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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Complex microstructures, as obtained by quenching and tempering (Q&T) and thermo-mechanical (TMCP) processing are investigated. The considered steels are low/medium carbon steels (C=0.06%-0.40%) with yield strength in the range YS=500-1000 MPa. Results show that the strength and the impact toughness behaviour are controlled by different microstructural parameters and not, as in the case of polygonal ferritic steels, by the same structural unit (the grain size). In particular, yield strength is controlled by the mean sub-grain size, whereas the structural unit controlling the critical cleavage stress is the covariant (bainitic or martensitic) packet, whose size is slightly lower than the average unit crack path (UCP). The critical stage in the fracture process appears to be the propagation of a Griffith crack from one packet to another, and the resistance offered by high-angle boundaries is approximately the same as that of low-C steels with bainitic or polygonal ferrite microstructure.

Biography

After completing his degree in Physics at the University of Pisa and PhD in Materials Engineering at the University of Napoli, Andrea Di Schino joined Centro Sviluppo Materiali SpA (CSM), a european leading centre for Materials Research. After spending more than 10 years in CSM he joined the University of Perugia as Professor of Metallurgy. His main interest is to combine fundamental theoretical research and experiments to explain mechanisms and discover new insight in the field of steel metallurgy. Author of more than 200 papers relating to physical metallurgy and product development, he is member of the Editorial Board od several Journals (Acta Metallurgica Slovaca, Metalugija, Journal of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Journal of Materials and Environmental Science, SciFed Journal of Metallurgical Science, Materials Research India).

Speaker
Andrea Di Schino / University of Perugia
Italy

Abstract

Practical Aspects of Obtaining Bulk Material Property Parameters from Instrumented Indentation Data TW Clyne & J Dean Department of Materials Science, University of Cambridge 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge C3 0FS, UK Email: twc10@cam.ac.uk, Phone: +44(0)1223 334332 URL: http://www.ccg.msm.cam.ac.uk/ There is serious industrial interest in obtaining bulk materials properties from instrumented indentation data, using iterative FEM simulation of (spherical) indentation and converging on optimal parameter values by optimising the agreement between predicted and measured outcomes. It has already been demonstrated that this is viable for plasticity parameters (such as the coefficients in the Ludwik-Hollomon expression) and the outlook is promising for creep (recognising that primary creep inevitably affects indentation outcomes and obtaining parameter values in an appropriate formulation, such as the Miller-Norton law). Much the same approach can be used to obtain residual stress levels (in near-surface regions), in materials for which plasticity (and possibly creep) characteristics are known. Progress is also being made concerning other material properties, including those related to superelastic deformation and fracture. A summary will be given of the current state of the art in these areas. Some attention will be focussed on practical aspects of testing procedures, including optimal indenter size and (relative) penetration levels. These include approaches to in situ testing of components and the potential for using measured residual indent profiles for such fieldwork, during which accurate load-displacement monitoring may be difficult. It is also noted that some form of ballistic indentation may be preferable to conventional static loading in such situations, although this may require account to be taken of the strain rate dependence of plastic deformation and/or the transient heating effects. The overall methodology is becoming increasingly accepted by industry and software packages implementing these capabilities are now starting to become commercially available - see, for example, https://www.sempid.com/

Biography

After completing his first degree and PhD in the Materials Science Department at Cambridge, Bill Clyne held University lecturing posts in Brazil, Switzerland and Surrey (UK), before returning to Cambridge, where he was appointed in 1999 to a chair in Mechanics of Materials. He has been the Director of the Gordon Laboratory (since its opening at that time). His research interests centre on the thermo-mechanics of composites and coatings, particularly processing, numerical modelling and fine scale mechanical interrogation. Details are available at www.ccg.msm.cam.ac.uk/. He has authored over 300 papers, two textbooks (on composites) and 10 educational software packages. He is in the original ISI Highly Cited list (www.isihighlycited.com). He has been sole supervisor for over 80 PhD students in Cambridge and has given about 50 Invited Keynote Talks and Colloquia over the past 10 years. He was President of the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS - http://www.fems.org/) and is now an Honorary Member. He has been Principal Investigator for many large projects, with an aggregate value running into several tens of £M, and has chaired 8 large international conferences. He is also the Director of DoITPoMS (www.doitpoms.ac.uk/), which maintains a globally-accessed Educational Materials Science website. Current Scientific Council memberships include IMDEA (Madrid), The Materials Science Cluster of Excellence (Erlangen) and the Jülich Helmholtz Centre for Energy & Climate Research. In 2004, he was awarded the Griffith Medal, a premier prize of the Institute of Materials. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2008 and Helmholtz International Fellow in 2014.

Speaker
Bill Clyne / University of Cambridge
UK

Abstract

In the recent decades precious metals, particularly gold, has received worldwide attention. Gold has a wide range of practical applications in the industry due to its unique physicochemical properties. Recovery of the valuable metals from low-gold-bearing-ores, such as pyrite (FeS2) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) can be a laborious process, involving pyrometallurgy and/or hydrometallurgy. This recovery process is highly dependent on the chemical and physical properties of the ore as well as the state of existent minerals inside the ore. Pyrometallurgical processesuse high temperatures to convert ore into raw metals, with the side effect of releasing sulphurous gases which need to be captured and treated. Hydrometallurgical methods, on the other hand, consumes large volumes of strong acids or bases to dissolve the minerals, which is then followed by extraction and recovery and consequently has an extensive impact on the (aquatic) environment. Both of these traditional recovery methods are very costly, time-consuming and require extensive labour. Therefore, the development of alternative techniques for dissolving sulphide gold-containing ores in order to liberate gold, is highly desirable. Previous research indicated that ionic liquids is an attractive alternative technique for the solubilisation of sulfidic ores to liberate gold. Ionic liquids are considered promising alternatives due to their unique solvent properties. This presentation will describe the results of an investigation on the use of imidazolium-based ionic liquids as an environmental friendly way for dissolving and recovering gold from a refractory ore tailings source in South Africa.The aim of this investigation was to determine whether imidazolium-based ILs can be used efficiently and selectively for dissolving and recovering gold from a refractory gold tailing stream. Some of the aspects investigated that will be described in this contribution, involved the efficiency of the selected ionic liquids, the kinetics of the process, the selectivity of the selected ionic liquids, the yields obtained with the selected ionic liquids and establishing how recyclable the selected ionic liquids were.

Biography

Prof. Herman Potgieter has been attached to the School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), South Africa for more than a decade. He currently holds a joint appointment between Wits and the Manchester Metropolitan University (MMU)in the UK. During his career of 35 years he has supervised nearly 50 postgraduate students to successful completion of their degrees, and has published 215 peer-reviewed journal articles and conference proceedings. He has worked in a number of research areas including corrosion, water treatment, extractive metallurgy, polymers and electrochemistry. He is currently part of a group investigating new and novel ways to extract metals from wastes, in particular gold from tailings. Herman Potgieter is one of the associate editors of the journal Corrosion Engineering, Science and Technology, He is a member of several scientific and learned organizations, e.g. fellow of IOM3, fellow of RSC, fellow of SAIMM, ass. fellow of IChemE, and member of SOMP, MemSCI, and ICorr. He holds chartered status as both a metallurgical engineer and chemist. He held visiting positions at the University of Antwerp (Belgium). King Carlos III University (Spain), Tshwane University of Technology (South Africa) and the University of Manchester (UK).

Speaker
Herman Potgieter / Manchester Metropolitan University
UK

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Simulation of thermal shock cracking in ceramics using bond-based peridynamics and finite elements Abstract The effects of moderate intensity ‘hot’ or ‘cold’ shock in brittle solids have been extensively studied, while much less is known about thermal shock response during large temperature variations. In this study, a combined finite element – peridynamics numerical procedure is proposed for the simulation of cracking in ceramic materials, undergoing severe thermal shock. Initially, Finite Element nonlinear heat transfer analysis is conducted. The effects of surface convection and radiation heat exchange are also included. Subsequently, the interpolated temperature field is used to formulate a varying temperature induced action for a bond-based peridynamics model. The present model, which is weakly coupled, is found to reproduce accurately previous numerical and experimental results regarding the case of a ‘cold’ shock. Through several numerical experiments it is established that ‘cold’ and ‘hot’ shock conditions give rise to different failure modes and that large temperature variations lead to intensified damage evolution.

Biography

Hamid Bahai received his PhD degree in 1993 in Computational Mechanics from Queen Mary College, University of London. Between 1993 and 1995 he worked as a Senior Research Engineer at T&N Technology where he was involved in research and development work on a number of projects for the automotive and aerospace industries. This was followed by a period at Halliburton Inc during which time he carried out design and analysis of a number of major offshore structures. In 1996 he moved to the aerospace industry by joining Astrium, an aerospace subsidiary of European Aeronautics Defence and Space company, where as a senior scientist, he played a leading role in conducting design, mathematical modelling and computational analysis of Euro3000 space craft structures and Arian launcher / spacecraft adapter. It was during this period that he was made a fellow of the Institute of Mechanical Engineers for his outstanding technical contributions and services to the scientific and engineering communities. In 1998 he returned to academia and joined Brunel University where he is currently a Professor in Computational Mechanics and Head of Department of Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering. He has led a number of research projects covering a wide range of topics in the area of Computational Mechanics and has published over 120 papers on various themes in the field. Amongst Hamid Bahai’s many theoretical and applied contributions include the development of a new type of non-linear shallow shell strain based finite element and a novel inverse eigen value formulation for optimising the vibratory behaviour of structures. His current research interests include development of non-linear finite element formulations and fluid-solid interaction algorithmsHe has conducted consulting work in the field of structural integrity for many UK and International companies and has given invited talks and courses the world over on various topics in structural computational mechanics. He is the Editor-in-Chief of the European Journal of Computational Mechanics.

Speaker
Hamid Bahai / Brunel University
London

Abstract

Grain Structure and Crystallographic texture investigation of similar and dissimilar friction stir welded aluminum alloys using EBSD M.M.Z. Ahmed1.2.3,Sabbah Ataya2,3, Essam Ahmed2,3, M. ElsayedSeleman2,3, Abdallah Mahdy3 1:Mechanical Engineering Department, The British University in Egypt, El-Sherouk 11837, Cairo, Egypt. 2:Suez and Sinai Metallurgical and Materials Research Center of Scientific Excellence (SSMMR-CSE), Suez University, Suez, Egypt 3:Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez University, 43721 Suez, Egypt. Correspondent author: mohamed.zaky@bue.edu.eg Abstract In this research FSW was conducted for similar and dissimilar aluminum alloys AA7075, AA5083, AA5754, AA7020 at different rotational speeds of 300, 400, 500, and 600 rpm and different travel speeds of 20, 40, 60, and 80 mm/min using FSW tool from H13 tool steel. The effect of material positions in terms of advancing and retreating sides were investigated for the dissimilar joints. The microstructure of the nugget zone and the base materials were investigated mainly using EBSD technique on Quanta FEG 250 SEM. The Mechanical properties of joints were investigated in terms of tensile testing and hardness testing along the transverse cross section of the joints. It has been noted that in all joints the large grain size of the base materials has been transformed into fine grain structure as a result of the geometric dynamic recrystallization processes taking place during the FSW process. The significant differences between the investigated alloys in terms of grain structure and type of precipitates have strong impact on the recrystallization process that responsible for the formation of the final grain structure inside the NG zones. A significant grain refining was occurred in the NG zones of both similar and dissimilar FSWed aluminum alloys with average grain size ranged between 7 µm and 2 µm depending on the FSW parameters and the alloy type. Increasing the welding speed from 50mm/min to 200mm/min in case of AA7075 and AA5083 of 5mm thickness has resulted in a great reduction in the average grain size for the similar joints from 6 µm to 2 µm in case of AA7075 and from 9 µm to 3 µm in case of AA5083. In case of the 10mm thickness joints a significant reduction in the grain size was observed between the top surface and the bottom surface of the joints along the NG thickness as can be seen in Fig. 1. This can be attributed to the effect of the shoulder near the top surface that resulted in higher thermal cycle. Bio. Dr. Mohamed Zaky Ahmed graduated from Suez Canal University, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in 1997, obtained his master in 2002 from the same department. Dr. Ahmed received his PhD in the field of Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Sheffield-UK in 2009. During his PhD study about thick section friction stir welding of aluminum alloys established very strong relation with The Welding Institute (TWI) staff in Sheffield that still in collaboration till now. Dr. Ahmed joined the British University in Egypt (BUE) in September 2016 as Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department having previously been Associate Professor at the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Suez University where he established number of research centers such as the friction stir welding center through STDF funded project as the principal investigator. Also he is the Co-director of the Metallurgical and Materials research center of scientific excellence at Suez University that is established through another STDF funded project. Dr. Ahmed with his team have successfully designed and manufactured the first Egyptian Friction Stir Welding Machine for research and development that enriched the research and development in the field all over Egypt as well as the collaboration with industry. Dr. Ahmed is supervising more than 25 master and PhD students in a number of universities. Dr. Ahmed co-authored over 40 publications in the fields of materials processing and characterization in international scientific journals and conferences.

Biography

Dr. Mohamed Zaky Ahmed graduated from Suez Canal University, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering in 1997, obtained his master in 2002 from the same department. Dr. Ahmed received his PhD in the field of Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Sheffield-UK in 2009. During his PhD study about thick section friction stir welding of aluminum alloys established very strong relation with The Welding Institute (TWI) staff in Sheffield that still in collaboration till now. Dr. Ahmed joined the British University in Egypt (BUE) in September 2016 as Associate Professor at the Mechanical Engineering Department having previously been Associate Professor at the Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Suez University where he established number of research centers such as the friction stir welding center through STDF funded project as the principal investigator. Also he is the Co-director of the Metallurgical and Materials research center of scientific excellence at Suez University that is established through another STDF funded project. Dr. Ahmed with his team have successfully designed and manufactured the first Egyptian Friction Stir Welding Machine for research and development that enriched the research and development in the field all over Egypt as well as the collaboration with industry. Dr. Ahmed is supervising more than 25 master and PhD students in a number of universities. Dr. Ahmed co-authored over 40 publications in the fields of materials processing and characterization in international scientific journals and conferences.

Speaker
Mohamed Zaky Ahmed / British University Egypt

Abstract

Will be updated soon

Biography

Ph.D (Mechanical Engineering) from Hindustan University, Chennai in 2017 • M.E (Mechanical Engineering) from BIT-Mesra, Ranchi in 2008 with 84.8%. • B.E (Mechanical Engineering) from Saurashtra University in 2001 with 72.56%.N. Rachchh and C. Parekh, ‘Elements of Mechanical Engineering’, Vol. 1, ISSN 978-93- 5260-793-8, Mc Graw Hill Education, 2017. • N. Rachchh and D. Trivedi, ‘Mechanical characterization and vibration analysis of hybrid e glass/bagasse fiber polyester composites’, Mat. Today Proc., Elsevier (Accepted) • N. Rachchh and B. Vaghasiya, ‘Evaluation of physical and mechanical properties of woven bamboo glass polyester hybrid composite materials’, Mat. Today Proc., Elsevier (Accepted) • N. Rachchh, R. Misra and D. Roychowdhary, 'Effect of red mud filler on mechanical and buckling characteristics of coir fibre-reinforced polymer composite', Iran Polym J, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 253-265, 2015. (SCI Impact Factor: 1.806) • N. Rachchh, P. Ujeniya and R. Misra, ‘Mechanical characterization of rattan fibre polyester composite’, vol. 6, pp. 1396-1404, Procedia Mat. Sci., 2014. • N. Rachchh and R. Misra, ‘Mechanical characterization and analysis of randomly distributed short banana fiber reinforced epoxy composites’, Iranian Journal Of Materials Science And Engineering, vol. 11, pp. 1-16, 2014. • B. Saradava, N. Rachchh, R. Misra and D. Roychowdhury, 'Mechanical characterization ofcoir fiber reinforced polymer composite using red mud as filler', in International Conference on Research & Development in Engineering, Technology and Sciences 2013, Tramba-Rajkot, 2013, pp. 472-476. • N. Rachchh, R. Misra, P. Das, ‘Uses of red mud in built environment – An India perspective, International Journal of Business and Engineering Research, vol. 4, pp. 1-6, 2011. • N. Rachchh and R. Misra, ‘Mechanical performance of coir fiber reinforced polyester composite’, International Journal of Advanced Materials Science, vol. 1, pp. 19-28, 2011. • N. Rachchh and R. Misra, ‘Comparative analysis of mechanical behavior of chemically treated & untreated coir fibers at different percentage of coir fibers’, International Journal of Applied Engineering Research, vol. 4, pp. 433, 2011

Speaker
NIKUNJ V RACHCHH / Rajkot India

Abstract

Metallurgical characterisation of detonating cord alloys and the development of mechanical properties during processing. Guangyu Liu, Shouxun Ji Brunel Centre for advanced solidification technology (BCAST), Brunel University London, Uxbridge, Middlesex UB8 3PH, UK The unique characterisation of the sheath materials of detonating cordsfor the clearance of aircraft canopiesrequires the specific propertiesduringapplication. Based on the characteristics analysis and the materials selection, the metallurgical study was carried out in the present study for Sn-Cu and Sn-Zn-Bi alloys. The solidification and microstructural evolution were studied with the subsequent rolling. Microstructural inhomogeneity of Sn-alloys was also analysed. Particularly, the property study showed that the alloyexhibits strainsoftening behaviour under stress, which benefits sheath manufacturing andsubsequent processing after assembly with high-energy explosive materials. The numerical performance simulations and proof tests were conducted using AnsysAutodyn-2D, to verify the cutting capability of the Sn-alloys as cord sheaths. Numerical results and experimental test confirmed that new alloys showed similar levels of cut depths with differentcords sheathed by varied metals/alloys incorporating Pb, Pb-Sb, Cu,and Ta. The industrial application has demonstrated the success of development.

Biography

Dr Shouxun Ji is a Reader at the College of Engineering, Brunel University London, UK. His research activities are carried out at Brunel Centre for Solidification and Technology (BCAST) and the Institute of Materials and Manufacturing (IMM). His research interesting includes the metallurgy of lightweight materials and the manufacturing of hybrid structure, including aluminium alloys, magnesium alloys and cast iron. He has led and participated a number of research projects supported by EPSRC, IUK and industries. The development of new casting alloys and manufacturing of hybrid structure have been licensed to several companies for industrial applications. The advanced magnesium piston, lead-free detonating cords, aluminium alloys for elevated temperatures in automotive engines, aluminium alloys with improved strength and ductility, high pressure die casting of thin-wall componentsfor automotive applications, monoblock casting technology for heat exchanger, and recyclable aluminium structural casting alloy have been used in different countries. Dr. Ji serves as a member of the editorial board of four international scientific Journals, technical committee member in BSI and 3 ISO divisions of aluminium alloys and magnesium alloys. He is the technical reviewing member of EPSRC College. He is the keynote and/or invited speaker, the Session chair for 8 international conferences in the past 4 years, the organizational scientific member of 5 international conferences, and the reviewer of numerous scientific journals. Dr Ji received the innovation award of CMF UK 2017.

Speaker
Shouxun Ji / Brunel University London UK

Abstract

Various kinds of modified SUS316LNstable austenitic stainless steels with different Mn contents from 0.02 to 5.96 in mass % wereheavily cold rolledup to 95% at maximum. Heterogeneous nano-structure, i.e., a mixture of nano-lamellar, shear bands and mechanical nano-twins,was homogeneously developed.A characteristic “eye-shaped” structure, in which nano-twin domains were surrounded by shear bands, wasalmost uniformly embedded in the lamellar structure. The lamellar was partially further subdivided by mechanical twins. The average boundary spacing of the lamellar and the twins in the domains wasabout 30 nm and 37 nm respectively.The width of the shear bandswas approximately 90 nm. Evolution of ultrafine-grained structure was, therefore, stimulatedeven by simple heavy cold rolling in the SUS316LN stable austenitic stainless steels by mechanical twinning [1]. The 90% rolled samplesexhibited high ultimate tensile strength (UTS)over 1.5 GPa along rolling direction and 1.7 GPa along transverse directions with ductility approximately 10%. The rather good ductility in spite of high UTS induced by heavy cold rolling was attributed to suppression of sharp {011} texture evolution by the appeared {111} twinning planes on the surface due to “eye-shaped” domains. UTS were further raised by ageing at 748 K to 1.7 GPa and 2.0 GPa at minimum. Analysis by means of small-angel neutron scattering method suggested hardening due to nano-cluster formation. Even while 2.3 GPa UTS was attained at best, no specific differences in the evolved microstructure and mechanical properties could be found.Ultrafine-grained structure and superior mechanical properties,therefore,could beachieved by simple cold rolling, i.e., without severe plastic deformation.

Biography

1989 Research Associate, University of Electro-Communications; 1994 Lecturer; 1997 Associate Professor; 2014 Professor, Toyohashi University of Technology. Working on microstructural control of metallic materials by high-temperature deformation or severe plastic deformation. Original papers250.

Speaker
Hiromi Miura / Toyohashi University of Technology Japan

Abstract

Recently Ti-Nb-W oxides with complex crystal structures attract many researchers because the materials might be possible candidateforbattery electrodes for LIBsand others energy storage materials [1]. One of the ternary oxides of Ti and Nb has been thought to form a solid-solution crystal because their ion radii are similar. Their Crystal structures of these oxides were mostly studies by X-ray or neutron diffraction methods and complementally by ahigh resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) method [2-4]. Howeverthese methods have been limited to solve problems order disorder problems. This limitation has been overcome by recent development in STEM (Scanning TEM) combined with the advanced EDS (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy) technology. The spatial resolution of EDS has been allowed to image individual atoms in a crystal, or elemental mapping of a crystalincluding oxygen atoms. Here we report,as an example, a clear evidence of cationsordering in a ternary metal oxide crystal of Ti2Nb10O29. The oxide and related oxides have been intensively studies by the present authors in the 1970s [4,5].

Biography

Sumio Iijima is University Professor, Meijo University, Nagoya, Japan since 1998 and Senior Research Fellow of NEC. He was formerly Director, Research Center for Advanced Carbon Materials, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan. He received his PhD degree in physics from Tohoku University in 1969 and worked in Prof. J. M. Cowley’s group at Arizona State University from 1970 to 1982 and also at Cambridge University in 1979. At Arizona he developed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), which has been the basis of the current HRTEM method, and studies numerous materials including complex metal oxides of Ti, Nb and W. His work was recognized with the Eugene Warren Diffraction Physics Award from the American Crystallography Association in 1976. Iijima returned to Japan in 1982 to work in the Ultra-Fine Particles Project (JST, Japanese government research agency) and later he joined the NEC Fundamental Research Laboratories in Tsukuba in 1987. In 1991 he discovered carbon nanotubes and opened up a new era of nanoscience and nanotechnology. His discovery was recognized with numerous awards and honors such as the Agilent Europhysics Prize (2002), Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics (2002), the J. C. McGroddy Prize (2002), the Japan Academy Award and Imperial Award (2002), Person of Cultural Merits, Japanese government (2003). He also received the Gregori Aminoff Prize (Royal Swedish Academy of Science, 2007), the Balzan Prize for Nanoscience (Italy-Switzerland, 2007), The Kavli Prize in Nanoscience (2008). He is a member of the Japan Academy, and foreign members of the NAS (2007), the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (2009) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (2012).

Speaker
Sumio Iijima / University Professor Meijo University, Japan
Sessions:

Abstract

Photovoltaic properties of Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells using n-type binary oxide semiconductor thin films prepared by low damage magnetron sputtering method Toshihiro M., Hiroki T., and Tadatsugu M. Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Japan We recently reported a dramatic improvement of the obtainable photovoltaic properties in p-n heterojunction solar cells fabricated by depositing appropriate n-type oxide semiconductor thin films using a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method on p-type Cu2O sheets.[1] However, PLD method have technical disadvantages for practical fabrication technology of solar cells, such as, low deposition rate and difficult to large area deposition. On the other hand, magnetron sputtering (MSD) method was easy to prepare the large area deposition and obtaining the high deposition rate. But, photovoltaic properties of Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells fabricated by magnetron sputtering (MSD) method was poor than that of PLD. In this paper, we describe the improvement of the photovoltaic properties for Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells using the n-type bainary oxide semiconductor thin films prepared by the sputtering apparatus having the newly developed multi-chamber system. Thermally oxidized p-Cu2O sheets were used as an active layer. The multi-chamber MSD apparatus have loading and deposition chambers, and used a d.c. and an r.f. power supply that was applied either separately or together. One example, drastic improvement of the current density–voltage (J–V) characteristics was obtained by using n+-AZO thin film/n-type ZnO thin film/p-Cu2O heterojunction solar cells. The n+-AZO/n-ZnO/p-Cu2O heterojunction solar cell’s leakage current prepared by magnetron sputtering with 10 min pre-sputtering, measured under a reversed bias, was improved than that of n+-AZO thin film/p-Cu2O heterojunction solar cell’s. This suggests that a greater improvement of the p–n junction, as seen in the n+-AZO/n-ZnO/Cu2O heterojunction, can be achieved by the newly developed multi-chamber magnetron sputtering methods. The highest efficiency as high as about 3.22% was obtained. References [1] T. Minami, Y. Nishi, and T. Miyata, Appl. Phys. Express 9, 052301 (2016).

Biography

Toshihiro Miyata is a professor at the Kanazawa Institute of Technology (KIT) in Japan, and a researcher of the Optoelectronic Device System R&D Center at KIT, where his interests center on optoelectronic devices, especially solar cells using Cu2O. Toshihiro Miyata received his B.E. degree in electronics engineering from KIT in 1987, and his M.E. and doctor of engineering degrees from the KIT in 1989 and 1992, respectively. From 1992 to 1993, he was visiting scientist at the Micro Systems Technology Laboratory at MIT, USA.

Speaker
Toshihiro Miyata / Kanazawa Institute of Technology (KIT) Japan

Abstract

Novel surface engineering techniques such as CCT and surface micro-patterning were undertaken on cpTi and investigated against S. aureus and E. coli to determine their potential antibacterial effect. The surface micro-pattern (LIPSS) was in the scale of 1 ɥm and CCT was undertaken at 600°C for 85 hours. Other characterisation tests were also undertaken to investigate the longevity of the surface treatments. The surfaces generated produced an antibacterial effect and decreased the growth of both the Gram positive and negative species. The surfaces were also tested against osteoblast-like model cells (SaOS-2 cells) to determine the biocompatible nature of the surface treatments. Both the surface treatments were found to be biocompatible and promoted the growth of the SaOS-2 cells. The combination of the presence of the artificial TiO2 and the micro-pattern had a synergistic antibacterial and biocompatible effect. The TiO2 increased the surface micro-hardness and roughness of the Ti samples. It is hoped, that with further research and investigation, these surface treatments could potentially be used for titanium medical implants.

Biography

Ikra Khan is currently undertaking a PhD from the University of Birmingam in the IMPaCT centre, UK. She completed her undergraduate in Biomedical Materials Science (BMedSci) from the University of Birmingham, UK.

Speaker
Ikra Khan / University of Birmingham UK

Abstract

Interaction of hydrogen with neutron irradiation-induced nanoscale defects in steel Evgenii Krasikov National Research Centre «Kurchatov Institute», Kurchatov sq.,1, Moscow, Russia As the service life of an operating nuclear power plant increases, the potential misunderstanding of the degradation of aging components must receive more attention. Integrity assurance analysis contributes to the effective maintenance of adequate plant safety margins. In essence, the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) is the key structural component of the NPP that determines the lifetime of nuclear power plants. Environmentally induced cracking in the stainless steel corrosion-preventing cladding of RPV’s has been recognized to be one of the technical problems in the maintenance of light-water reactors. Therefore, in the case of cladding failure, the problem arises of hydrogen (as a corrosion product) embrittlement of irradiated RPV steel because of exposure to the coolant. The effects of neutron fluence and irradiation temperature on interaction of hydrogen with neutron irradiation-induced nanoscale defects (adsorption, desorption, diffusion, mechanical properties at different loading velocities, post-irradiation annealing) were studied. Experiments clearly reveal that the higher the neutron fluence and the lower the irradiation temperature, the more hydrogen-radiation nanodefects occur, with corresponding effects on the RPV steel mechanical properties. Hydrogen accumulation analyses and thermal desorption investigations were performed to prove the evidence of hydrogen trapping at irradiation defects. Extremely high susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement was observed with specimens which had been irradiated at relatively low temperature. However, the susceptibility decreases with increasing irradiation temperature. To evaluate methods for the RPV’s residual lifetime evaluation and prediction, more work should be done on the irradiated metal–hydrogen interaction in order to monitor more reliably the status of RPV materials.

Biography

Date of birth: September 11, 1946. Education: Moscow Power Engineering Institute. Degree(s) or Diploma(s) obtained: Master’s Degree in Material Science – 1970, Ph.D. – 1974, D.Sc. -2005. Membership of professional bodies: member of Scientific Council of RAS on Radiation Damage Physics of Solids. Years within the firm: since 1974. Key qualification: responsible executor in Radiation Damage Physics of Solids. Professional experience record: since 1974 till now, Moscow, National Research Centre "Kurchatov Institute”, Department: Reactor Materials and Technologies Institute.

Speaker
Evgenii Krasikov / Kurchatov Institute Russia

Abstract

Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has proven its applicability in the field of engineering and biomaterials with its high fracture toughness, strength and suitable wear properties. The material has a proven capability in the biomedical field in the context of orthopedic applications for replacement of hip/knee joint. This paper reports integrated Taguchi based grey relational analysis for the tribological behavior of Si3N4-hBN ceramic composite sliding against alumina (Al2O3) in the dry condition. The wear tests were conducted with 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 % volume of hBN in Si3N4 at loading conditions in the range 5N < Load < 25N, with 5N increments using Pin-on-Disc (PoD) tribometer. A weighted grey relational grade is calculated for minimization of volumetric wear rate and coefficient of friction with aim of improving tribological performance of Si3N4-hBN ceramic composite applicable for various industrial and biomedical applications. Load and % volume of hBN addition are two factors considered for optimization. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) presented % vol of hBN is significant factor followed by load. In the Si3N4-hBN / alumina contact pair, the main phenomenon of wear observed was an adhesive type of wear at both low load and at high load.

Biography

Dr. Sachin Ghalme is currently working as Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Sandip Institute of Technology & Research Centre (SITRC), Nashik (MS), India. He has completed his research in the field of tribological performance of Silicon Nitride-hBN ceramic composite at Manoharbhai Patel Institute of Engineering and Technology, Gondia. He has received the Doctor of Philosophy in the field of Mechanical Engineering from Department of Science and Technology, Rashtrasant Tukdoji Maharaj Nagpur University, Nagpur (MS), India. He is having a total of 18 years of experience in the field of technical education. He has authored several scientific articles in peer-reviewed and reputed International and National Journals. Dr. Sachin Ghalme is associated with many scientific associations, and along with this he is also a Reviewer of International Journals (SCI & Scopus Index). He is a Life Member of Indian Society for Technical Education (ISTE) and Member of The Institution of Engineers (MIE), International Association of Computer Science and Information Technology (MIACSIT), International Association of Engineers (MIAENG), International Association of Advanced Materials (IAAM) and Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). He looks forward to guiding many research scholars often developing his own interest in the field which he is expertized. He has completed two minor research projects sponsored by Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune. His basic research interest includes the tribological performance of industrial lubricants, biomaterials, and applications of nanomaterials.

Speaker
Sachin Ganpatrao Ghalme / Sandip Institute of Technology and Research Centre, Nashik (MS), India.

Abstract

Influence of sintering temperature on the densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6Ni alloy developed via spark plasma sintering Azeez L. Rominiyi,1 and Mxiolisi B. Shongwe1 1Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built environment, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria, South Africa. Abstract Titanium is used extensively in wide range of engineering applications as a result of its unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties. However, the difficulty encountered in fabricating a fully densified titanium sample informed the introduction of alloying elements into the matrix in order to form a liquid phase and enhance sinterability. This work explored the influence of sintering temperature on the densification, microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-6Ni alloy developed via spark plasma sintering. 6 wt.% nickel were dry- mixed with titanium powder (Gd 1) using Turbula mixer at 101 rpm for 8 hrs. The resulting powder mixture was sintered at varying temperature from 850 to 1200 °C in a vacuum under constant isothermal holding time, heating rate and applied pressure of 10 min, 100 °C/min and 50 MPa respectively. Characterization of the as-received, mixed and bulk, sintered sample was carried out with the aid of scanning electron microscope coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDS) and X- ray diffraction (XRD) equipment. Relative density measurement of the sintered samples was conducted in accordance with Archimedes method. The hardness of the sintered samples was determined using Vickers microhardness tester. Densification above 99 % was achieved across the sintering temperature for all the samples.

Biography

Azeez L. Rominiyi is currently a PhD student at the Department of Chemical, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, South Africa. His work over the years has resulted in over 5 publications in reputable and peer reviewed journals. Mxiolisi B. Shongwe completed his PhD from University of the Witwaterstrand, Johannesburg. He is a Senior Lecturer and Sectional Head, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Unit, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, South Africa. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Azeez Lawan Rominiyi / Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, South Africa

Abstract

ABSTRACT Sinter plants as a part of integrated steel plants provide agglomerated and pre-reduced iron ore feed for blast furnaces. Coke breeze is the common used fuel in the raw mix. Within the sinter process a partial material melting, is achieved, resulting in a high concentration of pollutants, specifically CO, NO X , and SO 2 in the off gas. The best way to minimize the emissions is to substitute the coke at least partially with an emission friendly alternative fuel. Previously conducted studies showed that this substitution may lead to a weakening of the sintered material. In this study, the substitute fuel was methane, allowing an even distribution of the fuel across the sinter material, to establish an improved, sinter strength. In test trails, it was discovered that short pulsing of the secondary burning gas injection is more efficient than a constant feed of the fuel gas. With the used sinter lab device, it is possible to explore the best compromise between coke content, sinter strength, off gas level and needed amount of the burning gas. The material for these tests were received from the industrial partner with varying coke content (approx. 5 wt.-% to 3.5 wt.-%). Permeability tests before and after the sinter test allow an optimization of the injection cycles in our experimental test runs. The new developed secondary gas injection scheme would successfully produce a product sinter strength which proved comparable to sinter plant material.

Biography

Nicos Tsioutsios is a research associate and a Ph.D. candidate at the chair for Process Technology and Industrial Environmental Protection at Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria). After receiving his master´s degree at the same University, where he was testing different substances for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode production, his research interest changed to more process integrated. Since 2015 the focus of his doctoral research has been the possibility of the off-gas reduction in the steel production, during the sintering of the iron ore before the blast furnace. To meet the new European proposal ”Low Carbon Roadmap” with a 80% CO 2 -level reduction, some investigations with the new technologies have to be done. With his sinter test facility at the chairs technical centre, the possibility of gas sintering and its impact on the sintering strength and the return fine ratio are being tested. The new test results will be shown in his presentation at the Metallurgy 2019.

Speaker
Nicos Tsioustsios / Montanuniversität Leoben, Austria

Abstract

RhoVol mechanical analyzer has found great usage in other metallurgical industries, but has not yet found usage in coal processing. This equipment provided useful analyses of different variables that can be used to optimize a coal beneficiation process without the intense float and sink analyses. The benefits of this equipment is the online generation method of different parameters such as Mass, Volume, Density and detailed volumetric and size analyses which other beneficiating methods can not consider such as Diameter, Compactness, Elongation and Flatness which are measured per particle passed through the equipment. The current work focuses on the efficiency of the equipment for coal and the benefits it would provide as a diagnostic analytical method that is used for plant optimization. Impressive results from this equipment includes the fact that the product are sorted according to the various preselected parameters and such can be used for further analyses.

Biography

Nkhume Tshiongo-Makgwe was born South Africa. She is a mother of two adorable boys (10 and 5). She hold a Master’s degree in Extraction Metallurgy from TUT. She presently registered for a PhD in Geology at UJ where she is currently working as a lecturer at the department of Metallurgy. Her research niche area is Coal processing and Usage, Clean coal technology and environmentally associations of coal combustion. Her professional affiliations includes The South African Coal Processing Society (SACPS) and the Southern African institute for mining and Metallurgy (SAIMM) where she is an active member. Her achievements includes;  Being a finalist for UNESCO: Engineer Your Earth competition in 2014,  Being a mentor for South African Women in Engineering,  Being a guest speaker for First Avenue Institute: on Importance of studying mathematics for their 2015 girls winter camp,  Being a guest speaker at the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre Science week 2016.  Being actively involved with organizing and session chairing for SAMM Young professional’s conference since inception in 2013,  Organizing and chairing a session in the SAIMM Entrepreneurship in Mining Forum,  In addition, she is the current a member o the SAIMM Young Professional Council (2017-2018).

Speaker
Nkhumeleni Tshiongo-Makgwe / University of Johannesburg,South Africa

Abstract

The feasibility of Pd-based organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites is comprehensively explored with both theoretical and experimental methods for the first time. Experimentally, the new 3D perovskite CH3NH3PdX3 (X=Cl, Br, I) can be transited to a new 2D perovskite (CH3NH3)3Pd2I7 (X= Cl, Br I) by modulating the ratio of the organic part to inorganic part. The structure, lattice parameters, and symmetry of these two perovskites are verified by a series of simulations, refinement, and characterizations. The basic optical and electronic properties of these two new perovskites are characterized and calculated with DFT for future applications. Interestingly, both types of perovskites exhibit long stability (one week to one month) in air with 50% relative humidity. The highly stable and adjustable structure and physical properties may ignite people’s interest for their further application.

Biography

Xixia Liu received his bachelor degree in College of Power Engineering from Chongqing University (CQU) in 2016. He is now a PhD candidate in Department of Materials Science & Engineering from National University of Singapore (NUS) and his current research mainly focuses on perovskite solar cell, including new perovskite materials calculation and synthesis, carrier transport layer design and photovoltaic device fabrication.

Speaker
Liu Xixia / National University of Singapore.

Abstract

Surface shot peening (SP) with different intensities plus 650 °C aging was performed on the Super304H austenitic stainless steel and it is found that the local high stress/strain concentration at some typical sites caused by over saturated cold deformation induced the early nucleation of sigma phase and the enhanced chromium diffusion in nanocrystallized microstructure promoted its fast growth. The critical shot peening time to trigger fast precipitation of sigma phase is 10 min under 0.5 MPa for the Super304H steel (Fig. 1). Unlike the mechanism of early sigma phase precipitation at the recrystallizing grain boundaries in other deformed steels [1], the nucleation of sigma phase takes place before recrystallization of deformed microstructure during aging in the severely SPedSuper304H steel. Deformation promoted precipitation (DPP) of sigma phase is attributed to the high distortion energy in the unevenly over-saturated deformed areas like nano grain boundaries and twinning intersections. Dispersion strengthening phase like Nb(C,N), due to its pinning effect on deformation sliding or twinning, also brings a high stress concentration and contributes to the early DPP of sigma phase at phase boundaries. Compressed by the high stress field in the deformed austenite matrix, sigma phase particles grow slowly at the early stage of aging. When recrystallization of deformed austenite happens with the increase of aging time, however, sigma nuclei grow abnormally quickly to 1~2 μm in size at the recrystallizing boundaries due to the release of distortion energy and residual stress at the recrystallized side, and the fast chromium diffusion at the deformed side without recrystallization.

Biography

Qingwen Zhou is a Ph.D. candidate from School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, China. Her research is on the intergranular corrosion sensitivity and precipitation behavior of Super 304h austenite stainless steel.

Speaker
Qingwen Zhou / South China University of Technology, China.

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Will be updated soon

Biography

Email: bhushan.2@osu.edu Home page: https://nlbb.engineering.osu.edu/
RESEARCH INTERESTS Fundamental studies in the interdisciplinary areas of bio/nanotribology/nanomechanics and nanomaterials characterization inbio/nanotechnology and biomimetics with a focus on scanning probe techniques; Science Policy.
EDUCATION Doctoris Honoris Causa University of Kragujevac, Serbia, 2011 Doctor Honoris Causa Metal-Polymer Research Institute of National Acad. of Sci., Gomel, Belarus, 2000 Doctor of Technical Sciences Warsaw University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland, 1996 Doctor Technicae University of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway, 1990 M.B.A., Management Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N.Y.,1980 Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo., 1976 M.S., Mechanics University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo., 1973 M.S., Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., 1971 B.E. (Hons.), Mechanical Eng. Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, 1970
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE 1991-Present Ohio Eminent Scholar and The Howard D. Winbigler Professor and Director ofNanoprobe Lab for Bio- & Nanotechnology and Biomimetics, Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng., and Graduate Res. Faculty Advisor, Dept. of Mater. Sci.and Eng., Affiliated Faculty, Battelle Center for Science & Technology Policy, John College of Public Affairs,Ohio State University 1986-91 Research Staff Member and Manager Head-Disk Interface, IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA 1981-86 Development Engineer/Manager, General Products Division Lab, IBM Corporation, Tucson, AZ 1980-81 Research Scientist, Technology Services Division, SKF Industries Inc., King of Prussia, PA 1976-80 Physical Tribology/Program Manager, R&D Division, Mechanical Technology Inc., Latham, NY FELLOWSHIPS(selected) Sept. 13- Aug 14 ASME Science & Technology Policy Fellow, House Committee on Science, Space & Technology, United States Congress, Washington, DC. Jan.-May 07 Senior Visiting Scientist (Jan.-Feb) &Humboldt Research Prize for Senior Scientists (March-May), Max- Planck InstitutfuerMetallforschung, Stuttgart, Germany. Nov. 06 Invited Professor, Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris Sud XI, Orsay, France April 05; Guest Professor in Nanotechnology, EidgennoessischeTechnischeHochschule (ETH), June-July 07 Nanotechnologyand Mico/NanosystemsGroups, Zurich, Switzerland. July 03;Visiting Professor, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institut de Physique de la Sept.-Oct. 06 Matiere Complexe and Sciences et Techniques de I”Ingenieur, Lausanne, Switzerland Jan.-Feb. 02 Max Planck Foundation Research Award for Outstanding Foreign Scientists, Max-Planck InstitutfuerEisenforschung, Duesseldorf, Germany Dec. 99 United Nations Senior TOKTEN Expert Award, IIT, Delhi and IIS, Bangalore, India. May 98- Sept. 99; Humboldt Research Prize for Senior Scientists, Universitaet Ulm, Abteilung Jan.-Feb. 01 ExperimentellePhysik, Germany March-April 99 Fulbright Senior Scholar Award and Guest Professor, TechnischeUniversitaet Wien, InstitutfuerFeinwerktechnik, Austria March 99 Franco-American Comm. for Edu. Exchange, Interfoundation Grant, Ecole Centrale de Lyon Feb. 99 Guest Professor, Departments of Physics & Engineering, University of Cambridge, U.K. Sept. 98- Feb. 99 Humboldt Research Prize for Senior Scientists, Universitaet Karlsruhe , Institut fuer Werkstoffkunde und Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung, Germany July-Aug. 1997 Sony Sabbatical Chair Professor, Sony Corporation Research Center, Fujitsuka, Japan Jan.-Dec. 1989 Visiting Professor, University of California, Berkeley, CA June 1989 Visiting Senior Scientist, USSR Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Gomel, Vilnuis and Leningrad May-July 1987 Visiting Senior Scientist, Norwegian Council for Sci. & Indus. Res., Univ of Trondheim, Norway
HONORS AND AWARDS(selected) 1980 ASME Henry Hess Award for the best original technical paper 1981 ASCE/AIME/ASME/IEEE/WSE Alfred Noble Prize for outstanding technical papers 1983 ASME Burt L. Newkirk Award for a notable contribution to the field of tribology 1983 University of Colorado George Norlin Award for attaining eminence in his field of endeavor 1985 University of Colorado Regents Distinguished Service Award 1985 IBM Corp. Invention Achievement Award

Speaker
Bharat Bhushan / The Ohio State University
USA

Abstract

Will be updated soon

Biography

Professor Jan AWREJCEWICZ (JA) is aHead of the Department of Automation, Biomechanics andMechatronics at Lodz University of Technology, Head of Ph.D. School on 'Mechanics' (since 1996) and of graduate/postgraduate programs on Mechatronics (since 2006). He is also recipient of Doctor Honoris Causa of Academy of Arts and Technology (Poland, Bielsko-Biala, 2014) and of Czestochowa University of Technology (Poland, Czestochowa, 2014). His papers and research cover various disciplines of mechanics, material science, biomechanics, applied mathematics, automation, physics and computer oriented sciences, with main focus on nonlinear processes. He is a corresponding member of Polish Academy of Sciences (since 2016) and recipient of numerous honors and awards, such as Golden Cross of Merit (1996); Medal of the Ministry of Education (1998); Knight's Cross of the Order of Poland Reborn (2001); Award of the Ministry of Education and Sport for the book "NonclassicalThermoelastic Problems in Nonlinear Dynamics of Shells", (2004), Awards of the Ministry of Science and Education of Poland in (2004, 2006, 2008, 2015); "Golden Lamp" of Łukasiewicz Award, PGNiG, (2006) (only one person from the technical sciences has been awarded in national competition); Award of the Minister of Science and Higher Education for the book "Nonlinear Dynamics of a Wheeled Vehicle" (2006); Individual II Prize of the Minister of Science and Higher Education for the book "Mechanics" and "Mathematical Modeling of Systems" (2008); The MASTER Program Award of FNP (National Science Foundation of Poland), (2009); The Alexander von Humboldt Award for research and educational achievements (2010/2011); Officer's Cross, Order of Poland Reborn (2013); The Alexander von Humboldt Award (second time) (2016). JA was also chosen for the following distinguished positions:Member of the Polish Central Commission of Scientific Degrees and Titles (2013-2016) and (2017-2020); Vice President of the PolishSociety ofBiomechanics(2012-2016); Member of The Academy of Engineering in Poland (2005-); Chairperson of the 'Technical Committee for Nonlinear Oscillations of the IFToMM' (1995, 2000-2005, 2006-2009); Member of the Committee of Mechanics of Polish Academy of Sciences (1993-2018). He authored/co-authored over 765 journal papers and refereed international conference papers and 50 monographs. JA is Editor-in-Chief of3 international journals and member of the Editorial Boards of90international journals (23 with IF) as well as editor of 25books and 28journal special issues. He also reviewed 45 monographs and textbooks and over 600 journal papers for about of 140 journals. JA supervised23 finalized and 7 ongoing PhD theses, 8 habilitation theses and 37 Master/Bachelor theses. He also issued opinions on 57 Habilitation Theses and Scientific-Didactic Achievements as well as 30 on Scientific, Didactic and Organization Achievements for Professor Title/Position. We was principal investigator in 39 research grants by Polish Ministry of Education and Science (21), Committee for Scientific Research (17), National Science Centre (3). JA also carried long term research at the following Institutions: 1987 - Department of Dynamics and Control, The Strathclyde University, Glasgow, Scotland (1 month); researcher; 1987-1990, 1993 - Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, University of Braunschweig, Germany (24 months); researcher; 1990 - Japanese Society Foundation for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo University, Japan (12 months); researcher; 1991 - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tokyo University, Japan (3 months); researcher; 1992 - Research Centre for Advanced Science and Technology, The Tokyo University, Mitsubishi Endowed Chair, Japan (9 months); Professor; 1995 - E.N.T.P.E., RégionRhônes-Alpes, TEMPRA, Lyon, France (6 months); Professor; 1996/1997 - Department of Mathematics, The Waikato University, Hamilton, New Zealand (1 month); Professor; 1999 - Le Prix du Ministére de l'EducationNationale, de la Recherche et de la Technologie, E.N.T.P.E., VaulxenVelin, France (2 months); Professor; 1999/2000 - Tadeusz Kościuszko Foundation, Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, USA (3 months); Professor; 2001/2002 - Fulbright Foundation (Senior Grant Award), Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of California, Berkeley, USA (12 months); Professor; 2001/2002 - Région Rhône-Alpes, TEMPRA PECO, E.N.T.P.E., VaulxenVelin, France (3 months); Professor; 2003 - Central European University (Fellowship Program), Department of Mathematics and Its Applications, Budapest, Hungary (2 months); Professor; 2005 - NATO Grant Award (Service des Bourses de RechercheScientifique et Technique du Traite de l'Atlantique Nord (OTAN)); ENTPE, VaulxenVelin (Lyon), France (3 months); Professor; 2010/2011 - Alexander von Humboldt Award for Research and Educational Achievements, The Technical University of Darmstadt and Frauenhofer Institute for Structural Durability and System Reliability (LBF) (12 months), Professor ; 2016 - Alexander von Humboldt Award for Research and Educational Achievements, The Technical University of Darmstadt (3 months). He was the organizer and Chairperson of the series of international conferences: Dynamical Systems – Theory and Applications” in Łódź, Poland — (14; 1992-2017); "International Conference of the Polish Society of Biomechanics”, Łódź (2014); “Mechatronics: Ideas for Industrial Applications”, Warsaw (2012), Łódź(2014), Gdańsk(2015); “Biomechanics – Modelling, Numerical Simulations, Experimental Investigations and Biomedical Applications”, Łódź (1998); “Nonlinearity, Bifurcation and Chaos. The Doors to Future”, Łódź-Dobieszków(1996) He served as Invited/Keynote Speaker for 52 international and 17 nationalConferences and Tutorials.

Speaker
Jan Awrejcewicz / Lodz University of Technology
Poland

Abstract

AbstractSteady state deformation was characterized based on the experimental results of dilute single-phase aluminium alloys. It was found that, although the characteristic properties such as flow stress and grain size remained constant with time, continuous loss of grain boundaries occurred as an essential feature at steady state. A physical model, which takes into account the activities of grain boundary dislocations, was developed to describe the kinetics of steady state deformation. According to this model, steady state as a function of strain rate and temperature is the very turning point of grain size and strength relationship, i.e.,Hall-Petch relation holds when grain size is larger than that at the steady state or inverse Hall-Petch relation takes over if grain size is smaller. The transition between the two relationships of grain size and strength is a phenomenon depending on deformation conditions, rather than an intrinsic property as generally perceived. A general scale law deformation is established accordingly.

Biography

Dr Yan Huang leads metallic biomaterials research at Brunel, working on both traditional permanent titanium implants and novel biodegradable magnesium medical devices for orthopedic cardiovascular applications. He recently won three research grants in biomaterials research from the Royal Society, EPSRC and European Commission. Dr. Huang is a founding member and co-investigator of the EPSRC Future Liquid Metal Engineering HUB where he leads the activities on process development and light alloy processing involving both solidification and plastic deformation. He has extensive experience in process innovation for combined solidification and thermomechanical processing (semisolid forming, twin roll casting, and integrated cast-forming), solid state joining, severe plastic deformation for light alloys and light metal matrix composites. He has long-term interests in the characterization of microstructure and texture evolution during thermomechanical processing and fundamental issues of strengthening, plastic deformation and grain boundary migration.

Speaker
Yan Huang / Brunel University
London

Abstract

Titanium is a relatively young engineering material and its full potential in industrial applications has not been achieved yet due to its high cost as titanium is expensive both to extract and to process. Reduction of costs can be targeted either from a manufacturing or from a material point of view. The development and implementation of creative/innovative techniques and the use of cheap alloying elements are, respectively, the key aspects for the former and the latter. This paper discusses some strategies currently under development for the cost-effective production of Ti-based materials via thermomechanical powder consolidation. The powder metallurgy blending elemental approach is used to produce standard titanium alloys and to design new low-cost compositions starting from inexpensive commercial powders. Rather than the conventional lengthy vacuum sintering cycle normally used for titanium, alternative consolidation techniques which guarantee a faster material turn around are analysed. Hot thermomechanical deformation processes without and/or with additional heat treatments are used to tailor the mechanical behaviour of the alloys manufactured. Demonstration of the feasibility and viability of the different methods proposed is addressed using diverse classes of Ti-based materials including alpha, alpha+beta and high strength metastable beta Ti alloys. Generally, the materials produced reach similar or even better mechanical performance in comparison to the respective ingot metallurgy titanium alloy counterpart both in terms of static tensile behaviour and fatigue properties. Emphasis is put on understanding the relationship between the microstructural features and the properties of the targeted titanium alloys.

Biography

Dr. Leandro Bolzoni is a metallurgist, a mechanical engineer specialized in materials science by training, whose scientific interest is on the physical metallurgy of light metals (i.e. Ti, Al, and Mg). Leandro joined the University of Waikato in July 2015 after completing his Doctorate in Materials Science and Engineering (powder metallurgy of titanium-based alloys) at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and spending three years at Brunel University London as post-doc developing effective master alloys for grain refining Al-Si cast alloys. Leandro currently works at WaiCAM, the Waikato Centre for Advanced Materials of the School of Engineering, at the University of Waikato in Hamilton (New Zealand). He leads his own research group currently focused on the development and commercialization of titanium-based materials obtained via powder metallurgy thermomechanical processes. Leandro is the leader of the Titanium Research Group, which is central to the $14.5M MBIE-funded (Ministry of Business, Innovation, and Employment) Titanium Technologies New Zealand (TiTeNZ) project, a multi-disciplinary platform constituted by universities, Crown Research Institutes and industrial partners. Leandro is a committee member of the Society of Materials New Zealand Inc. (SMNZI) and received different prizes including the Innovation Award from the Cast Metals Federation in 2015 and the Early Career Research Excellence Award from the University of Waikato in 2016. The latest award, the Charles-Hatchett Award from the Institute of Materials, Minerals, and Mining (IOM3) in 2016 was in recognition of the significant contribution to metallurgical knowledge, and the potential of the results of the research to make a major technical, technological, commercial, environmental or other sustainability-related impacts on important industrial sectors.

Speaker
Leandro Bolzoni / The University of Waikato
Newzealand

Abstract

The mechanical behavior of materials with complex microstructures, such as advanced high strength steels, are difficult to understand without a detailed knowledge of the mechanical response of individual phases. Since these phases can rarely be fabricated as standalone materials they must be probed in situ. Over the past few years we have explored a range of in situ characterization methods, each of which provides important information on the state of the material and its evolution during deformation. When used in combination they enable us to develop a robust understanding of the deformation and damage processes that control both the strength and ductility of a material. One approach to mapping local strain is through digital image correlation (DIC). While that typically involves the application of a paint spatter pattern to the surface from which the strain is mapped we demonstrated how to use the microstructure itself as the speckle pattern, thus enabling strain mapping on the scale of the finest microstructural features. These measurements can then be coupled with x-ray tomography to map the evolution of damage within the structure and x-ray diffraction to assess the phase evolution due to TRIP. In this paper we will present the evolution of this methodology and its application to the study of a range of complex-phase steels.

Biography

David S. Wilkinson is Distinguished University Professor at McMaster University. He received his undergraduate degree in Engineering Science from the University of Toronto (1972) and his Ph.D. in Engineering Materials from the University of Cambridge (1978). He joined McMaster University in 1979 and was promoted to full professor in 1988. He was the Dean of Engineering from 2008-2012, then Provost and Vice-President Academic from 2012-2017. He was awarded the title of Distinguished University Professor at McMaster University in 2008, a title that was then available to only 8 active faculty members at a time. In 2009 he was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and in 2010 as a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering. Prof. Wilkinson is the author of over 280 scientific publications, specializing in the mechanical behavior of both metals and ceramics. His research interests include the effect of thermomechanical processing on the properties of alloys with a current focus on the formability of automotive sheet and the incorporation of damage into models of deformation and ductile fracture. Prof. Wilkinson was the founding Director of the McMaster Centre for Automotive Materials and Principal Investigator for the Initiative for Automotive Manufacturing Innovation (iAMi) – a $46M research collaboration. He has held visiting professorships at the Max Planck Intitut für Metallforschung (as a von Humboldt fellow), the University of California Santa Barbara, the Institut National des Sciences Appliqués de Lyon, the Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (as CNRS fellow) and the University of Tokyo (sponsored by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science). He is a recipient of the Canadian Materials Physics Medal (2004) as well as the Dofasco Award (2004), the Alcan Award (2012) and the Silver Medal (2016) of the Metallurgical Society of CIM. He is also a recipient of two awards for contributions to the scientific literature, most notably the Ross Coffin Purdy Award of the American Ceramic Society (2000) for the best paper published globally on ceramics in a given year.

Speaker
David Wilkinson / McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Sessions Will be updated soon...

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