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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Clinical Pharmacy is a unique service provided by the leading pharmacy departments in the United States. The concept of Clinical Pharmacy evolved after the significant increase in number of pharmaceuticals in the market and the increasing potential of drug interactions. However, the Clinical Pharmacists is not merely an individual who advises on the drug interactions. There are number of functions which include but not limited to; design of appropriate drug therapy, Pharmacokinetics assessment and evaluation to optimize drug therapy, drug information dissemination to the physicians and other healthcare providers and participate as toxicology consultant in Poison management. At King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH) the first Clinical Pharmacy services program began in 1983. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of our Clinical Pharmacy program on the patients' care as well as its perception by the Medical staff that came from different parts of the world. Our Clinical Pharmacists were asked to record any suggestions or interventions in the form (figure 1). The forms were all collected at the end of each day and entered into a database for analysis. Each intervention was analyzed in order to assess the merit of the action in terms of the therapeutic, financial and direct cost impact. The study showed a positive impact on the patients' care as well as on the economy of drugs prescribing. Meanwhile, the service was very much appreciated by the Medical staff as well as other healthcare providers. Key Words: Clinical Pharmacy; Economic Impact

Biography

Abdulaziz A Saddique has a Bachelor of Pharmacy Degree from King Saud University and Doctorate degree in Clinical Pharmacy from the University of Minnesota. He is a Certified Clinical Toxicologist and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Intensive Care, also is a Certified Professional in Health Care Quality (CPHQ), California, USA and Certified Six Sigma Master Black Belt, ASQ USA 2005. Certified KPI Professional and Practitioner. KPI Institute. He is a member of King Abdulaziz Quality Award, Committee, and Healthcare Standards Committee Ministry of Health. Board Member CBAHI up to 2008. He published seven books on Quality Management, Pharmacy, and Toxicology and more than 200 papers in national and international journals. Experience: CEO at Qimat Taiba Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Factory Board Member at Alternative Energy Company Ltd Co-Owner and VP at CCICKSA Administration Advisor at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital Executive Director for Quality Management at King Saud University Administration and Quality Management Consultant at Al Hammadi Hospital Al-Olaya Consultant on Protection against Weapons of Mass Destructions at Ministry Of Defence and Aviation Saudi Arabia Strategic Planning and Business Development Consultant at Sultan Almousa Group Assistant Editor at Micromeix Drug Information System Member of Drug Registration Committee at Ministry Of Health Saudi Arabia Clinical Pharmacists and Director of Pharmacy Services at King Khalid University Hospital Consultant on Developing Pharmaceutical Technology Factory at Husain Al-Ali Group Clinical Assistance Professor at University Of Minnesota Research Associate Cardiac Surgery at United Hospital, St Paul Minnesota

Speaker
Abdulaziz A. Saddique / King Saud University
Saudi Arabia

Abstract

In vivo studies from several laboratories had found remarkable anticancer effect of methylglyoxal on cancer-bearing animals. However, many in vitro studies have assigned a toxic role for methylglyoxal. Our laboratory demonstrated that methylglyoxal is non toxic in vivo at its therapeutic dose. Four species of animals, both rodents (mouse, rat, rabbits) and non-rodent (dogs), were treated with different doses of methylglyoxal through oral, subcutaneous and intravenous routes. Acute (treatment for only 1 day) toxicity tests done with mouse and rat and chronic (treatment for around a month) toxicity test done with mouse, rat, rabbit and dog found that methylglyoxal had no deleterious effect on the physical and behavioral pattern of the treated animals. Fertility and teratogenecity studies established that animals produced healthy litters indicating no damage of the reproductive systems as well as no deleterious effect on the offspring. The biochemical and hematological parameters of methylglyoxal-treated rats and dogs and histological studies of several organs of methylglyoxal treated mouse indicated that methylglyoxal had no apparent deleterious effect on the vital organs of these animals. Additionally, pharmacokinetics of orally fed methylglyoxal in mice has indicated that the concentration of methylglyoxal reaches maximum at 4 h after administration and reaches its basal levels after another 4 h.

Biography

Professor Manju Ray is an Indian scientist in Molecular Enzymology and Cancer Biochemistry. She has done notable work in the development of anticancer drug and understanding of differentiation process of cells. Her interests cover tumor biochemistry and molecular enzymology.

Speaker
Manju Ray / Bose Institute
India

Abstract

Biography

He is a Reader in Nanomedicine within the School of Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences, Liverpool John Moores University, UK. I obtained my Pharmacy degree from the same university and am a registered pharmacist. In 2004, I received my Doctor of Philosphy (Ph.D) in drug delivery from Aston University, UK, entitled Improving diagnosis and vaccination strategies against Bovine Tuberculosis. Upon completing my Ph.D I went on to undertake a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at University of New Mexico in the Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory of Dr H Smyth, working in the area of dry powder inhalation of anticancer agents for treatment of lung cancer.

Speaker
Imran Saleem / Liverpool John Moores University
UK

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Carbon dots (C-dots) with size less than 10 nm have recently triggered great attention in the research of materials science and engineering due to their unique properties. They have been widely explored for applications for bio imaging, drug delivery, thermoelectric materials, photo catalysis and biomedical engineering. In this presentation, we will discuss the preparation and characterization of different types of C-dots. These C-dots were prepared from both "top-down" and "bottom-up" strategies and rigorously characterized by spectroscopy (UV-Vis, fluorescence, FTIR, and XPS), microscopy (AFM and TEM) and other (e.g., mass spectroscopy, zeta potential, etc.) commonly used techniques. We will also discuss various applications of the C-dots developed in our lab. (1), we have shown that C-dots could significantly inhibit the fibrillation formation of both insulin and amyloids, which has significant indication in the biomedicine field. (2), a major medical challenge one faces to treat central nervous' system (CNS) related diseases is to cross the tight junctions between endothelial cells, which are known as blood—brain barrier. Recently, our in vivo experimental observations suggested that the transferrin conjugated C-dots could enter the CNS of zebrafish while C-dots alone could not. (3), thanks to the abundant presence of carboxylic acids on the surface, C-dots are easily conjugated with transferrin and anticancer drug doxorubicin. The system was proved to be an effective drug delivery system for the delivery of doxorubicin into cancerous cells. (4), our study has shown that C-dots with low quantum yield ("dark") bind to calcified bone structures of live zebrafish larvae with high affinity and selectivity. Binding resulted in a strong enhancement of luminescence that was not observed in other tissues, including non-calcified endochondral elements. Retention of C-dots by bones was very stable, long lasting, and with no detectable toxicity. Further, we have shown that this high affinity and specificity binding property towards bone is unique to the C-dots developed in our lab, selective C-dots in literature did not show any interaction with the bone. These observations support a novel and revolutionary use of C-cots as highly specific bioagents for bone imaging and diagnosis, and as a potential bone-specific drug delivery carrier. (5), thermoelectricity refers to phenomena by which thermal energy is converted directly into electrical energy without any moving parts or working fluids. Significant efforts have been devoted to developing materials that could improve the conversion efficiency. We recently discovered that the addition of C-dots could increase the conversion efficiency of thermoelectric materials by as much as 70%, which is unprecedented.

Biography

Roger M. Leblanc received his B. S. in chemistry in 1964 from Université Laval, Canada, and Ph. D. in physical chemistry in1968 from the same university. From 1968 to 1970, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Prof. George Porter, FRS, in Davy Faraday Research Lab, the Royal Institution of Great Britain. He was a professor from 1970 to 1993 at Department of Chemistry and Biology in Université du Québec à Trois Rivières, Canada. During this period, he was Chair from 1971 to 1975 at the same department, and Director from 1981 to 1991 at Photobiophysics Research Center. In 1994, he moved to University of Miami, where he has been a professor at Department of Chemistry since then to present. At University of Miami, he was Chair of Department of Chemistry from 1994 to 2002, and he is appointed as Chair from 2013 to present. He was also one of the three editors of Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces from 1998 to 2013.

Speaker
Roger M. Leblanc / University of Miami
USA

Abstract

As for other administration routes, active compounds that must operate at the level of anterior eye segment or in vitreous body and retina would need to be produced in the form of liquid formulations (eye drops) to be applied locally on the conjunctiva or cornea, or either injectedintravitreally. As a consequence, lipophilicity and scarce solubility of several drugs are often a strong limit to the production of efficacious ophthalmic dosage forms. Our Research center is actively involved in exploring strategies for the effectively and safe local administration of ocular drugs and gene material, through various technological approaches, including nanotechnological means, that would improve the solubility of compounds and allow their penetration inside the inner eye tissues after topical application. The presentation will focus on some of the results recently obtained in this field, for instance through the use of polymeric nanoparticles, lipid nanoparticles (SLN, NLC, LDC), nanomicelles, etc.

Biography

Rosario Pignatello is Full Professor of Pharmaceutical Technology at the Department of Drug Sciences, University of Catania, Italy. He is the director of NANO-i, a research center devoted to the development of pre-industrial and industrially-driven studies on the controlled delivery and targeting of drugs to the anterior and posterior eye segments. Member of the Board of TEFARCOInnova, an inter-university consortium active in the field of innovative pharmaceutical technology. He is co-author of more than 140 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of many Journals in the area of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacology.

Speaker
Rosario Pignatello / University of Catania
Italy

Sessions:

Abstract

The cellulose nanowhiskers were prepared from the stingingcotton in two procedures the first one included the macerated in 4N hydrochloric acid solution for 14 days until the cotton fibers transformed into thick suspension. The second one carried out with commercial cotton was mixed with 1L of boiling hydrochloric acid (2.5 N HCl) solution and stirred for 45 min. at 450C to yield a thick suspension of hydrolyzed cotton wool. The CNWs dissolved in DCM and treated with Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) and P-dimethyl aminopyridine (DMAP), during 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) were added drop wise to the prepared suspension to produced compound 2, the resulted compound 2 was reacted with doxorubicin to form the final compound 3. The compounds were characterized with XRD, FT-IR, HNMR spectroscopy and SEM, AFM. In vivo anticancer effect of the synthesized nanocarrier grafted with DOX was evaluated on laboratory mice with induced mammary adenocarcinoma (AM3). The evaluation of anticancer effect based on measuring the degree of the reduction in the size of the tumor mass in comparison to unloaded DOX as standard

Biography

Prof. Dr. Ashour H. Dawood, PhD, MSc. BSc. Bioinorganic Chemistry, Baghdad University, Vice Dean of Scientific Affairs Al-Esraa University College, interesting in Drug daredevilry, nanocompounds of drug carrier, anticancer agents.

Speaker
Ashour Hammood Dawood / Al-Esraa University College
Iraq

Abstract

While translational research can mean different things to different stakeholders, mostinvestigators consider translational research to representa “bench-to-bedside” approach whereby basic scienceknowledge is applied towards the development of novel devices, new therapies and medication delivery methodsaimed at ultimately improving health. In 2006, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) established a road map citing three major priorities towards human disease: • Increase efficiency in determining the relevance of novel discoveries • Enable clinical researchers to shapealternate hypotheses • Accelerate the rational transfer of knowledge for improving public health outcomes As a result of these priorities, academic centers, foundations, pharmaceutical industries, hospitals and health care systems established translational research programs, not only in the USA, but also in Europe andthe UK. However, in spite of these efforts, a number of gaps and challenges remain. Gaps include academic research culture, funding capacity, intellectual property, ethical and legal considerations,and regulatory oversight for commercialization, marketing, pricing and access of novel therapeutic agents. In addition, growing challenges related to rising healthcare costs, research budget cuts, and tightening regulations stifle translational research endeavors. While private organizations and federal agencies work with various stakeholders to bridge the gaps, one cannot ignore the disturbing reality that as life spans increase, health spans havenot, and the fastest growing segment of the world’s population is the geriatric sector, which is projected to reach ~1.6 billion by 2050.

Biography

Shanaz Tejani-Butt is a professor in the department of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia. Dr. Tejani-Butt’s research interests include the neurobiological mechanisms associated with the regulation of biogenic amines in an animal model of depressive behavior, implications of these biogenic amines in modulating stress and reward,and therapeutic action of psychiatric drugs.Dr. Tejani-Butt has been a recipient of numerous research grants, andserved as a Grant Reviewer forthe National Institute of Health. She is a global speaker, authoring more than 100 research papers and presentations. Over the years, Shanaz has held the position of Dean, College of Graduate Studies, and Director, Office of Research Administration. Shanaz Tejani-Butt received her PhD in Medicinal Chemistry from the Medical College of Virginia, her MS in Organic & Natural Product Chemistry and BS in Chemistry and Microbiology from the University of Bombay. She received her MBA degree in Healthcare Business from the Mayes College of the University of the Sciences.

Speaker
Shanaz Tejani-Butt / University of the Sciences in Philadelphia
USA

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disorder characterized by increased blood glucose level and the cause is insufficient or inefficient insulin response. There are 20.8 million children and adults in the United States who have diabetes and it cause about 5% of all deaths globally each year. Caffeic acid is the major phenolic compound in coffee, found widespread in plants, and can be isolated from the leaves and fruit. There are reports that increased coffee consumption has significantly associated with a decreased risk of diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. This paper understands the effect and the mechanism of action of caffeic acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The study reveals that caffeic acid has enhancing effect on glucose uptake in both time- as well as dose-dependent manner. The 4 hour incubation with caffeic acid (25 μM), 2,4-Thiazolidinedione (THZ) (10 μM ) and metformin (20 μM) shows approx 3.27, 3.29 and 2.95-fold increase in glucose uptake. The caffeic acid has shown synergy for glucose uptake activity with both the combination i.e., with metformin and THZ. The effect of chlorogenic acid on the GLUT4, PI3K and PPAR gamma genes also have been studied and its showing that the glucose uptake activity of caffeic acid is via PI3K dependent pathway. These results suggest the beneficial effect of chlorogenic acid on glucose uptake and on the insulin pathway. Keywords: Diabetes, Hypoglycemic, Biguanide, caffeic acid, Dose.

Biography

Dr Pranav Kumar Prabhakar has received his PhD in Biotechnology from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Madras, India. Currently, he is working as Assistant Professor in Lovely Professional University Punjab, India. His research has included synergy, Phytomedicine, metabolic disorders. He has authored 25 research articles/books/ book chapters. He is a member of Indian Science Congress, Royal Society of Chemistry and Asia-Pacific Chemical, Biological& Environmental Engineering Society (APCBEES).

Speaker
Pranav Kumar Prabhakar / Lovely Professional University
India

Abstract

Objectives; the abuse of drugs can have serious ramifications on a person’s physical health, mental health, and overall well-being. Aim of the work is to determine the prevalence of some drugs among patients from the laboratory point of view. Methods; the sample size for this study was five hundred patients with acute poisoning by some drugs of abuse. In this study all patients were subjected for detection of drugs of abuse in urine by EMIT system and Gas Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) for confirmation of the obtained results. Results; the study revealed that the percentages of positive urine samples by Enzyme Multiplying Immunoassay Technique (EMIT) confirmed by Gas Chromatography / Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). Conclusion; presence of these drugs has a serious effect on man health, consequently his environment. Recommendations; it is recommended that public health intervention aimed at preventing drug use among inhabitants should be designed to raise awareness about the negative effects of drug abuse. Keywords: Patients, Drugs, prevalence. EMIT.

Biography

Dr. Rafaat is an associate consultant (Professor) of Toxicology at the Emergency Hospital in the Faculty of Medicine at Mansoura University, Egypt. He obtained a PhD of hydro geochemistry in 2004, at Mansoura University and previously completed an MSc in hydro geochemistry in 2001 at the same institution. He also has a Diploma of toxicology and forensic chemistry (1996) from the Faculty of Medicine and a Diploma of applied chemistry (1993). Dr. Rafaat specializes in medical analysis, toxicology & forensic chemistry as well as water pollution. He has published papers over 10 local paper and 13 in international publications. He has spoken at 55 local conferences and workshops and 15 international meetings. He is currently a member of eight international scientific societies. ?

Speaker
Raafat Abdeldayem / Mansoura University
Egypt

Abstract

Alternative splicing (AS) is a process that enables mRNA to generate protein isoforms with different biological properties. Cancer cells often use this maneuverability to produce proteins that contribute to growth and survival. In our previous studies, we have determined a novel biological action of amiloride, namely the modulation of AS in cancer cells. However, the effective concentration of amiloride is too high, which limits its applications in cancer treatment. In this study, we used computational algorithms to screen potential amiloride derivatives for their ability to regulate AS in cancer cells. We found that 3,5-diamino-6-chloro-N-(N-(2,6-dichlorobenzoyl)carbamimidoyl)pyrazine-2-carboxamide (BS008) could regulate AS of apoptotic gene transcripts, including HIPK3, SMAC, and BCL-X at a lower concentration than amiloride. This splicing regulation involved various splicing factors, and it was accompanied by a change in the phosphorylation state of SR proteins. RNA sequencing also discovered that the AS of many other apoptotic gene transcripts such as AATF, ATM, AIFM1, NFKB1, and API5 were modulated by BS008. In vivo experiments further indicated that the treatment of tumor-bearing mice with BS008 resulted in a marked decrease in tumor size. Combining BS008 and sorafenib enhanced the antitumor activity of sorafenib and enabled sorafenib dose reduction without compromising antitumor activity. These findings suggest that BS008 may possess therapeutic potential for cancer treatment.

Biography

Jan-Gowth Chang is the director of Center for Precision Medicine, Epigenome Research Center, and Department of Laboratory Medicine in China Medical University Hospital. He has received the Distinguished Researcher Awards, National Science Council, ROC in 2002, 2005, 2010, and 2014. His research mainly includes three areas: (1) Diagnosis and treatment of spinal cord muscular atrophy and establishment of animal models; (2) Diagnosis and treatment of cancer, especially in the regulation of alternative splicing of apoptotic gene transcripts; (3) Genetic polymorphism in drug metabolism, and more than 100 articles have been published in reputed journals.

Speaker
Jan-Gowth Chang / China Medical University Hospital
Taiwan

Abstract

Coffee is one of the nutraceutical and one of the drinks is consumed by the world community. Coffee contains a lot of caffeine. The results of studies showed that coffee could reduce weight gain. Method: This study was conducted using a systematic review method. Results and Discussion: Some of the mechanisms of caffeine in weight loss include helping lipid metabolism by increasing thermogenesis as part of increased fat oxidation. Caffeine shows the ability to reduce adipose pad size and the number of adiposity cells. Caffeine also reduces the TNF-α regulatory response in primary tissue of adipose tissue. Conclusion: Caffeine is able to reduce weight gain through thermogenesis and caffeine activity in adipose tissue. Keywords: Caffeine, coffee, reduce, weight gain, adipose, tissue/cells

Biography

Rosa Lelyana completed medical school in 1997 and graduated S2 is less than 2 years of research in the field of coffee. She is a member of the ACS (American Chemical Society) on request since 2014. In 2011 she received an award from the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine and University lecturer Diponegoro as one of the best level textbook authors of university medical faculty level Diponegoro.

Speaker
Rosa Lelyana / Diponegoro University
Indonesia

Plenary Talks

Abstract

MyoNovin® (1,2-di-O-nitro-3-(o-methoxyphenoxy) propanediol) is a novel skeletal muscle regenerator with potential for treating sarcopenia and related atrophies. MyoNovin® mediates the activation of skeletal muscle satellite cells by providing new precursor cells for skeletal muscle growth. Targeting satellite cells directly has the potential to minimize many adverse effects associated with other treatment modalities. In-vitro and in-vivo studies show that MyoNovin® triggers DNA synthesis in a mouse model. The biopharmaceutical properties of MyoNovin® have been studied by characterizing its physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties utilizing computer software packages to predict its physicochemical properties. MyoNovin® showed lower predicted water solubility and higher LogP value compared to its precursor guaifenesin, indicating higher lipophilicity and higher protein binding. Fed state solubility of MyoNovin® in gastrointestinal fluid was predicted to be superior to fasted state solubility. MyoNovin® showed a 20-fold higher skin permeability vs guaifenesin and approximately 10-fold higher effective jejunal permeability compared to guaifenesin. In silico results suggest that the relatively high lipophilicity and skin permeability of MyoNovin® renders it a good candidate for transdermal application, while the intestinal permeation property and fed state solubility in gastrointestinal fluid suggests better oral absorption will be achieved when administered with food. Using an in-vivo animal model, MyoNovin® was determined to have a t1/2 of 0.16 h, Vss of 0.62 L/kg, and excretion primarily by non-renal routes. Biomarkers of MyoNovin® cardiac and renal toxicity were not significantly different from baseline controls. Further in-vitro and in-vivo studies are in progress in our laboratory to elucidate the pharmacokinetic profile of MyoNovin®.

Biography

Dr. Frank Burczynski (BSc. Pharm, MSc, PhD.) is a professor at the College of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba and served as associate dean research and graduate studies chair. Research interests focus on drug transport and development of novel dosage forms. Current research focuses on the cellular drug uptake process during periods of oxidative stress and the influence of extracellular and intracellular binding proteins on uptake. Other research areas of interest involve targeted drug delivery and skeletal muscle regeneration.

Speaker
Frank J Burczynski / University of Manitoba
Canada

Abstract

PURPOSE: Drug diversion by healthcare staff is a significant problem that compromises safe medication practices, may adversely affect employees, and is an affront to patient safety. Every healthcare system should have systematic, coordinated, and continuous operations to ensure drug diversion can be readily identified, promptly addressed, and minimized to the fullest extent possible. In accordance with this regard, an evaluation mechanism was developed to measure the compliance rate of existing health system policies and procedures for controlled substances with best practice guidelines on preventing diversion of controlled substances. METHODS: Best practice guidelines on preventing diversion of controlled substances were compiled from the literature (e.g., Mayo Clinic, ASHP, etc.) and served as the basis for development of an assessment tool. A checklist template tool was created to address various categories within theseguidelines. We utilized fourteen categories, each containing a variable number of items. Each category was referenced with a section number where detailed information about each item could be found on the template. A comment section was included for each item so that specific information about the nature of a‘yes’ or ‘no’ response could be clarified or explained, if needed. There were a total of 252 possible yes/no responses among items within the fourteen categories. A compliance rate was calculated for each category via a ratio of ‘yes’ responses to total number of items. An over-all compliance rate was calculated to determine how well healthcare system controlled substances practices, policies, and procedures compare with best practice guidelines. RESULTS: Tabulation of ‘yes’ responses on the assessment template served as the basis for calculating a compliance rate. The greater the compliance with best practices guidelines, the greater the likelihood that controlled substance diversion may be minimized. Note that while the assessment template is based on best practice guidelines rather than regulations, evidence indicates that adherence is commensurate with an effective drug diversion detection, prevention and response program. Compliance with best practice standards can serve as validation that healthcare system policies and procedures are proactive, and that the organization is taking responsible action to prevent, detect and respond to drug diversion. Periodic assessment of healthcare system policies and procedures for controlled substance utilization can ensure that compliance with best practice standards are being met. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare systems need a mechanism to ensure their controlled substance policiesand procedures related to the prevention, detection and response to potential diversion are not only adequate, but also proactive. Guidelines on preventing diversion of controlled substances, which were developed from a review of multiple literature sources, can serve as a model set of standards for all healthcare systems to emulate. By utilizing an assessment tool compiled from these guidelines, healthcare systems can identify gaps in existing policies and procedures, take appropriate corrective action, and implement modifications. A compliance rate of 90% or better is an indication that the healthcare system is meeting the challenge towards preventing and reducing drug diversion activity. Additionally, for benchmarking purposes, calculated compliance rates from other healthcare systems can provide valuable aggregate data that can be incorporated into continuous quality improvement initiatives.

Biography

Dr. Frank Breve is a clinical pharmacist consultant licensed in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, West Virginia, Nebraska, and has been practicing as an independent consultant for more than 25 years. He is president and CEO of two consulting firms: Mid AtlanticPharmaTech Consultants, LLC and Opiate Consulting Educational Solutions. He is Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor at Temple University School of Pharmacy, a former hospital clinical pharmacist at several large teaching facilities in the Philadelphia and southern New Jersey area, and past President of the New Jersey Pharmacists Association. Dr. Breve has expertise in clinical and regulatory consulting to healthcare systems with special emphasis on psychotropic agents and medications used to treat pain. Recent engagements include consulting for hospitals and narcotic treatment programs throughout the US and Canada for drug diversion issues.In addition to educational initiatives, Dr. Breve provides services to ensure regulatory compliance and continuous quality improvement for proper use, storage and monitoring of controlled substances, measures for prevention, and resolution for healthcare-related drug diversion. He is a member of the National Association of Drug Diversion Investigators, the Association of Healthcare Internal Auditors, and numerous pharmacy and medical professional organizations.

Speaker
Frank Breve / Temple University School of Pharmacy
United States

Abstract

Biography

Experienced Executive Committee Member with a demonstrated history of working in the pharmaceuticals industry. Strong business development professional skilled in Organic Synthesis, Drug Discovery, Life Sciences, Cell Biology, and Biochemistry.

Speaker
Roberto Di Santo / Sapienza University of Rome
Italy

Abstract

Biography

Dr. Mandip Sachdeva is a Professor and Section Leader for the Pharmaceutics activity at Florida A&M, College of Pharmacy. He has made significant contributions to the knowledge and understanding in the area of drug delivery with special emphasis in inhalation/aerosol delivery as applied to lung cancer, Triple negative breast cancer and topical delivery of neuropeptides. He has used a multidisciplinary approach of not only delivering novel anticancer agents by inhalation drug delivery but also look into their mechanism of action for newer targets.

Speaker
Mandip Singh Sachdeva / Florida A&M University
USA

Keynote Talks

Abstract

The primary objective of this study is to compare the possible therapeutic effects of ivabradine used in combination with bisoprolol versus uptitration of bisoprolol in Pakhtun population with systolic heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Patients with systolic heart failure (n=114), LVEF < 35% by Teichholz method, NHYA class I-III, sinus rhythm and resting HR >70 bpm, already on bisoprolol 5 mg od (p.o) were divided into 2 groups; each group had 57 patients. Group 1 (n= 57) were uptitrated to bisoprolol 10 mg od (p.o) and patients in Group 2 (n= 57) received ivabradine 5 mg b.i.d(p.o) in addition to bisoprolol 5 mg o.d (p.o). Blood samples for BNP level, an ECG, echocardiogram, systolic and diastolic BP were taken at baseline and at the end of 3rd month of therapy. When ivabradine and control groups were compared, a significant decrease was found in heart rate (94.82±7.03 vs. 68.75±5.35 b.p.m, p < 0.0001; 96.33±8.03 vs. 81.58±8.87 bpm, p < 0.0001) and BNP (969.8.3±348.9 vs. 348.6±230.2 pg/ml, p < 0.0001; 927.3±350.3 vs. 460.4±311.9 pg/ml, p < 0.0001). A significant decrease was found in LVEDD (61.11 ± 6.25 vs. 54.40 ± 4.86 mm, p < 0.0001; 62.18 ± 5.65 vs. 57.23 ± 5.32 mm, p < 0.0001) and LVESD (51.44 ± 6.22 vs. 42.56 ± 5.65 mm, p < 0.0001; 51.96 ± 6.06 vs. 45.93 ± 6.35 mm, p < 0.0001) in ivabradine and control groups. However, a significant increase was observed in LVEF in ivabradine group as compared to control groups (31.40±5.37 vs. 41.68±5.33 %, p < 0.0001; 33.68±4.52 vs. 39.79±5.77 %, p < 0.0001). A significant decrease in systolic BP: p = 0.0144 and diastolic BP: p = 0.0011 was observed in ivabradine group. Conclusions: The study concludes that long-term reduction of heart rate with ivabradine 5 mg b.i.d (p.o) and bisoprolol 5 mg o.d(p.o) when used in combination has proven to improve primary efficacy endpoint, left ventricular ejection fraction, symptoms of heart failure and BNP significantly.

Biography

Professsor Dr. Niaz Ali is PhD in Pharmacy from University of Peshawar, Pakistan. He has certificate and Master in Health Professions Education from Khyber Medical University, Peshawar, He has published 67 research publications of international repute. He has helped in starting Pharm D program, M.Phil and PhD programs. He has established research laboratories. His area of interest are Pharmacological screenings and Pharmacogenetics. He has been awarded Higher Education Commission Best University Teacher award in year 2013. Currently, he nominated for President’s medal.

Speaker
Niaz Ali / Medical University
Pakistan

Abstract

Biography

Dr. Mino R Caira is professor at University of Cape Town, South Africa. He has directed the Centre for Supramolecular Chemistry Research at the University of Cape Town (UCT) since 2005. His research focuses on the modes of molecular association found in crystalline polymorphs, pseudo polymorphs, inclusion compounds and molecular complexes, with an emphasis on pharmacologically active substances. Dr. Caira retired as Professor of Physical Chemistry in 2014 and was subsequently appointed as a Senior Scholar in the Department of Chemistry at UCT. His expertise is in the area of solid-state chemistry of drug polymorphs and novel multi-component systems containing active pharmaceutical ingredients. He has published over 300 papers in international journals and since 2009 has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of the Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Speaker
Mino Caira / University of Cape Town
South Africa

Abstract

Biography

Amani Khalifa, After earning her Ph.D. in Pharmacology & Toxicology from College of Pharmacy, University of Georgia, USA in 1995, she was appointed as the first faculty member in the Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University (ASU), Cairo, Egypt; one of the most reputable universities in Egypt. She served as an adjunct Assistant/Associate Professor at the American University in Cairo (AUC) for many years thereafter and then she became the Head of the Pharmacology & Toxicology Department in Faculty of Pharmacy, ASU, theVice-Dean for Graduate Studies & Research and the Acting Dean of Faculty of Pharmacy, ASU while being the Vice-Dean for Graduate Studies.

Speaker
Amani E. Khalifa / Ain Shams University
Egypt

Sessions:

Abstract

Cocaine and heroin derive addictive properties from rapid dopamine (DA) reuptake inhibition in brain reward ciruits. In contrast, methadone produces slow long-lasting DA reuptake inhibition. Methadone’s success in treating heroin addiction has prompted suggestions that slow long-lasting agonist pharmacotherapies may be useful in treating cocaine addiction. We studied this hypothesis, using a series of slow long-lasting DA reuptake inhibitors (“slowDARIs”) in a variety of addiction-related preclinical animal models, and compared them with methadone’s effects on heroin’s actions in the same models. SlowDARIs produced long-lasting enhancement of electrical brain-stimulation reward (BSR) and extracellular nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA. Pretreatment with slowDARIs augmented cocaine-enhanced BSR, prolonged cocaine-enhanced NAc DA, and reduced cocaine self-administration without an extinction pattern, suggesting an additive effect of slowDARIs with cocaine. In contrast, methadone pretreatment inhibited heroin-enhanced BSR and NAc DA, and inhibited heroin self-administration with an extinction pattern, suggesting functional antagonism by methadone of heroin’s actions. Also, slowDARIs may have abuse liability, as they produce dose-dependent enhancement of BSR and NAc DA, maintain self-administration, and dose-dependently reinstate drug-seeking behavior. In contrast, methadone only partially maintains self-administration with an extinction pattern, and fails to reinstate drug-seeking behavior. These findings suggest that the actions of slowDARIs’ differ significantly from those of methadone. We conclude that agonist pharmacotherapies for cocaine must fully emulate methadone’s actions vis-à-vis heroin – block DA transporters to moderately augment NAc DA and enhance brain reward (thus relieving “drug hunger” and propensity to relapse) and also functionally block cocaine’s binding site on the DA transporter.

Biography

Eliot Gardner received his AB degree from Harvard College and Harvard Medical School, his MA and PhD degrees from McGill University and Montreal Neurological Institute, and postdoctoral studies in pharmacology and neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He served as Branch Chief, U.S. Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine; and spent 33 years as professor of pharmacology, neuroscience, neurology, and psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He is Chief of the Neuropsychopharmacology Section, National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. National Institutes of Health. He has authored more than 400 published articles/abstracts.

Speaker
Eliot L. Gardner / National Institute on Drug Abuse
USA

Abstract

Chirality is a subject of great relevance in modern pharmaceutical analysis, since usually the desired pharmacological effect of a certain substance is related to only one of the enantiomers. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is a useful alternative for the most frequently used chromatographic techniques in chiral analysis with advantages related to rapid method development, high separation efficiency, low consumption of analytes, reagents and chiral selectors, and especially with the high flexibility in choosing and changing the chiral selector. One of the most interesting class of pharmaceuticals regarding stereoselectivity is the one of modern antidepressants, represented by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) respectively selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SSNRI). These substances have at least a chiral center in their structure and differences between the pharmacological effects of the two enantiomers are demonstrated. The aim of the study was the development of new separation techniques for the enantiodiscrimination of three frequently used modern antidepressants (fluoxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine) using CE and cyclodextrins (CDs) as chiral selectors. In order to establish the optimal chiral selector a complex screening of several native and derivatized, neutral and ionized CDs was applied. The electrophoretic conditions were optimized establishing the influence of buffer concentration and pH, CD concentration, system temperature, applied voltage and injection parameters on the chiral resolution. The methods were validated with regard of precision, linearity, accuracy and detectability and were applied for the determination of the substances from pharmaceutical preparations. CE proved to be an efficient tool in the preliminary chiral analysis of pharmaceuticals.

Biography

Gabriel Hancu is an associate professor at the University of Medicine and Pharmacy Science and Technology from Tîrgu Mureș, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Tîrgu Mureș, Romania. His research work is related to applications of capillary electrophoresis for the analysis of pharmaceutical substances focusing especially on chiral separation of pharmaceuticals. He has published more than 75 articles in differen journals, amongst them 45 indexed in ISI Web of Science.

Speaker
Gabriel Hancu / University of Medicine and Pharmacy Science and Technology
Romania

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Our previous articles showed that suppressive or preventive treatment with the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin reduced the number and duration of genital herpes outbreaks with no adverse effects. These studies also revealed that the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin is mostly superior to acyclovir, valacyclovir, and famciclovir drugs in genital herpes. This study tested the effect of Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin in oral herpes (also called cold sores and fever blisters). RESULTS: Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin was effective in 89.3% of participants. The treatment reduced the mean number of outbreaks per year from 6.0 and 3.6 in the control groups to 2.0 in the treatment group ( P < .0001 and P = .07, respectively). Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin reduced the mean duration of outbreaks from 9.8 and 5.8 days in the control groups to 3.2 days in the treatment group ( P < .0001 and P = .02, respectively). There were no reports of adverse experiences. Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin was compared to acyclovir and valacyclovir in 6 tests. In all tests, Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin showed higher efficacy. Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin also showed superior safety. CONCLUSIONS: This clinical study showed that suppressive or preventive treatment with the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin reduced the number and duration of outbreaks in oral herpes without any adverse effects. The study also showed that the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin had better clinical effects than acyclovir and valacyclovir, the leading drugs in the category. Based on these results, we recommend using the herbal Gene-Eden-VIR/Novirin as preventive treatment for oral herpes and, specifically, as an alternative to the acyclovir and valacyclovir drugs.

Biography

Dr. Polansky is the director of the Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (CBCD). Dr. Polansky received his PhD on Computational Models of Intuition from the Hebrew University in Israel. He then worked at Cornell University, and the University of Rochester. Dr. Polansky wrote the book: Microcompetition with Foreign DNA and the Origin of Chronic Disease. Dr. Polansky is also the developer of the psycholinguistic-based data-mining program called Computer Intuition. The program uncovers the intuition of scientists hiding in scientific papers. Dr. Polansky is using Computer Intuition in in uncovering surprising relationships hiding in the scientific literature.

Speaker
Hanan Polansky / The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease
USA

Abstract

There has been emerging interest in the application of cannabinoids in medicine, and several have been tested as drugs for a variety of disease processes. Synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs) are rapidly emerging drugs of abuse, which can result in extreme agitation, hallucinations, tachycardia, syncope, and seizures, and their use has exploded in many sections of the population including teenagers. However, the metabolism of classical and synthetic cannabinoids and the biological activity of their metabolites, produced by cytochrome P450s (P450s) and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), have not been thoroughly investigated. In the present studies, the oxidative and conjugative metabolic pathways of classical cannabinoids, such as ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC), and SCBs were compared. Cannabinoids underwent extensive metabolism by P450s and UGTs resulting in the biosynthesis of hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites that were subsequently excreted in human urine, primarily as glucuronides. Steady-state kinetic analyses were performed, and rigorous metabolite identification was carried out using LC-MS/MS and HPLC-UV/Vis. Subsequent mechanistic studies involving binding and activation of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) CB1 and CB2 showed that SCBs caused psychoactive effects similar to those of ∆9-THC. Moreover, CBRs were able to bind several hydroxylated and glucuronidated SCB metabolites with an affinity similar to that of the parent compound. Finally, our in vivo data demonstrated that SCB metabolites retained biological activity in mice. The fact that some hydroxylated derivatives and the glucuronides of SCBs are biologically active makes the study of these compounds essential for understanding their severe toxicity and pharmacokinetics/dynamics. Studies on the bioactivity of classical cannabinoid metabolites are underway. (NIH/NIDA DA039143 ARP & PLP).

Biography

Anna Radominska-Pandya, a Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at UAMS, is the Editor in Chief for Drug Metabolism Review. She received her Ph.D. from the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, Poland. She published 175 papers in peer-reviewed journals and received thirteen R01 grants from NIH and DoD. Research interests include: regulation and suppression of human UGTs and their role as anti-proliferative agents in cancers, interactions between UGTs and cannabinoid receptors, delivery of UGT genes and drugs into cancers using nanomaterial, and the roles of UGTs in biotransformaing drugs including marijuana and synthetic cannabinoids.

Speaker
Anna Radominska-Pandya / University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
USA

Abstract

Biography

Abdulaziz A Saddique has a Bachelor of Pharmacy Degree from King Saud University and Doctorate degree in Clinical Pharmacy from the University of Minnesota. He is a Certified Clinical Toxicologist and Clinical Pharmacy Specialist in Intensive Care, also is a Certified Professional in Health Care Quality (CPHQ), California, USA and Certified Six Sigma Master Black Belt, ASQ USA 2005. Certified KPI Professional and Practitioner. KPI Institute. He is a member of King Abdulaziz Quality Award, Committee, and Healthcare Standards Committee Ministry of Health. Board Member CBAHI up to 2008. He published seven books on Quality Management, Pharmacy, and Toxicology and more than 200 papers in national and international journals. Experience: CEO at Qimat Taiba Pharmaceutical Biotechnology Factory Board Member at Alternative Energy Company Ltd Co-Owner and VP at CCICKSA Administration Advisor at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital Executive Director for Quality Management at King Saud University Administration and Quality Management Consultant at Al Hammadi Hospital Al-Olaya Consultant on Protection against Weapons of Mass Destructions at Ministry Of Defence and Aviation Saudi Arabia Strategic Planning and Business Development Consultant at Sultan Almousa Group Assistant Editor at Micromeix Drug Information System Member of Drug Registration Committee at Ministry Of Health Saudi Arabia Clinical Pharmacists and Director of Pharmacy Services at King Khalid University Hospital Consultant on Developing Pharmaceutical Technology Factory at Husain Al-Ali Group Clinical Assistance Professor at University Of Minnesota Research Associate Cardiac Surgery at United Hospital, St Paul Minnesota

Speaker
Abdulaziz Saddique / Corporate Chief at Al-Mouwasat Medical Services

Abstract

The paper submitted the preliminary results of Groundwater Quality Studies in a Pune Area in Pharmaceutical Instituions. Water quality varies seasonally, some wells showing increase in salinity as water level in the post monsoon period. Water quality is identified based on various geochemical classifications. Water samples collected from different water cooler were analysed using standard laboratory techniques. Modified stiff, piper trilinear diagrams and trend surface maps were constructed to identify the chemical character of the shallow groundwater. Groundwater has been analysed and found suitable for general domestic and irrigation purposed except some which are intensively irrigated. Samples are analysed for Ca, Mg, Na, K, HCO3, Cl, TDS, pH, Electrical conductance etc., and the results are summarized below: Hydrogen ion concentration : The pH of groundwater varies from 6.7 to 8.2 This indicates slight alkalinity of groundwater in this area.

Biography

Dr. Rahul Hajare is bright student of Renowned Immunologist Honorable Respected Dr. Ramesh S Paranjape’’ Retired Director and Apex body member of Indian Council of Medical Research New Delhi. He is Fellow Indian Council of Medical Research Serving the nation since 1911. He is working as guest faculty Shikshan Vikas Mandal Trust (Establishment 1951). Trust became a democratic republic constitution came into effect on 26 January 1950. He is graduated certified Vidyabharati College of Pharmacy, Trustee Respected Pratibhatai Patil (Ex President of India). Dr Hajare is double certified by Vidarbha Youth Welfare Society Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research was founded by the great visionary of this region Prof Ram Meghe in the year 1965.

Speaker
Rahul ajare / Fellow Indian Council of Medical Research New Delhi
India

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