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Scientific Program

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Biography

Prof. Antonio Bianconi is a director of Rome International Center for Materials Science, Italy.Antonio Bianconi is member of the Editorial Board of the of the journal and Member of the European Academy of Sciences. Dr.Antonio Bianconi research interests are synchrotron radiation research; complex oxides; quantum phenomena in complex matter; quantum confinement; superstripes in complex matter; lattice complexity in transition metal oxides; high Tc superconductors; valence fluctuation materials

Speaker
Antonio Bianconi / Sapienza University of Rome
Italy

Abstract

Confronting with the gigantic volume of data produced every day, raising integration density by reducing the size of devices becomes harder and harder to meet the ever-increasing demand for high-performance computers. One feasible path is to actualize more logic functions in one cell. Many efforts have been dedicated to explore the prospective candidates of spin logic gate in different systems, such as Oersted-field controlled magnetic tunnel junctions and magnetic domain engineered nanowires, etc. However, only a few of them are compatible with CMOS architecture, which limits their practical applications [1-2]. Among of them, Spin Logic is of great interest as its desired property of nonvolatility and subsequentially the potential for realizing the idea of processing in memory architecture which is regarded to play increasingly important role in today’s fast-growing volumes of data. In this respect, we experimentally demonstrate a prototype Spin-Orbit Torque (SOT) based Spin Logic cell integrated with five frequently used logic functions (AND, OR, NOT, NAND and NOR). The cell can be easily programmed and reprogrammed to perform desired function [3-7]. As for a Spin Logic cell demonstration, two currents with same amplitude were applied separately to two mutual-orthogonal channels of Hall bar as logic inputs. The direction of the current serves as the logic input ‘1’ or ‘0’. A magnetic field was applied along the angle bisector between two currents (Fig.1a). Based on the magnetization response to different magnetic field and input currents, five logic functions, i.e. AND, OR, NAND, NOR and NOT, can also be implemented in a single cell. Programmability lies in the initial magnetic state and the polarity of magnetic field [3-7]. Furthermore, the information stored in cells is symmetry-protected, making it possible to expand into logic gate array where the cell can be manipulated one by one without changing the information of other undesired cells. This work provides a prospective example of multifunctional Spin Logic cell with reprogrammability and nonvolatility, which will advance the application of spin logic devices in near future. Keywords: Spin Logic; Magnetic Logic; Spin-Orbit Torque (SOT) Effect, MTJ, Nonvolatile, Multifunctional, Programmable.

Biography

Speaker
Xiufeng Han / Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Abstract

Biography

Giulio was born in Trieste (Italy) in 1967, is currently based in ASEAN with Engineering operations in both Italy and Austria. He is Mechanical Engineer “cum laude” with a PhD in Microsystems and prior to Microspace has worked for 5 years as mechanical designer, R&D engineer and technical manager in SME, MNC and Industrial Research companies and has served as Officer in the Italian Navy at the Venice Shipyard. Giulio speaks his mother tongue Italian, professional English, fluent German and basic French.

Speaker
Giulio MANZONI / MicroSpace Srl
Italy

Abstract

Electrically control the spin in solids is the core of spintronics. We investigated the spin Hall effect control the magnetization switching in heavy metal/ferromagnet multilayers and their applications [1]. The spin-orbit torque switching controllablly in above structures have to have the assistant of the external magnetic field. Without breaking the symmetry of the structure of the thin film, we realize the deterministic magnetization switching in a hybrid ferromagnetic/ferroelectric structure with Pt/Co/Ni/Co/Pt layers on PMN-PT substrate.The effective magnetic field can be reversed by changing the direction of the applied electric field on the PMN-PT substrate, which fully replaces the controllability function of the external magnetic field[2].In addition,we realized the adjustable electrical current-induced magnetization switching in a magnetic multilayer structure without external magnetic field utilizing interlayer exchange coupling[3]. We also investigatedmagnetic-field-free spin-orbit toque induced synaptic plasticity of a multi-state perpendicular ferromagnetic layer (FM1) in an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupled Pt/FM1/Ta/FM2 structure[4].

Biography

Kaiyou Wang, PhD, Professor in Institute of Semiconductors in Chinese Academy of Sciences, Director of State Key Laboratory for Superlattices & Microstructure,obtained his PhD in 2005 at School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nottingham. He worked as a researcher assistant from March to the end of May/2005 in University of Nottingham. He then worked as a researcher in Hitachi Cambridge Laboratory from June/2005 to the end of March/2009. During his stay in UK, he had twice short visits to Institute of Physics, Poland and also a short visit to Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen. He joined State Key Laboratory for Superlattices & Microstructure, Institute of Semiconductors in CAS as a member of “100 talent program”. In 2012, he has been awarded the “National Outstanding Youth foundation” from NSFC. In 2014, he was selected to be excellent in the “100 talent program” final assessment. In 2018, he has been awarded the IAAM medal. His current research interests include: (1) spintronic devices ; (2) physical properties based on low dimensional nano-electronic devices.

Speaker
Kaiyou Wang / Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Keynote Talks

Abstract

It is well known that natural or artificial materials with cubic or square lattices exhibit isotropic transport, optical, thermoelectric and other properties. Recently we have shown that application of a strong enough magnetic field B can spoil this isotropy when a cubic or square array of insu-lating (conducting) inclusions are placed inside a conducting (insulating) host medium (i.e., in the case of periodical composite or, as they are now called, metamaterials) [1-3]. Such a strong magneto-induced anisotropy can be observed when the dimensionless magnetic field H=μH|B|=ωcτis greater than a/R (B is the applied magnetic field in conventional units, μH is the Hall mobility, ωc is the cyclotron frequency, τ is the conductivity relaxation time, R is the inclu-sion radius, a is the lattice constant). It was first predicted [1] and then verified experimentally [4] that the strong field dc effective magnetoresistivity tensor ρe(H) of such metamaterials will exhibit a strong dependence on the precise orientations of the external magnetic field B and the volume averaged current density . A similar magneto-induced anisotropy should exist in the case of ac conductivity, i.e., for the macroscopic or bulk effective permittivity tensor εe of metal-dielectric metamaterials and consequently for their optical properties [2]. Now we study the ef-fects of an externally applied magnetic field B on the thermoelectric response of a periodic me-tamaterial with such structures where at least one of the constituents has a strong thermoelectric response and another constituent has a strong Hall effect [3].

Biography

Yakov M. Strelniker is an Associate Professor in Bar Ilan University (Israel). He is an expert and a leading scientist in the field of condensed matter and statistical physics, theoretical and numerical studies of magneto-optical and magneto-transport properties of ordered and disordered metamaterials, percolation theory etc. Strelniker has discovered (in collaboration with D.J. Bergman) several surprising new physical phenomena, such as magneto-induced anisotropy of magneto-transport and magneto-optical properties of periodical metamaterials. He has also applied percolation theory to systems with hopping conductivity and has explained and modelled some novel phenomena observed experimentally in ferromagnetic and superconducting granular nano-films.

Speaker
Yakov M. Strelniker / Bar-Ilan University
Israel

Abstract

Not yet to be finalized

Biography

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Speaker
Jyh-Ping Chen / Chang Gung University
Taiwan

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

The structural, magnetic, and spin dependent transport protpertis of graphene and h-BN based magnetro resistive junctions on ferromagnetic transition metals (fcc-Ni and Co(111)) surface are examined by first-principles calculation based on density functional theory (DFT). We investigate not only symmetric junctions, i.e., with te same metal on both sides of the spacer layer Ni(111), but also non-symmetric, two different (Ni and Co) metallic ferromagnetic electrodes. The atomic and electronic structures are examined by plane-wave based DFT code, VASP, and the transport property is calculated by the real-space grid based DFT code, RSPACE. When a single and bilayer graphene sheet is sandwiched between these transition metal electrodes, strong interaction with chemical bonding between the metal surface atoms and carbon atoms destroys the unique dirac cone characteristic of the inserted graphene sheet. The spin filtering effect is quite sensitive to ferromagnetic metal electrodes of junctions and the thickness of graphene or h-BN layers. It is noteworthy that the tunneling magneroresistance (TMR) ratio is higher for symmetric junctions rather than non-symmetric junctions. The highest 50% TMR ratio is acheved for bilayer graphene while it is 43% for bilayer h-BN. These results indicate that the bilayer sheets of graphene and h-BN are promising candidates for the spacer of magnetroresistive junctions in the application of spintronics.

Biography

Tomoya Ono was born in Okayama, Japan, in 1974. He received degree of Engineering Bachelor (1997), Engineering Master (1998), and Ph.D (2001) from Osaka University. He was appointed as research fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of the Science in 2000, as an assistant professor at Osaka University in 2001, as an Alexande vin Humboldt Fellow in 2007, as PRESTO researcher in 2013, and as associate professor at the University of Tsukuba in 2014. His current research interests include the design and simulation of quantum transport and the development of new computational methods for first-principles calculations.

Speaker
Tomoya Ono / University of Tsukuba
Japan

Abstract

The geomagnetic field provides all animals that can sense it with a wealth of navigational information. This is best studied in birds: they can use the direction of the geomagnetic field as a compass and components like intensity as a part of their navigational map. The magnetic compass was analyzed based on the orientation of the spontaneous activity of migratory birds, an analysis that revealed some surprising characteristics: (1) The avian magnetic compass functions only in a biological windows around the intensity of the local magnetic field. This window is flexible, however; birds can oriented in intensities outside if they have been exposed to these intensities before. (2) Birds are not sensitive to the polarity of the magnetic field, but only to the axial course of the field lines, which they interpret it by their inclination – their compass is an inclination compass. (3) The avian magnetic compass is light-dependent, requiring light from the short-wavelength range of the spectrum from UV to about 565 nm green. -These unusual characteristics of the avian magnetic compass caused Ritz and colleagues (2000) to propose the Radical Pair Model, which suggests spin-chemical processes in the eye with cryptochrome, a flavoprotein, forming the crucial radical pairs. Observations are in agreement with this model: orientation is disrupted by RF-fields, and cryptochrome 1a is found in the outer segments of the UV cones in the retina of birds. - Magnetic compass orientation has also been demonstrated in other animal groups, but there seem to be some differences in the functional modes. Birds are also able to record the intensity of the geomagnetic field and use it as a component of the map mechanism determining position. This is suggested by the disoriented behavior of homing pigeons released in magnetic anomalies and by some ‘virtual’ displacement experiments with birds exposed to magnetic fields from distant sites, where these birds showed compensatory headings. The receptor mechanisms for this sense are still poorly known; they seem to involve in magnetite-based receptors in the beak.- Birds thus have two receptors for sensing different aspects of the magnetic field, one for sensing magnetic directions in the eyes and one for sensing magnetic intensity.

Biography

Roswitha and Wolfgang Wiltschko are both retired professors of Zoology at the Goethe-University at Frankfurt a.M., where they received their Ph.D.s in Biology. Their joint research focused on the avian magnetic compass, its functional mode, biological significance and possible reception mechanisms as well as bird navigation. Several stays for research in southern Spain, at Cornell University in the 1970/80, at the Università di Pisa, Italy, and in the 1990/2000 at the University of New England in Armidale, NSW, Australia and at the University of Auckland, New Zealand in. Both are Honorable Fellows of the Royal Institute of Navigation, London.

Speaker
Roswitha Wiltschko / Goethe-Universität Frankfurt
Germany

Abstract

Magnetic skyrmions are topologically protected whirling spin texture. Their nanoscale dimensions, topologically protected stability and solitonic nature, together are promising for future spintronics applications. To translate these compelling features into practical spintronic devices, a key challenge lies in achieving effective control of skyrmion properties, such as size, density and thermodynamic stability. Here, we report the discovery of ferroelectrically tunable skyrmions in ultrathin BaTiO3/SrRuO3 bilayer heterostructures. The ferroelectric proximity effect at the BaTiO3/SrRuO3 heterointerface triggers a sizeable Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction, thus stabilizing robust skyrmions with diameters less than a hundred nanometres. Moreover, by manipulating the ferroelectric polarization of the BaTiO3 layer, we achieve local, switchable and nonvolatile control of both skyrmion density and thermodynamic stability. This ferroelectrically tunable skyrmion system can simultaneously enhance the integratability and addressability of skyrmion-based functional devices.

Biography

Prof. Lingfei Wang has completed his PhD from University of Science and Technology of China, China and postdoctoral studies from Seoul National University, Republic of Korea. He is now the research assistant professor of Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science in Republic of Korea. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Lingfei Wang / Seoul National University
South Korea

Abstract

As the nearest-row neighbor of carbon, boron have similar structural features and rich electronic properties when forming nanostructures. In this talk, we will show that boron and boron-carbon nanostructures exhibit rich variety of electronic properties. We show that BCS superconductivity in the stable 2D boron structures is ubiquitous with the critical temperature above the liquid hydrogen temperature for certain configurations. Our results support that 2D boron structure may be a pure single-element material with the highest Tc on conditions without high pressure and external strain. We find that tensile and compressive strains have significant but different effects on the buckled triangle and 12 borophenes. Our results reveal that the lower-frequency acoustic branch affected by the strain plays an important role for the variation of the superconductivity. Our results show that the adsorption energy of alkaline and alkaline earth atoms on BC3 sheet is larger than the cohesive energy of the metal atoms themselves. We show that, under a suitable external electric field, a considerable magnetism can be induced, accompanying with the emergence of both magnetism the electric dipole moment of the systems with strong coupling of them. The thallium (Tl) decorated BC3 and the transition metal atoms adsorbed BC3 can host robust quantum spin Hall state and quantum anomalous Hall state, respectively, which indicates that the systems of graphenelike BC3 with adatoms are good platforms for the study of quantum spin Hall and quantum anomalous Hall effects.

Biography

Jun Ni has completed his PhD from Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, and postdoctoral studies from Department of Physics, Tsinghua University. He is now the professor in Department of Physics, Tsinghua University. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Jun Ni / Tsinghua University
China

Abstract

The aimed of this work was to synthesize magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, NiFe2O4 and NiFe2O4), prepared as nanofluids, thin films and nanocomposites, using several techniques of preparation such as coprecipitation, hydrothermal and sol-gel processes. The variation in the processing resulted in different materials with regards to physical-chemistry properties, which were confirmed by characterization techniques during the processes. The materials have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, gas adsorption, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction, EDS and EELS. The magnetic properties of materials have been studied as a function of the preparation temperature and used process. The obtained materials were tested in several application such as production of ink, catalyst, cancer treatment, ferroic devices, among others.

Biography

Dr. Nelcy Della Santina Mohallem, PhD in Applied Physics by USP/Brazil (1990), postdoc in the CETEC-MG, in hydrothermal synthesis of ferroelectric and magnetic materials, author of about 100 scientific publications between articles, patents and book chapters, and full professor in the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, UFMG, Chemistry Department, Laboratory of Nanostructured Materials, since 1992. Member of scientific technical board of the Center of Microscopy of UFMG since 2006. She supervised directly various undergraduate and graduate students. She has experience in the field of material science, with emphasis on physics and chemistry of the condensed state, acting mainly in the following themes: Nanoscience and nanotechnology, coprecipitation, hydrothermal and sol-gel processes. She works with the synthesis, characterization and application of nanoparticle materials, nanocomposites, ferrofluids and thin films. She has large experience in coordination of several academic projects, including projects in collaboration with Brazilian companies. She created a company “spin off” of her laboratory, Nanum Nanotechnology SA in 2003, which now is exporting magnetic nanoparticulate products.

Speaker
Nelcy Della Santina Mohallem / Federal University of Minas Gerais
Brazil

Abstract

A magnetic proximity effect of a topological insulator in contact with an itinerant ferromagnet in thin film bilayers of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 and SrRuO3 will be described [1]. I shall also discuss the observation of strongly suppressed superconductive proximity effect and ferromagnetism in topological insulator, ferromagnet and superconductor thin film trilayers of Bi2Se3 on SrRuO3 on underdoped YBa2Cu3Oy [2]. By comparing our transport and magnetoresistance results of the bilayers and trilayers to those of a reference ferromagnetic film, and a reference trilayer with the topological layer replaced by a highly overdoped and non-superconducting La1.65Sr0.35CuO4 layer, we found that the topological layer strongly affect both proximity effects [1, 2]. While a conventional proximity effect was found in the bilayers, in the trilayers proximity induced edge currents led to the creation of a 2D network of 1D channels of weak-link superconductivity on the wafer. Conductance spectra of micro-bridges pattern on these trilayers reveal zero bias conductance peaks which are sensitive to magnetic field and could be attributed to Majorana zero energy bound states. Though our trilayer network of weak-link channels is disordered, it is similar in concept to that of the artificially prepared ordered network demonstrated in the literature by growing selectively Al on InAs [3]. Both systems could provide a platform for future Majorana electronics for quantum computing.

Biography

Prof. Koren received his PhD degree in Physics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1974, spent his post doc in the IBM Research lab in Zurich in 1974-5, and then joined the Technion in Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. where he had been a full professor since 1998. His fields of interest in condensed matter physics and laser applications include high temperature superconductivity, proximity effects and magnetism using epitaxial thin films, junctions and multilayers with various ferromagnets, topological insulators and normal metals.

Speaker
Gad Koren / Israel Institute of Technology
Israel

Abstract

Exploring single phase multiferroic materials has been a long-time-sought quest due to the promise of novel spintronic devices. BiFeO3 has been recognized as the most important room temperature single phase multiferroic material which has a large polarization together with the antiferromagnetism above room temperature. However, the weak magnetoelectric coupling remains as the key issue which obstructs its applications. On the other hand, type-II multiferroics, where the ferroelectricity generally originates from some special magnetic structure, have the serious shortcomings of very weak polarization and a critical temperature much lower than room temperature though a strong magnetoelectric coupling is expected. Therefore, it has been a challenge issue to develop the room temperature single phase multiferroic materials, and the relatively realistic approaches include: i)Enhancing manetoelectric coupling in BiFeO3-based systems; and ii)Searching the third way to realize the co-presence of ferroelectricity/ferromagnetism and strong magnetoelectric coupling. In the present work, both BiFeO3–based solid solutions and h-RFeO3 multiferroic new systems are systematically investigated. Electric field-controlled magnetism is achieved in Bi1-xRxFeO3 solid solutions by tuning the symmetry from polar R3c to polar Pna21, where two morphotropic phase boundaries (MPB) are detected together with the greatly enhanced ferroelectric polarization and magnetism. The electric field-controlled magnetism is realized by an electric field induced structural and magnetic transition from Pna21 back to R3c, and this transition is shown to be reversible with additional thermal treatment. On the other hand, h-RFeO3 room temperature single phase multiferoic new materials have been designed and created by introducing chemical pressure (In-substitution for Lu) in LuFeO3. The crystal structure of Lu1-xInxFeO3 ceramics is tuned from centrosymmetric Pbnm (x=0) to non-centrosymmetric P63cm (x=0.4~0.6), and subsequently to centrosymmetric P63/mmc (x=0.75), while the Pbnm and P63cm biphase structure is detected for x=0.25. The clover leave ferroelectric domain structures are determined in polar Lu0.5In0.5FeO3 samples, and the ferroelectric domain walls at atomic scale has been evaluated by the aberration-corrected high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM), where the spontaneous polarization of 1.73C/cm2 is determined for x=0.5. Meanwhile, the magnetic transition from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic is determined at ~350K, and the weak-ferromagnetism is detected at room temperature.

Biography

Dr. Xiang Ming Chen is currently a Chair Professor of Materials Science, Director of Institute of Materials Physics in School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. He graduated from Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University (China) in December 1981, and he was awarded the Doctor Degree in Engineering by The University of Tokyo (Japan) in March 1991. He spent three years to serve as a research engineer at Yokohama R&D Laboratories, Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd. (Japan) before he returned to China to become an Associate Professor at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University in July 1994. He was promoted Professor at Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University in November 1996.

Speaker
Xiang Ming Chen / Zhejiang University
China

Abstract

Spinel oxide materials are characterized by an AB2O4 structure, where A and B are divalent and trivalent cations. The A cations occupy the tetrahedral positions (Th) in the structure, whereas the B cations occupy the octahedral (Oh) ones. If some degree of inversion, x, exists, the structure is represented as (A1-xBx)[AxB2-x]O4, where ( )denote Th positions in the structure and [ ]Oh positions, respectively. The evaluation of the inversion parameter, x, in spinel materials is crucial to understand their functional magnetic properties. For large volume materials, several techniques such as x-rayand neutron diffraction refinement, Mossbauer spectroscopy, x-ray absorption or nuclear magnetic resonance are extensively used to assess the coordination of chemical species. Nevertheless, when dealing with nanoparticles or more complex systems such as core/shell nanostructures, high spatial resolution is required, making classical bulk approaches unsuitable. In this work, using scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS), two different methods to calculate the cation inversion parameter of spinel crystals with unprecedented spatial resolution are demonstrated. The first one is based in the measurements of energy loss near edge spectroscopy (ELNES) features, to evaluate the oxidation state of transition metals by using the onset of the L3 peak. Then the divalent/trivalent cation lattice distribution at atomic resolution can be obtained from spectrum images acquired at high energy and spatial resolution and the L3 onset shift between octahedral and tetrahedral coordination sites measured and used to determine the inversion parameter. An alternative way is to apply multivariate analysis (MVA) and spectral decomposition techniques to map the contribution of divalent and trivalent components. If such maps are obtained at atomic resolution, for a spinel crystal the cation inversion can be estimated as the fraction of signal from the 3+ ion at the tetrahedral coordination position. These two methods will be applied to characterize the cation inversion parameter in Fe3O4/Mn3O4 core/shell nanoparticles. Interestingly, X-ray absorption experiments, a well-stablished method to asses cation coordination inversion on the nanoparticle powder samples confirm the presence of cation inversion in Mn3O4 with reasonably similar values.

Biography

Prof. Francesca Peiro is the leader of the Laboratory of Electron Nanoscopies (LENS-MIND) at the Department of Electronics and Biomedical Engineeringof the University of Barcelone and researcher of the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Institute (In2UB). The main objective of LENS is the development of instrumental methods as well as data treatment for advanced scientific problems in nanomaterials usingTEM techniques. Prof. F. Peiro is one of the IP’s of the Network of Excellence for advanced aberration corrected electron microscopy in Spain. She is also member of the Executive Board of the Spanish Society of Microscopy. She has published more than 220 peer-reviewed publications and 3 book chapters, (H=32) and has presented more than 400 communications in international conferences with more than 45 invited talks.

Speaker
Francesca Peira / University of Barcelona
Spain

Abstract

Barium hexaferrite (HF) nanoplatelets display a high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy with an easy axis that is perpendicular to the platelet. This unique property gives them tremendous potential in innovative applications, for example, in the magneto-mechanical eradication of cancer cells. As the nanoplatelets adopt a distinct structure and composition, which are significantly different to the bulk, they can be considered as novel structural variations of hexaferrite stabilized on the nanoscale. For example, the structure of the normally used nanoplatelets (~ 50 nm wide and 3 nm thick) can be represented by a SRSRS stacking sequence, where S and R represent a hexagonal (BaFe6O11)2- and a cubic (Fe6O8)2+ structural block, respectively. Thus, the nanoplatelets are Fe-rich (BaFe15O23) when compared to the BaFe12O19 HF bulk. The weak point of the HF nanoplatelets is their modest saturation magnetization, MS. The MS can be effectively increased by substitution of a part of Fe3+ ions in the nanoplatelet structure with Sc3+ ions. The increase was unexpected as the Sc-substitution decreases the MS of the bulk. In the lecture this opposite effect of the Sc-substitution in the nanoplatelets than in the bulk will be discussed based on combination of detailed analysis of the lattice site of Sc incorporation and ab-initio calculations.

Biography

Prof. dr. Darko Makovec is full professor, head of Department for Materials Synthesis and scientific chancellor at Jozef Stefan Institute. He has defended his PhD from chemistry at the University of Ljubljana in year 1995. In 2001-2002 he worked as a Fulbright scholar at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA. His scientific interests are focused in synthesis and characterization of the inorganic and hybrid nanomaterials, especially materials containing magnetic nanoparticles. He is also expert in advanced electron microscopy. Prof Makovec has published over 170 peer-review articles.

Speaker
Darko Makovec / Jožef Stefan Institute
Slovenia

Abstract

Rare-Earth Transition Metals permanent magnets are vital components in the rapidly-developing renewable energy sector, where the motors require strong magnets with the ability to operate at temperatures well over 100°C. To achieve high coercivity, remanence and consequently high energy product at elevated temperatures the addition of heavy rare earth (HRE) to the basic Nd-Fe-B composition] is needed. On the list of Critical Raw Materials published by the EC in 2014, HRE is on the very top of it. To drastically reduce the use of HRE we focused on developing a new method, which should enable us to achieve the properties needed for high-temperature application with the lowest amount of scarce elements. By our new inventive technique further transferred to a pilot production, we could minimize the amount of HRE used, down to 0.2 at %, the improvement of coercivity was 30 % with minimal loss in remanence. The total saving of the HRE is 16-times less need for the same performance, which is a significant contribution to the world economy and clean environment. In studying the mechanism for such an improvement in coercivity without significantly decreasing the remanence, a detailed microstructure investigation was performed by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Besides the use of these new developed high energy magnets for electric and hybrid cars and the wind turbine generators the important application is also as the source of the magnetic field in the development of the new magnetic cooling devices.

Biography

Prof. Dr. Spomenka Kobe, Scientific Advisor and a full professor at the International Postgraduate School Jozef Stefan and a member of the Governing Board of the School. She is the Leader of the National Research Programme Nanostructured Materials, and until 2017 the Slovene director of The International Associated Laboratory between CNRS, Nancy, France and Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana, Slovenia. She initiated rare-earth magnet research activities in Slovenia and was recently the Coordinator of the European project Replacement and Original Magnet Engineering Option - ROMEO. Prof. Kobe was the President of the Academic Society for Science and Engineering, and in the year 2017, she became a Member of the Slovenian Academy of Engineering.

Speaker
Spomenka Kobe / Jozef Stefan Institute
Slovenia

Abstract

Ferromagnetic materials with large magnetostriction have found wide applications in sensors, transducers and actuators based on the conversion between magnetic and elastic energies. Fe-Ga solid solutions, known for the large magnetostriction at low external fields and the good mechanical property, have attracted considerable interest since 2000. The structural diversity of Fe-Ga alloys allows one to obtain abundant properties from the composites containing two or more phases. In this talk, we shall present our recent efforts to extend the function scope of this traditional material through controlling the diffusional D03 (ordered BCC) → L12 (ordered FCC) phase transformation. Using the “solution-treating and aging” route, natural ferromagnetic Fe-Ga composites containing both BCC and FCC phases have been prepared. The slow transformation kinetics, different intrinsic magnetic properties and elastic properties of these two phases can facilitate novel properties that are highly desired in engineering applications. The gradual transformation from the BCC phase with lower magnetization into the FCC phase with higher magnetization can facilitate highly thermal stable magnetization up to 880 K [Nature Comm. 2017]. The compensation of stress-induced anisotropies between these two phases with opposite magnetostriction signs can facilitate highly stable magnetic permeability under stresses [PR Mater. 2018]. The semi-coherent phase interface between them can also bring 2~3 times enhancement in damping capacity [unpublished]. Our work suggests that controlling the diffusional phase transformation is a useful tool to design multi-functional ferromagnetic materials.

Biography

Prof. Tianyu Ma has completed his PhD from Beihang University (Former name “Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics”), China and postdoctoral studies from National Institute for Materials Science (JSPS foreign postdoctor fellowship), Japan. He is a full professor of Frontier Institute of Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, China. His research interest covers functional magnetic materials and rare earth permanent magnets. He has published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals, such as Nature Communations, Acta Materialia, Physical Review Materials, etc.

Speaker
Tianyu Ma / Xian Jiaotong University
China

Abstract

By method of pulsed electron beam evaporation in vacuum of targets from non-magnetic in bulk state, Al2O3, SiO2, CeO2, CaF2 and BaF2 magnetic nanopowders with a high specific surface were produced. The nanopowders were irradiated in air in room-temperature by electrons with energy of 0.7 MeV with pulse FWHM of 100 ns, using a pulse-periodic accelerator URT-1 for 15 and 30 minutes. The magnetic, thermal, and cathodoluminescence characteristics of nanopowders were measured before and after irradiation. It was established that the electron irradiation non-monotonically changes the magnetization of the pristine samples. To the contrary, a clear correlation between the intensity of cathodoluminescence and the irradiation does is found in the most of the oxides and fluorides. There was a decrease in the intensity of cathodoluminescence after irradiation. Thermal stability and phase transformations of unirradiated and irradiated nanopowders were analyzed by synchronous analysis using thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. Luminescent and thermal properties reflect the transformation of structural defects in nanopowders more strongly after the exposure to a pulsed electron beam in comparison with corresponding changes of the nanopowders magnetic response.

Biography

Prof. Sokovnin Sergey Yur’evich, has completed a degree of Candidate (1994) and Doctor of Technical Sciences (in Electrophysics) in 2005. He is the head of group of electrophysical technologies, Institute of Electrophysics of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg, Russia. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals. He developed a method for production of nanopowders, including evaporation of a target by a pulsed electron beam, condensation of the vapor of the material in a low-pressure gas, and deposition of nanopowders on a large cold square crystallizer.

Speaker
Sergey Sokovnin / Ural Federal University
Russia

Abstract

The Kitaev model is a promising way to realize a topological quantum spin liquid, which would be suitable for quantum computing. Kitaev magnetic interactions were identified in the Jeff =1/2 Mott insulator α-RuCl3, however, due to additional interactions, this system harbors an antiferromagnetic ground state instead of the quantum spin liquid. This ordered state can be suppressed under magnetic fields toward a field-induced quantum spin liquid. In this study, we used hydrostatic pressure and chemical substitution to tune the magnetic properties of α-RuCl3 and we discuss here the effect of this tuning on the magnetic interactions, the magnetic ground state and the field-induced quantum spin liquid. Magnetization measurements under hydrostatic pressure revealed a pressure-induced structural transition into a non magnetic state : a valence bond crystal with the formation of Ru-Ru bonds [1]. On the other hand, the effect of partial substitution of the Ru3+ ions with Jeff = 1/2 moments by Cr3+ ions with S = 3/2 was studied by means of magnetization, ac susceptibility and specific heat measurements. The ground state of Ru1-xCrxCl3 was found to be a spin glass on a broad Cr concentration range.

Biography

Dr. Gaël Bastien performed his Phd thesis in CEA-Grenoble on Uranium based superconductors and defended it in January 2017. He is now post doctorant at the IFW-Dresden. He works on frustrated magnetism and is funded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie foundation.

Speaker
Gaël Bastien / Leibniz institute for solid state and materials research dresden
Germany

Abstract

Magnetic skyrmions are topologically stable whirlpool-like spin textures that offer great promise as information carriers for future ultra-dense memory and logic devices. To enable such applications, particular attention has been focused on the skyrmions in highly confined geometry such as nanodisks or one dimensional nanostripes or wires. Here, we systematically reviewed our recent effort on the real space visualization and manipulation of individual magnetic skyrmion in FeGe nanostripes or nanodisks by high resolution Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron holography technique. We observed the flexibility of the shape of individual skyrmion tuned by the width and a unique field-driven helix-to-skyrmion cluster states transition directly. Also, a new state, called target skyrmion consisting of a central skyrmion surrounded by one or more concentric helical stripes and the magnetic bobbers are also identified. These findings demonstrate that the geometry defects can be used to control the formation of topologically nontrivial magnetic objects.

Biography

Mr Mingliang Tian has completed his PhD from Wuhan University, China and postdoctoral studies from University of Science and Technology of China and the Pennsylvania State University, USA. He is the vice director of China High Magnetic Field Laboratory and Dean of School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, China. He has published more than 160 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as the Advisory Editorial Board member for the Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials.

Speaker
TIAN Mingliang / High Magnetic Field Laboratory,Chinese Academy of Sciences
China

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

In polyacetylene and graphene nanoribbons a solition with a fractional charge exists as a domain wall connecting two different phases. In polyacetylene a fermion mass potential in the Dirac equation produces an excitation gap, and a twist in this scalar potential produces a zero energy soliton. Similarly, in gapful graphene nanoribbons a distortion in the chiral gauge field can produce a solitonic domain wall between two neighboring zigzag edges with different chiralities [1]. The existence of a soliton in polyacetylene can lead to formation fractional charges on the opposite ends of polyacetylene. However, the situation is different in graphene nanoribbons with an excitation gap since antiferromagnetic coupling between the opposite zigzag edges (shown in Fig.1) gives rise to integer boundary charges [2]. We show that presence of disorder in graphene nanoribbons partly mitigates the effect of antiferromagnetic coupling between the opposite zigzag edges, see Fig.2. As a consequence of this, midgap states can have fractional charges on the opposite zigzag edges in the weak disorder regime [3]. The probability density of such a state is shown in Fig.3. The measurement of the differential conductance in atomically precise graphene zigzag nanoribbons [4] using a scanning tunneling microscopy may provide rich information on the distribution of edge charges. References [1] Y. H. Jeong, S.C. Kim and S.-R. Eric Yang, Topological gap states of semiconducting armchair graphene ribbons, Phys. Rev. B 91, 205441 (2015). [2] Y. H. Jeong and S.-R. Eric Yang, Topological end and Zak phase states of rectangular armchair ribbon, Annals of Physics 385, 688 (2017). [3] Y. H. Jeong, S.-R. Eric Yang, and M. C. Cha, Fractional edge charges of interacting disordered graphene zigzag nanoribbon, arXiv:1812.02853. [4] P. Ruffieux, S. Wang , B. Yang , C. Sanchez-Sanchez , J. Liu, T. Dienel, L. Talirz , P. Shinde, C. A. Pignedoli, D. Passerone, T. Dumslaff , X. Feng, K. Mullen and G. Fasel R, On-surface synthesis of graphene nanoribbons with zigzag edge topology, Nature 531, 489 (2016).

Biography

Professor S.-R. Eric Yang has completed his PhD from University of California at San Diego, USA and postdoctoral studies from University of Maryland, USA. He is a condensed matter theorist. His long-time interest has been the interplay between disorder and elecron interaction.

Speaker
S.-R. Eric Yang / Korea University
Korea

Abstract

Zinc Oxide is a semiconductor which used in electronic devices due to its physical and its chemical bonds properties, where these chemical bonds is between ionic and covalent.In this work we investigated parallel molecular dynamics and dlpoly_4 software(RAVEN Supercomputer of Cardiff University) to analyse the effect of pressure and temperature in the range of 0-200GPa and 300-3000K on chemical bonds Zn-Zn, Zn-O, and O-O of ZnO wurtzite type. The short-range of interatomic interaction is modeled by a pair potential of Buchingham and the long-range by the Coulomb interaction. Our results are in vicinity of theoritical and experimental lierature although no more work under previous conditions of extended temperature and pressure. These data is very important in industry of technology and nanotechnology especialy in geophysics, medecine, pharmacetics , and cosmetics. Our results are a simulation prediction which need confirmation in future.

Biography

Yahia CHERGUI has completed his PhD from Badji Mokhtar University in Annaba, Algeria. He is a teacher in Boumerdes University since 2012. He has published more than 7 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a referee with condensed matter journal (IOP) and Energy journal (Elsevier).He passed 6 months in Cardiff University and Queen University for summer school

Speaker
yahia chergui / university of Boumerdes
Algeria

Abstract

Nowadays, energy-saving and increasing the efficiency of power transmission lines, electrical machines and transformers are important as much as diversity and renewability of energy resources. The existing worldwide power transmission lines are sufficient for 1GW power transmission, which meets the current need of the World. However, considering the increasing power need it would be impossible to transmit dozens of GW power using the existing transmission lines due to the current carrying limitation of the metals used in transmission lines. Hence, it is necessary to develop new materials for power transmission lines. Although superconductors are a superior choice in terms of energy efficiency, it has disadvantages such as high production and operation costs in addition to critical temperature, current and field limitations. The production stages of superconductor wires are performed by using special devices and expensive techniques. Moreover, cooling them down to cryogenic temperatures increases the operating costs. Thus, superconductors are not used in power transmission except a few test-based applications in the World. The studies on energy- efficient materials, which can be alternative to superconductors and normal conductors, especially for applications of daily life are continued due to these disadvantages. It is known that new generation electrical materials on which the studies heavily performed in recent years have demonstrated close or better performances than superconductors in certain aspects even though they are not superconductors. One potential approach for decreasing copper’s electrical resistivity is the incorporation of carbon nanotubes into copper. This nano-composite material is calledUltraConductive copper. Carbon nanotubes conduct electricity differently than metals: optimizing the electrical conductivity of a copper/nanocarbon composite requires careful engineering on a nano-scale. Research done by James Maxwell et all in USA Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this purpose shown that, because carbon nanotubes (CNT) are ballistic conductors, wires produced from CNT-Cu composite structures have higher conductivity and much better current carrying capacities than copper. (http://www.lanl.gov/science/NSS/issue2_2011/story5full.shtml). CNT contained composite wires can be used for many applications such as transmission lines due to Improvement of the conductivity of CNT-containing composite wires [Lekawa-Raus et al. 2012], reducing the weight by increasing the mechanical strength [Koziol et al.2007] and less skin effect [Banerjee 2008], [Antonini et al. 2011]. Incorporation of carbon nanostructures in metals is desirable to combine the strongly bonded electrons in the metal and the free electrons in carbon nanostructures that give rise to high ampacity and high conductivity, respectively. The latest one of these materials are metal-nanocarbon composites also called “covetic”. Electrical and thermal conductance, mechanical strength, oxidation and corrosion resistances, current carrying capacities of these new materials are enhanced considerably compared to conventional pure materials such as Cu, Al which are commonly used in the electrical and electronics industry. Covetic wires have close or superior performances than superconductors in almost every aspects excluding the zero-resistance property of superconductors for DC currents. Nanoscale carbon increases the melting temperature of copper and aluminum covetics. By adding carbon nanostructures in metals, it is possible; i. to get a higher electrical conductivity than the best electrical grade metals, ii. It is also possible to add unusually high amounts of nanocarbon to metals (above 6% for copper, well beyond thermodynamic stability limits reported in conventional phase diagrams for copper), iii. A small addition of carbon nanostructures is sufficient to improve the physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of the Metal/CNT-graphene composites and iv. Excessive reinforcement of CNTs degrades the properties especially, thermal conductivity and ductility of the composites through CNTs agglomeration, breakage and delamination and the increase of process related defects.

Biography

Mehmet Ertugrul received the B.Sc. degree from the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, Erzurum, Turkey, in 1986, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Atatürk University, in 1990 and 1994, respectively. From 1994 to 1996, 1996 to 2001, and 2001 to 2002, he was an Assistant Professor, an Associate Professor, and a Full Professor with the Department of Physics, Atatürk University, respectively, where he has been a Full Professor with the Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, since 2003. He was a visitor scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA for several periods and several years. He has authored or co-authored over 166 papers published in international SCI journals. His current research interests include superconducting and semiconducting devices with applications, nanofabrication and nanoelectronics, ultraconductors, metamaterials, wearable antennas, gas and biomedical sensors. He has several national and international awards. Dr. Ertugrul was a recipient of the Award by The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK), the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) and Ataturk University. He has two of NATO-C grant.

Speaker
Mehmet Ertugrul / Ataturk University
Turkey

Abstract

Will be Updated Soon

Biography

Prof. Dr. Run-Wei Li is the director of Key Laboratory of Magnetic Materials and Devices, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). He obtained his Ph.D. degree from Institute of Physics (IOP), CAS in 2002, then worked in Osaka University, Japan as a JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) research fellow, and in Kaiserslautern University, Germany as an AvH (Alexander von Humboldt) research fellow. In 2005, he joined in the International Center for Young Scientists, National Institute for Materials Sciences, Japan as a senior research fellow. He joined in NIMTE as a full professor in 2008. He gained sponsorship from the National Science Fund for Distinguished Young Scholars of China in 2015. He was elected leading talent of the Ten Thousand People Plan in science and technology innovation in 2016. Now his research interests focus on flexible functional materials and devices for information storage and sensor.He has filed more than 100 patents and published more than 200 papers in peer-reviewed journals. All the papers have been cited over 4000 times. He serves as a referee for over 50 international journals such as: Nat. Nanotech., Nat. Commun., Adv. Mater.and etc.

Speaker
Runwei Li / Ningbo Institute of Material Technology
China

Abstract

Biochars prepared from five different agro-waste were tested as potential sorbents for Cd and Pb. Results indicated that all tested biochars can effectively remove both metals from aqueous solution (in the range between 43.8% and 100%; Trakal et al., 2014). The removal rate of both metals is the least affected by the biocharmorphology and specific surface but this removal efficiency is strongly pH-dependent. Next,the metal sorption efficiency of all tested biocharswere further modified by impregnation with magnetic particles (Trakal et al., 2016). All selected biochar characteristics were significantly affected after the modification. More specifically, the cation exchange capacity increased after the modification, except for grape stalk biochar.However, the changes in the pH value, PZC, and BET surface after modification process were less pronounced. The metal loading rate was also significantly improved, especially for Cd(II) sorption on/innut shield and plum stone biochars (10- and 16-times increase, respectively). The results indicated thatcation exchange (as a metal sorption mechanism) was strengthened after Fe oxide impregnation, whichlimited the desorbed amount of tested metals. In contrast, the magnetization of grape stalk biocharreduced Pb(II) sorption in comparison with that of pristine biochar. Magnetic modification is, therefore,more efficient for biochars with well-developed structure and for more mobile metals, such as Cd(II).

Biography

Dr. Lukas Trakal (22/09/1981) received the Master Degree in Hydrogeology at Charles University in 2006. From 2006 to 2008 he lived in USA and worked for private company Symbio-m Ltd. He recieved the PhD in 2012 at Czech University of Life Sciences (CULS) and worked then as a post-doc and from 2017 he is an associate professor at CULS. He attained: (i) 2-moths fellowship in 2014 at CEBAS, Murcia, Spain; (ii) 3-months fellowship in 2015 at the James Hutton Institute, Aberdeen, UK; and (iii) 6-months fellowship in 2018/2019 at SCK•CEN Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol, Belgium. His main reserch activites are focused on utilization of biochar in order to: (i) remove metal(loid) from the environment; and (ii) increase water retention in soil. He is also interested in mathematical modelling of water flow and transport of contaminants in soil and measurement of physical and chemical properties of soil. He is author of several paper with IF (263 citations), two book chapters and other technical reports and works presented at international conferences.

Speaker
Lukas Trakal / Czech University of Life Sciences Prague
Czech Republic

Abstract

Correlated oxides such as manganites and iridates are candidate materials to exhibit interplay of comparable energy scales, thus leading to novel phases such as charge-ordered states in the former and 3D topological phases in the latter. In case of manganites, although the understanding of charge ordering phenomena has grown enormously over the past few decades helped by the substantial progress on the experimental side, there are still open questions regarding the exact nature of the electronic and magnetic inhomogenities. On the other hand, experiments on iridates exploring topological phases are still at a nascent stage and the role of electronic inhomogenities is less emphasized. In this talk, we shall discuss some recent experiments carried out by our group, which, inter alia, deal with electronic and magnetic inhomgeneities in certain class of manganites and iridates.

Biography

Soumik Mukhopadhyay completed his PhD from Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (Jadavpur University, India) in 2009 and did postdoctoral studies in Indian Institute of Science, India. He is presently an associate professor in the Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. He is an experimental condensed matter physicist with research interest in several areas such transport and magnetic properties of correlated oxides, multiferroics, nanomagnetism, etc.

Speaker
Soumik Mukhopadhyay / Indian Institute of Technology
India

Abstract

Air pollution is one of the most important environmental concerns having a huge impact on climate, ecosystems but also on human health. Especially particulate matter is believed to have a major health impact. In many countries dense networks of official air monitoring stations exist. In many western cities several of these monitoring stations are installed and believed to represent the urban air quality. However, several studies have shown that especially urban air quality shows an enormous spatial variation due to differences in the urban architecture and traffic flows. Correct and detailed knowledge of this spatial variation is, however, of the utmost importance for reliable exposure assessment of citizens. Environmental biomagnetic monitoring offers the possibility to use vegetation as high-spatial resolution monitoring stations for atmospheric particulate matter. This presentation gives an overview of the broad expertise of the research group and the international research community on biomagnetic monitoring of atmospheric particulates in urban and industrial environments. Topics that will be discussed are species specific differences in leaf characteristics, and their temporal dynamics, that drives leaf particle deposition. The intra-urban spatio-temporal variation in atmospheric particulate matter is explained at various spatial scales from street canyons over urban and even regional level. The use of biomagnetic monitoring in very successfull citizen science projects in Belgium and European level is intensively illustrated, together with the societal impact of these projects. In conclusion the potential of biomagnetic monitoring techniques to become included in official air quality monitoring is discussed.

Biography

Roeland Samson is full professor at University of Antwerp, Belgium. He leads the Laboratory of Environmental and Urban Ecology. His research focusses on the importance of urban green infrastructures for - between other ecosystem services - air pollution mitigation, based on both an experimental and moddeling approach. He has major expertise on vegetation-based biomonitoring of air quality, and is a leading voice in Belgium on environmentally-oriented citizen science projects, based on biomagnetic monitoring techniques. He has published more than 100 papers in reputed peer-reviewed journals and is co-editor of a book on urban forests.

Speaker
Roeland Samson / University of Antwerp
University of Antwerp

Abstract

The problem of propagation of heat in magnetic fluid under transverse magnetic field is solved. The problem is considered for two options: a) stationary problem when heat propagates by balanced way and b) non-stationary one when thermal jet happens and heat starts to propagate in fluid. It’s shown that transverse magnetic field results in decreasing the heat transfer in fluid under given conditions of the problem. The heat is accumulated near the magnets location point where “magneto-thermal capture” is created. Such a behavior has been experimentally discovered in some cases, when freezing water and/or other industrially used fluids did not observed if magnets were placed along these fluids moving. The problem has also been solved for the next cases: a) moving the fluid with speed v (v – the speed of free and/or forced convection) and b) heat propagation in fluid with heat transfer with surrounding medium by the Newton’s law. Calculations show that at convection, the location points of “magneto-thermal captures” shift together with motion direction of the fluid, thereto the more the speed of convection, the essential is the shift effect. However, the “captures” shift can be compensated by the power of the magnet. The shift value reduces by the intensity of the applied magnetic field. If one takes into account the heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding medium, two different rates of the fluid behavior are possible: a) monotonically changing temperature field in the fluid in dependence on the temperature gradient of the surrounding medium if the heat comes into the fluid from outside and b) thermal structures in the fluid if the heat comes from fluid outside. For getting more stable “magneto-thermal captures” magnets of special forms should be applied. The effect described is greater if one uses magnetic fluids. Hence, for acquiring more brilliant effect fluids which have more magnetic susceptibility should be used. The calculations provided can be used for managing thermal properties of solids and gases also.

Biography

Hikmat Gafar Hasanov (born 02/06/1962) graduated from the School of Physics at the Azerbaijan State University in 1984 and the same year started his academic career at Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences. Subject of interests covered kinetic effects in condensed matter under different physical fields. After completing his Ph. D (in Physics) in 1992 (subject of research: Kinetic effects in superconducting ceramics under physical fields) he continued his career in State Oil Company where made fundamental and applied research on effect of physical fields (magnetic, electric and electro-magnetic) on processes in oil-gas industry. Completed his Doctoral Degree (Doctor of Physics and Mathematics) in 2005 (subject of interest is the Effect of Physical Fields on Heat and Mass transfer in Fluids). At the moment he is involved into research in space industry and is hired as consultant in Azercosmos JSC. His university career is started in 1997 as part-time professor at the Khazar University, Baku and finalized it in 2011. At the University he reached the position the Head of Department of Applied Physics between 2006-2013. From Autumn 2013 up to day he has been conducting his lectures in National Aviation Academy, Baku as part-time Professor. Main area of interest is effect of physical fields on kinetic processes, stimulating and managing them for different purposes including electronic devices, energetic modules, space technology and so on. Have around 100 papers.

Speaker
Hikmat Gafar Hasanov / Development of LEO Satellite Systems
Azerbaijan

Abstract

Improvement in the stability and magnetic response of magnetorheological fluids (MRF) are needed in MRF applications. Conventional MRFs usually consist of micron size carbonyl iron (CI). In our study, bidispers MRFs composed of CI and nano-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPION) were formed to improve these two critical properties. Two types of SPIONs were used: poly(acrylic acid) coated and lauric acid coated ones to alter the interaction between the nano and micron sized particles. SPIONs were added in 12 wt% into micron sized carbonyl iron particles dispersed in hydraulic oil and also into commercial 140-CG LORD MRF. Magnetorheological properties and sedimentation behavior of these bidispers MRFs were studied and compared with conventional MRFs. Yield stress, shear stress and viscosity were measured using MRC 302 Anton-Paar rheometer under different magnetic field strengths and shear rates in rotational mode and frequency sweep mode. As a result, we have observed reduced sedimentation with higher viscosity and yield stress compared to the commercial LORD with same particle loading.

Biography

Will be updated soon

Speaker
Mona Nejatpour / KOC UNIVERSITY
Turkey

Abstract

Nanopowder of substituted manganites samples was prepared by the sol gel method. X-ray powder diffraction result using Rietveld refinement shows that the samples are single-phase with space group Pnma. Scanning Electron Microscopy shows that the grains are homogenous and most of their sizes are lower than 30 nm. Magnetic measurements showed that the samples exhibit a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition at a Curie temperature. The magnetic entropy change |〖ΔS〗_M^Max | has been deduced by the Maxwell relation method. The maximum value of the magnetic entropy change |〖ΔS〗_M^Max |obtained from the M (H) plot data is found to be considerable for an applied magnetic field of 2 T. At this value of magnetic field, the relative cooling power (RCP) is more than 50 J/kg. At low temperature, large change in magnetic entropy has been observed in the samples. This kind of nanopowders can be used for magnetic refrigeration and the composites of such samples should be investigated to increase the RCP of magnetocaloric effect in the industry. Key words: Manganites, X-ray diffraction, Infra-red, Isothermal magnetization, Magnetocaloric study

Biography

Dr.Mohamed Ellouze is full professor in physics at university of sfax,tunia,south afric. And he is specialized in magnetic as well crystallographic field. His also member of the International Center of Diffraction Data (ICCD) USA in metallic and alloys. His is also President of the Maghreb Alexander Von Humboldt Alumni. Prof. Dr. Mohamed Ellouze works in department of physics in Sfax University Tunisia. Reviewer in some international journals with impact factor. He has more than 100 papers and 2-chapter book and Chairman of 3 international conferences.

Speaker
Mohamed Ellouze / Sfax University
Tunisia

Abstract

Updated soon

Biography

Marilena Ferbinteanu is Associate Professor at the University of Bucharest,Romania.She received her Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Bucharest in 1998. She was awarded with Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship (1999-2001) and Japan Society for Promotion Science Fellowship (2004-2006). She was Visiting Professor at several universities and institutes. The research in Ferbinteanu-Cimpoesu’s group is focused on the exploration of new areas of the molecular magnetism, from the synthesis and analysis point of view, proposing both a new chemistry and rather inedited theoretical perspectives, with original conceptual and methodological developments.

Speaker
Marilena Ferbinteanu / University of Bucharest
Romania

Abstract

We report theoretical and numerical results on scaling laws for systems with multiple time scales in the context of kinetic dynamics of domain growth [1]. The theoretical method has been tested by Monte Carlo simulationsin classical magnetic systems. In particular, we show that in the case of a planar magnetic Heisenberg model with long-range interactions the characteristic length of the domain growth behaves according to a Lisfshitz-Allen-Cahn law with logarithmic corrections [2]. Finally, scaling laws for Skyrmions will be presented.

Biography

Dr.David Laroze is Full Professor and Director of the Mathematical Modeling Laboratory at the University of Tarapacá. Also, he holds an Occasional professorship at Yachay Tech University.He has published more than 100 manuscripts in journals and conference proceedings, including 88 papers in journals indexed in the Web of Science – Journal Citation Reports. Dr. David has participated in the scientific and in the organized committee of conferences and serves as a reviewer in many international journals.He is interested on nonlinear phenomena, magnetism, radiation problems, hydrodynamic instabilities, and thermal and electronic transport in quantum systems.

Speaker
David Laroze / University of Tarapaca
Chile

Will be updated soon...