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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Biography

B. M. Azizur Rahman received the B.Sc.Eng and M.Sc.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering with distinctions from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 1976 and 1979, respectively. He also received two gold medals for being the best undergraduate and graduate students of the university in 1976 and 1979, respectively. In 1979, he was awarded a Commonwealth Scholarship to study for a Ph.D. degree in the UK and subsequently in 1982 received his Ph.D. degree in Electronics from University College London. In 1988, he joined City University, London, as a lecturer, and became a full Professor in June 2000. At City University, he leads a large research group on Photonics Modelling, specialized in the use of rigorous and full-vectorial numerical approaches to design, analyze and optimize a wide range of photonic devices. He has published more than 550 journal and conference papers, and his journal papers have been cited more than 5000 times and h-index of 34. He has supervised 31 students to complete their Ph.D. degrees as their first supervisor and received more than £11 M in research grants. Prof. Rahman is Life Fellow of the IEEE, and Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the SPIE.

Speaker
Azizur Rahman / University of London
UK

Abstract

Luminescence properties of phosphors are generally varied with pressure because the electronic structures of the host material including Ln3+:4f, 5d and trap levels depends on pressure. We have reported compositional variation of electronic structures such as the conduction band (CB) bottom and Ce3+: 5d levels in Y3Al5-xGaxO12: Ce3+ (YAGG:Ce) phosphors as well as their persistent luminescence of Cr3+ codoped samples (YAGG:Ce-Cr)[1]. We have also reported Ga-content (x) dependence of quantum efficiency of Ce3+ in GYAGG, which rapidly drops in compositions above x>3.0 [2]. By using a diamond anvil cell (DAC) Prof. Grinberg in Gdansk and our group have reported large pressure dependence of photoluminescence (PL) in YGG (x=5)[2]. According to the results, non-luminescent YGG: Ce3+ at RT becomes luminescent and its lifetime, thermail quenching temperature increase with increasing pressure because of increasing CB bottom, which is close to the Ce3+: 5d1 level. In this study, the pressure dependence of PL and persistent luminescence (PersL) in Ce3+-M3+ codoped Y3AlGa4O12 (x=4) phosphors were investigated, in which M3+ ions (M = Yb or Cr) act as an electron trap for persistence. The PL intensity of Y3AlGa4O12: Ce3+-M3+ was increased by pressure because the nonradiative rate due to thermal ionization decreases due to the increase of energy gap between the CB bottom and the 5d1 state of Ce3+. With increasing pressure, the slope of PersL decay curve in the Yb-codoped system decreases. This result indicates the pressure increases the energy gap between CB and trap level of Yb2+, the electronic configuration of which is 4f 14. On the other hand, in the Cr3+ phosphor, the persL decay slope of Ce3+ were increased with increasing pressure. This discrepancy is due to different nature of 3d orbitals of chromium, which are split in a crystal field and more largely under higher pressure. In the garnet structrure, the Cr3+ ions (3d3) occupy the octahedral site, which accept one more electron to be Cr2+ during charging as a result of photo-ionization of Ce3+. As a high-spin configuration under a moderate 10Dq, this 4th electron occupies the eg-state with higher energy. Increasing 10Dq under high pressure can decrease the trap depth of Cr2+.

Biography

Setsuhisa Tanabe received his PhD from Kyoto University, Japan. He is now a full Professor of Kyoto University. He has published more than 200 papers in reputed journals, 25 book chapters and 37 review papers on rare-earth doped luminescent materials for upconversion, fiber amplifier for optical telecommunication and LED phosphors. He has served as a plenary, keynote or invited speaker at more than 100 international conferences. He was the chair of Technical Committee of Optoelectronic Glasses (TC20) of International Commission on Glass (ICG) and now a member of Steering Committee of ICG since 2013. He has been serving as a vice Editor of Journal of Luminescence since 2015.

Speaker
Setsuhisa Tanabe / Kyoto University
Japan

Abstract

Recent nanotechnology fabrication related advances allow maturing integrated silicon-photonic and plasmonic passive as well as active devices. In this paper I will present various silicon photonic configurations (photonic devices realized on top of silicon chips) based on nanoparticles as well as on nano-structures and which yield the realization of photonic active devices such as Boolean logic gates and transistors as well as photonic passive devices such as spectral and polarization sensitive filters. I will also show the realization of plasmonic logic gates such as the XOR gate being compatible for interfacing, via special nano-antennas, with input and output data modulated on top of a photonic carrier. I will present plasmonic wireless communication link on a silicon chip and its usage for the realization of processing devices with reduced number of interconnects.

Biography

Zeev Zalevsky received his B.Sc. and direct Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Tel-Aviv University in 1993 and 1996 respectively. Zeev is currently a full Professor in the faculty of engineering in Bar-Ilan University, Israel. His major fields of research are optical super resolution, biomedical optics, nano-photonics and electro-optical devices. By April 2015 Zeev has published more than 380 refereed journal papers, more than 200 conference proceeding papers, more than 335 international presentations out of which more than 110 were invited or plenary, 38 issued patents and more than 15 patents pending, 6 authored books, 3 books as an editor, 27 book chapters and 4 papers in SPIE Milestone series. In 2007 Zeev has received the Krill prize given by the Wolf foundation (Wolf prize for young scientists) and in 2008 the International Commission of Optics (ICO) prize and Abbe medal for his contribution to the field of optical super resolution. In 2009 he won the Juludan prize for advancing technology in medicine and in 2010 he was selected to be a fellow of the SPIE for his significant scientific and technical contributions in the multidisciplinary fields of optics, photonics and imaging. In 2011 Zeev received the international SAOT (School for Advanced Optical Technologies) Young Researcher Prize for his pioneering contributions in the development of optical techniques for enhanced imaging resolution and its use for biomedical applications. In 2011 he also received the Lean and Maria Taubenblatt Prize for Excellence in Medical Research for the development of a "Multi-functional bio-medical micro probe". In 2012 Zeev was selected to be a fellow of OSA for his significant scientific contribution to the field optical super resolution and extended depth of focus imaging. He was also selected to be IEEE senior member for his significant contribution in electro-optics. In 2012 Zeev also received the young investigator award in nanoscience and nanotechnology given by the Israel National Nanotechnology Initiative (INNI) together with the Ministry of Industry, Commerce and Labor and was the winner of the international Wearable Technologies (WT) Innovation World Cup 2012 Prize. In 2013 Zeev has received the Tesla Award for Outstanding Technical Communication in Electro-Optics. In 2014 Zeev received the Best paper award for paper presented in the 2013 Information Optics Workshop, he was the first and the second place winner in ICIS'2014 startup competition and received OSA Outstanding Reviewer Award for 2013. In 2014 Zeev also received the EOS fellow award for his significant contribution to the field of super resolved imaging and biomedical sensing. In 2015 Zeev received Image Engineering Innovation Award of the Society for Imaging Science and Technology (IS&T) for the invention of the Kinect as breaking through 3-D sensing technologies and products. His paper on optical realization of the Radon transform received the best poster paper award in OASIS which is the largest conference on optics and electro optics in Israel organized every second year. In 2015 Zeev also received the "Christians for Israel Chair in Medical Research" awarded for the academic year of 2013/2014 for his research on Non-Contact Photonic Biomedical Diagnostics and Sensing of Diseases.

Speaker
Zeev Zalevsky / Bar-Ilan University
Israel

Keynote Talks

Abstract

When dimension of an optical waveguide is much smaller than the operating wavelength, unique materials and structural dependent properties can be observed and these recently have been receiving much attention. In this regard, Silicon Photonics is becoming particularly attractive as the low-cost and mature CMOS fabrication technology widely used in the electronics industry can be exploited. In future, both electronics and photonics functionalities can be incorporated in the same chip. The high index contrast of silicon allows light confinement in submicron size waveguides and thus allows more compact photonic functional devices. High lateral index contrast also allows creation of very compact bends with low-loss and by interconnecting many devices in a single chip with reduced size also increased relaibaility and functionality of photonic integrated circuits. However, strong spatial field variation and high field at the dielectric interface demands a full-vectorial approach must be used. A rigorous H-field based full-vectorial approach using computationally efficient finite element has been developed to characterise these sub-micron size waveguides. A rigorous junction analysis code has also been developed, which can more accurately characterize the abrupt dielectric discontinuity of a high index contrast optical waveguide. As a result, the full-vectorial H and E-fields and the Poynting vector profiles are shown in detail. The modal solutions of silicon nanowires and vertical and horizontal slot waveguides will be presented. Rigorous design optimization of silicon power splitters, mode splitters, polarization splitters, polarization rotators, biosensors and spot-size converters will also be presented.

Biography

B. M. Azizur Rahman received the B.Sc.Eng and M.Sc.Eng. degrees in Electrical Engineering with distinctions from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Dhaka, Bangladesh, in 1976 and 1979, respectively. He also received two gold medals for being the best undergraduate and graduate students of the university in 1976 and 1979, respectively. In 1979, he was awarded a Commonwealth Scholarship to study for a Ph.D. degree in the UK and subsequently in 1982 received his Ph.D. degree in Electronics from University College London. In 1988, he joined City University, London, as a lecturer, and became a full Professor in June 2000. At City University, he leads a large research group on Photonics Modelling, specialized in the use of rigorous and full-vectorial numerical approaches to design, analyze and optimize a wide range of photonic devices. He has published more than 550 journal and conference papers, and his journal papers have been cited more than 5000 times and h-index of 34. He has supervised 31 students to complete their Ph.D. degrees as their first supervisor and received more than £11 M in research grants. Prof. Rahman is Life Fellow of the IEEE, and Fellow of the Optical Society of America and the SPIE.

Speaker
B M Azizur Rahman / University of London, UK

Abstract

Diamond has unique characteristics, including the highest Young’s modulus and highest thermal conductivity among all the materials that have been used and a wide band gap. For SAW applications, diamond has the highest Young’s modulus, and this yields the highest SAW velocity compared with other typical materials such as quartz, LiNbO3, and LiTaO3. Yamanouchi published the first paper on SAW filters using a diamond thin film in 1989 [1]. After his study, Shikata et al., who worked for Sumitomo Electric Industries, studied the development of diamond SAW filters as a commercial product [2]. However, although numerous studies have demonstrated SAW devices on polycrystalline diamond thin films, all have much larger propagation loss than single-crystal materials such as LiNbO3. Fujii et al reported that the one-port resonator with an interdigital transducer (IDT)/AlN/single crystal diamond structure has excellent quality factor Q of 8346 at 5.2 GHz [3]. In this report, we provide an overview of these efforts and present the recent results of studies on developing diamond SAW filters above 5 GHz including Minimal-fab process [4].

Biography

Satoshi Fujii received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Material Science from Tsukuba University, Ibaragi, Japan, in 1985 and 1987, respectively. He received his Ph. D. degree in Material Engineering from Kyoto Institute of Technology in 2007. In 1987, he joined Sumitomo Electric Industries and engaged in research on GaAs ICs and diamond SAW devices. In 2009, he moved to Chiba University as a professor. In 2015, he joined the faculty of the National Institute of Technology, Okinawa and also works for Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo as a professor.

Speaker
Satoshi Fujii / Okinawa College, Okinawa, Japan

Abstract

Various nanomaterials including upconversion nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles, carbon nitrides and quantum dotshave been extensively investigated in my laboratory for highly selective/sensitive sensing toxic metal ions, toxic gases, drugs and biochemical molecules with simplicity. Novel multiple emitting amphiphilic conjugated polythiophene-coated CdTe quantum dots for picogram level determination of the 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) explosive are developed. Portable, cost effective, and simple to use paper strips and chitosan film are successfully applied to visually detect as little as 2.29 pg of TNP. The possibility of utilizing a smartphone with a color-scanning APP in the determination of TNP is also established. Novel “turn off-on” optosensors based on amphiphilic thiophene copolymers coated CdTe quantum dotswere also developed for the dual detection of heparin and spermine. The emission ofthe nanoparticles is found to be quenched in the presence of heparin by electron transfer mechanismthrough electrostatic and hydrogen bonding interactions.We report the effective synthesis of biocompatible upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP)-loaded phosphate micelles and successful delivery of UCNPs and drugs to prostate cancer cells via secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA-2) enzyme cleavage of the loaded micelles for the first time. The selective release of UCNPs to prostate cancer cells rather than other cells, specifically cervical cancer cells, was observed and confirmed by a range of bioimaging studies. In addition, the proposed method was successfully utilized for selective drug delivery of estramustine phosphate, anti-prostate cancer drug, to prostate cancer cells. Drug encapsulation efficiency (EE%) was found to be 81.432% and release efficiency (RE%) was found to be 91%.

Biography

Yong-Ill Lee is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Director of the BK21 Plus Nanobio Research Center at Changwon National University (CWNU), Changwon, Korea. He is an author of over 300 scientific publications,20 patents, two books on laser-induced breakdown spectrometry. He received his M.Sc. in Polymer Science in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Analytical Chemistry in 1993 from the University of Massachusetts (UMASS), USA. He received several awards including the 2003 Outstanding Scholar Award from the Korean Chemical Society (Analytical Chemistry Division), the 2007 Sunil Scientific Award from the Korean Society for Analytical Sciences, the 2009 A.A. Benedetti-Pichler Award from the American Microchemical Society.He is currently an editor for Asia of Applied Spectroscopy Reviews, editorial board member of the Microchemical Journal, Spectroscopy Lettersand also an Advisory Board of Mass Spectrometry Letters.

Speaker
YONG-ILL LEE / Changwon National University, Changwon 51140, Republic of Korea

Abstract

Nanomaterial has attracted considerable attention in the field of biomedicine. A variety of nanostructures with unique optical properties have been used for biomedical applications, suh as two-photon imaging, drug/gene delivery, cancer therapy, etc. Owing to the so-called surface plasmon resonance (SPR) oscillation effect, gold nanoparticles have strong and tunable laser absorption in the visible and near-infrared bands. The subsequent photothermal conversion can be used to enhance the laser aborbption by blood, which has great potential in the laser treatment of vascular dermatolosis. In this study, the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) approach was employed to systematically investigate the effect of morphology on the optical properties of gold nanospheres (GNPs) and nanorods (GNRs), thereby providing the guidance for the choice of morphology of GNRs and corresponding laser parameters in GNRs-assisted laser treatment of PWSs. The results show that GNPs had one extinction peak in visible range which was dependent on the diameter of GNPs and the ambient medium. When the diameter increased from 5 nm to 40 nm, the extinction peak increased from 521 nm to 528 nm, and the extinction absorbance also increased. With the increment of refractive index of ambient medium from 1.0 to 1.8, the extinction peak changed from 509 nm to 567 nm. GNRs have two extinction peaks: a weak transverse extinction peak in visible range and a strong longitudinal extinction peak in near infrared range. The longitudinal extinction peak linearly increases with the increase of aspect ratio of GNRs. Besides, the effective radius mainly affects scattering intensity of GNRs. The findings show that GNRs with aspect ratio of 5.9 and less reff can be used to enhance blood absorption to Nd:YAG laser and improve treatment efficacy

Biography

Dr. Bin Chen is now a full professor and vice director in State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University. For more than a decade, Dr. Chen has devoted his efforts to the research of nano material application in bio-medical engineering, especially laser dermatology. He has published over 60 peer-reviewed journal papers and was invited for more than 20 keynote speeches

Speaker
Bin Chen / Xi’an Jiaotong University, China

Abstract

These last few decades, the demand for chemical detection methods and measurement techniques has been constantly increasing. This demand is driven by environmental, security and process control concerns and by the need for efficient and quick medical diagnostics.Classical methods based on sample collection and lab measurements are the most used measurement techniques. They are accurate and reliable but they are expensive, not real time and cause statistics issues. Devices based on chemical sensors are a good solution as these systems can be very sensitive, low cost, small size, real time and easily integrated in common electronics to build portable systems. This paper presents chemical sensors based on molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) built with conductive polymers as polymer matrix. MIP is a polymer synthesized by incorporating a template molecule. Functional monomers form a complex around the template and are linked afterwards to form a polymer constituted of a series of “cages” trapping the template. Afterwards, the template is removed, leaving cavities imprinted in the polymer matrix that allows the polymer to selectively recognize the target molecule. These elements are cheap, easy to synthesize and can be adapted to any kind of surface. When using conducting polymers for building MIP’s, the adsorption of the template can modify their optical or electrical properties. We showed that it was possible to use these materials for building chemoresistive, potentiometric or optical fiber sensors for the detection ofpollutants in air, glucose or molecules of medical interest with a good selectivity and sensitivity.

Biography

Marc Debliquy received his Ph.D. at the Faculty of Engineering in Mons (Belgium) in 1999. He joined the company Sochinorin2000 and then Materia Novain 2003. SinceOctober 2008, he joined the Material Science Department of University of Mons and worked as a team leader of the sensor group. He was promoted associate professor in September 2013.Hismain research interest is smart coatings for chemical detection. He is (co)author of more than 55 articles in international journals, 10 book chapters and 60 proceedings. He is also co-founder of the company B-Sens active in the field of sensors.

Speaker
Marc Debliquy / Université de Mons, 7000 Mons Belgium

Sessions:

Abstract

The unique quantum properties of the spin color center in silicon carbide (SiC) open a new role for this material as a flexible and practical platform for the use of new quantum technologies. Atomic-scale color centers in bulk and nanocrystalline SiC are promising systems for spintronics, photonics, quantum information processing, and sensing under ambient conditions. Their spin state can be initialized, manipulated, and read using optically detected magnetic resonance, level anti-crossing and cross-relaxation, whose radiation extends to a near infrared range of 800-1600 nm which is area of transparency for fiber optics and living systems. It has been shown that there are at least two families of color centers in SiC with triplet and quadruplet spin states, which have the property of optical alignment of the spin levels and allow a spin manipulation. The ground and the excited states were demonstrated to have quadruplet spin state and a population inversion in the ground state can be generated using optical pumping, leading to stimulated microwave emission even at room temperature. Experimental achievements in magnetometry and thermometry with submicron spatial resolution based on the spin state mixing at level anti-crossings and cross-relaxation in an external magnetic field can be implemented using the same spin system. A new all-optical thermometry technique based on the energy level cross-relaxation in spin centers in silicon carbide is proposed, which exploits a giant thermal shift of the zero-field splitting for defects undetected by photoluminescence coupling to neighbouring optically active spin centers, and does not require radiofrequency fields.

Biography

He has completed his Ph.D and and doctoral thesis in Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russian Academy of Sciences. He is the head of laboratory of microwave spectroscopy of crystals, professor in Ioffe Institute. He is the supervisor of more than ten PhD theses. He has about 400 publications and conferences, 20 patents (see http://www.ioffe.ru/labmsc/en/main.html ) Book: “Magnetic Resonance of Semiconductors and Their Nanostructures: Basic and Advanced Applications”: P. G. Baranov, H. J. von Bardeleben, F. Jelezko, J. Wrachtrup, Springer Series in Materials Science, Volume 253, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria 2017. Head of more 20 projects, including the international projects.

Speaker
P. G. Baranov / Ioffe Institute, 194021, Saint Petersburg, Russia

Abstract

The anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect is a fundamental phenomenon in which the electrical resistivity depends on the relative angle between the current I and magnetization M directions. The efficiency of the effect “AMR ratio” is defined by , where ( ) is a resistivity for I//M (I M). The AMR effect has been experimentally studied for various ferromagnets including half-metallic ferromagnets since about 160 years ago. The systematic and intuitive explanations about the AMR effect, however, have scarcely been reported. In this study, we first derive a general expression of the AMR ratio extending the conventional model to a more general one [1-5]. Using the general expression, we next give the systematic and intuitive explanations about the AMR effect [1, 2]. In a model with no crystal field, we also find that the negative AMR ratio is a necessary condition for half-metallic ferromagnets [1-3, 6-8]. References

Biography

Satoshi Kokado received his Ph. D degree in condensed matter theory from Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Japan in 1999. He was a researcher at Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Limited and a postdoctoral fellow at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. He is now a Professor of Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan. His research interests are theoretical studies on spin-dependent transport (e.g., anisotropic magnetoresistance effect), spin-atomic vibration interaction, magnetic phase transition, magnetic resonance, and magnetic excitation.

Speaker
Satoshi Kokado / Shizuoka University, Hamamatsu, Japan

Abstract

The optical and photoelectric properties of semiconductors with direct transitions are largely determined by the state of the near-surface layer. However, many aspects of this phenomenon are still unclear, which makes a study of the influence of surface transformations on the optical and photoelectric properties of direct bandgap semiconductors very relevant. An extremely high sensitivity of the optical and photoelectric exciton spectra of direct bandgap semiconductors to the characteristics of the surface layers opens up the possibility to use the excitonic states as a highly sensitive probe to study the photoelectric properties of these surface layers. In this work, we have studied the low-temperature (77 K) photoconductivity spectra and dark conductivity of CdS crystals depending on the duration of irradiation of a sample immersed in double-distilled water by radiation of low power (25 mW) He-Cd laser ( = 441.6 nm). Subsequently, the topography and chemistry of the irradiated CdS crystals were determined by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Our studies have established an important role of the near-surface nucleation and decay of Cd nanoclusters in the formation of the photoelectric properties of irradiated CdS. These Cd nanoclusters are acting as s-centers of rapid recombination in the surface layers of CdS. The obtained results demonstrate that the fine excitonic structure in the low-temperature photoconductivity spectra is a highly sensitive indicator of Cd surface enrichment originating from the excess of non-stoichiometric cadmium interstitials in the CdS lattice.

Biography

Erdni Batyrev graduated in exciton spectroscopy from Saint Petersburg State University, where he was working at the Solid State Physics department headed by Prof. Boris Vladimirovich Novikov. In 2001, he moved to Amsterdam to work on a Ph.D. project entitled “Cu/ZnO interaction in model catalysts for methanol synthesis” at University of Amsterdam. In 2006, he started his Postdoc at the Condensed Matter Physics group of Prof. Ronald Griessen, Free University Amsterdam, where he studied hydrogen storage in the intermetallics by hydrogenography. Since 2008, he is working as a scientist at Tata Steel Europe R&D in the Netherlands; leading collaboration projects with academic institutions on gas-metal reactions, initiating new product development projects and managing surface science facilities. His research interests focus on physical properties of new materials and surfaces, functional coatings, surface engineering and hydrogen interaction with solids.

Speaker
Erdni D. Batyrev / Tata Steel Europe R&D, PO BOX 10000, 1970CA IJmuiden, the Netherlands

Abstract

Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have seen an impressive increase in device performance in recent years and can now rival established silicon technologies. The light absorbing material in PSCs is an organic-inorganic hybrid material with an ABX3 perovskite structure, where A is typically a small organic cation, B is lead and X is a halide. This material has many extraordinary qualities, such as long charge carrier diffusion length and a high absorption coefficient, which makes it an ideal material for solar cell applications. Another remarkable property is that the material tends to exhibit improved device performance after several days of storage in an inert environment at room temperature. My previous work has shown that this is at least in part due to grain boundary migration in perovskite films, that leads to an overall increased grain size and reduced defect density.1 In this presentation I will discuss my recent work on this phenomenon, highlighting the influence of environmental factors such as temperature and oxygen, and intrinsic material properties such as composition and phase transitions. This work can provide an important insight into ways to improve PSC efficiency and stability.

Biography

Bart Roose obtained his PhD from the Adolphe Merkle Institute, Switzerland and is now a Newton International Fellow at the University of Cambridge, UK. His research focuses on understanding aging processes in perovskite solar cells. He has published more than 15 peer-reviewed papers in highly respected journals, that are cited over 800 times.

Speaker
Bart Roose / University of Cambridge, United Kingdom

Abstract

Rotational polygonal mirrors (PMs) are the fastest optomechatronic laser scanning systems. Their rotational speeds are up to 70 krpm nowadays, and polygons with up to 128 facets are utilized. Maximum scan frequencies of 8.96 MHz can therefore be reached. A brief overview of the niche applications where such performances are necessary is made, from the fast scanner in two-dimensional (2D) lateral scanning systems (with a galvanometer scanner (GSs) for the slow scan axis) to swept sources (SSs) for Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), the latter in telescope or telescope-less variants. Commercial and industrial applications are also pointed out. The theory of PM scanning heads that we have recently developed is presented. Their analysis was completed regarding all characteristic functions, including scanning function, scan speed, pairs of characteristic angles, duty cycle/time efficiency, as well as the migration functions we introduced to characterize the main issue of PMs (with regard to GSs), i.e. the translation of the laser beam on a PM facets. All the PM parameters were considered for this analysis: inner radius of the PM, number of facets, eccentricity of the incident laser beam with regard to the PM pivot (dependent on the off-axis position of the PM), distance from this incident beam to the principal plane of the objective lens, as well as the rotational speed of the PM. A discussion on the optimization of these laser scanners is performed. A comparison of PM scanners with the more utilized GSs and with Risley prisms concludes the study.Acknowledgement:This work was supported by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund under the Competitiveness Operational Program [BioCell-NanoART, POC-A1-A1.1.4-E 30/2016].

Biography

Prof. Virgil-Florin Duma, AurelVlaicu Univ. of Arad, Romania, is head & founder of the 3OM Group (http://3om-group-optomechatronics.ro/). He received his PhD cum laude in 2001, from the Polytechnic Univ. of Timisoara (UPT), where he graduated in Fine Mechanics in 1991, valedictorian. He was a Fulbright Senior Research Fellow at The Institute of Optics, Univ. of Rochester, NY, where he is Visiting Scientist. He is also Visiting at the Univ. of Kent, UK, and Adjunct Prof. at UPT. Prof. Duma defended his Habilitation Thesis in 2013. He is author of more than 250 publications in journals and conference.

Speaker
Virgil-Florin Duma / Univ. of Arad, Romania

Abstract

Ca1-xSrxVO3 (CSVO) with 3d1 electron configuration exhibit a metal-insulator transition (MIT) of bandwidth-control type. The effective bandwidth W is controlled by the V-O-V bond angle, which changes from 180° for cubic SrVO3 (SVO) to 160° for orthorhombic CaVO3 (CVO). The W of SVO is larger than that of CVO, while the electron correlation energy is not different in both SVO and CVO since SVO and CVO are d1 (V4+) oxides. Therefore, the correlation strength U/W can be controlled by changing the x value without changing the number of conduction electrons. Detailed of the CSVO thick film systems is indispensable for controlling MIT and designing applications such as resistive random access memory (ReRAM) applications. In this study, we investigated the electrical properties of epitaxial CSVO thin films (50 nm) prepared on SrTiO3 (STO) substrates. Furthermore, Two CSVO-based all-solid-state redox transistors were fabricated; one with a Li4SiO4 (LSO) Li+ ion conductor and one with Y-stabilized-ZrO2 (YSZ) H+ ion conductor. In this presentation, we report that the electrical conduction can be controlled by valence states and insertion/desertion of Li+ or H+ ion

Biography

Dr. Tohru Higuchi received his PhD from Tokyo University of Science in 2000. He worked as a research associate in Tokyo University of Science, Japan from 2000 to 2007 and a visiting scientist in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California in Berkeley, U.S.A from 2007 to 2008. From 2009, he is an Associate Professor in Tokyo University of Science. He has published more than 190 papers in reputed journals. His research interests include the nanoionics devices using oxide ionic conductor and strongly correlated oxide thin film.

Speaker
Tohru Higuchi / Tokyo University of Science, Japan

Abstract

Cells are the smallest living units of human body's structure and function, and their behaviors should not be ignored in human physiological and pathological metabolic activities. Each cell has different scales and also presents distinct responses to specific scales: vascular endothelial cells may obtain a normal function when regulated by the 25 µm strips, but de-functions if the scale is removed; Stem cells can rapidly proliferate on the 30 nm scales nanotubes surface, while stop proliferating when the scale is changed to 100 nm. Therefore, micro and nano scales play crucial role on directing cell behaviors on biomaterials surface. Recent years, we have developed series of biomaterials surfaces with micro and/or nano scales, such as micro-patterns, nanotubes and nanoparticles to control the target cell behavior, further enhance the surface biocompatibility. This contribution will introduce part of our work and review the advances in the micro/nano scales for biomaterials surface functionalization. The study was supported by the Joint Fund for Fostering Talents of National Natural Science Foundation of China and Henan province (U1504310), Key scientific research projects of higher education institutions in Henan province (16A430030), Key Project and Special Foundation of Research, Development and Promotion in Henan province (No. 182102310076), the Joint Fund for Fostering Talents of NCIR-MMT & HNKL-MMT (No. MMT2017-01), and Young Teachers Foundation of Zhengzhou University (No. 32210475).

Biography

Recent research on biomaterials with nanoscales

Speaker
Jingan Li / Zhengzhou University, Chin

Abstract

III-Nitride based LEDs have developed significantly during the last two decades as a green technology with the advantages for the energy saving and environment protection. Based on blue GaN-based LEDs, the luminous efficacy has increased dramatically for phosphor converted white LEDs. However, when the wavelengths beyond blue regions by increasing the In or Al composition, the luminous efficacy will decrease and still remain a challenge. To enhance the light output of III-nitride based LEDs, a variety of micro and nano-scale structures have been incorporated into the devices, such as nano-pattern sapphire substrates, photonic crystal. Nanostructures have been demonstrated to improve the crystal quality and prevent the internal reflection. In addition, with the increased luminous efficacy, researcher have also started to transfer their attention to some other cutting-edge applications, such as visible light communications using nanostructure. In this presentation, I will review the progress of GaN-based LEDs using nanostructure, including the nanostructure to improve the crystal quality and herein the internal quantum efficiency, modify the surface/interface morphology to increase the light extraction efficiency, realize the single white LED without phosphors using nano-pyramids GaN-based LEDs to, etc. Especially, some novel nanostructures, the localized surface plasma and lateral porous GaN DBR structure to co-optimize the optical power and modulation bandwidth for application of visible light communication.

Biography

Lixia Zhao received the Ph. D degree in physics from University of Nottingham, UK, in 2005. Afterwards, she worked at the GaN research Center of University of Cambridge. From 2007 to 2009, she worked in the Forge Europa, UK and was responsible for the development and quality of semiconductor lighting. In 2009, she joined the Institute of semiconductor, CAS with the “Import Outstanding Technical Talent Program” from CAS and was elected as youth innovation member of CAS in 2011. She has authored or co-authored over 100 papers with more than 2300 citations, and applied over 20 patents. Currently her research interests are mainly focused on the physical properties of III-Nitride semiconductor material and novel nanostructured devices.

Speaker
Lixia Zhao / Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

Abstract

The electrical conductivity of the laterally ordered polyacrylonitrile(PAN) can be improved by pyrolytic modification. Newly synthesized MoS2nanosheets covalently grafted with PAN (MoS2-PAN) does not exhibit any electrical switching and memory effect in an ITO/MoS2-PAN/Au device under applied bias voltages. After annealing at 220°C for 4h, the resultant pyrolyticallymodified product “pyro-MoS2-PAN” shows good nonvolatilerewritable memory performance, with a large ON/OFF current ratio of 4 104 and lower switching on and off voltages of -1.09 and 1.24V. Highly reproducible memory I-V loops of more than 60 consecutivecycles have been achieved without clear degradation of the ON and OFF states.The first oxidation potential of pyro-MoS2-PAN is cathodically shifted over 530mV lower than that of MoS2-PAN, indicating the higher hole injection of pyro-MoS2-PAN when compared to MoS2-PAN. As expected, the non-annealed MoS2/PAN blends–based device does not show any memory effect under the same experimental condition. After annealing at 220°C for 4h, the blends exhibited unstable electrical switching and rewritable memory performance.

Biography

Yu Chen is afull professor at East China University of Science and Technology. He received his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry at Fudan University in July 1996. He has publishedmore than 210 papers, reviews and communications in Chem. Soc. Rev., Prog. Mater.Sci., Nat.Commun.,Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., J.Am. Chem. Soc., Adv. Mater., Adv. Funct. Mater., Mater. Horizons, Chem. Mater.and others

Speaker
Yu Chen / East China University,Shanghai,china

Abstract

Van der Waals epitaxy of III-nitride semiconductors on two-dimensional (2D) materials, such as graphene, BN and metal sulfides, has attracted increasing attention because it can allow heteroepitaxy with large lattice mismatch and different crystalline symmetry to the substrates. Besides, due to the weak van der waals interaction within 2D layers or between 2D layer and the epitlayer, the 2D materials can act as a mechanical release layer for photoelectric devices and power devices and thus enable the device lift-off. In this work, we report crack-free crystalline AlN film grown on 2D multilayer h-BN/sapphire substrate by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Before the AlN growth, the surface of h-BN was treated by O2 plasma to induce surface dangling bonds and facilitate the AlN nucleation. The achieved AlN film showed a surface root-mean-square roughness of ~0.19 nm, and the full width at half-maximum value of (002) X-ray diffraction rocking curve was about 1000 arcsec. With the aid of carbon flexible tape, we further realized the exfoliation of AlN film utilizing the weak bonds within h-BN layers. Moreover, AlGaN-based deep-ultraviolet light emitting-diodes grown on the AlN/BN/sapphire template exhibited sound electroluminescence peaking at 281 nm and decent electrical properties. It is promising that the multilayer h-BN will pave the way to obtain transferable high-efficiency devices with wafer scale.

Biography

Prof. Jinmin Li is the director of State Key Lab of Solid-State Lighting(SSL)and the executive chairman of China SSL Alliance. He has been in charge of many state key science and technology projects, including National Program on Key Basic Research Project, and National High-tech R&D Program of China, which are supported by Chinese Ministry of Science and Technology, the National Natural Science Foundation of China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. The research work in his group leads the development of domestic Solid-State Lighting technology.

Speaker
Jinmin Li / State Key Laboratory of Solid State Lighting, Beijing, China

Plenary Talks

Abstract

The intriguing progress of bioimaging has upsurged versatile graphene quantum dots (GQDs) as an iconic candidate in biomedical avenue because of their superior biocompatibility, photostability, optical, photoelectric, and benign nature. Sulphur-doped Graphene quantum dots (S-GQDs) are a zero-dimension, sp2-hybridised advanced multifunctional fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystal comprising of characteristic properties of both quantum dots and graphene, exhibiting pronounced quantum confinement effect, abundant edge states, and functional groups. However, there is a need to develop GQDs with longer decay time and high quantum yield bearing excellent biocompatibility. For the first time, we present facile, large-scale, one-pot, one-step, template- and catalyst-free, economical synthesis of sustainable, highly crystalline GQDs via a hydrothermal route from agro-industrial wastes with superior biocompatibility. Employing a suite of characterization methods, the intrinsic structural and morphological properties of GQDs were revealed. Mechanistic insight for biowaste based S-GQDs synthesis was obtained using powder X-ray diffraction patterns (PXRD).S-GQDs prepared via this method are highly biocompatible giving the highest quantum yield (47%) from biowaste and large decay time for easier detection. Moreover, the resulting water-soluble SGQDs have hydrophilic and electron donating moieties in the edge sites. Their SAED pattern showed that they are defect free single crystalline. The as-prepared S-GQDs were well explored with three kind of cell lines: primary chicken embryonic fibroblast (DF-1) cells, human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells and human hepatic cancer (HepG2) cell line to demonstrate non-toxic behaviour invitro as well as ex-vivo along with fluorescence localization, holding future for quick point-of-care screening and real-time monitoring in bioimaging

Biography

Prof.Monalisa Mukherjee has completed her PhD and postdoctoral studies from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India. She is the Director of Amity Institute of Click Chemistry Research and Studies(AICCRS) and Professor of Amity Institute of Biotechnology (AIB) at Amity University, Noida, India. She received Distinguished Visiting Scientist Award for the year 2011 from University of Nottingham,United Kingdom. She has published more than 17 papers in reputed journals including ACS, RSC and Nature group and three granted patents out of 9 filed patents. She has been serving as an editorial and reviewer board member of Nature, ACS, and RSC journals, respectively.

Speaker
Monalisa Mukherjee / Amity University
India

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Near infrared (NIR) light with 800-2000 nm wavelength is known as optically most transparent for biological tissues in the range of UV-VIS-NIR. The authors have developed fluorescent materials for the NIR luminescence. To date, some sort of dyes, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes and rare-earth doped ceramic nanoparticles are known to be luminescent. By using nanostructures with them, observation depth of several cm has been reported for the fluorescence in vivo bioimging. Not only the contrast of the objectives, recent development of the probes enabled temperature imaging of the deep tissue of animals. For most of the imaging, the size of the probes must be controlled to be less than 100 nm for the circulation in body. If the size is more than that, they will be captured by macrophages quickly. Some more important matter is dispersion. Blood contains a lot of proteins with positively and negatively charged parts as well as hydrophobic parts. Nonspecific interaction with the proteins and the probes will cause agglomeration to make the size of the probes to be several hundred nm. For keeping the probes dispersed, necessarily hydrophobic and non-toxic polymer should be introduced on the surface of them. Along with the development, the authors have commercialized a near infrared fluorescence small animal imaging system, SAI-1000, with a company, Shimadzu co. The paper will review both of the materials and system development for the near infrared fluorescence small animal imaging.

Biography

Prof. Kohei SOGA started his research on rare-earth-doped luminescent materials in 1990 as a graduate student of the University of Tokyo. After obtaining the Ph. D. degree in 1995, he explored his research onto the photonic applications, especially on that relating to optical communication. Since 2004, he has developed biophotonic system under near infrared excitation as an interdisciplinary research by a bio-nano-photonics collaboration. The research is attracting the interests from the researchers in various scientific fields. He has authored and co-authored 190 journal papers and presented totally more than 671 oral and poster presentations including 116 invited presentations.

Speaker
Kohei Soga / Tokyo University of Science, Japan

Sessions:

Abstract

FBG based sensors have been increasingly used for the health-condition monitoring of high-speed railways, for the superior advantages of absolute measurement, anti-electromagnetic interference, high precision and multiplexing integration of sensing network. It can be noted that the deformation of substructures of a railway in operation can be affected by the temperature induced by the mechanical friction and the ambient temperature variation. For the temperature-sensitive characteristics of fibre Bragg grating(FBG) sensing element, temperature compensation measure should be considered to remove the temperature effect on the FBG, so as to accurately reflect the deformation state of the monitored structure. For the surface-attached FBG sensors, the traditional temperature compensation method ignores the influence of the interaction between FBG sensor and the monitored structure on the sensing signal, which may lead to the compensated value smaller than the actual value. For this reason, modified function is proposed to enhance the measurement accuracy of the FBG sensors in this paper. Laboratory test has been conducted to validate the effectiveness of the modified function. The research in this work presents a reliable instruction for the better interpretation of testing data measured by FBG sensors applied to the civil structures.

Biography

Huaping Wang received the Ph.D. degree from the Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, China, in 2015. She had a two-year experience in The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. She is the associate Professor of Lanzhou University. Her major research interests include structural health monitoring, optical-fiber-based sensing technology, strain transfer theory, damage identification, and condition assessment based on in-field data.

Speaker
Huaping Wang / Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, Gansu, China

Abstract

Chalcogenide compound semiconductors are receiving a strong interest for the development of cost efficient thin film solar cells. This includes chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)(S,Se)2 (CIGS) that are already moving towards mass production stages as well as emergent kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTS) technologies that avoid the use of critical raw materials (CRM). In all these compounds, optoelectronic properties are determined by the presence of structural defects that are induced by the presence of a non-stoichiometric (Cu-poor) composition, and the achievement of high efficiency devices requires for a careful control on the presence of these composition-induced Cu-poor defects. This gives a strong relevance to the availability of non-destructive techniques suitable for the advanced characterisation of these defects. This work describes the development of Raman scattering (RS) based methodologies for the quantitative characterisation of compositional induced Cu-poor defects in photovoltaic grade layers and devices. This includes multi-wavelength excitation resonant RS strategies that are very sensitive to the presence of electronic active devices as Cu vacancies (VCu), antisites and their related defect clusters. Presence of these defects induces the modification of the relative intensity of specific vibrational modes of the atoms involved in the point defects, which are related to the reduction of the Cu partial phonon DOS in expenses of the increase other vibrations modes. Correlation of the relative intensity of these modes with the presence of the defects provides with a non-destructive methodology for the high sensitivity assessment of these semiconductors in photovoltaic advanced technologies.

Biography

Alejandro Pérez-Rodríguez is Full Professor of Electronics at the University of Barcelona. Since October 2009 he is ascribed to IREC as Head of the Solar Energy Materials and Systems Group. His research activities are centred in the development and advanced characterisation of thin film chalcogenide devices and processes for next generation cost-efficient sustainable photovoltaic technologies, including the development of Raman scattering methodologies for the advanced characterisation of these processes. He is co-author of 385 scientific publications, including 225 papers published in ISI international journals, with an h-index of 42 (Scopus January 2019), and has supervised 15 Doctoral thesis.

Speaker
Alejandro Perez-Rodriguez / Universitat de Barcelona,Barcelona,Spain

Abstract

Formation of lattice defects (point defects/dislocations/grain boundaries) is an unavoidable phenomenon which is associated with almost all synthesis procedures following fast formation kinetics. Therefore a polycrystalline thin film of hybrid perovskite developed for a solar cell invariably contains lattice defects. Similarly in a systematic fashion using ball mill grinding technique we have synthesized perovskite material, Methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) with different degrees of crystal defects as probed by positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS) and utilized to fabricate flexible piezoelectric nanogenerators (FPENGs). Five sets of MAPbI3 samples are prepared by ball mill grinding procedure with different grinding time (15m, 30m, 60m, 90m and 120m). The formation and morphology of MAPbI3 is confirmed from their powder XRD pattern and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images. The optical band gaps (1.63 eV) of all the samples are calculated from their absorption onset at 760 nm. The x-ray diffraction pattern suggests the formation of tetragonal crystal phase. We have demonstrated that at room temperature the lattice defects play the pivotal role in governing the ionic polarization from temperature dependent dc conductivity measurement and establish one-to-one correlation with the lattice defects as probed by PAS, which in principle governs the piezo-effect in MAPbI3. Here, we have shown that lattice defect mediated ionic polarization significantly changes VOC, but ISC remains almost same for all the samples as ISC has its origin on the value of piezoelectric constant and elastic modulus of the material. The best device performance is exhibited by maximum defect containing sample (30m) having significant amount of Pb2+ defects. A device fabricated with 5 wt% PDMS composite produces piezo-voltage (>100V) with a maximum power density of 0.3 mW/cm3 and can illuminate commercially available 30 blue light emitting diodes.

Biography

Partha Pratim Ray is presently working as an Associate Professor of Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India. He has done his Ph.D. and postdoctoral research work on thin film silicon based solar cell. He is presently working on synthesis and application of different nanostructured materials in energy harvesting devices. He has studied the effect of different synthesis methods on charge transport properties which determines device performance. He is also working on metal organic framework based thin film photosensitive Schottky diode.

Speaker
Partha Pratim Ray / Jadavpur University, Kolkata

Abstract

The unique quantum properties of the spin color center in silicon carbide (SiC) open a new role for this material as a flexible and practical platform for the use of new quantum technologies. Atomic-scale color centers in bulk and nanocrystalline SiC are promising systems for spintronics, photonics, quantum information processing, and sensing under ambient conditions. Their spin state can be initialized, manipulated, and read using optically detected magnetic resonance, level anti-crossing and cross-relaxation, whose radiation extends to a near infrared range of 800-1600 nm which is area of transparency for fiber optics and living systems. It has been shown that there are at least two families of color centers in SiC with triplet and quadruplet spin states, which have the property of optical alignment of the spin levels and allow a spin manipulation. The ground and the excited states were demonstrated to have quadruplet spin state and a population inversion in the ground state can be generated using optical pumping, leading to stimulated microwave emission even at room temperature. Experimental achievements in magnetometry and thermometry with submicron spatial resolution based on the spin state mixing at level anti-crossings and cross-relaxation in an external magnetic field can be implemented using the same spin system. A new all-optical thermometry technique based on the energy level cross-relaxation in spin centers in silicon carbide is proposed, which exploits a giant thermal shift of the zero-field splitting for defects undetected by photoluminescence coupling to neighbouring optically active spin centers, and does not require radiofrequency fields.

Biography

He has completed his Ph.D and and doctoral thesis in Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, Russian Academy of Sciences. He is the head of laboratory of microwave spectroscopy of crystals, professor in Ioffe Institute. He is the supervisor of more than ten PhD theses. He has about 400 publications and conferences, 20 patents (see http://www.ioffe.ru/labmsc/en/main.html ) Book: “Magnetic Resonance of Semiconductors and Their Nanostructures: Basic and Advanced Applications”: P. G. Baranov, H. J. von Bardeleben, F. Jelezko, J. Wrachtrup, Springer Series in Materials Science, Volume 253, Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria 2017. Head of more 20 projects, including the international projects.

Speaker
Pavel G. Baranov / Ioffe Institute, 194021, Saint Petersburg,Russia

Abstract

The III-group nitride materials attract attentions owing to their electroluminescence properties.InN belongs to the III-group nitride materials and it has a unique properties of the high mobility of electrons and a promising material for the IR emitting/receiving optical devices, but is known to have a low decomposition temperature which causes intractable grain growth compared to the other nitrides, GaN, AlN, etc. We prepared InNs with a flower-like and pillar-like shape as well as film structure by Atmospheric Pressure Halide CVD (APHCVD) method, in which InN is synthesized by CVD under atmospheric pressure. In the present study, we have fabricated the flower/pillar structured InN on Si(100) and/or a-plane sapphire substrate, respectively, in order to investigate the effect of the substrate on crystallization behavior of the InN crystals. Fabrication of pillar structure by controlling growth condition will be presented at the conference site.

Biography

Naonori Sakamoto obtained a Bachelor degree in 2001, Master degree in 2003, and Ph.D. in 2006 from the Tokyo Institute of Technology. He served as a post-doctoral researcher at Tokyo Institute of Technology (2006-07), as an assistant professor at Shizuoka University (2007-15), and as an associate professor at Shizuoka University (2015-present). He also served as a visiting researcher at Jozef Stefan Institute of Slovenia in 2013. He has published 95 Journal papers, and more than 100 Proceedings and made more than 100 presentations at national/international conferences

Speaker
Naonori Sakamoto / Shizuoka University, Japan

Abstract

National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, 305-8565, Japan; We present copper-matrix carbon nanotube composites (Cu/CNT) towards next-generation lightweight wiring or high reliability interconnect to replace Cu. We fabricated the Cu/CNT composites by electrodepositing Cu into the pores of the CNT structures in different forms, such as micro-fabricated lines, macroscale sheet or wires1-5, suggesting the potential of our Cu/CNT composites for a wide-range of applications from the microscale interconnect or interposer in electric devices to macroscale wire cable or motor coil in automobiles and aircrafts. Our Cu/CNT composites is 2/3rd as light as Cu and shows high electrical conductivity (1-4.7 x 105 S/cm) similar to Al. The temperature coefficient of resistivity is lower for the CNT/Cu (~4.4 x 10-4) composite than that of Cu (3.4 x 10-3)1,3.Besides, the CNT/Cu composites shows high electromigration resistance and the maximum current carrying capacity measured in the micro-fabricated lines is 6.0x108 A/cm2 for CNT/Cu composite, which is 100 times higher than that of Cu and Au1. The CNT contribute to the suppression of fast failure path in Cu by increasing the activation energy of the Cu diffusion. Further, thermal expansion coefficient of CNT/Cu composite is 3-6 ppm W/K, which is similar to Si, and it can remarkably reduce thermally induced mismatch of lattice strain between conducting material and dielectric surrounding in the electronic devices. Accordingly, we believe that the CNT/Cu composites has the potential to encourage the miniaturization of the electronic devices with increased functionality, and could replace heavy Cu electrical wiring in automobiles and aircrafts for improved fuel efficiency. (up to 250 words)

Biography

Atsuko Sekiguchi has completed herPh.D at the age of 27 years from Tohoku University and postdoctoral studies from IMEC(Interuniversity Microelectronics Centre, in Belgium) and from Tohoku University in JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) fellowship.She has worked in Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd. She is the senior researcher of AIST, National institutes of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology. She has published more than 23 papers in reputed journals. (Upto 100 words)

Speaker
Atsuko Sekiguchi / National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Japan

Abstract

Optical properties of the composites based on polystyrene (PS) and graphene oxide (GO), synthetized by the styrene radical polymerization in the presence of benzoyl peroxide, pentane and GO, are reported. A change of PS spheres size from 3.5 m to 250 nm, when the GO sheets concentration increases from 0 to 5 wt.% is reported by scanning electron microscopy. Using IR spectroscopy, a progressive increase in the absorbance of the IR band at 1743 cm-1 that is accompanied of an absorbance diminution of IR bands situated in the spectral ranges 1028-1070, 1450-1492 and 2922-3026 cm-1, when the GO sheets concentration in the PS/GO composites mass increases from 0 wt.% to 5 wt.%, take place. The Raman scattering studies indicate a diminution in the relative intensities of the D and G Raman bands of the GO sheets simultaneous with a down-shift of the D band from 1351 to 1322 cm-1 when a decrease of the GO sheets concentration in the PS/GO composites mass from 5 wt.% to 0.5 wt.% occur. In the absence of the GO sheets, the PS spheres are characterized by a photoluminescence (PL) band with the maximum at 397 nm. As increasing of the GO sheets concentration in the PS/GO composite mass, from 0.5 wt.% to 5 wt.%, a PS PL quenching process is reported. Besides, in the presence of the UVA light, a photo-degradation process of the PS/GO composite having the GO concentration equal to 5 wt.% is also demonstrated by the PL studies.

Biography

Dr. Malvina Stroe has completed his PhD from Bucharest University, Romania. She has published 10 papers in journals ISI. At the present time activity is carried out on composite carbon based materials.

Speaker
Malvina-Simona Stroe / Bucharest University Romania

Abstract

The Hall sensor is an important magnetometer in research as well as in industry. Among various kinds of Hall sensor design, we focused on the two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) Hall sensors which are expected to have ultrahigh field sensitivity. We dedicated to investigate the device performance on sensitivity and the minimum detectable Hall voltage by measuring the noise level of the magnetic sensor itself (Spectral density approximate to 10-15 V2rms/Hz for frequency higher than 1 kHz). The low frequency noise exhibits 1/f feature, following the Hooge¡¦s model. However, the current-dependent study revealed a non-linear relation between the noise level at 1 Hz and the quadratic current. This was attributed to the generation-recombination noise, resulted from the carrier capture-release process around the defects near the conducting channels. This result provides information to find a better operation current window for the 2DEG Hall sensors.

Biography

Assistant Professor Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan B.S.,Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, JUN 2002 B.S: Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, JUN 2002 M.S:Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, JUN 2004 Advisor: Prof. Dr. Minn-Tsong Lin Title: Capping effect of Cu overlayer on Co/FeMn/Cu(001) exchange bias system Ph.D,Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei,Taiwan, OCT 2009 Advisor: Prof. Dr. Minn-Tsong Lin Title:Magnetic domain imaging from ultrathin film to nanostructure

Speaker
Chii-Bin Wu / Chung Yuan Christian University Taiwan

Abstract

This study is focused on evaluation of the interaction between graphene oxide (GO) and Triticum aestivum L. seedling. The wheat caryopses were exposed to 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/L of GO for 48 h and 7 days, according to the assessed parameter. Our results revealed a decrease of germination rate in dose-response relationship, and a slight increase of the shoot length. The root elongation was lower than control, except for 1000 mg/L GO sample. Regarding photosynthetic system, the chlorophyll a content was significantly decreased at 2000 mg/L GO (p<0.05). The carotenoids content, with homeostasis role, was affected at 500 mg/L GO, proving a response of the plant to the stress induced by GO treatment. The genotoxic effect of GO was evaluated by establishing the mitotic index (MI), the progression of division phases, and the rate of chromosome aberrations in root meristem cells. At 1000 and 2000 mg/mL of GO, the MI is higher than control, especially by accumulation of the prophase cells. The frequency of the cells with aberrations increased about 5.3 times (1000 mg/mL GO), exhibiting an increase in the type of the aberrations, correlated with increasing of GO concentration. The most frequent aberrations were simple or multiple bridges, followed by fragments, lagging chromosomes and multipolar ana-telophases. The micronuclei, as expression of chromatid and/or chromosome deletion, were observed in all GO samples. These mitosis alterations are expression of clastogenic, as well as aneugenic effect of GO treatment. Our results provide information that allows a better understanding of plant-nanoparticle interactions.

Biography

GABRIELA VOCHITA is a senior researcher at the Institute of Biological Research Iasi. She has completed her PhD at “Alexandru Ioan Cuza” University, Faculty of Biology. Her thesis title is: “Cytogenetic and physiological effects induced by pesticides treatments at barley, two row barley and rye”. Her research activity includes studies in animal and plant cytogenetics field (karyotype, idiogram, physical and chemical mutagenesis, in situ hybridization, electrophoresis), molecular biology, biochemistry, in vitro cell cultures. She has written many scientific papers, participated in national and international congresses/conferences. The managerial activity was carried out as a leader of national and international projects.

Speaker
Gabriela Vochita / Institute of Biological Research Iasi, Romania

Abstract

Nanosensors for detecting of bio or chemical target particles are one of the major topics in the research of fusion technologies combining bio- and nanotechnologies. The basic requirements for such sensors are: 1) high sensitivity and 2) possibility of mass production of portable diagnostic systems. Sensors based on the silicon-on-insulator field-effect transistors (SOI FETs) allow mass production using well-known CMOS processes and fabrication of sensor elements on the same crystal with the signal processing electronics. They transform the interaction of bio or chemical target particles with surface of sensors into the change of their conductivity, and unlike labeling methods, can simultaneously sense various materials within a sample with high sensitivity, in real time, and without biochemical processing of sample under study. Nowadays, such sensors are employed for the detection of single viruses, or proteins, DNA, mi-RNA, and other target particles with a sub-femtomolar concentration in solutions. In this report, we focus on the factors limiting the sensitivity of sensors and the methods to overcome them. The specific aspects addressed in this report are 1) surface modification, 2) algorithm for choosing the operation mode of sensors to provide their maximum response during the detection of target particles, and 3) dielectrophoresis as a method to deliver target particles to the sensor surface. This study was supported by the Russian Science Foundation for Basic Research project N18-29-02091.

Biography

Dr. Olga V. Naumova received the Ph.D. degree from the Institute of Semiconductor Physics in Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk, Russia, in 1992. Her thesis was related to impact electric fields on the radiation defects in silicon. In 2013, she defended her doctoral dissertation on nanoscale Si/SiO2 structures and sensors based on them. She is the head of Laboratory of technology of silicon microelectronics. She has published more than 100 papers in technical journals and conference proceedings. Her current interest areas are the nanowire based sensors and transport phenomena in multilayered nanoscaled heterostructures.

Speaker
V. Naumova / Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science Russia

Abstract

Topological insulators are a new class of materials which are characterized by an energy gap in the bulk electronic band structure and metallic states at the boundaries. Closing of the band gap by the surface or edge states is caused by nontrivial topology of the bulk states originating from an inversion in the order in the valence and conduction bands at special points in the Brillouin zone. In the case of two-dimensional nanostructures, the topological insulators were realized in HgTe/CdTe and InAs/GaSb/AlSb quantum wells where large spin-orbit interactions induce a significant band gap in inverted band structure. In this talk, a theoretical study on the topological insulator state in InGaN/GaN and InN/InGaN quantum wells will be presented. It will be demonstrated that negative spin-orbit coupling in these nanostructures is not an obstacle to induce the topological insulator with sizable bulk energy gap1. The topological phase transition between the normal insulator phase and the topological insulator occurs in InGaN-based quantum wells thanks to the large built-in electric field and it is almost always mediated by the two-dimensional Weyl semimetal arising from an anticrossing of the highest light hole subband and the lowest conduction subband. Interestingly, for certain InGaN/GaN quantum wells, the magnitude of this anticrossing vanishes, leading to the appearance of the Dirac semimetal1. This novel transition between Weyl and Dirac semimetals is a unique feature of InGaN/GaN quantum well system and cannot be found in HgTe/CdTe and InAs/GaSb/AlSb nanostructures

Biography

Sławomir P. Łepkowski has received his MSc degree in electronics from Warsaw University of Technology, Poland in 1991. He has completed PhD in optoelectronics from the Institute of Electron Technology in Warsaw, Poland in 1999 and DSc in solid state physics from the Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences in 2010. He is a professor of theoretical solid state physics at the Institute of High Pressure Physics - Unipress, Polish Academy of Sciences. He has published more than 65 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an referee in many highly regarded journals.

Speaker
Łepkowski / Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

Abstract

The present study reports the use of Vaccinium myrtillus leaves extract for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The aqueous 10mM AgNO3 solution when subjected to V. myrtillus extract were bio-reduced and ensued in green synthesis of AgNPs. The aqueous bilberry leaf extract was enriched with polyphenols (14.17mg/g gallic acid equivalent) and flavonoids (3.066 mg/g catechin equivalent). The AgNPs synthesis was manifested by a colour change from colourless to yellow brown after the introduction of extract of V. myrtillus. The characterizations of synthesized AgNPs were done using UV/Vis spectroscopy. This green procedure has high yields without application of toxic reagents or surfactant template. As methods of study the AgNPs interactions with environmental microorganisms, like Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the biochemical assays of defense systems of antioxidative activity and proteins contents were applied. The lipid peroxidation, expressed as malondialdehyde content has been also evaluated. Overall, results showed a variation of activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase in fungus mycelium depending on the concentration of AgNPs and the age of fungus after inoculation.

Biography

LACRAMIOARA OPRICA obtained her PhD degree at Alexandru Ioan Cuza University Iasi where she works, in present, as lecturer at Biochemistry Department, Biology Faculty. Her researches are focuses on quantification of physiological and biochemical parameters involved in oxidative stress (enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants) occurring in plants and microorganisms under abiotic stress conditions. The dissemination of the obtained results was done by publishing over 150 peer-reviewed journal papers (as author or co-author) in the areas of Plant Environmental Stress Physiology, Natural Product Chemistry, Cellulolitytic Fungi Biotechnology and Green Biosynthesis of Nanoparticles. She has acted as a scientific referee for national and international journals in the fields of biochemistry.

Speaker
L. Oprica / Alexandru Ioan Cuza University Romania

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