as well as to favor the governance and decision-making processes at the Small Island Developing States.

Biography

Celene Milanés Batista has completed her PhD in Technics Science in Universidad de Oriente, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba and postdoctoral studies from Universidad Federal do Para, in Belem do Para, Brazil. Her research interests include Land-Use Planning, urban risk and vulnerabilities due to climatic change and Integrated Coastal Zone Management. She is developing different projects in thematic relating urban resilience, territorial planning and coastal urban regeneration in small islands and coastal cities. Currently, she is coordinator of the Master Degree in Development Sustainable. Tenured Professor and Researcher in Universidad de la Costa, Colombia.

Speaker
Celene Milanés Batista / University of the Coast
Colombia

Abstract

Biography

David Crookall, PhD, has taught at several universities in several countries (France, Singapore, Thailand, USA, etc.). For many years, he was Editor-in-chief of Simulation & Gaming (Sage), and is on the editorial board of several scientific journals. He has published several books and many articles in top journals. He is often invited to run workshops and seminars.

Speaker
David Crookall / University of Nice Sophia Antipolis
France

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Changqian Ma / China University of Geosciences
China

Abstract

Biography

Professor Govind Singh Bhardwaj, retired from senior most faculty In-Charge Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory and Nodal officer GIS, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology India; 35 years teaching and research experience and continuing the high impact research work. Graduated in 1979, Post Graduate M.Sc Geology in 1981, Post PG M.Sc Technology Applied Geology 1983 and PhD. Vast Experience of field work in remote areas in mountainous region, river course etc. full of wild life in different parts of the country, including his stay with tribes. Explored several aspects of the Pre-Cambrian rocks deformation history of the world’s oldest mountain chains of Aravallis, challenges faced against wild life as an adventurous period of life, may be quoted as inspiring one. Importantly he has explored world’s largest low grade alumino-silicate mineralization during field work in connection with his PhD degree awarded. Several awards and appreciations are due recognition to his work, appreciation from Urban Improvement Trust Udaipur, District Level Best Teachers Award 2007; University Best Professor Award two times 2009 and 2011; International Professional Research Paper Awards at Sylhet University Of Science and Technology, Bangladesh ( 2011 and 12); The Mining Geological and Metallurgical Society of India’s Smt Bala Tondon National Award (2011), Outstanding Service Award (2013), “The Teacher’s Excellence National Award 2015”, by the Confederation of Education Excellence, Delhi and supported by Ministry of Ayush, Government of India. Felicitated and honored for contribution in quality education-2016, National Award From Global Management Council, Ahmedabad. Worthwhile to mention Turkey, Bangladesh, China, Japan countries foreign visits for international assignments of Organizing Committee Member, Technical Session Chairman, Invited Speaker, Keynote Speech Speaker, Research Paper presenter etc. His concept of the GEO-SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT have been appreciated at international level. The Indian mineral industry, civil engineering construction and environmental protection of highways, four/ six lanes road net work development in hilly areas is remarkable. Contributed in excavation, conservation and environment of minerals, marble slurry born environmental appraisal, recognized by the National Human Right Commission, Delhi, India. Industry-institute interaction; Sustainable development of mine-hydro-geoenvironmental regimes research are landmark. Numerical analysis of failure risk and stability of existing/ under construction motorways twin tunnels. He has handled various software’s like Galena, FE, Matt lab, Flagylist, Flac 3D, TNTmips and Arc GIS, Rockware, DIPS etc. Team member Mo U signed with Centre for Development of Stones (CDOS), INDIA.

Speaker
Govind Singh Bhardwaj / Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
India

Abstract

Biography

Esam Elasrag is the CEO of beGreen Global-UK. He has more than 25 years of experiance in higher education, sustainability standards development, Energy Systems and building Physics gained through his work in the middle East and Europe. In additional to his work as a consultant,he continues to be active in scientific research in buildings and energy.He has delivered Invited lectures and published papers in reputed intuitions and journals.He has specialist expertise in sustainable developments, technology development, renewable,energy modeling and building services.

Speaker
Esam Elasrag / beGREEN Global
United Kingdom

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Biography

Professor Govind Singh Bhardwaj, retired from senior most faculty In-Charge Geotechnical Engineering Laboratory and Nodal officer GIS, Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology India; 35 years teaching and research experience and continuing the high impact research work. Graduated in 1979, Post Graduate M.Sc Geology in 1981, Post PG M.Sc Technology Applied Geology 1983 and PhD. Vast Experience of field work in remote areas in mountainous region, river course etc. full of wild life in different parts of the country, including his stay with tribes. Explored several aspects of the Pre-Cambrian rocks deformation history of the world’s oldest mountain chains of Aravallis, challenges faced against wild life as an adventurous period of life, may be quoted as inspiring one. Importantly he has explored world’s largest low grade alumino-silicate mineralization during field work in connection with his PhD degree awarded. Several awards and appreciations are due recognition to his work, appreciation from Urban Improvement Trust Udaipur, District Level Best Teachers Award 2007; University Best Professor Award two times 2009 and 2011; International Professional Research Paper Awards at Sylhet University Of Science and Technology, Bangladesh ( 2011 and 12); The Mining Geological and Metallurgical Society of India’s Smt Bala Tondon National Award (2011), Outstanding Service Award (2013), “The Teacher’s Excellence National Award 2015”, by the Confederation of Education Excellence, Delhi and supported by Ministry of Ayush, Government of India. Felicitated and honored for contribution in quality education-2016, National Award From Global Management Council, Ahmedabad. Worthwhile to mention Turkey, Bangladesh, China, Japan countries foreign visits for international assignments of Organizing Committee Member, Technical Session Chairman, Invited Speaker, Keynote Speech Speaker, Research Paper presenter etc. His concept of the GEO-SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT have been appreciated at international level. The Indian mineral industry, civil engineering construction and environmental protection of highways, four/ six lanes road net work development in hilly areas is remarkable. Contributed in excavation, conservation and environment of minerals, marble slurry born environmental appraisal, recognized by the National Human Right Commission, Delhi, India. Industry-institute interaction; Sustainable development of mine-hydro-geoenvironmental regimes research are landmark. Numerical analysis of failure risk and stability of existing/ under construction motorways twin tunnels. He has handled various software’s like Galena, FE, Matt lab, Flagylist, Flac 3D, TNTmips and Arc GIS, Rockware, DIPS etc. Team member Mo U signed with Centre for Development of Stones (CDOS), INDIA.

Speaker
Govind Singh Bhardwaj / Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology
India

Abstract

For the first time, the deeper part of the Cambrian-Vendian aquifer across the entire Baltic Artesian Basin BABwas sampled for dating tracers, noble gases and chemistry. Chemistry and noble gases confirmed that the mixing modelwith three end-members (recent meteoric water, glacial meltwater, brine) is suitable for northern Estonia andcan beapplied to the deeper parts of the aquifer as well. Withdepth the brine end-member becomes increasingly dominant and a more accurate composition for the brine end-member was established. 81Kr measurements all gave abundances less than half of today’s atmospheric abundance, confirming that groundwater in the Cm-V aquifer is indeed very old. For two samples, after correction for contaminated well casings using 85Kr, 81Kr abundances below the detection limit were found, indicating that these waters are older than 1.3Ma. These are the first samples with a81Kr abundance below detection limit, providing evidence that underground production is negligible. The absence of underground production increases credibility that the still quite new 81Kr dating method is reliable. Based on the mixing model and 81Kr measurements, the age of the recent meteoric end-member could be estimated. These confirm the modelling results giving an average horizontal velocity of 0.34 m/a between the recharge area and the Gulf of Riga. As the brine was found to be beyond the dating range of 81Kr, mean ages for the samples as a whole cannot be given, only lower age limits. 4He and 40Ar/36Ar measurements confirm that the waters are indeed old. However, 4He and 40Arwere found to becontrolled by a combination of several factors, which makes them difficult to interpret and prevents their use as dating tools. Because 36Cl would also be problematic in the BAB 81Kr measurements provided a unique tool to better understand and constrain flow patterns in the Cm-V aquifer of the BAB.

Biography

ReinVaikmäe has completed his PhD fromInstitute of Geography Soviet Academy of Sci,Russia. He is Professor emeritus and the head of Division of isotope geology in Tallin University of Technology and adviser for the Presidnt of the Estonian Academy of Sdiences. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been servingas editorial board member of repute journals and as research adviser in the Estonian Ministry of Education and Research.

Speaker
Rein Vaikmae / Tallinn University of Technology
Estonia

Abstract

The use of high resolution ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) datasets provides spatial density and vertical precision for obtaining highly accurate Digital Surface Models (DSMs). As a result, the reliability of flood damage analysis has improved significantly, owing to the increased accuracy of hydrodynamic models. In addition, considerable error reduction has been achieved in the estimation of first floor elevation, which is a critical parameter for determining structural and content damages in buildings. However, as with any discrete measurement technique, LiDAR data contain object space ambiguities, especially in urban areas where the presence of buildings and the floodplain gives rise to a highly complex landscape that is largely corrected by using ancillary information based on the addition of breaklines to a triangulated irregular network (TIN). The present study provides a methodological approach for assessing uncertainty regarding first floor elevation. This is based on: (i) generation an urban TIN from LiDAR data with a density of 0.5 points•m−2, complemented with the river bathymetry obtained from a field survey with a density of 0.3 points•m−2. The TIN was subsequently improved by adding breaklines and was finally transformed to a raster with a spatial resolution of 2 m; (ii) implementation of a two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic model based on the 500-year flood return period. The high resolution DSM obtained in the previous step, facilitated addressing the modelling, since it represented suitable urban features influencing hydraulics (e.g., streets and buildings); and (iii) determination of first floor elevation uncertainty within the 500-year flood zone by performing Monte Carlo simulations based on geostatistics and 1997 control elevation points in order to assess error. Deviations in first floor elevation (average: 0.56 m and standard deviation: 0.33 m) show that this parameter has to be neatly characterized in order to obtain reliable assessments of flood damage assessments and implement realistic risk management.

Biography

Dr Jose María Bodoque obtained his Ph.D. in Geology from Complutense University of Madrid, Spain. He undertook his postdoctoral studies at the Department of Civil Engineering –Texas A&M University, United States. Currently, he is professor of the Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Biochemistry at the University of Castilla-La Mancha His main research is focused on hydrology and geomorphology, which has resulted in more than 45 papers in international peer reviewed journals related to fluvial geomorphology, flood risk assessment and management, soil erosion, water quality and ecological restoration.

Speaker
Jose Maria Bodoque del Pozo / University of Castilla-La Mancha
Spain

Abstract

This study presents time-frequency attributes based on the bidimensional Empirical mode decomposition (2D EMD). This method allows to decompose of a bidimensional signal into intrinsic mode functions (IMFs) (or modes). Application on Algerian seismic sections shows that meaningful attributes, specifically instantaneous Hilbert spectral amplitude attributes, resulted from the computed IMFs, help detect subtle hydrocarbon traps that cannot be identified by the conventional attributes. The present application on field data shows that 2D EMD provides meaningful instantaneous Hilbert spectral amplitude attributes, which help to detecting anomalies, which is critical for finding oil and gas traps. Keywords: bidimensional Empirical mode decomposition (2D EMD), seismic data, tight reservoirs.

Biography

Said GACI received a B.S. with honors, a M.SC. and a PhD in geophysics from University of Sciences and Technology Houari Boumediene (Algiers). He received also a M.SC. in Petroleum economics and strategic management from Algerian Petroleum Institute. He works at Sonatrach- Division exploration as a senior geophysicist since July 2004. His research interests are the application of advanced signal processing techniques in geosciences.

Speaker
Said Gaci / Sonatrach-Algerian Institute of Petroleum(IAP)
Algeria

Sessions:

Abstract

Coastal and inland flooding has been a problematic occurrence, specifically over the past century. Global warming has caused an 8 inch sea level rise since 1990, which made the coastal flood zone wider, deeper and more damaging. Additionally, riverine flooding is extremely damaging to the coastal communities’ substructure and economy as well which causes river banks to overflow, inundating low-lying areas. Low-lying coastal areas at severe risk for flood hazard, sea level rise, land depletion, economic loss, property damage, destroy habitat destruction, and also threaten human health and safety which are the main study area of this work. A decision making framework is being built to help mitigate the impacts of the environmental and economical dangers of storm surges, sea level rise, flashfloods and inland flooding. With vigorous research and the use of innovative hydrologic modeling, this tool can be utilized to help with resiliency planning for coastal communities. This will allow the individuals living in a coastal community to understand the details of climatic hazards in their area and risks associated to their communities. This tool also suggest the best solution for the problem each community faces. The results and benefits from the simulation and modeling techniques, allow coastal communities to choose the most appropriate method for building a long lasting and sustainable resilience plan in the future.

Biography

Rouzbeh Nazari, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rowan University. His primary research interests are: application of remote sensing in water resources and environment, Coastal resiliency, hydrodynamic modeling, storm water management and impact assessment of extreme weather events on built environment. He has worked on New York and New Jersey Resiliency planning has been a pioneer in identification of the high risk areas and prediction of the possible damages and cost analysis under various extreme climatic scenarios. He has received over $3,000,000 in funding from federal, state and industry for his research. Dr. Nazari's research has been supported by NSF, USDA, FEMA, NJDCA, NJDEP, NY/NJ DOT, and American Water. Dr. Nazari's work has been featured on TV and major Newspapers including, PIX11 news, NJTV, US Guardian, Philadelphia Inquirer, New Jersey Business and Press of Atlantic City to name a few.

Speaker
Rouzbeh Nazari / Rowan University
United States

Abstract

Bridge pier scouring in cold regions occurs when the surface of water turns into ice in which an additional solid boundary is being added to flowing water which leads to significant change in flow field and scour pattern around the bridge piers. Investigation of local scour under ice covered flow has become an ongoing concern for the hydraulic engineers due to difficulty and restriction in measuring the local scour process around bridge piers under ice cover. In the present study, based on experimental results, the validity of numerical modeling to predict the local scour around a pair of cylindrical side-by-side bridge pier under ice-covered conditions is investigated. To study the impact of roughness of ice cover on the local scour, both smooth ice cover and rough ice cover are used. The simulated scour patterns around a pair of cylindrical side-by-side bridge pier agreed well with measured results in laboratory. Finally, the calibrated numerical model has been applied to a pair of rectangular side-by-side bridge piers. The results show that the shape of bridge piers can be greatly affected by the intensity of local scour around bridge piers. Key words: Local scour, numerical simulation, bridge pier, pier shape

Biography

Mohammad rezaNamaee was a PhD student under the supervision of Dr. Jueyi Sui at the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC), Canada. During his PhD program, Mohammad carried out both experimental study and numerical simulation regarding local scour around side-by-side bridge piers under ice-covered flow conditions. His research fields include river hydraulics (both open channel and ice covered flows), sediment transport, and hydrology and watershed studies. He holds a master’s degree in hydraulic engineering and a Bachelor degree in civil engineering.

Speaker
Jueyi Sui / University of Northern British Columbia
Canada

Abstract

High resolution sequence stratigraphy is based on the principle of base-level cycle and the principle of accommodating spatial variation to reveal the relationship between base-level cycle sequence and sedimentary dynamics and stratigraphic response process, as well as the corresponding sedimentary microfacies evolution sequence, preservation status and the development location and output characteristics of favorable reservoir sand bodies, source and interval layers.Use drilling core, logging (Yinan 4, 2 well and Yishen 4 Wells) and outcrop (Kezlenur group and Tugerming group) etc, through analyzing changes in vertical lithologic facies , vertical phase sequence and the change of the combined cycle of the overlay style and geometric relations of strata cycle identification, lower Jurassic in kuche depression formed can be identified as six long-term base level cycle (equivalent to Vail Ⅲ sequence) and 20 to 23 mid-term base-level cycle (equivalent to Vail Ⅳ sequence);Among them, well Yinan 2 has 20 medium-term base level cycles, well Yinan 4 has 23 medium-term base level cycles, and well Yinan 4 has 22 medium-term base level cycles .Long-term base level cycle is the foundation and key to establish high-resolution sequence stratigraphic correlationframework in this area. The variation of phase combination,thickness and symmetry is small,thus the whole area can be tracked and compared.Medium-term base level cycle is the basic unit of reservoir heterogeneity research, reservoir prediction and combination analysis of source, reservoir and cap.

Biography

Yuan Chun has completed her Undergraduates course from Southwest Petroleum University, China, and now she is a graduate student in Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development. In this period, she is a member of Tarim Basin project team. As a student,she owns the ability of undertaking the project.During the researching time,she is diligent in completing the research task. After several times taking part in Academic Congress such as National congress on sedimentology, Nanjing, 2017. Conference on sequence stratigraphy, Hangzhou, 2018. She broadened her knowledge of her major.

Speaker
Chun Yuan / Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development
China

Abstract

The Ajjaj shear zone is part of the regional-scale Qazzaz-Ajjaj-Hamadat (QAH) shear zone that dominates the structure of the northwestern Arabian shield, which consists of granitic gneiss and metavolcano-sedimentary rocks. It is studied to show its relationship to the nappe contacts and to explain the nature of the subhorizontal foliation typical for the Ajjaj shear zone. The Rf/ and Fry methods were employed on quartz, and feldspar porphyroclasts and mafic grains (such as hornblende and biotite) in thirty seven samples. The obtained finite-strain data show that the gneisses were moderately to highly deformed; the X/Z axial ratios range from 3.20 to 5.80 for Rf/ method and from 3.40 to 4.85 for Fry method. The direction of finite strain for the long axes shows clustering along N to WNW trend and shallow plunges, WNW in most studied samples. The Z axes are subvertical and associated with a subhorizontal foliation. The data indicate oblate strain symmetry (flattening) in the The Ajjaj shear zone and the strain magnitudes do not increase towards the tectonic contacts. It is suggested that the accumulation of finite strain was not associated with any significant volume change. The penetrative subhorizontal foliation is subparallel to the tectonic contacts with the overlying nappes and foliation was formed during nappe thrusting. This observation contrasts with the widely held opinion that nappe formation in orogens is by simple-shear deformation.

Biography

Osama M. K. Kassem obtained his PhD degree in Structural Geology from Institute of Geosciences, University Mainz Germany in 2005. He has been working as a Professor in Structural Geology at Geology and Geophysics Department, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia since 2017; Associate Professor from 2012 to 2017; Assistance from 2008 to 2012 and Researcher at Geosciences Department, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt from 2005 to 2008. He has authored more than 50 papers in reputed international and peer reviewed journals as Lithosphere, Arabian Journal of Geosciences (AJGS), Journal of King Saud University (JKSU), Journal of Earth Science (JES), International Journal of the Physical Sciences (IJPS), and Associate Editors in Journal on Geological and Earth Sciences (JGES).

Speaker
Osama M. K. Kassem / King Saud University
Saudi Arabia

Abstract

The construction of engineering projects requires the knowledge of the subsoil. In this way, the geotechnical characterization of soils is essential for the realization of any geotechnical analysis. This characterization is a complex process that begins during the exploration of the subsoil, continues with field and laboratory tests carried out to estimate certain properties of the ground, and culminates with the interpretation of the available data and the delimitation of sectors of the studied parcel. Given the uncertainty that dominates the entire geotechnical environment, it is not usual for practical Geotechnical Engineering to perform rational analyzes of the available data, beyond elementary statistical techniques, which entails a certain degree of subjectivity to determine geotechnical parameters and characterize a terrain. The developed of the rational methodology for geotechnical characterization (RMGC), was based on the performance of discriminant analyzes using the available data for coarse soils (243 samples) and cohesive soils (926 samples). These analyzes were carried out to differentiate the variable stiffness for the different soil samples. As independent variables, available soil properties in routine geotechnical studies were considered. The validity of the obtained discriminant functions to predict new cases for each type of soil was analyzed, resulting in that the new cases being correctly classified in a percentage higher than 81%. Finally, a practical application of the RMGC is presented in an area located in the Araya Peninsula, in the Northeast of Venezuela. The results obtained are summarized in the geotechnical zoning and soil behavior drawings, constructed applying the geostatistical technique of kriging, in order to differentiate sectors of the parcel considering the rigidity and behavior expected for the predominant soils in the project area.

Biography

Alvaro Boiero has completed his MSc in Earth Sciences at Simón Bolívar University, and he is Civil Engineer from Oriente University, both institutions located in Venezuela. His research interest is soil behavior under static and dynamic loads. Currently, he is Professor at the Andrés Bello Catholic University, in Caracas, teaching postgraduate classes in the subject Slope Stability, and undergraduate classes in the subjects Soil Mechanics and Soil Laboratory. Additionally, since 2010 he is Geotechnical Manager in Amundaray Ingeniería Geotécnica, C.A. (www.aig-ca.com.ve), a company dedicated to consulting in the area of Geotechnical Engineering for projects linked to the energy industry (oil - gas - electricity).

Speaker
Alvaro Boiero / Amundaray Ingeniería Geotecnica, C.A
Venezuela

Abstract

Convective clouds produce a significant proportion of the global precipitation and play an important role in the energy and water cycles. We quantify changes of the convective cloud ice mass-weighted altitude centroid (ZIWC) as a function of aerosol optical thickness (AOT). Analyses are conducted in smoke, dust and polluted continental aerosol environments over South America, Central Africa and Southeast Asia, using the latest measurements from the CloudSat and CALIPSO satellites. We find aerosols can inhibit or invigorate convection, depending on aerosol type and concentration. On average, smoke tends to suppress convection and results in lower ZIWC than clean clouds. Polluted continental aerosol tends to invigorate convection and promote higher ZIWC. The dust aerosol effects are regionally dependent and their signs differ from place to place. Moreover, we find that the aerosol inhibition or invigoration effects do not vary monotonically with AOT and the variations depend strongly on aerosol type. Our observational findings indicate that aerosol type is one of the key factors in determining the aerosol effects on convective clouds.

Biography

Jonathan Jiang Jiang obtained a B.Sc. degree in Astrophysics (1985) from Beijing Normal University, China; a M.Sc. degree in Astrophysics (1991) and a Ph.D. degree in Atmospheric Physics (1996) from York University, Canada. Currently, he is a Principal Scientist of Engineering and Science Directorate and Managing Supervisor of the Aerosol and Cloud Research Group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, managing a team of more than 30 scientist and engineers. He worked at McGill University and University of Quebec at Montreal, Canada from 1996-1999 prior to working at JPL. He has authored and co-authored over 140 peer-reviewed publications, and has been twice awarded the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medals in 2010 and in 2013 for his leadership and innovation in climate studies using NASA satellite observations.

Speaker
Jonathan Jiang / Jet propulsion Laboratory
United States

Abstract

Hongmei apricot is a deciduous fruit tree and one of the best apricot and cash crop. But along with the growth of Hongmei apricot, soil drying become severer,which influence the yield and benefits of Hongmei apricot because precipitation is shortage,and seasonal and annual change of precipitation is big. At this time,the relationship between the soil water and Hongmei apricot growth have to be regulated on Soil Water Resources Use Limit by plant and soil water carrying capacity for vegetation to reduce or evade the bad influence of soil drought on the yield and benefits of Hongmei apricot. However, there have been no studies on Use Limit of Soil Water by Hongmei apricot. In this paper, the daily precipitation, soil water content at different soil suck power was measuredby centrifuge-based approach , and the maximum infiltration depth is determined by the series two curves method and the soil water resources use limit by Hongmei apricot was determined. The results show that wilting coefficient varies with soil depth from 7.98%in surface soil to 7.1%, and the maximum infiltration depth is 290 cm , and Use Limit of Soil Water Resources by Hongmei apricotinthe maximum infiltration depth is 212.7 mm.When the soil water resources in the maximum infiltration depth equal 212.7 mm,the relationship between the soil water and Hongmei apricot vegetative growth have to be regulated on soil water carrying capacity for vegetation to reduce or evade the bad influence of soil drought on the yield and benefits of Hongmei apricotand ensure sustainable use of Soil Water Resources and the sustainable produce of Hongmei apricot.

Biography

Zhongsheng Guohas completed his PhD from Northwestern A & F University, China. He is Professor. He has published more valuable papers in reputed journals and found the theory of Soil Water Resources Use Limit by plant and soil water carrying capacity for vegetation and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Zhongsheng Guo / Northwestern A & F University
China

Abstract

The increasing demand for energy, economic development, intense industrial activity and world population growth, in turn, demands the increasing need of fuels. Electricity generation and motor vehicles depend, in most cases, on the burning of fossil fuels whose reserves are not renewable; petroleum and coal. But, importantly, there must be changes in the industrial production process, and in the consumption of energy, which can result in the reduction of impacts and environmental aggression, which favors the support of the search for sustainable and social development. Dimethyl ether can be produced from natural gas, which is highly available. In addition, costs do not depend on oil price swings. Hydrogen is a clean fuel that can be produced from hydrocarbons in the methanol vapor reforming reaction. The development of new materials with different properties and industrial applications makes it necessary to investigate materials that possess good physical, surface, electronic, mechanical and thermodynamic properties. The quasicrystalline alloys have been exploited for coating applications in various materials, composites, hydrogen storage and in the use as catalysts for catalytic reactions. Investigations by characterization techniques such as; X-ray diffractometry to accompany the evolution of the alloy phases, the Scanning Electron Microscopy allows the study of surface microstructure, among others the physico-chemical characterization analyzes, the catalytic tests are for conversion and selectivity of methanol and products formed from the reaction. It is possible to have a catalytic reaction of interest with higher formation of clean fuels, using the quasicrystals catalyst at a lower reaction temperature.

Biography

Member of the Board, Director Innovation-Technology & sustainability at MG JAM E JAM Clean & Bio Fuel Catalyst Co-LTD/Brazil. Doctoral in Chemical Engineering/Masters of Mechanical Engineering-emphasis in Materials Science/Bachelor degree in Physics-Solid state/Bachelor degree in Industrial Chemistry/Bachelor degree in Chemistry/ Specialist in the teaching of Mathematics by IMPA/UFPB/ Specialization course in Chemistry EDX/MITX from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ 22 courses Human Resources in Oil and Natural Gas Program (PRH-28), National Petroleum Agency-Natural Gas (ANP) PETROBRAS (Brazil). More than 60 publications on international and national journals (Environment, Education and Technology of Petroleum)/Reviewer international journal of Elsevier/National scientific Journals and Participation of International Congresses of OMICS on Petrochemicals and Chemical Engineering on 2013 San Antonio / 2014 in Las Vegas/Part of the organizing committee of the World Conference and Expo on Petrochemicals and Natural Resources 2016 Dubai-2018 Czech/Two Books with ISBN/One Patent in Catalyst Area. Area research in Heterogeneous catalysis, in the production of "Green Chemistry" catalysts/ Working on research with catalytic reactions (Steam Reform of Methanol to produce Hydrogen, Dehydration of Methanol in Dimethyl Ether)/Two projects were applied to the petrochemical industry/Catalytic reactions of oxidation of methanol using quasicrystalline alloys/Research of Acoustic spectroscopy system of Minerals in visible.

Speaker
Lourdes Cristina Lucena Agostinho Jamshidi / MG JAM E JAM Clean & Bio fuel Catalyst Co-LTD
Brazil

Abstract

In contrast to low orbit and geostationary satellites, the EPIC instrument on board the DSCOVR satellite provides multispectral images of the sunlit side of the Earth every hour or two. EPIC’s 10 narrowband channels span from UV to visible and near IR. The spectral observations reveal a strong daily cycle and seasonal variations in the average brightness of the planet, especially at longer wavelengths. By combining EPIC observations taken at different wavelengths, we examine the way the brightness and the color of our planet have varied since the launch of the DSCOVR satellite in mid-2015. A special attention has been paid to the spectral daily and monthly seasonal variability of the EPIC observations. In order to understand the observed variability, the study also analyzes the influence of factors such as (i) variations in the observed size of land and ocean, (ii) cloud cover, as well as the role of (iii) polar regions in Earth radiation budget. For example, it was found that including the polar areas enhances daily mean reflectance by up to 2 to 6% in northern hemispheric winter and up to 1 to 4% in summer.

Biography

Alexander Marshak received the M.S. degree in applied mathematics from Tartu University, Estonia, in 1978 and the Ph.D. degree in numerical analysis from the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, Novosibirsk, Russia, in 1983. In 1991, he joined GSFC, first working for SSAI, then UMBC/JCET, and finally, NASA/GSFC, where he has been since January 2003. Dr. A. Marshak conducts research on remote sensing of clouds, aerosols and blowing snow, on cloudaerosol interaction, and on many aspects of atmospheric radiative transfer. Dr. Marshak has published over 150 refereed papers, books, and chapters in edited volumes

Speaker
Alexander Marshak / NASA
United States

Abstract

Protected natural ecosystems are fundamental for the conservation of biodiversity. In Spain the protected area reaches 27.21% and its coast length is 7,880 km, with a total of preserved marine areas that exceeds 8%. However, to achieve their full potential, adequate monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are needed. Within the framework of the Spain National projects ARTeMISat 1 and 2, new techniques for the processing of remote sensing images have been developed, using high spatial resolution multispectral (ARTeMISat-1) and hyperspectral (ARTeMISat-2) for the sustainable management of natural resources, as well as the monitoring of the environment and the estimation of parameters related to climate change and anthropogenic pressure. Coastal areas (Maspalomas, Corralejo, Cabrera and Medes) have been selected from the Canary Islands, Balearic Islands and Catalonia. In order to achieve these objectives, ARTeMISat-1 has already been implemented and, currently, in the ARTeMISat-2 project is being investigated very advanced remote sensing techniques applied to the data recorded by sensors of last generation in different platforms: satellites, airplanes and drones. Thus, the main objective of this research, some concluded and others in the development phase, is the generation of knowledge that is materialized in the implementation of methodologies that allow the monitoring of vulnerable ecosystems at maximum spatial resolution. Specifically, advanced multiplatform techniques are being implemented that, for coastal marine resources, provide validated products of water quality, bathymetry and seabed mapping, with special interest in the classification of seagrass and algae. Seagrass meadows are very important in coastal areas and its preservation in a sustainable manner needs the appropriate management tools.

Biography

Francisco Eugenio (M’00-A’00) received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degree from the University of Las Palmas of Gran Canaria (ULPGC), Las Palmas, Spain, in 1986, 1993 and 2000, respectively, both in on Electrical Engineering. He joined the Department of Signal and Communications, ULPGC, in December 1988. From 1998 to December 2000, he was with the Technical University of Catalunya in Barcelona (UPC), Barcelona, Spain, in the image processing group. Since 2003, he is Associate Professor at ULPGC, having served as Associate Dean of the Telecommunication School (EUITT) at ULPGC (1994-1999). Since 2004 he is Dean of the Telecommunication School at ULPGC. He is currently lecturing on the area of remote sensing and radar. From January 2006 he has been elected to the grade IEEE Senior Member. His current research interests include remote sensing image processing, modelling and georeferencing, especially in applied remote sensing in the field of physical oceanography. In these areas, he is author or coauthor of many publications that have appeared as journal papers and proceeding articles. His research is conducted at the Institute of Oceanography and Global Change (ULPGC) and includes multisensor/multitemporal remote sensing image processing and, specially, high resolution multispectral imaging processing of coastal areas.

Speaker
Francisco Eugenio / University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Spain

Abstract

Ecological, Economic & Social sustainability are important prerequisites factors for a better development of Energy Efficiency & also in other industrial sectors. The motivation, as well as the general concern, is based on several climatological phenomena, the deforestation of forests, & the emission of polluting gases, which comes from industrial activities. The world economic aspect & in the field of science seek alternatives from renewable sources, clean energy, sustainable materials & green chemically. Nano composites are materials used with wide variety & purpose in various industrial areas; are produced to be more resistant, light & functional. The thin films obtained through chemical/mechanical processes have applicability in the biomedical, petrochemical & electronic sensors area. The structure of the thin films from the metal matrix plus graphene oxide, observes a barrier in the formation in the layers. This barrier within the film may occur in the rate of permeation of water & oxygen molecules. The potential of quasicrystalline alloys in catalytic reactions is due to their equilibrium phases are stable even at high temperatures. The catalysts of quasicrystals supported with Nanosheets of graphene, in catalytic reaction becomes more resistant to the poisonings. In this work, we used experimental techniques such as X-ray diffraction to monitor the evolution of the quasicrystalline alloy phase, scanning electron microscopy, allowing the study of the surface microstructure, & other physicalchemical characterization tests of Nanocomposite materials.

Biography

Vice President, Member of the Board, Executive Director at MG JAM E JAM Clean & Bio Fuel Catalyst Co-LTD/Brazil. Doctoral in Material Science & Engineering, Masters in Material Science & Engineering – Civil Urban Planning Engineering, BS Social Planning & Civil Construction/Architecture. Reza has one patent, publishing two book with ISBN, more than 31 articles published in international & national journals (Materials Sciences, Chemical Engineering, & Education), Participation of extension courses Pyrolysis of Biomass for Biofuel Production; & participation 3th publication of the two International Congresses, OMICS on Petrochemical and Chemical Engineering on November 2013 San Antonio; & on October 2014 Las Vegas & Part of the organizing committee of the World Conference & Expo on Petrochemicals & Natural Resources on October 2018 Czech-Prague. Doctoral research was developing nanoparticles of Graphene Oxide/metallic alloys, for the production of electronic sensors, biological sensors, super capacitors, catalysts for petrochemical industrialists and etc. It uses of Reduced Graphene Oxide of low acidity and high in the formation of composites employed in thin films. Masters projects with applicability of the petrochemical industry were developed. These projects were formed composites (Graphene oxide + Polymers & metallic alloys with composition based on Aluminum).

Speaker
Reza Jamshidi Rodbari / MG JAM E JAM Clean & Bio fuel Catalyst Co-LTD
Brazil

Abstract

Hui Su received a B.Sc. from Peking University in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences from University of Washington in 1998. Currently, she is a principal scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). She worked at UCLA from 1998 to 2005 prior to working at JPL. Dr. Su received the JPL Lew Allen Award for Excellence in 2008 and NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2010. She has published over 90 peer-reviewed articles. She is an Editor of the Geophysical Research Letter. Her research interest is primarily in climate dynamics and convective processes.

Biography

Climate models predict that the tropical ascending region would become narrower in response to global warming, but observational evidence has been lacking. Using a number of satellite observations and reanalysis data, we show that the observed spatial extent of the relatively moist, rainy and cloudy regions in the tropics associated with the large-scale ascent has been decreasing at a rate of −0.3% decade−1 from 1979 to 2016, resulted from the combined effects of natural variability and forced climate change. The tightening of the tropical ascending region in the last four decades causes a long-term precipitation reduction of −1.8% decade−1 at the edges of the ascending zone with profound implications for local water resources and biodiversity, while the average rainfall inside the ascending zone increases at ~2.0% decade−1, roughly 13% per unit surface warming.

Speaker
Hui Su / Jet Propulsion Laboratory
United States

Sessions:

Abstract

Landslides occur in the city of Tuzla in almost all geological environments. The terrains are mostly built of unpainted structures that are susceptible to the influence of exogenous processes. From May to August 2014, 1359 landslides were registered in the city of Tuzla. These landslides cover an area of 13.5% of the total area of the city of Tuzla. The main causes of landslides on the slopes of the city are large amounts of rain in May 2014. Also, the undeveloped precipitation sewage in some parts of the city on the slopes of the terrain is the cause of the landslide. Also, area of Tuzla is often threatened flooding urban and suburban area of the field.

Biography

Professor Nedim Suljic is vice dean for scientific and research work at the Faculty of Mining, Geology and Civil Engineering, University of Tuzla, Bosnia and Herzegovina He is head of the doctoral study of civil engineering. He has published about 50 scientific papers and 10 expert papers at international conferences, symposiums and scientific journals. He published three university textbooks and two books in the field of geotechnics and hydrotechnics. One book was published in Serbia. He is a regular reviewer and member of the international editorial board of the following scientific-professional journals: The International Journal of Mechanical Engineering and Automation (USA, New York), The Open Journal of Water Pollution and Treatment (USA), The Journal Civil Engineering and Architecture (USA), The of Journal Civil Engineering Research (Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA), The of Journal Geosciences (Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA), American Journal of Fluid Dynamics (Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA), The Scientific Journal Ecologica, Belgrade, Serbia.

Speaker
Nedim Suljić / The University of Tuzla
Bosnia and Herzegovina

Abstract

African plate influenced by the forming, drifting and breaking up of the Gondwana during Phanerozoichas experienced three tectonic evolution stages, and developped several types of basins. Based on the study of tectonic evolutionand petroleum geology, the structural characteristics and rules of hydrocarbon accumulation in different types of rifts are determined as follows. Inthe pre-cratonic basins in north Africa the Paleozoic petroleum system dominated in those basins, which accumulated mainly in dome structures, and the variations in intensitiesof subsidence and locations of depocentersincontinental margin rift basins in north Africa led to diversity of hydrocarbon accumulation and resource potential. The passive margin rift basins in the east and west Africa formed during thebreakup of Pangea and rifting of Atlantic and Indian Ocean: In the west, the widely depositedsaliferous formations acted as main seal,whichconstitutedtwo petroleum systems; in the east, hydrocarbon distribution was controlled primarily by the structural architectures of the basins. The intra-continental central and west Africa rift basins experienced three stages of rifting, and in those E-W trending basins hydrocarbons were accumulated primarily in the lower Cretaceous. However,hydrocarbon distributionsin NW-SE striking basins weremainly in the upper Cretaceous-Paleogene, which primarily depended on the intensities of inversion took place at the Santonian (about 80Ma). Inthose newly formed eastern African rift basins and the Red Sea basinCenozoic petroleum systems were dominant.

Biography

Zhang Guangya has more than 35 years of experiences in petroleum geology study and OIL AND GAS Exploration. He has completed the national key projects named resource evaluation of global petroleum-bearing basins and published more than 20 academic papers on tectonic evolution and petroleum geology of Africa plate. At present, he is mainly engaged in the structural and petroleum geological study and exploration activities in West and Central Africa rifts.

Speaker
ZHANG Guangya / PetroChina Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development
China

Abstract

Albania has two main types of aquifers, karst aquifers and aquifers in sediments. The latter ones are mostly situated in the coastal areas largely in sandy sediments intercalated with clays. Albania is situated in a tectonic active area, in the seam between the European and African plates. Thus, in the recent few thousand years many changes have occurred along the coast line. The deforestation during the last few hundred years have increased erosion and extended the coast line seawards. This study concerns three coastal aquifers, in the Mati river plain, in Drin river coastal area and in the Vjosa river plain. The study was initiated due to the concern regarding possible seawater intrusion. In the Mati plain aquifer there was elevated salinity at places. The study has involved groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis including isotope determinations including D, 18O and 34S. A few of the more mineralized samples of were used for age determination by 14C. The water isotopes of groundwater with higher chloride levels did not indicate seawater intrusion but was interpreted as formed by diffusion from intercalated clay layers. In the Mati aquifer up to an age of 6000 years was found, an age indicating that the salinity was introduced during the Flandrian transgression. In the Drin and Vjosa plains chloride levels were only moderately elevated and the water isotopes did not indicate seawater mixing. 34S was used to trace the origin of sulphate in the water. Three sources were possible, from rainwater, seawater and from mining activities in the catchment. This showed that the elevated sulphate levels had sulphide origin from active or closed mines in the area. Although no current seawater intrusion was indicated there is need for continued monitoring of groundwater chemistry and groundwater levels in view of the current and increasing droughts for water supply and irrigation. Another local risk, notably in the Mati plain, is digging of sand along the river. This might cause clogging and decreased recharge. In a longer perspective the climate change with a higher seawater level is a risk in view. Along the Fani and Mati rivers heavy metals were studied. Local hot spots from sulphidic mining waste were detected. Most of the metals were in colloidal or suspended form and did not present a threat for the groundwater.

Biography

Gunnar Jacks is professor emeritus in groundwater chemistry at Royal Inst. of Technology, Sweden. He has been working in India for three years at Central Ground Water Board. More recently he has been involved in the study of arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh, India and Vietnam. He has studied zinc deficiency in Mali in West Africa. Over the last 23 years he has 58 publications in international peer reviewed journals written 10 book chapters.

Speaker
Gunnar Jacks / Royal Inst. of Technology
Sweden

Abstract

The technology of multi-fractured horizontal well is the one of the most effective and efficient methods to develop shale gas reservoir. Referring to absorption/diffusion effect, stress sensitivity effect in shale formation and slippage effect and, a compound flow model of multi-fractured horizontal well is built and its analytic solution in Laplace space is also obtained. Using Stefest numerical reversion technology and Duhamel principle, taking wellbore storage and skin effect into consideration, a non-dimensional productivity model in real space is built and its solution is resolved, thus drawing standard template of non-dimensional productivity model and carrying out sensitive analysis of influencing factors. According to the consequences of realistic application, this model can predict real productivity of a multi-fractured horizontal well and the forecast accuracy is high enough to solve real problem. The result shows that production of multi-fractured horizontal well in shale gas can be divided into three seepage zones and five stages. In the first stage when linear flow in artificial fractures is dominant, production relatively high whereas the decline rate is also high; in the middle stage when linear flow in nature fractures or micro-fractures is dominant, production and decline rate are both decreasing; in the final stage when linear flow in matrix is predominant, production period long with low production rate. This paper builds foundation for learning complicated seepage law of multi-fractured horizontal well, forecasting productivity of multi-fractured horizontal well in shale gas reservoir, revaluating result of artificial fracturing and optimizing fracturing parameters of horizontal well.

Biography

Wang is pursuing his PhD from Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, PetroChina, China. He specializes in the exploration and development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as tight oil&gas, shale oil & gas. He is also interested in hydro thermal simulation and development.

Speaker
QIANG WANG / Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development
China

Abstract

Study of the chemical and gas composition of underground water from self-pouring wells in Armenia reveals that observed time series arevery sensitiveto geodynamic activity in the region. Hydro-geochemical composition of observed water from self-pouring wells also shows numerous geochemical precursors for strong earthquakes. They are appeared as decrease in dispersion of observed data time series within sliding windows. More detailed studiesof the precursors shows that some ofthemare consistent prior to all major seismic events in the region. They have long time duration and appear almost one year prior tostrong earthquakes. There is a correlation between the statistical characteristics of precursors and time, intensity, and the location of following earthquakes. Statistical characteristics of observed time series can be regarded as stable indicator of geodynamic activity in region. Monitoring of underground water hydro-geochemical composition allows observation of the post-earthquake geodynamic changes in the region and earthquake interaction process. It also let us to reveal ongoing earthquake preparation process. Retrospective predictive analysis of strong events shows the possibility of using these types of precursors for early detection of earthquake nucleation processin real time.Comparison of data from different observation stations shows that the concentration of He in the underground water can be seen as the most reliable and universal precursor. In order to explain the observed data a new type of earthquake nucleation model was proposed based on cumulative strain increaseidea. The calculation bases on proposed mathematical model shows that predictive signal can be obtain long time before the event with no missed events or false alarm. The determination of the time, location, and magnitude of strong earthquakes can be based on the proposed physical model of earthquake hearth. Solved noble gas monitoring of self-pouring wells will allowtracking ofboth earthquake nucleation and the development process long time before an event. Real time early detection of a strong eventnucleation process should be based on geochemical monitoring consisting observation stations about 100 km apart from each other.

Biography

Will be updated soon

Speaker
Armen Kazarian / Institute of Geological Science NAN Yerevan Armenia
United States

Abstract

Many of core-flood experiments and field-scale applications have demonstrated that the Gas-Assisted Gravity Drainage (GAGD) process has gravity-stable oil displacement and thus enhances the oil recovery. One of the effective reservoir development plans based on this process is injecting gas into the gas cap through vertical wells and displace water and oil downward to the horizontal producers. The corresponding methods to predict the oil recovery of the GAGD process in the previous literature is limited in terms of universality and accuracy, because they attempt to consider either the capillary number or the Bond number independently. In addition, only one formula is attempted for all cases. In this paper, we propose a novel empirical dimensionless formula (Nd) which takes all capillary number, Bond number, and viscosity ratio into consideration. Instead of previous dimensionless number given directly, we use mathematical approach and experimental data to regress three exponents so that the predictive method is improved in terms of both accuracy and universality. Last but not least, we coded this approach into an in-house software, of which the input is the oil viscosity, Darcy velocity, permeability, porosity etc. The software then calculates the expression of Nd and regression straight line of as well as oil recovery. This method has been compared with core-flood experiment and oil field data in immiscible GAGD process, and we observe a good alignment in this validation.

Biography

Kewen Feng is studying for a master degree at the Petrochina Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development. His research interest is focus on reservoir modeling and simulation, production optimization, modeling of Gas injection.

Speaker
Kewen Feng / Petrochina Research Institute of Petroleum Exploration & Development
China

Abstract

Water shortage is the most vitalcommonlimitation to Jordan’s financialdevelopment and advancement. Quickincrements in populace and mechanicalimprovement have setexceptionalrequests on water resources. Add up torequest is drawing closer one billion cubic meters per year, which approximates the restrain of Jordan’s renewable and financially developable water resources.Orderly unsustainable overdrafting of groundwater and extraction of surface water dominate the water management of Jordan. The populacedevelopment is around 3.4% not countingvariances caused by universal political occasions. Right now, approximately 90% of the populace is concentrated in the northern and central portion of the country, where precipitation is most elevated and most of the water resources are there. Agriculture accounted for 6% of Jordan's netresidentialitem (GDP) and 12% of its sends outprofit,natural products and vegetables. Around 10% of the labor constrain was utilized in agriculture. Municipal water is utilized for residential and commercial purposes, nearbycultivatewater system and small-scale businesses, which is provided from the civilarrange. It tooincorporates the water losses from spillages in the metropolitandispersionframework, which may reach almost 40% of the totalsupply in a few Governorates. Floodedagriculture is the major water client in Jordan. Approximately 63 % of the total water provided in Jordan is utilized to irrigatealmost 700,000 dunums of land in the Jordan Valley and in the highlands. Challenges facing development of water resources are desalination, capacity building, energy generation, negative natural impacts, restriction of water resources, hazard administration of treated wastewater and greywater and storm water collection. Keywords: water, agriculture, extraction, management, precipitation.

Biography

Will be updated soon.

Speaker
Atef / German Jordanian University
Jordan

Abstract

Accessible element organic derivatives of aliphatic nitro compounds can be prepared easily from respective halogenides X–Hal and salts of aliphatic nitro compounds.{1] Trialkylsilylnitronatesexsist as O-forms exclusively. However, dialkylboron derivativesof aliphatic nitro compounds are as dimeresA as a rule. In the presentation a basic types of nitronateswill be briefly considered and possible migrations of elementorganic fragment are discussed. Also the ways for the use of element-organic derivatives in the directed organic synthesis will discussed.

Biography

Will be updated soon.

Speaker
Sema L. Ioffe / ND Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry
Russia

Abstract

The Kurdistan foreland basin (NE Iraq) was formed as a result of the ophiolite obduction of the Iranian plate on the on the northeastern periphery of the Arabian Plate during the late cretaceous. This basin of high interest for their hydrocarbons contents. Based on field work and lab data from 30 thirty outcrops and 10 hydrocarbon wells, about twenty 26 associations and 22 biostratigraphic zones have been established. The generation stage extends from Middle Turonian to late Maastrichtian and characterized by Pre-flysch, flysch,Rudist patchy reef and molasses facies, that is bounded at its base by sequence boundary type one of Turonian age and at its tope by 250m thick conglomerates, manifesting Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary. The development phase is characterized by the progressive migration of the depocenter basin towards southwest. The reactivated thrust faults, generates segmented basin with remarkable lateral and vertical facial changes in different tectonic domain and extends in age from Paleocene to late Eocene. The flysch facies overlain by nummulites –algal patchy reef ,which in turn overlain by molasses deposits . This sequence terminated with a major gap at the top of Eocene that called Zagros Major Hiatuses(20 million years). During the Oligocene - Early Miocene the foreland basin s forms interior basin ,filled by shallow marine carbonates ,that changes upwards into lagoonal facies, and last planktic facies. The termination over filled phase extends from the Middle Miocene to late Pliocene and characterized by the deposition of about 4000-5000 m of siliciclastics that eroded from the uplifted Zgaros mountain range.

Biography

Fadhil Ameen has completed his PhD from university of sulaimani, Kurdistan region- Iraq. He is professor of stratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy.He worked in the geological survey of iraq for seven years. Also he worked as consultant for FAO (UN) and several oil companies. He was the president of the geological society of kurditsan. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Fadhil Ahmed Ameen / University of sulaimani
Iraq

Abstract

In atmosphere, the moisture and temperature distribution are non-uniformed. Air masses can be dry in one place and quickly becomes moist or saturated in other places. For the most of regions in troposphere, the atmosphere is neither absolutely dry nor completely saturated. In the past, potential temperature (θ) is introduced for dry atmosphere and equivalent potential temperature (θe) is also developed for diagnosing saturated moist atmosphere. However, until now, it is still lack of a variable that can describe the real moist atmosphere. So the generalized potential temperature (θ*) was introduced here to describe the thermodynamic state in the moist atmosphere. Besides, potential vorticity (PV) is the core of the balanced dynamics, and it has been widely applied to different diagnoses and analyses of weather systems. However, we found that the PV gradient is related to more important weather phenomena, such as heavy rain areas, tropopause. Hence, a second-order of potential vorticity is proposed, and it can include the PV gradient for diagnosing different weather events.

Biography

Shouting Gao has completed his PhD from Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. His research interests include mesoscale dynamics and weather analysis. Currently, he is a professor of the University of Chinese Academy of Sciences and working on mesoscale meteorological field.

Speaker
Shouting Gao / University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Abstract

Today, use of GIS in optimizing geo-resources has become a major focus of decision makers, since timely decision making procedure is required in every stage of planning exercise. However, an assessment procedure often becomes a very complicated matter when evaluation involves some amount of criteria consisting of a number of GIS attribute identities or cells which are spatially indexed. The principal aim of this paper is to utilize a compromise programming (CoPr), which is a mathematical programming technique that is used to find a compromise solution within a set of conflicting objectives method in GIS, to assess land resources in terms of potential development on a geo-spatial basis. A so-called fuzzy logic is used for rating procedure to determine ideal points of geo-resources. Some archetype areas are used for implementing the concept: urban-suburban fringe, rural area, and region. Based on the validation procedure conducted, this optimizing procedure indicates good results. Correlation coefficients resulted from comparison analysis with commonly used method, ground survey, and crop production in agricultural land are reasonably good (more than 0,85). Standard deviations of cell digital numbers are low within such comparison procedures. The results of this CoPr and fuzzy set applications indicate that transformation procedure of data from a category into a set of continuous information is always useful to assist in simplifying the problem. Structured collection of organized spatial data provides systematic insights regarding a given phenomenon to enables the combination of various factors such as biophysics, ecology, socio-economy, etc.to be considered in a resource assessment model.

Biography

Sumbangan Baja has completed his Ph.D from School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Australia in 2002. He has worked with international agencies: JICA, IDB, World Bank, in various resource assessment, planning, and mapping projects. He was a Chairmen of Indonesian Society for Remote Sensing Chapter South Sulawesi Province until 2018. He is now Vice Rector for Planning, Finance, and Infrastructure, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia, and still active as the Head of Geospatial Information and Land Use Planning Laboratory, Hasanuddin University. His research interest is spatial modelling, GIS and Remote Sensing, spatial decision making analysis, and land resource assessment. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has presented his works at more than 30 international conferences and symposiums.

Speaker
Sumbangan Baja / Hasanuddin University
Indonesia

Abstract

One of the adverse impacts of climate change is drought, which occurs more frequently in the High Ziz river Basin, Central High Atlas, Morocco. The application of drought index analysis is useful for drought assessment to consider adaptation and mitigation method in order to deal with climate change. By figuring out the level and duration of the drought. In order to analyze drought in the specific area, Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is an index to quantify the rainfall deficit for multiple timescales. At present, the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is the most widely used drought index to provide good estimations about the intensity, magnitude and spatial extent of droughts. Is widely accepted that SPI time scales affect different sub-systems in the hydrological cycle due to the fact that the response of the different water usable sources to precipitation shortages can be very different. The aim of this study is to characterize the drought in the High ZIZ basin. It is based on the calculation of the standardized precipitation index SPI (Standardized Precipitation Index), to estimate changes of future drought conditions in the catchment studied. This suggests that it is necessary to test the drought indices and time scales in relation to their usefulness for monitoring different drought types under different environmental conditions and water demand situations. Keywords: High ZIZ basin, drought, climate change, standardized precipitation index (SPI)

Biography

Will be updated soon

Speaker
Khadija DIANI / LO3G Laboratory
Morocco

Abstract

The Indonesian archipelago is located between the Continent of Australia and the Continent of Asia, has 17,508 large islands and small islands, with an area of 5,193,250 km2 covering land of about 1,919,440 km2 and the sea around 3,273,810 km2. Indonesia has a beach length of 95,181 km and is inhabited by around 140 million inhabitants. Indonesian coastal areas have productive ecosystems and have high biodiversity in the form of coral reef ecosystems, seagrass ecosystems, estuary ecosystems and mangrove ecosystems. Mangrove ecosystems in Indonesia are around 3.5 million ha or 25% of the area of mangrove forests in the world. Mangrove forests have economic functions and ecological functions. Mangrove ecosystems are a shelter for various organisms such as shrimp, crabs, shellfish, fish, birds and wood that can be used as fuel, carbon, wood for paper, home and boat raw materials. The research was carried out in three different locations namely the Tongke-Tongke mangrove area, South Sulawesi province; Tahura Ngurah Ray, Bali province; and Bee Jay Bakau, East Java province. This study uses a quantitative method, all user activities are to catch fish, crabs, shrimp, shellfish, wood, analyzed in a period of 45 days. From the results of the analysis obtained the results of the economic value of mangrove forests ($ USD / ha / year) are: shrimp (7,485.32); fish (2,400.91); crabs (3,184.99); and wood (9,836.70). Global climate change impacts on the biological and ecological aspects of mangroves, causing the importance of responding to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations, measuring greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, rising sea levels, and the impact of hydrology and storm / sea wave disasters. . In this case, Indonesia would be threatened with a loss of $ 25,364.63 / ha / year.

Biography

Dr.Ir.Suryawati Salam.,M.Si, has completed his Ph.D. from Universitas Hasanuddin, Makassar- Indonesia, He is the lecturer environment science in Universitas Bosowa. He has published reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member.

Speaker
Suryawati Salam / Universitas Bosowa
Indonesia

Will be updated soon...