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Plenary Talks

Abstract

This study was aimed to optimize a microwave treatment to fix enzymes after Oolong tea fermentation based on concentrations of tannin, total polyphenols and the remaining activity of PPO (polyphenol oxidase) enzyme. Three factors including power levels (540 - 720W), radiation time (160-195 sec) and sample loading density (0.026-0.078 g.cm-2) were considered for the optimization. Results showed that the optimal conditions were at power of 630 W, radiation duration of 190 s and the sample loading density of 0.06 g.cm-2. At these conditions, dry matter of treated tea had 23.14% tannin, and 24.10% total polyphenols, and the remaining activity of PPO was at 11.19%. The concentrations of tannin of the samples treated by microwave were higher than those of the conventionally roasted sample (21.10%). Remained total polyphenols of the former were also higher and the remaining PPO activity was lower. The color of the microwave-treated sample was better whereas the flavor and taste were less preferred as compared to the onventionaltreated tea. The results showed that microwave had high potential to inactivate enzymes in fermented tea. However, flavor and taste of the microwave-treated tea needs to be improved.

Biography

Prof. Phan Phuoc Hien
Nong Lam University, Vietnam

Major(s): Biochemistry (Bio-Pharmaco Chemical Technology, Food processing and Agriculture High Technology, Medecine materials…)

Degree and professional ranks:
PostDoct in Agro-Industrial Chemistry (Institute of National Polytechnique Toulouse France) Ph. D in Biochemistry (France & Vietnam combinative program)
Scientific function rank: Associate Professor in Biochemistry (2010), Senior Lecturer
Current works:
Director, Institute of Conservation and Development for Medicine Materials Saigon, Ho Chi Minh City
Director of International Cooperation and Research, Southern Can Thơ University CTC, Mekong River Delta
Vice Director, Van Lang Institute for High Technology Research and Development, Van Lang University HCMC Vietnam
Senior Expert and Advisor for KVIP (Korea Vietnam Incubator Park) Can Tho City Vietnam
Senior Lecturer at Nong Lam Uiniversity, Bach Khoa University HCM City (Polytechnic University), Nam Cantho University
President, Nhat Viet Applied Research and Development of High Technology Company, HCM City

CURRENT RESEARCH THEMES:
Bio-Pharmaco Chemical Technology: Natural Substance/Secondary Metabolites in plants, Biochemical technology for medicinal plants
- Food processing with traditional and modern technologies, functional foods
- Traditional and modern methods of extraction, separation, isolation, purification, and crystallization of secondary products from plants (including supercritical CO2 method)
- - Qualitative and quantitative analysis methods, direct or indirect determination of molecular structure by modern chromatography (GC, GCMS, HPLC. MS, LCMS…), and X-ray diffraction methods.
- Technologies of processing finished products for use as insecticides and fishicides, functional food and cosmetic applications from secondary metabolites
- Effect of biochemical product prepared from secondary metabolites on crops plants and aquaculture protection, with a view to protect and treat environmental pollution and establish sustainable agriculture
- Applied research on applications irradiation techniques to produce new materials, plant breeding, and prolong self –life for foods/foodstuffs, bio-fuel

Speaker
Hien Phanphuoc / Van Lang University
Vietnam

Abstract

The adequate balance of magnesium and vitamin D is essential for maintaining the physiologic functions of various organs. Vitamin D helps regulate calcium and phosphate balance to maintain healthy bone functions. Skeletal muscles, heart, teeth, bones, and many other organs require magnesium to sustain their physiologic functions. Abnormal levels in either of these nutrients can lead to serious organ dysfunctions. All of the enzymes that metabolize vitamin D seem to require magnesium, which acts as a cofactor in the enzymatic reactions in the liver and kidneys. A strong correlation exists between Mg & vitamin D deficiency. Mg supplementation, taken along with vitamin D supplementation, was more effective at correcting a vitamin D deficiency than vitamin D supplementation alone. Consider Mg Gluconate 550 mg supplement with each meal. Mg homeostasis is maintained by the delicate interactions of the intestine, bone, and kidney. Magnesium is an essential cofactor for vitamin D synthesis and activation and, in turn, can increase intestinal absorption of magnesium and establish a feed-forward loop to maintain its homeostasis. Dysregulation in either of these nutrients can be associated with various disorders, including skeletal deformities, cardiovascular disorders, and metabolic syndrome. Magnesium is an essential cofactor for vitamin D synthesis and activation and, in turn, can increase intestinal absorption of magnesium and establish a feed-forward loop to maintain its homeostasis.

Biography

Prof. Haq graduated from Aligarh Muslim University, India. Started his professional career from All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi in 1984. Having more than 35 years experience as a basic & clinical research scientist around the world including Pasteur Institute, Paris, France; McGill University, Montreal, Canada; King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Serving as Guest Editor for the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology for the last 4 years. Currently, working as the Professor & Head, Department of Food Technology, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India.

Speaker
Afrozul Haq / Hamdard University
India

Abstract

Will be update soon...

Biography

Dr. Monique Lacroix obtained her B.Sc.A. (1980) and her M.Sc. (1982) in food science and technology from Laval University. Recipient of a one-year fellowship in biotechnology in 1983, from the France-Quebec exchange program, she participated in a study of the differential absorption kinetics of milk protein hydrolysate in vivo in pigs, at laboratory of nutrition physiology, INRA, Jouy-en-Josas, France,. She was awarded a Ph.D in nutrition by Laval University in 1986, where she specialized in the improvement of nutritional value of canola proteins using enzymatic hydrolysis, chemical pre-treatment, fermentation and ultrafiltration in order to eliminate phenolic compounds and concentrate the protein hydrolysate. In 1987, she was appointed professor in the Research Centre in Sciences Applied to Food (CRESALA), founded by Dr. Marcel Gagnon in 1972, to collaborate with the food industry in developing new technologies, ensuring safe processing methods, improving food preservation, and developing new high quality products. In addition, she worked on combined irradiation treatments designed to improve food safety, while protecting nutritional value and reducing nutritional loss. Her research in food science is focused on improving the bio food industry through the exploitation of new processing technologies and treatments to ensure the overall quality of food as well as the use of food by-products to develop new high quality products. The improvement of new technologies (ex: irradiation) or combination of treatments results in a reduction of loss and maintains both product safety and nutritional value. Research in the different areas of food toxicology, microbiology, chemistry and biochemistry, physico-chemical properties and the sensory evaluation of food is focused on perfecting new processes.

Research Activities

Development and application of new food processing technologies to ensure food safety and prevent foodborne illness: basic research on environmental components such as the mechanism by which natural bio-active molecules (organic acids, essential oils, edible coating) can destroy pathogenic bacteria or can influence bacterial radiosensitivity during cold pasteurization under different atmospheric conditions (air, modified atmosphere conditions). Study the mechanism of action of natural endogenous compounds from plants, new probiotic bacteria recently isolated in our laboratory and their metabolites (EPS, bacteriocins) for the development of new nutraceutical products and functional foods. Propose new solutions as a change of antibiotic resistance Prevention of nosocomial and infectious disease Maintenance of good health and prevention of degenerative sickness, by their properties to stimulate immune system, their antioxidant, antimutagenic and antiradical capacity, and the capacity to generate apoptosis of cancer cells Valorize food by-products for the development of biodegradable packaging and nanopolymer-based films to protect the environment against pollution and develop high value products.

Speaker
Monique Lacroix / INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Center
Canada

Keynote Talks

Abstract

The stomach is attributed to the reservoir of Helicobacter pyrlori, an etiologic agent of acute or chronic gastritis associated with severe pathologies such as peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma of lymphoid tissue. Recent studies have put the hypothesis of being the oral cavity the ideal reservoir of the bacterium by the environmental conditions of microaerophilia, nutrients such as glycoproteins, essential moisture ions, pHcalcalino, dental biofilm as a surface of adherence. In this study, 61 saliva samples were studied from patients with or without periodontal disease of several age groups selected from theDental Clinical of the University Institute of Health Sciences, Gandra Porto, Portugal. The study included, conventional methods of culture, differential testing to detect enzyme urease. In a later study, PCR-RFLP amplicon (Restriction Fragment, Length Polymorphism) was used to visualize positive, the negative, and inconclusive samples in the PCR and PCR-RFLP positive sample (CIP 11260) with periodontitis and 4 positive patients without periodontitis. The results obtained using PCR in patients with and without periodontitis were 6 positive, 3 and 3 respectively. The results with PCR-RFLP were 3 positive in patients with periodontitis and 4 in patients without periodontitis in the 61 samples studied. Conclusions: 1. In the cases considered positive, two specific genes of H.p., 2. inconclusive cases need to be reevaluated by specific targets of H. pylori, 3.The cases of individuals with periodontitis and the degrees of hygiene, moderate or poor hygiene were correlated with the presence of H. pylori.

Biography

Corsina Velazco Henriques,Full Professor.Teaching and Researcher at the TMI of San Marcos University Lima-Peru. Researcher and organizer of the Reference Laboratory Phagetyping Staphylococcus aureus, linked to the of Colindale in England.In Portugal criation of theOral Microbiology Laboratory International Grants obtained,OMS,OEA,DAAD and Socrates Erasmus Researchers to Toulouse University. Participation to integrate exchange to the Universities of Johannesburg,Pretoria, CapeTown, Beijing and Shanghai. Appointment with honorable distinction by the Scientific Council of the University Institut highlighting the contributions provided in teaching and research and further strengthened in public ceremony with all students and Professors

Speaker
Corsina Velazco Henriques / Jubilee of the Institute University of Health Sciences
Portugal

Sessions:

Food Technology and Probiotics

Abstract

Nutrition might be one of the numerous biological, immunological, and ecological factors that influence the adaptation of human population to malarial infection. Although vitamin E deficiency may cause abortion, neurological dysfunction, myopathies, and diminished erythrocyte lifespan, epidemiological studies have suggested beneficial effects of vitamin E deficiency on malaria infection. However, it has not been clinically applicable for the treatment of malaria owing to the significant content of vitamin E in our daily food. Since α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP) has been shown to be a determinant of vitamin E level in circulation, however, manipulation of vitamin E levels by α-TTP inhibition was considered as a potential therapeutic strategy for malaria. Knockout mice showed that inhibition of α-TTP confers resistance against malaria infections, accompanied by oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in the parasite, arising from vitamin E deficiency. Combination therapy with chloroquine and α-TTP inhibition significantly improved the survival rates in mice infected with malarial parasites. Thus, clinical application of vitamin E deficiency could be possible, provided that vitamin E concentration in circulation is reduced. Probucol, a recently found drug, induced vitamin E deficiency in circulation and was effective against murine malaria. Currently, treatment of malaria relies on the artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT); however, when mice infected with malarial parasites were treated with probucol and dihydroartemisinin, the beneficial effect of ACT was pronounced. Protective effects of vitamin E deficiency might be extended to manage other protozoan parasites.

Biography

Hiroshi Suzuki, Full professor in Research Unit of Functional Genomics, National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan. Research topics and work description: Analysis of gene function in vivo by means of transgenic technology. Competences: Transgenic technology, Assisted reproductive technology.

Speaker
Hiroshi Suzuki / Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine
Japan

Abstract

The move towards a de-carbonised world, driven partly by climate science and partly by the business opportunities it offers, will need the promotion of environmentally friendly alternatives, if an acceptable stabilisation level of atmospheric carbon dioxide is to be achieved. This requires the harnessing and use of natural resources that produce no air pollution or greenhouse gases and provides comfortable coexistence of human, livestock, and plants. This study reviews the energy-using technologies based on natural resources, which are available to and applicable in the farming industry. Among these are greenhouses, which are necessary for the growth of some plants (i.e., vegetables, flowers, etc.) in severe climates. However, greenhouses require some air conditioning process to control their temperature and relative humidity to suit specific plants. To achieve this, a novel air humidifier and/or dehumidifier systems using mop fans had been designed and employed in an experimental greenhouse to evaluate its performance under a controlled environment. This device helped to reduce the energy consumption of the greenhouse whilst providing a pleasant environment for the plants inside the greenhouse. The system was designed taking into account the meteorological conditions, which affect the environment inside the greenhouse. The performance of the system was monitored over a period of time by measuring the temperature and relative humidity of the greenhouse. Results of the monitoring have shown that the system was able to provide comfortable conditions (temperatures of 16-26oC and relative humidity of 65%) suitable for the plants grown in the experimental greenhouse. It also enabled the minimisation of temperature variation and, hence, avoided the hazard of any sudden climatic change inside the greenhouse.

Biography

Dr. Abdeen Mustafa Omer (BSc, MSc, PhD) is an Associate Researcher at Energy Research Institute (ERI). He obtained both his PhD degree in the Built Environment and Master of Philosophy degree in Renewable Energy Technologies from the University of Nottingham. He is qualified Mechanical Engineer with a proven track record within the water industry and renewable energy technologies. He has been graduated from University of El Menoufia, Egypt, BSc in Mechanical Engineering. His previous experience involved being a member of the research team at the National Council for Research/Energy Research Institute in Sudan and working director of research and development for National Water Equipment Manufacturing Co. Ltd., Sudan. He has been listed in the book WHO’S WHO in the World 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2010. He has published over 300 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 200 review articles, 15 books and 150 chapters in books.

Speaker
Abdeen Omer / Energy Research Institute
UK

Abstract

Introduction: Nutrition has a significant impact on cardio-vascular pathology- coronary heart diseases, cerebro-vascular accidents, peripheral arterial diseases. In the present study, we documented a correlation between the food composition and cardio-vascular diseases, and tried to establish a cardiovascular risk score, with a prognostic and therapeutic significance.
Methods: This epidemiological study consisted in a control group which comprised a statistically significant number of individuals without clinically manifest cardiovascular diseases, compared with a study groups which comprised patients with atherosclerotic clinical impairment in different territories (coronary, cerebral, peripheral arterial ischaemia), and / or hypertension), hospitalized in different clinical departments (Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Neurology. Food and eating habits were studied in both groups. The presence or absence of protective alimentary factors were taken in consideration in our individuals, in both groups.
A substudy followed, which investigated the food model and cardiovascular risk in the population of a large city - Cluj Napoca, (on a randomized, statistically significant lot), compared to rural places with intermediate risks .
Results and conclusions: Starting from epidemiological studies conducted on our subjects, areas of cardiovascular risk (food habits, geographical areas, relation to the recognized pollutants of the area) have been identified. The collected data was entered into the computer system and stored in a medical database. We established a knowledge base containing data taken from different regions concerning the predominant diet of the population, also taking into account the geographic area, the age and sex, socio-professional and demographic factors, compositional assessments of the main food items that make up the food model. In the case of food of animal origin, the system contains data concerning the feed composition of these animals (including the particular composition of the soil as origin of animal nutrition). The results of the epidemiological studies were introduced into an intelligent computer system and lead to the development of a set of rules . A cardiovascular risk score, prognostic and therapeutic scores were established.
A simulation module can intelligently exploit the knowledge base and issue assumptions for developing strategies, diagnosis and predictions concerning the future medical evolution of an individual.

Biography

Prof. Dan Radulescu is an internal medicine and cardiology specialist at the Medical University of Cluj Napoca, Romania. He is the editor of several books of cardiology, electrocardiography, arrhythmias. He published tens of papers in the cardiology and ultrasound fields. He was involved in a large national project, together with veterinary medicine and IT specialists, a project studying the impact of nutrition on cardio-vascular diseases (MACSIM). He conducted numerous workshops and sessions in cardiology, at national conferences.

Speaker
Dan Radulescu / University of Medicine and Pharmacy
Romania

Abstract

Vitamin D deficiency is a common problem in Saudi Arabia affecting all ages especially the postmenopausal women due to obesity, lack of exposure to sunlight and poor dietary Vitamin D supplementation. In our study done in Saudi women in the age group of 40 -70 years, 82% had vitamin D deficiency. There was no statistically significant association between Vitamin D levels and exposure to sunlight (P value > 0.05) which supports the view that sunlight exposure alone cannot maintain the vitamin D level. 57.3% of the Vitamin D deficient female patients had low bone mineral density. There was some association between bone mineral density and Vitamin D deficient diet though not statistically significant (P value <0.05). Another study was undertaken to find out the major environmental factors contributing to autism in Saudi children aged 3-10 years in the Northern and Eastern parts of Saudi Arabia. Genetic and environmental factors play a role in the development of autism in children. In our study, we found that the significant environmental factors which could contribute to the development of autism were consanguineous marriage, inadequate family income, medications taken by the mother during pregnancy, vitamin D deficient diet of the child and increased maternal age during pregnancy. Significantly lowered ORs for Autism in children consuming a Vitamin-D rich diet. Maternal malnutrition has been suggested as a risk factor for autism by many researchers. In our study, we found that even the childhood diet lacking in Vitamin D can be a risk factor for autism.

Biography

Prof. Dr. Anitha Oommen is a Clinical Anatomist working for 29 years in various medical universities and for the last 8 years in Northern Border University, Saudi Arabia. She has published many papers and presented papers in international conferences. She completed an online course entitled ‘Leaders in Learning’ offered by Harvard University, USA. She is a member of many international organizations like American Association of Clinical Anatomists and World Autism Organization. She has done research in Saudi Arabia on the role of Vitamin D deficiency in the development of different diseases. She has authored books in Anatomy and Embryology.

Speaker
Anitha Oommen / Northern Border University
Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Progress toward the development of efficacious therapies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is halted by a lack of understanding early underlying pathological mechanisms. Systems biology encompasses several techniques including genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. Metabolomics is the newest omics platform that offers great potential for the diagnosis and prognosis of neurodegenerative diseases as an individual’s metabolome reflects alterations in genetic, transcript, and protein profiles and influences from the environment. Advancements in the field of metabolomics have demonstrated the complexity of dynamic changes associated with AD progression underscoring challenges with the development of efficacious therapeutic interventions. Defining systems-level alterations in AD could provide insights into disease mechanisms, reveal sex-specific changes, advance the development of biomarker panels, and aid in monitoring therapeutic efficacy, which should advance individualized medicine. Since metabolic pathways are largely conserved between species, metabolomics could improve the translation of preclinical research conducted in animal models of AD into humans. A summary of recent developments in the application of metabolomics to advance the AD field is provided below.

Keywords: Alzheimer’s disease, metabolomics, lipidomics, biomarkers, animal models of Alzheimer’s disease

Biography

Dr. Anil Batta is presently professor and senior consultant in Baba Farid University of Health Sciences/ GGS Medical College, Faridkot, Punjab, India. He did his M.B.B.S. and M.D. in Medical Biochemistry from Govt. Medical College, Patiala in 1984 and 1991, respectively. His research interest is mainly in clinical application especially cancer and drug de-addiction. He has supervised more than 15 M.D., M.Sc. and Doctorate researches and published more than 30 international research papers. He is the chief editor of America’s Journal of Biochemistry. He is also working as advisor to the editorial board of International Journal of Biological and Medical Research. Recently, he has been deputed advisor to Pakistan Medical Journal of Biochemistry. He has been attached as technical advisor to various national and international conferences in Biochemistry. He has been attached as hi-tech endocrinal, genetics and automated labs of GGS Medical College, Faridkot. He has chaired various sessions in the Biochemistry meets.

Speaker
Anil Batta / Baba Farid University of Health Sciences
India

Abstract

Africa is endowed with a variety of Indigenous food plants which grow annually despite erratic rainfall. The greatest untapped potential lies in Africa, which could become the “bread basket” for the rest of the world. These plants provide an important source of food for people with either low or middle income and have been consumed for many years to supplement diets. They are also a source of income; thereby improve the living standard of local communities. They contain vital nutrients and essential vitamins for the proper maintenance of human health, especially for children who are often suffering from malnutrition and diseases. The main purpose of this study is to understand and solve the food security issues specially in African Countries . Indigenous plants play an important role in food security because they yield a crop even in poor rainfall arears where arable crops fail. There is a great untapped potential for higher productivity as the continent holds 65% of the world’s arable land. Indigenous foods can contribute to food security, the eradication of hunger and poverty, as well as the prevention of diseases in Africa. All these information collected through Secondary sources or existing information . This abstract describes that indigenous food plants commonly consumed by rural populations during periods of food shortage in rural villages in Africa , can play a vital role to eradicate hunger and malnutrition. It also shows the contribution of indigenous food plants to rural household food security.

Key Words :Indigenous , Productivity , Eradicate ,Malnutrition , Rural Household

Biography

Jayshree Soni was born at Himmatnagar, Gujarat, India in 1984. She is a well know food security analyst who secures Gold Medal in Diploma in Management and Post Graduate Diploma in Computer Application . She has also completed Post Graduate Diploma in Computer Application. She is a double Doctorate in Political Science and Management Science. She pursed Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science with the University Fellowship. Her research title in Political Science was "An Analytical Study on the Food and Agriculture Organization- Specialized agency of UNO". Her research title in Management Science was "A Study On The Potential of AgroIndustries To Achieve Food Security In Rural India".

Speaker
Jayshree Soni / JNV University
India

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the grain composition, physical characteristics and functional potential of Egyptian date palm pollen (DPP)and compare two other DPP forms: an80% ethanol DPP extract and nano-encapsulated DPP. In addition, three forms of functional yoghurt enriched with DPP were produced to investigate the impact of the fortifications on the physicochemical, microstructural, textural and sensorial characteristics of DPP yoghurt. The micromorphology was explored via scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was employed for functional group detection. Phenolic compounds were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while fatty acids were identified via gas-liquid chromatography (GLC). The evaluation of Egyptian DPP grains revealed high contents of protein and carbohydrate (36.28 and 17.14 g/100 g, respectively); Fe, Zn and Mg (226.5, 124.4 and 318 mg/100 g,respectively); ω-3, ω-6 and ω-9 unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs; 8.76, 20.26 and 7.11 g/100 g, respectively, which were increased by ethanol extraction);and phenolic compounds, especially catechin (191.73 µg/ml), which has a high antioxidant potential (IC50 35.54 mg/g). FTIR analysis indicated the presence of soluble amide (protein) and polysaccharide (fibre) functional groups in DPP. Of the three DPP forms examined(DPP grains, ethanolic DPP extract and nano-encapsulated DPP),the optimal fortification was nano-encapsulated DPP, which had a colour and microstructural, FTIR, textural, microbiological and sensorial characteristics that were comparable to those of the control. Yoghurt fortified with DPP had increased viscosity, syneresis, and water-holding capacity (WHC)compared to those of the control and can be considered a symbiotic functional product because it contains both probiotics (106 CFU/g) and prebiotics. Key words: Egyptian date palm pollen (DPP); SEM; FTIR; Nano-encapsulation; Fortified symbiotic yoghurt; Texture profile analysis.

Biography

Tarek Nour Soliman is a Researcher in Dairy Department, and Centre of Scientific Excellence, Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory,, National Research Centre, El- Buhouth St., Dokki, Cairo, Egypt. He specializes in the areas of food biopolymers and colloids, and in particular on the development of functional food-based structured delivery systems forbioactive components. Dr. Tarek Soliman earned his PhD on “The Use of Whey Protein Hydrogel as Potential Encapsulation Matrix for the Delivery of Bioactive Compounds” Dairy Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Ain Shams University (2016). (Tarek Nour Soliman, Ph.D.) Dairy Department, Food industries and nutrition Research Division, National Research Centre, Dokki, Cairo, Egypt. Tel.: +2 01155945511 Fax (+202) 33370931

Speaker
Tarek Nour Soliman / National Research Centre
Egypt

Abstract

The aim of this project is assessing the possibility of Improvement of some marine fish productivity performance (seabass, seabream and mullet) in Ismailia province by recent biotechnological techniques through, algae production on a large scale to create the demand protein for fish nutrition, production and control of fish diseases. As well as, trial to increasing of the marine fish production in ponds, in similar environmental to marine aquaculture was done. Recovery the prevailing some marine fish diseases, the nutritional and environmental status of some marine fishes in Ismailia province.Assessment of phytoplankton production in aquaculture farms.Detection of the most predominant agents which causes high losses in some marine fishes.Analysis of water samples collected from different districts of Ismailia province for physico-chemical analysis. Detection of the more prevailing algae for marine fish feeding in Ismailia province.Identification the most appropriate algae to feed the marine fishes.

Biography

Will be update soon...

Speaker
Ahmed Ismail Noor El Deen / National Research Centre
Egypt

Abstract

Functional foods began in Japan in 1980, in year 1991 which published that some foods have health benefits and it has been proved this claim. In America in 1993 it has been proven with results that it help in reducing the risk of diseases also the FDA agreed on the relationship between components of food and pathogens. The definition of functional foods and bioactive compounds pre- pro biotics .The World Council food information which cleared and defined functional food as "food ingredients that improve physiological function and health in addition to their nutritional value. Important to explain difference between Prebiotic and Probiotic , to know Some reasons for the spread of functional foods and pre- pro biotics like, increasing of awareness of food and health , increase in life expectancy for the elderly . clearence of the difference between each of prebiotics and probiotics and showing some examples for functional food and important pre- pro biotics definitions. Also , explaining the relationship of the bioactive ingredients in food and color of food and its food sources. From the above it is clear that "functional foods and pre- pro biotics " are sensitive issue and influential sectors of health, industry, directly and indirectly, and on the other sectors, multi economically and socially, as it represents a good area of scientific creativity should attract serious scholars and researchers in the field of scientific research.

Biography

Dr. Shereen is currently Associate Professor at Agriculture Research Center, Department of Food Science And Technology, Egypt & lecturer at AUC-American University In Cairo . She was Associate Professor at, KSA King Faisal University K.S.A . Dr. Shereen earned her Ph.D. at the University of Zagazig , Egypt in the field of Food Science and Technology Department (2003 ) and did her Master at Cairo University Department of Home economics and Nutrition (1999) . She has published 10 peer reviewed research papers and one Book in Nutrition and health . Specific experience in the Nutrition work field.Attending & participation in conferences & workshops & represented Egypt in different countries like Dubai , AbuThaby, Jordon, Spain, India and Algeria. As a speaker in different fields related to food science & nutrition , food and bakery free gluten & food safety . Research work in the field of food safety, food and bakery and nutrition. Ongoing project of relation of food safety awareness,food pollution & functional food ( Functional bakery products.Experienced teaching activities,Postgraduate& undergraduate subjects related to nutrition food safety and general health.

Speaker
Shereen Lotfy Nassef / Agriculture Research Center
Egypt

Abstract

Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) is the main fruit crop in arid and semiarid regions, particularly in the arid regions of western Estern Asia and North Africa .Date Palm can also be grown in many other countries for food or as an ornamental plant including the continents of Americas, southern Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. The date palm tree that had been in cultivation since 2400 BC was praised and cherished as it is an evident from the drawings and sculptures of ancient civilizations of the Sumerians, Assyrians, Babylonians and Egyptians, and later by the Greeks and the Romans that inhabited the Mediterranean basin where date palm and other Phoenix spices are also commonly grown. Date Palm still carries great religious significance in all the three major religions of the world. In Islam, date palm is cited 21 times in the Holy Quran and 300 times in the Hadith of the Prophet Mohammed, making Observations of this plant were first recorded around 5000-6000 BC in Iran, Egypt, and Pakistan. Most likely, these species were wild. The first record of cultivation comes from Lower Mesopotamia around 4000 BC. Later, when the Moors entered Spain, they brought the date with them. Although the Moors were forced out of Spain, the dates stayed and were brought to the Americas by the early Spanish missionaries. By 1890, the USDA was beginning to look into date production in the United States.
There are a lot of date products such as date molasses, which is a very rich source of important minerals, juice of dates and also date seed coffee , date seed oil and date seed butter.On the other hand By-products from date palm are used in building structures, animal feed, and also in several items such as baskets and ropes. it by far the most frequently cited plant. Similarly, date palm is praised in Christian and Judaism faiths and has been linked to numerous religious ceremonies such as Passover and Palm Sunday . Sugar poses many health problems, the most important of which is that it feeds cancer cells and works to increase them In addition, it reduces the efficiency of the immune system ,Therefore, many patients should refrain from taking it as cancer patients and patients with impaired immune system and healthy people should also reduce their intake of sugar. Today, there is a use of date powder as an alternative to sugar and has been introduced into many food products. In this regards, during the lecture we will highlight the dates applications and the nutritional value on new products and the usages of the dates waste in food industry and as alternatives to sugar and the role of dates as a functional food.

Biography

Dr. Marwa Abdel- Karim Sheir, Researcher at Food Technology Research Institute (FTRI) Agricultural Research Center Egypt, A Technical Member of Food Industries Alliance, Recipient of the International Khalifa Award for date palm and Agricultural Innovation 2018.

Topics and work description:
Production of therapeutic food, Manufacture of commercial food products with low cost and high nutritional value, environmental impacts of the food production and services, Finding solutions for many food processing problems, development of date industries, Introduction of nanotechnology in food processing, utilization of the wastes of the food industry.

Speaker
Marwa sheir / Agricultural Research Center
Egypt

Abstract

Industrial applications of natural hydrocolloids will be possible due to its ability to bind with water. Thus, it will mainly be used as a thickener and stabilizer. But the future trends are related to industrial development and the ability to produce competitive products from the standpoint of performance and price. A detailed survey of all production-cost aspects is essential to appraise the economic value of these hydrocolloids in comparison to its counterparts. This ambitious challenge is crucial for a more sustainable approach to the production of novel food hydrocolloid source for food industries. On the other hand, the cost of commercial hydrocolloids is steadily increasing due to drought and unexpected increase in demand. Therefore, their usage by food manufacturers will be very limited. In this situation, if a new replacement is found, the new gum will be welcomed. Also, the food industry will always substitute new texturizing gums to the old ones. Natural hydrocolloids can be applied because of their unique properties in the food industry, such as dairy, bakery‚ and other food processing industries. Middle East countries can help to export the most of these hydrocolloids in the future to support the productivity in the food industry. Subsequently, natural hydrocolloids can affect the global economy gradually. They can be one of the importing commodities in the world market. Future and options for natural hydrocolloids application can be high in the coming years.

Biography

Mohammad Ali Hesarinejad has completed his PhD from Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran. He has joined as an assistant professor at Research Institute of Food Science and Technology, Iran. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Mohammad Ali Hesarinejad / Research Institute of Food Science and Technology (RIFST)
Iran

Abstract

Advances in food manufacturing are now moving the industry from identifying the problem of nutritional deficiencies toward producing of foods that promote optimal health and wellness as well as to reduce the risk of chronic disease. The issue of sugar consumption and its potential contribution to obesity and diabetes is being made to encourage manufacturers to reduce the sugar content of all products and particularly Drinks. Tagatose (D-tagatose) is a new food ingredient being used as a low calorie bulk sweetener in foods and beverages. D-tagatose, is a ketohexose in which the fourth carbon is chiral and is a mirror image of the respective carbon atom of the common D-sugar, fructose. D-tagatose is naturally found in some dairy products. D-tagatose is produced through enzymatic isomerization of D-galactose. Galactose is found in the highest concentrations in lactose, the disaccharide found in the whey fraction of milk. Based on a similarity in sweetness (92%) and physical bulk to sucrose, D-tagatose is intended to be used as a reduced-calorie bulk sweetener and sugar replacer in ready-to-eat cereals, diet soft drinks, frozen yogurt/nonfat ice cream, soft confectionery, chocolate confectionery, hard confectionery, bakery products, frosting, and chewing gum. With the increasing popularity of cheese and related cheese products, an increasing amount of whey accumulates worldwide annually, as permeate; and approximately small portion of that is used for food applications and the remainder discarded, thus causing environmental problems, while permeate has immense potential for the recovery of valuable nutrients such as carbohydrates but is still underutilized.

Biography

Mahmoud Ghorbani has expertise in Food Science & Technology and passion in research, innovation, cooperation, performance and administration of functional food science. He will receive Functional Food Scientist Certificate from Functional Foods Institute/Center, Dallas, USA in the near future. After years of experience in food science & Technology, he has established Partak Food Innovation Group, a corporate legal entity with limited liability establish in accordance with Iran law that is engaged in the area of professional services, development and sale of processes and products, including inter alia innovative applications for the food and pharmaceutical industries, such as ingredients derived from natural sources. The foundation is based on insight on research in functional foods and knowledge on how to create new functional food products.

Speaker
Mahmoud Ghorbani / Partak Food Innovation Group
Iran

Abstract

Probiotic provides various health benefit to the host that’s why probiotic based fermented food products gaining importance and acceptability worldwide. Among dairy based probiotic products yoghurt is one of them and have a strong market demand globally. Prebiotics selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics. The present study was designed to develop synbiotic yoghurt with the incorporation of Bifidobacterium infantis and pectin. Bifidobacterium infantis was isolated and characterized morphologically, physiologically, biochemically. The viability and survival of Bifidobacterium infantis was studied in yoghurt prepared with different concentration of pectin i.e. 0%, 0.5%, 1% and 1.5%. Yoghurt was assessed for viable cell count, tolerance of probiotic to gastric juice and bile salt, viscosity, proteolytic activity and sensory evaluation. Results revealed that probiotic viability and survival increased in the presence of prebiotic and maximum survival was observed in T3 as compare to control. Viscosity increased significantly P < 0.05 as the concentration of pectin increased among the treatments. Furthermore, as the concentration of prebiotic increases Bifidobacterium infantis were able to tolerate well in simulated gastrointestinal conditions (pH 2, 0.3% bile salt). As far as sensory evaluation was concerned, among all the treatments, T2 assigned maximum score by the panelist. The current research findings revealed that the pectin can be used as potential prebiotic to improve viability of probiotics.

Biography

Wahab Ali Khan is a Ph.D. student in the field of Food Science & Technology from National Institute of Food Science and Technology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Dairy Technology from University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore, Pakistan and Master degree in Food Science and Technology from University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan. He received various scholarship and awards during his academics. His research project has been focused on encapsulation of Vitamin D to improve its stability during processing and storage.

Speaker
Wahab Ali Khan / University of Agriculture
Pakistan

Abstract

Major progress has been made over the last decades in reducing the prevalence of malnutrition amongst children less than 5 years of age in developing countries. Approximately 27% of children under the age of 5 in these countries are still malnourished. This work focuses on the childhood malnutrition in Gamo Gofa Zone, Ethiopia. This study examined the association between demographic and socioeconomic determinants and the malnutrition problem in children less than 5 years of age using Data obtained from both rural and urban sampled surveys conducted in sample districts from December 1 to January 5, 2013. The study on the Child under nutrition and underweight prevalence has allowed us to quantify the negative impacts of child under nutrition in both social and economic terms. The results revealed that as many as 75% of all cases of child under nutrition and its related pathologies go untreated. It is also observed that about 35% of the health costs associated with under nutrition occur before the child turns 1 yearold. Generally, The results of the analysis show that place of residence, employment status of mother, employment status of partners, educational status of mothers, diarrhea, household economic level and source of drinking water were found to be the most important determinants of health/nutritional status of children. The study revealed that socio-economic, demographic and health and environmental variables have significant effects on the nutritional and health status of children in Ethiopia.

Keywords Bayesian Models, Childhood, Malnutrition, Social and Economic Impact, Ethiopia

Biography

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Speaker
Derbachew Asfaw Teni / Arba Minch University
Ethiopia

Abstract

Trend is shifted towards new functional foods and beverage, which improves nutritional status and health of consumer. In this context, probiotic functional food that promote health and well-being is a promising research priorities of food industry. Probiotics have been incorporated into different dairy products i.e. yoghurt, milk, ice cream, cheese and etc. Now a days, efforts are make to develop novel fruit and vegetable based fermented drink with probiotics. Fruit and vegetables provides vitamin, mineral, fiber, antioxidant, phenolic compounds and etc. Among vegetables, beetroot are good sources of antioxidants including carotenoids, flavonoids and phenolics. The current study was design to investigate the survival of free and microencapsulated probiotic bacteria in Simulated gastrointestinal condition and in beet root juices. Therefore, Bifidobacterium longum (BL-01) was chosen for microencapsulation with alginate chitosan biopolymer. It showed potential survivability in-vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The survival rate of free and encapsulated probiotic was 106 Log CFU/ml and 109 Log CFU/ml, respectively. The viable count was significantly higher than non-encapsulated probiotics in simulated gastric juice. The free or microencapsulated probiotic bacteria were inoculated into beet root juice and their viability was assessed during 28 days of storage. The product was also evaluated for its physicochemical (pH, acidity, Brix), microbiological analysis (Total plate count) and sensory attributes during storage. Microencapsulated probiotics survive after 28 days of storage while free probiotics lost their viability after 1 week of storage. In general, juice containing microencapsulated probiotic bacteria were more stable than those containing free probiotic organisms. So, microencapsulation is a promising technique to improve survival of probiotics in fermented foods.

Biography

Iqra Yasmin is a PhD in the field of Food Science & Technology from National Institute of Food Science and Technology, University of Agriculture Faisalabad, Pakistan. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Agriculture, Master and doctoral degree in Food Science and Technology from the same University. She received IRSIP scholarship and worked as visiting research scholar in Food Innovation Center, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, USA. Her research project has been focused on isolation of probiotics and encapsulation techniques to improve survivability and stability of probiotic during processing and storage.

Speaker
Iqra Yasmin / University of Agriculture
Pakistan

Plenary Talks

Abstract

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Biography

He received his PhD from Oregon State University and has many years of work experience in the food industry research institutes and academia. His main research area is Chemistry and technology of processing of food products, with special emphasis in dehydration and functional foods. Currently he is working on Vitamin D stability in foods and bioactive peptides from food waste.

Speaker
Conrad Oswald Perera / University of Auckland
New Zealand

Sessions Will be updated soon...

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