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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Dr. Miguel Nogueras(CLS, ASCP), RABQSA Director of J&J – Sterility Assurance Johnson & Johnson Franchise Leader – Consumer Medical Device (CMD) To help ensure patient safety and product quality, the focus for Sterility Assurance professionals for over 40 years has been to deliver sterile products for use by nurses, doctors, and other healthcare providers to help reduce the potential for patient infections. As we look in to the future, there are many new frontiers in healthcare, which requires the sterility assurance community to adapt our methods and engagement to an ever-increasing rate of innovation. While the development of new drugs and devices used to take a decade, it can now only happen in just a few years. To ensure more efficient delivery of these new innovations to patients, sterility assurance needs to keep pace with these product innovations. This can only be achieved by participating at all stages of the product life cycle rather than just focusing on a sterilization technology or modality. Sterilization cannot be an afterthought in product innovation, and sterility assurance professionals need to have a place at the table from design throughout the total life cycle of a product. No matter how innovative or groundbreaking a product might be, it’s rendered useless if not properly designed to withstand the sterilization, reprocessing and disinfection challenges we face today. Too often, sterility assurance comes at the end of the R&D process, mainly during the transfer process into production. If we are not innovative, we can either stop a product from coming to market or we could seriously delay the ability to bring new products to the market, thereby delaying advances that bring value to patients and/or consumers. To help promote collaborative innovation, the sterility assurance community needs to leverage its scientific foundation to constantly question the status quo, thereby opening doors to innovation. In order to achieve this, we need to start incorporating our professional in all steps of the process. During the Sterility Assurance E2E presentation we will explore the advantages and overcome challengesby artifact of incorporating the model into the product design/development, life cycle and distribution.Incorporating sterility assurance professionals in such a way will demonstrate: faster incorporation of new technology, and faster regulatory approvals servicing our patient needs sooner while ensuring patient safety.

Biography

Dr. Nogueras joined Abbot Medical Optics (AMO) now J&Jin 2009 as Divisional Sr. Manager of Quality & Compliance in the areas of QC, Microbiology, Environmental Controls and Sterilization. He was also one of the founders and chair of AMO Global Microbiology Council and Co-Founder of the Abbott Sterilization Task Force.He has held multiple positions within J&J including Site Quality Director at several of our manufacturing sites including Añasco, Puerto Rico, Kulim, Malaysia, and Hangzhou, China. Miguel has over 20 years of experience in the industry, including clinical research, pharmaceutical, viral vaccines, biological products, autologous molecules and medical devices. Miguel holds a Doctorate in Viral Pathology and Infectious Diseases from the University of Paris- L’Institut Louis Pasteur, and a B.S. in Industrial and Clinical Microbiology from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez Campus. Heis an adjunct faculty member at multiple academic institutions throughout the world. Dr. Nogueras is a recognized industry leader in sterility assurance and sterilization practices, and he has over 20 years’ experience in sterility assurance.

Speaker
Dr. Miguel Ángel Nogueras / Director at Sterility Assurance for the Consumer Medical Device Group (CMD) at Johnson & Johnson

Abstract

There is increasing evidences that favor the prenatal beginning of schizophrenia. These evidences point toward intra-uterine environmental factors that act specifically during the second pregnancy trimester producing a direct damage of the brain of the fetus [1]. The current available technology doesn't allow observing what is happening at cellular level since the human brain is not exposed to a direct analysis in that stage of the life in subjects at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Methods. In 1977 we began a direct electron microscopic research of the brain of fetuses at high risk from schizophrenic mothers in order to finding differences at cellular level in relation to controls. Results. In these studies we have observed within the nuclei of neurons the presence of complete and incomplete viral particles that reacted in positive form with antibodies to herpes simplex hominis type I [HSV1] virus, and mitochondria alterations [2]. Conclusion. The importance of these findings can have practical applications in the prevention of the illness keeping in mind its direct relation to the aetiology and physiopathology of schizophrenia. A study of the gametes or the amniotic fluid cells in women at risk of having a schizophrenic offspring is considered. Of being observed the same alterations that those observed previously in the cells of the brain of the studied foetuses, it would intend to these women in risk of having a schizophrenia descendant, previous information of the results, the voluntary medical interruption of the pregnancy or an early anti HSV1 viral treatment as preventive measure of the later development of the illness.

Biography

Segundo Mesa Castillo. As Specialist in Neurology, he worked for 10 years in the Institute of Neurology of Havana, Cuba. He has worked in Electron Microscopic Studies on Schizophrenia for 32 years. He was awarded with the International Price of the Stanley Foundation Award Program and for the Professional Committee to work as a fellowship position in the Laboratory of the Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke under Dr. Joseph Gibbs for a period of 6 months, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Washington D.C. USA, June 5, 1990. At present he is member of the Scientific Board of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana and give lectures to residents in psychiatry

Speaker
Dr. Segundo Mesa Castillo / Psychiatric Hospital of Havana.

Abstract

Biography

Minić Ivan is very enthisuistatic Researcher in field of Medical science .He Actively participates in all world wide conferences and actively participating as Editorial Board Member in more than 15 Journals .He gave wide contribution from his side.

Speaker
 Dr. Minic Ivan / Medical Faculty, University of Nis, Serbia

Sessions:

Microbiology and Parasitology

Abstract

Innovation by the Incorporation of the End to End (E2E) Sterility Assurance Concept Dr. Miguel Nogueras(CLS, ASCP), RABQSA Director of J&J – Sterility Assurance Johnson & Johnson Franchise Leader – Consumer Medical Device (CMD) To help ensure patient safety and product quality, the focus for Sterility Assurance professionals for over 40 years has been to deliver sterile products for use by nurses, doctors, and other healthcare providers to help reduce the potential for patient infections. As we look in to the future, there are many new frontiers in healthcare, which requires the sterility assurance community to adapt our methods and engagement to an ever-increasing rate of innovation. While the development of new drugs and devices used to take a decade, it can now only happen in just a few years. To ensure more efficient delivery of these new innovations to patients, sterility assurance needs to keep pace with these product innovations. This can only be achieved by participating at all stages of the product life cycle rather than just focusing on a sterilization technology or modality. Sterilization cannot be an afterthought in product innovation, and sterility assurance professionals need to have a place at the table from design throughout the total life cycle of a product. No matter how innovative or groundbreaking a product might be, it’s rendered useless if not properly designed to withstand the sterilization, reprocessing and disinfection challenges we face today. Too often, sterility assurance comes at the end of the R&D process, mainly during the transfer process into production. If we are not innovative, we can either stop a product from coming to market or we could seriously delay the ability to bring new products to the market, thereby delaying advances that bring value to patients and/or consumers. To help promote collaborative innovation, the sterility assurance community needs to leverage its scientific foundation to constantly question the status quo, thereby opening doors to innovation. In order to achieve this, we need to start incorporating our professional in all steps of the process. During the Sterility Assurance E2E presentation we will explore the advantages and overcome challengesby artifact of incorporating the model into the product design/development, life cycle and distribution.Incorporating sterility assurance professionals in such a way will demonstrate: faster incorporation of new technology, and faster regulatory approvals servicing our patient needs sooner while ensuring patient safety.

Biography

Dr.Miguel Ángel Noguerasis the Director, Sterility Assurance for the Consumer Medical Device Group (CMD) at Johnson & Johnson. In this role, Miguel is responsible for end to end implementation of sterility assurance policies and strategies and assures that CMD programs are aligned with the overall J&J Sterility Assurance programs. He will serve as the global technical leader in the areas of aseptic processing, sterilization and microbiology across all CMD locations worldwide. Dr. Nogueras joined Abbot Medical Optics (AMO) now J&Jin 2009 as Divisional Sr. Manager of Quality & Compliance in the areas of QC, Microbiology, Environmental Controls and Sterilization. He was also one of the founders and chair of AMO Global Microbiology Council and Co-Founder of the Abbott Sterilization Task Force.He has held multiple positions within J&J including Site Quality Director at several of our manufacturing sites including Añasco, Puerto Rico, Kulim, Malaysia, and Hangzhou, China. Miguel has over 20 years of experience in the industry, including clinical research, pharmaceutical, viral vaccines, biological products, autologous molecules and medical devices. Miguel holds a Doctorate in Viral Pathology and Infectious Diseases from the University of Paris- L’Institut Louis Pasteur, and a B.S. in Industrial and Clinical Microbiology from the University of Puerto Rico-Mayagüez Campus. Heis an adjunct faculty member at multiple academic institutions throughout the world. Dr. Nogueras is a recognized industry leader in sterility assurance and sterilization practices, and he has over 20 years’ experience in sterility assurance.

Speaker
Dr. Miguel Nogueras(CLS, ASCP), RABQSA / Director of J&J – Sterility Assurance Johnson & Johnson Franchise Leader – Consumer Medical Device (CMD)

Abstract

There is increasing evidences that favor the prenatal beginning of schizophrenia. These evidences point toward intra-uterine environmental factors that act specifically during the second pregnancy trimester producing a direct damage of the brain of the fetus [1]. The current available technology doesn't allow observing what is happening at cellular level since the human brain is not exposed to a direct analysis in that stage of the life in subjects at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Methods. In 1977 we began a direct electron microscopic research of the brain of fetuses at high risk from schizophrenic mothers in order to finding differences at cellular level in relation to controls. Results. In these studies we have observed within the nuclei of neurons the presence of complete and incomplete viral particles that reacted in positive form with antibodies to herpes simplex hominis type I [HSV1] virus, and mitochondria alterations [2]. Conclusion. The importance of these findings can have practical applications in the prevention of the illness keeping in mind its direct relation to the aetiology and physiopathology of schizophrenia. A study of the gametes or the amniotic fluid cells in women at risk of having a schizophrenic offspring is considered. Of being observed the same alterations that those observed previously in the cells of the brain of the studied foetuses, it would intend to these women in risk of having a schizophrenia descendant, previous information of the results, the voluntary medical interruption of the pregnancy or an early anti HSV1 viral treatment as preventive measure of the later development of the illness.

Biography

Segundo Mesa Castillo. As Specialist in Neurology, he worked for 10 years in the Institute of Neurology of Havana, Cuba. He has worked in Electron Microscopic Studies on Schizophrenia for 32 years. He was awarded with the International Price of the Stanley Foundation Award Program and for the Professional Committee to work as a fellowship position in the Laboratory of the Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke under Dr. Joseph Gibbs for a period of 6 months, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Washington D.C. USA, June 5, 1990. At present he is member of the Scientific Board of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana and give lectures to residents in psychiatry

Speaker
Dr. Segundo Mesa Castillo / Psychiatric Hospital of Havana.

Abstract

Current research strongly indicates that male circumcision has health benefits. We Jews circumcise only our sons and we forcefully disapprove female genital mutilation/cutting/circumcision. In a personal communication to me, Harald zur Hausen (Medicine Nobel Prize 2008) does state that the effect of male circumcision in protecting against sexually transmitted diseases is at best moderate. In my texts discussing health benefits of male circumcision, human papillomavirus (HPV) is very much in focus. Male circumcision is linked to decreased risk in patients with penile HPV infection and penile cancer, and is related to reduced risk of cervical cancer in their female sexual partners.

Biography

I was born in Turku, Finland in 1933. My own language is Swedish. I have completed my MD from University of Lund, Sweden in 1962 and my PhD from University of Uppsala, Sweden in 1981. My main scientific subject is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection – male circumcision in focus.

Speaker
Elias Rubinstein MD PhD /

Abstract

Abstract Purpose: Malaria remains the most devastating infectious parasitic disease responsible for the death and economic losses among half the world’s population. The persistent development of resistance to most modern antimalarial drugs by Plasmodium species has necessitated the search for active ingredients in plants with antimalarial activity. The stem bark of Pseudocedrela kotschyi is used locally for the treatment of fever and the crude extracts have been reported to demonstrate antimalarial activity, hence the need for this research to authenticate the aforementioned claim. The aim of this study is to isolate and determine the antimalarial activity of fractions of the crude stem bark extracts of P. kotschyi using the rodent model. Materials and Methods: 200grammes of the stem powder was extracted in a soxhlet extractor using ethanol. 12 grammes from the ethanol extracts was pre adsorbed on silica gel using Thin layer chromatography (TLC) to determine the appropriate solvent system to be used for flash chromatography method which properly separated the component into 19 eluents. Fractions 1-4, 6–7, 10–11, 12-19 were combined, purified by repeated preparative TLC that recrystallized to give 7 fractions. Each of the fractions was subjected to GC-MS analysis. 40 mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei berghei were divided into 10 groups of 4 animals and treated with 100 mg/kg of the fractions to evaluate the antimalarial activity of fractions using suppressive and curative tests. Results: Fraction 5 recorded the highest chromatogram profile with an intensity of 13,260,430 while fraction 9 had the lowest chromatogram profile of 1,334,989. GC-MS analysis showed the presence of forty-four (44) chemical compounds in all the fractions of the plant. The fractions at 100 mg/kg suppressed the parasites by 100 %, 93.73%, 84.08 %, 78.15 %, 77. 93 %, 68.24 % and 57.06 % in fractions 5, 6-7, 10-11, 8, 1-4, 12-19 and 9 respectively while the crude extract produced 73.95 % suppression. The curative test recorded significant decrease in fractions 8, 9, 10-11, 12-19 and the crude extract. Conclusion: P. kotschyi contain active ingredients that have suppressive antimalarial which could be further harnessed by the pharmaceuticals industry to curb the menace of malaria in the world. Keyword: Antimalaria , Pseudocedrela kotschyi, Plasmodium berghei berghei

Biography

Prof David P. Yakubu has completed his PhD from University of Nottingham, U.K. in 2005. He is the Director of Student Industrial Work Experience Scheme (SIWES). He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as peer reviewer of repute. Anthony Dawet has completed his PhD in 2014 from University of Jos. He is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Zoology. He has published more than 15 papers in reputable journals and has been peer reviewer of repute. R. Omagha has completed her M Sc. from University of Jos in 2015 and is currently studying her PhD in University of Lagos, Nigeria.

Speaker
D.P.Yakubu / Department of Zoology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Jos

Abstract

We conducted comparative studies and analysis by means of transmission, scanning, comparative electron microscopy research and analysis of some types of bacteria (E.coli, Salmonella,Vibrio,Lactobacillus, et al), yeast (Candida) and Entamoeba. Based on obtained results, we suggest a study of the major changes in prokaryotic(gram negative,gram positive) and eukaryotic cells(yeasts,protists) ultrastructural pathologies patterns during culturally grown and different of the action of certain physical, chemical and biologically active natural factors on the ultrastructural characteristics of bacteria and protists (antibiotics, disinfectant, biologically active substrates(BAS), ultraviolet, X-radiation,γ-ionizing radiation. We have conditionally divided the microbes, yeasts and protozoa cell pathology changes into adaptive, balanced and irreversible-destructive ones. The convenient and destructive types of structural changes can be observed within the same dose of the same preparation or factor. The adaptive changes in bacteria are manifested by the formation of spheroplasts, protoplasts, L-form, non-cultivation dormants forms,lysogen and nanobacteria. Convenient changes in protozoa are expressed in plasmic layer, and cytoplasmic ribonucleoproteidal plasma, glycogenic, volutin structural changes, virus-like noncultivation symbiont, as well as with the increase in the number of phagocytosis and pinocytosis vacuoles and by the disintegration of chromatin. The suggested cell disease classification of bacteria, yeasts, and protozoa can be useful for bactericidal, sporicidal, protistocid preparations researches, as well as for the research of mechanism of interactions with microorganisms.

Biography

Speaker
Dr. Karlen / Center of Technological Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry of NAS RA, 26 Azatutyan Str. 0014,Yerevan, 0014, Armenia

Abstract

Some plant diseases that can completely destroy Potato plot, late blight is one of these devastating fungal diseases that attacks the potato field and completely destroy the potato field. If any proper preventive measure cannot be taken from beginning of initiate the late blight, farmers as well as potato seed production companies can be faced into great hamper. Although this devastating diseases can be controlled by using traditional fungicides like Carbondazim or Metalaxyl. Plant growth and tuber formation are gradually inhibited. As a results the farmers and seed potato production companies cannot get sufficient production/ expected yield. The objective of this present research is to standardize the protocol by which late blight diseases can be controlled easily without inhibition of the plants growth and its yield. Efforts made in present investigation to evaluate the concentration of few commonly used fungicides for their comparative efficacy against Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary- the incited of late blight, for its The highest (99.70) percentage of disease control and the highest yield (26.68 MT/ha) were recorded on fungicides containing 3.5 mg/L Sunoxanil 72 WP (Cymoxanil 8%+Mancozeb 64%) with 3.0 ml/L Contaf 5 EC (Hexaconazol 5%) during 2015-2016. The lowest (75.68) percentage of disease control and the lowest yield (15.67 ton/ha) were recorded on fungicides containing 2.0 mg/L Ridomil MZ 72 (Metalaxyl 8%+Mancozeb 64%) with 1.0 ml/L Autostin 50 WDG (Carbondaxim 50%) during 2014-2015. It was concluded that Sunoxanil 72 WP (Cymoxanil 8%+ Mancozeb 64%) acted as the best fungicide when applied as prophylactic measures. Sunoxanil 72 WP (Cymoxanil 8%+ Mancozeb 64%) was combined with Contaf 5EC (Hexaconazol 5%) or Actiphose (Phosphorous acid) showed the best result when applied as curative measures. Plant growth as well as its yield gradually decreased due to the application of Carbondaxim and Matalaxyl. It is new finding, although Metalaxyl and Carbondaxim play on vital role to protect the late blight after appearance the disease, the plant growth, tuber formation along with the yield was gradually inhibited. Therefore, it is recommended that Metalaxyl and Carbondaxim application should be avoided to protect the late blight after or before appearance the disease.

Biography

Author has done Ph.D. in Plant Biotechnology especially tissue culture and has published quite number of scientific publications in highly reputed journals in home and abroad. His Ph.D. dissertation was published as a text book from LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, Germany and another book entitle “Comparative Efficacy of Different Fungicides against Late Blight Diseases of Potato incited by Phytophthora infestans (Mont.) de Bary and standardized the doses for its Management” was also published from LAP LAMBERT Academic Publishing, Germany. He has an experience in tissue culture laboratory as well as has an experience to ensure quality of potato seed production farm especially in mini-tuber and breeder seed of potato production within net house and foundation and certified seed of potato production in field.`

Speaker
Siddique N.A / Siddique N.A, Ph.D, Metal Agro Ltd, Dhaka, Bangladesh,; Study on Rajshahi University, Bangladesh.

Abstract

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL), caused by several Leishmania species, is a complex disease with a wide spectrum of clinical features. This neglected vector-borne disease, is a major public health problem worldwide and one of the most common endemic diseases in Iran. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) reports,about 900,000 to 1.3 million new cases of leishmaniasis are reported per year; of these, approximately 0.7–1.2 million are cutaneous leishmaniasis. It is estimated that 20000 new cases are reported annually in Iran, nevertheless, due to under-reporting,theactual number is almost higher. North Khorasan province in north eastern Iran is one of the important focus of CL, and this study was performed to determine the main parasites, reservoir hosts and vectors of the disease in this district. Leishmania positive isolates from human cases in North Khorasan province (North East of Iran),were genotyped using PCR-RFLP analysis. Wild mammals were caught from gerbil burrows and the genus and species of the rodents were determined by external morphological characteristics. Leishmania parasites were detected to assess the infection of reservoir hosts through microscopically methods, PCR-RFLP and phylogenetic analysis. Sand flies were collected by sticky papers and identified to species level using light microscope and keys. PCR of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA, followed by RFLP were used for identification of DNA of Leishmania parasites within infected sand flies. The results of this study indicated that the parasite causing cutaneous leishmaniasis in this province is L. major. The results also revealed that Rhombomysopimus is considered as the main reservoir host of CL. Microscopic investigation on blood smear of the animals for amastigote parasites and PCR-RFLP revealed the presence of L. major in rodents. Two species of Phlebotomuspapatasi and Phlebotomussalehiwere found to be naturally infected with L. major. Moreover, mixed infection of L. turanica and L. major was observed in one specimen ofP. papatasi. Characteristics of the collected Leishmania isolates from North Khorasanrevealed that L. major is a predominant parasite of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Our study revealed that R. opimusis the most important reservoirhost for maintenance of the parasite source in the area. According to the results, two vectors of cutaneous leishmaniasis were found to be active in studied area. P.papatasi and P. salehiare, like in several places, the probable vectors of cutaneous leishmaniases in this focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis. We also found that the disease is endemic in Northern Khorasan Province.

Biography

Speaker
SadafSabzevari /

Abstract

Rheumatic fever and Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) are two distinct expressions of the same pathological process as a result of immunological reactions due to cardiotrophic agents. Group A streptococcal infection causes acute rheumatic fever, leading to pancarditis and valvular dysfunction. Similar to rheumatic fever, EMF predominates in children and young adults, causing extensive fibrosis of endocardium with plaque-like lesions due to various infections and it has been challenging to identify acute phase, characterized by generalized allergy/ immunological features including fever, abdominal distension, facial and periorbital swelling, urticaria, myopericarditis and neurological features. These two neglected cardiovascular diseases are confined to limited geographical areas, carries grim prognosis and emphasizing alternative routes for understanding and treatment of the disease.

Biography

will update soon

Speaker
Dr. Ramachandran Muthiah, M.D.,D.M., FNB, ACCF / Consultant Physician & Cardiologist

Abstract

The root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne incognita is considered one of the most economically harmful pathogens to worldwide agriculture and devastating to coffee plantations. Genetic improvement strategies for introgression of R genes result in a breakdown of resistance, whereas nematicidal chemicals are considered to be inefficient or toxic. In previous works, we observed that a gene homologous to miraculin was overexpressed at 5 and 6 days after infection in coffee roots resistant to M. incognita. Samples of these roots were sequenced by RNAseqllluminaHiSeq 4000, generating more than 800 million length readings of 2x100 nt. Differential in silico expression analysis and GO enrichment results indicate that some gene families are strongly deregulated in the resistance response. Fourteen superexpressed genes of Kunitz type family protease inhibitors (PIs), similar to miraculin, have been identified. The evidence to date is that miraculin must be important in responding to coffee stresses, because the CoMirmiraculin gene is overexpressed by the attack of the coffee beetle (Leucopteracoffeella). The present study shows the real-time expression analysis of the miraculin-like genes in coffee and the correlation of their expression patterns to other biotic or abiotic stress responses. These genes may be important actors in the coffee immune response and may be potentially used in biotechnology approaches for the control of nematodes and pests.

Biography

PhD. at the Science Faculty of Université de Montpellier II - France, and postdoctoral studies in nematode genomics at INRA (Sophia Antipolis - France). Currently principal investigator at the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation. Acts in phytopathology researching plant-pest interactions, especially with nematodes and insects. Has experience in the field of Biochemistry, with emphasis in Molecular Biology, studying mainly the following subjects: genomic, transcritômica, functional validation of genes, silencing by interfering RNA, genetic transformation of plants, genetic editing of plants.

Speaker
Érika Albuquerque / Embrapa Recursos Genéticos e Biotecnologia, Brasília - Brazil

Abstract

Title: Intestinal parasitoses in urban and rural children of a developing country. Objective: To compare intestinal parasitoses between urban and rural children in a developing country and its related factors. Methods: Children of 1-6 years old in the urban and rural areas who had not taken antihelmenthic drugs in the last 6 months were randomly selected. Various factors were taken as variables in a preformed questionnaire. Results: Among the total 52 children, 24 were in urban and 28 were in rural group. Male/female ratio of the rural group was 1:1 and that of the urban group was 1.4:1. Average family income was 12000 taka and 4000 taka per month in urban and rural areas, respectively. None of the rural group used sanitary latrine, whereas every one in urban group used sanitary latrine. Majority (71%) of the mothers in rural group were below the primary level of education. Majority (75%) of fathers were educated above higher secondary level in urban group. In the rural group 18 (64%) fathers had none received any education. Enterobius vermicularis was observed only in 1(4%) stool samples of urban children but in rural group it was found in 7(25%) of the stool samples. Enterovirus vermicularis was the major parasite isolated from both groups. Exclusive breast feeding practice of less than 6 months was observed in 20 (83%) children of urban group but in rural group that of less than one year was found in 22 (78%) children. Conclusion: Intestinal parasitic infestation is mostly found in rural children. Urban children almost have no intestinal parasitoses. It has the relation with the poor sanitation, low standard of living, less parental income and education, and early weaning. Unnecessary universal deworming of the urban and rural children in developing countries should be discouraged in order to use the money economically and effectively. It can be carried out in rural children and their living standard should be improved.

Biography

Speaker
Dr. AKM Mamunur Rashid /

Abstract

Ticks and tick borne parasites are a major constrain to good livestock productivity in the Sub-Saharan Africa including Nigeria. This study aimed at determining the prevalence of ticks and tick borne parasites in cattle at Shinge Livestock Market LafiaNasarawa State Nigeria. Ticks and blood collected from randomly selected cattle were examined using standard entomological, parasitological and haematological procedures. Out of the 200 cattle examined 112(56.0%) were tick infested. A total of 1,152 ticks were collected from all cattle examined. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus948(62.3%) was the most abundant species infesting cattle breeds followed by Amblyommavariegatum383(25.2%), then Hyalommarufipes 184(12.1%), while Rhipicephalussanguineus 7(0.5%) was the least tick species encountered. There was a very high significant difference (P < 0.00001) on species abundance. The bovine blood examined showed a 70.5% parasitic infection by two genera (Babesiaand Anaplasma).Babesiabigemina80(36.0%) was most prevalent, followed by Anaplasmamarginale77(34.7%), while Babesiabovis65(29.3%) was the least prevalent. There was no significant difference (P = 0.6848) in prevalence rate between tick borne parasites.Haematological investigation showed that blood indices examined were within standard ranges. It is therefore recommended that dips be introduced at strategic points to herders for easy access to de-tick their animals.

Biography

Faculty of Science, Federal University Lafia

Speaker
victoria Pam Adamu /

Abstract

Microbial approach is one of the best innovative tools for crops improvement. Achieving global food security in response to negative impact of environmental stresses and world population growth is the most challenging task for the 21st Century. The salinity and drought stresses are the major abiotic stress adversely affecting the plant productivity. Due to this the global food security is in danger, therefore, there is an urgent need to develop stress-tolerant plants with no yield loss under stress for future food security. Use of beneficial fungus (root endophyte Piriformospora indica) through non-transgenic and transgenic approaches could be one of the best innovative approaches for improvement plant productivity. Through non-transgenic approach P. indica has been found to provide strong growth-promoting activity during its symbiosis with a broad spectrum of plants including mustard, pea, tobacco, tomato, onions, rice, lepidium and many more medicinal plants. Despite its positive impact on the host, little is known about the P. indica genes that may be involved in stress tolerance to plants. To improve the plant productivity under salinity stress condition through transgenic approach, first high salinity-tolerant genes from P. indica need to be identified and cloned. We have cloned several salinity-tolerant genes from P. indica fungus by functional screening, based on random over-expression of a P. indica cDNA library in Escherichia coli grown on medium supplemented with 0.6 M NaCl. Out of these one of the salinity tolerant genes from P. indica has been functionally validated for its role in salinity tolerance in bacteria and plant both. This gene product functions as molecular chaperones and involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time a direct evidence of countering salinity stress tolerance in plant by genetic modification using a fungal gene. Other approaches (plant to plant) for plant productivity improvement will be discussed, specially the emerging role of DNA and RNA helicases in stress tolerance. This research will be beneficial not only in enhancing the productivity of agriculturally important crops under adverse conditions but also will be helpful in increasing the income of the poor farmers, the most deserving for this.

Biography

An elected fellow of numerous national & international academies, Prof. Narendra Tuteja is currently Visiting Scientist at ICGEB, New Delhi. He is former Group Leader at ICGEB and Professor and Director at Amity Institute of Microbial Technology, Noida. He has made significant contributions to crop improvement under adverse conditions through genetic engineering and microbial approaches, reporting the first helicase from plant and human cells and demonstrating new roles of Ku autoantigen, nucleolin and eIF4A as DNA helicases. Furthermore, he discovered novel functions of helicases, G-proteins, CBL-CIPK, forisome, and LecRLK in plant stress tolerance, and PLC and MAP-kinase as effectors for Gα and Gβ G-proteins. Narendra Tuteja also reported several high salinity stress tolerant genes from plants and fungi and developed salt/drought tolerant crops including rice, groundnut, sugarcane, chili etc. Total publications: 375; Books: 20; Citaion <21,000; h-index: 56; i-10: 216

Speaker
Narendra Tuteja / Visiting Scientist & Former Group Leader, International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology

Abstract

The Pine Wilt Disease is a severe forest epidemic that has been devastating numerous pine forests, first in Asian countries, and then in European ones. Pinewood nematode, the pathogen of this disease, is native to North America and not pathogenic to its domestic pine species. This forest disease involves various biological relationships that may influence the disease's spreading manner. For instance, Monochamus beetles are the vector of the pathogenic nematodes and transfer the pathogen from dead trees to healthy ones. The fungal flora in the dead pine tree where the larvae of the vector beetle overwinter strongly influenced the number of pathogenic nematodes vectored by a beetle. Also, the host's resistance to this disease seems to be affected by the mycorrhizal relationship developing underground. The host-parasite relationship is the most important, of course. How could such a tiny nematode kill a huge pine tree so quickly? To understand this, we have to know the physiological host reactions against the pathogen, the conducting water system in a host stem, and the various traits of the pathogenic nematode evolved to parasitize pine trees.

Biography

will be updated soon

Speaker
Dr. Kazuyoshi Futai / An emeritus professor of Kyoto University

Abstract

Aminopeptidases are increasingly being investigated as therapeutic targets in various diseases. In this study, we cloned, expressed, and biochemically characterized a member of the methionine aminopeptidase (MAP) family from Babesiabovisto develop a potential molecular drug target. Recombinant B. bovis MAP (rBvMAP) was expressed in Escherichia colias a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion protein, and we found that it was antigenic. An antiserum against the rBvMAPprotein was generated in mice, and then a native B. bovis MAPwas identified in B. bovisby a Western blot assay. Further, an immunolocalization assay showed that MAP is present in the cytoplasm of the B. bovismerozoite. Analysis of the biochemical properties of rBvMAP revealed that it was enzymatically active with optimum activity at pH 7.5 and stable at 37OC. Enhanced enzymatic activity was observed in the presence of divalent manganese cations and was effectively inhibited by a metal chelator, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Moreover, the enzymatic activity of BvMAP was inhibited by Amastatin and Bestatin as inhibitors of MAP in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, MAPi were also found to significantly inhibit the growth of Babesia parasites in both in vitro and in vivo without any side effects; additionally, they induced immunopotentiating activities in the host. The findings of the present study suggest that BvMAP is a viable molecular drug target and that Amastatin and Bestatinmight be potential drug candidates for the treatment of babesiosis due to their dual antibabesial and immunopotentiating

Biography

Munkhjargal has completed her PhD from Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Japan and postdoctoral studies from Obihiro University, Japan. She is a researcher of Institute of Veterinary Medicine, government organization. She has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Tserendorj Munkhjargal / National Research Center for Protozoan Diseases, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Inada-cho, Obihiro, Hokkaido 080-8555, Japan

Abstract

TiO2 nanoparticles incorporated GG film (2D) and scaffold (3D) was successfully fabricated. The fabricated 2D film and 3D scaffold was characterized using fourier transform infrared (FTIR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and termogravimetric/ differential thermal analyzer (TG-DTA) to study their physicochemical properties. The mechanical properties of film and scaffold was studied using an Instron Universal Testing machine (model 3366) with a load capacity ±10 kN grips and cross-speed set at 10 mm min-1. Water Vapour Transmission Rates (WVTR) and swelling was measured using American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International Standard method. Meanwhile, the biological properties such as antibacterial of film and scaffold was observed qualitatively and quantitatively. Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus) and gram-negative (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) microbes was for an anti-bacterial assay. In-vivo and in-vitro studies for biomedical application using fabricated 2D film and 3D scaffold was carried out. For in-vivo study, the excision wound model was applied on rats. An 8 mm wound was created using sterile wound bio-puncher. The measurement of the wound area was carried out from the day of the excision of the wound and at every three (3) days interval until the epithelisation of the wound was completed. On the other hand, in-vitro study of cell proliferation was quantified using a MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Commonly used cells are 3T3 mouse fibroblast, human skin fibroblast and etc.

Biography

Mohd Hasmizam Razali has a PhD degree in Materials Engineering (Nanomaterials) from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), MSc. in Chemistry (Catalyst) and B.Sc (Hons) in Chemical Industry from Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM). Currently he is a Senior Lecturer at School of Fundamental Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu (UMT), Malaysia. He has published more than 50 technical papers in journals and conference proceedings locally and internationally related to the nanomaterials and functional materials research. He has been awarded Who’s Who in the World for 3 years in a row 2013, 2014 and 2015 by The Marquis Who’s Who Publications Board. In 2014, the Cambridge Biographical Centre listed him as one of 2000 Outstanding Intellectuals of the 21st Century, due its ability to produce nanomaterials with tremendous improvement compared to conventional commercial materials. On top of that, he is also the recipient of the MAWHIBA Award and GENEVA Gold Medal Award in 1999.

Speaker
Dr. Mohd Hasmizam Razali / Institute Name,School of Fundamental Sciences, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu

Abstract

Public health systems are not always prepared for outbreaks of infectious diseases. Although in the past several public health institutes, like the French ‘Institut Pasteur’ and the Dutch ‘Tropeninstituut‘, were prominent surveyors of infectious diseases, the investments in worldwide public health have decreased. Now more attention is given to curative healthcare compared to preventive healthcare. The recent Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in West Africa initiated a new wave of interest to invest in Worldwide Public Health to prevent outbreaks of highly contagious diseases. Zoonotic diseases are threatening as the population does not have natural nor artificial (from vaccination) immune response to new diseases like in the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in 2014. The new strain of the Ebola Virus in West Africa was slightly less lethal, compared to other Ebola Virus strains, but the threat of spreading was far bigger as it had a longer incubation time. Most public health systems are not trained well enough to mitigate highly infectious and deadly disease outbreaks. NGO’s helping to fight the outbreak are often better trained in curative treatments and have less experience with biological (bioweapon) threats for which the military are trained for. The UNMEER mission was unique in this. It was a setting in which military and civilian actors cooperate in fighting a biological threat. Protection is essential for health workers. Smart systems have to be developed to prevent further spreading of the disease, but it is not only the biosafety, which has to be considered, but also the biosecurity, as misuse of extremely dangerous strains of microorganisms cannot be excluded. Several zoonotic infectious diseases, like anthrax, smallpox and hemorrhagic fevers are listed as potential bioweapons. Therefor both biosafety and biosecurity have to be implemented in all measures to fight

Biography

Works internationally for several medical and biotech companies as scientific advisory board member and is also an active reserve-officer of the Royal Dutch Navy in his rank as Commander (OF4). For the Dutch Armed Forces he is CBRNe specialist with focus on (micro)biological and chemical threats and medical- and environmental functional specialist within the 1st CMI (Civil Military Interaction) Battalion of the Dutch Armed Forces. For Expertise France he is now managing an EU CBRN CoE public health project in West Africa. He is visiting professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata giving lectures for the CBRN Master study. In his civilian position he is at this moment developing with MT-Derm in Berlin (Germany) a novel interdermal vaccination technology as well as a new therapy for cutaneous leishmaniasis for which he has won a Canadian ‘Grand Challenge’ grant. With Hemanua in Dublin (Ireland) he has developed an innovative blood separation unit, which is also suitable to produce convalescent plasma for Ebola Virus Disease therapy. He has finished both his studies in Medicine and in Biochemistry in The Netherlands with a doctorate and has extensive practical experience in cell biology, immuno-haematology, infectiousdiseases, biodefense and transfusion medicine. His natural business acumen and negotiation competence helps to initiate new successful businesses, often generated from unexpected combinations

Speaker
Cdr Dr Stef Stienstra / Civil-Military-Interaction-Command Royal Dutch Armed Forces

Abstract

Finger millet is a small cereal grain with potential for use in commercial maltsby germinating its grains under controlled conditions, with the aim of activating endogenous hydrolytic enzymes, majorly α-amylase. The present study examined the effects of temperature and incubation time on α-amylase activity in finger millet seed. Moistened finger millet seeds were incubated at 15 ºC, 25 ºC or 35 ºC for five consecutive days. Samples were withdrawn daily at an interval of 24 h and kilned at 30 ºC and 40 ºC respectively. Radicles developments were monitored with measuring ruler, and amylase activity was determined with starch solution following standard protocols. The results revealed that radicle development of finger millet increased with germination time. However, seed germinated at 25 ºC and kilned at 30 ºC showed significant (P< 0.05) better radicle development than others germinated at 15 ºC and 35 ºC respectively. Similarly, seed germinated at 25 ºC and kilned at 30 ºC also showed the highest amylase activity than other counterparts. It is apparent that the optimal condition suitable for effective malting of finger millet was at 25ºC germination and kilned at 30ºC. For further study, finger millet malt will be fermented to produce clear beer or probiotic beverages.

Biography

Oluyinka Mary Amos-Awoniyi,is in the second year of her PhD in Microbiology at the University of Zululand, South Africa. She has published four papers in reputed journals while three of her research papers have been submitted for publications. She is serving as a reviewer and editorial board member for Asian Food Science Journal, CientPeriodique Journals (CPQ) and Acta Scientific Nutrition health Journal. Her Current research topic is “Alcoholic and lactic acid fermentation of finger millet and its potential for clear beer/ probiotics food beverage”. My area of research interestsareFood Microbiology,Food processing andNutrition.

Speaker
Ms. Oluyinka MAry Amos-Awoniyi / University of Zululand, South Africa.

Abstract

Echinococcus multilocularis is an important zoonotic parasite, responsible for alveolar echinococcosis in human beings. As an immune organ, the spleen plays a key role in host immune responses during E. multilocularis infection. Here we showed that the apoptotic levels of the spleen cells significantly decreased in mice 2 month and 3 month post infection of E. multilocularis (p< 0.05). To decipher the mechanism behind this, the miRNA profiles of these spleen cells were defined and found several miRNAs including miR-146a-5p were dysregulated. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that there were several potential miR-146a-5ptargets related to apoptosis including BAG-1, an antiapoptotic protein. Both miR-146a-5p and BAG-1 was validated to be down-regulated and up-regulated by PCRin mice 2 month and 3 month post infection of E. multilocularis, respectively.Moreover, BAG-1 was further validated to be up-regulated at the protein level by Western blotin mice 2 month and 3 month post infection of E. multilocularis. The results of dual fluorescent reporting assay verified that miR-146a-5p was able to bind to the 3’ UTR of BAG-1, suggesting that BAG-1 is its real target. In mouse spleen cells, miR-146a-5p over-expression led to a significant increase of apoptosis (p< 0.05), while miR-146a-5p low-expression induced a remarkable decrease of apoptosis (p< 0.001). Taken together these results indicate that downregulation of miR-146a-5p is attributed to a decreased apoptosis of the spleen cells via upregulating BAG-1, thus affecting immune responses against E. multilocularis.

Biography

Speaker
Yadong Zheng / Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Lanzhou, China

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