Poster Presentations

Poster Presentations

Abstract

Dyes have been extensively used for thousands of years for manufacturing industries which can cause detrimental effects to human and aquatic systems. Ordered Mesoporous Carbon (OMC), a relatively new member of carbonaceous adsorbent family, has attracted substantial attention due to its unique features such as high BET surface area, large pore size and pore volume, and mechanical stability. In this study, ordered mesoporous carbon has been modified with neodymium(III) chloride for the first time for adsorptive removal of sunset yellow FCF. Traditional multistage technique was employed for synthesizing OMC where SBA-15 was employed as the silica scaffolding. Nitrogen Adsorption-Desorption Isotherms, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) were employed to characterize the modified OMCs. Highest removal efficiency was achieved for 2% wt. neodymium loading. Results from adsorption kinetics and isotherms suggest that Pseudo-Second-Order Model and Langmuir Isotherm well described the experimental data. Adsorption capacity increased by 39% with increased neodymium content from 0 to 2%.

Biography

Dr. Daniel Gang is currently a full professor and graduate coordinator in Department of Civil Engineering at University of Louisiana at Lafayette. He is the founding director of the Center of Environmental Engineering and Protection (CEEP) at UL. He earned his PhD from University of Missouri. His research has focused on physicochemical treatment of water and wastewater and environmental chemistry, fate and transport of contaminants in engineered and natural aqueous systems. He has been actively involved in numerous research projects funded by NSF, NASA, USEPA, DOE and state agencies with over $6 million in grants and contracts.

Speaker
Daniel Gang / University of Louisiana at Lafayette, USA

Abstract

Recently, numerous research groups have developed 3D bio-printing processes for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.In this study, we prepared 3D printable bioink containing extracellular matrix (ECM) isolated from decellularized porcine dermis tissue and evaluated the properties of bioink for suitability in 3D bioprinting applications. The decellularized ECM was extracted by mechanical, enzymatic, and chemical treatments of porcine dermis tissue. After decellularization, no nucleic acids residue was detected by DNA content, DAPI fluorescence staining and, hematoxylin and eosin staining. We sought to develop an optimized technique for decellularization of porcine dermis ECM. Moreover, major ECM components were measured, including acid/pepsin soluble collagen and soluble elastin. The elastin content increased substantially, and the collagen content reduced moderately after decellularization.Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis indicated the main functional groups of each component and chemical interactions forming the decellularized ECM.Decellularized ECM exhibited similar FTIR spectra as commercial type I collagen and no observable differences could be determined. To identify the printability of the bioink, hydrogel, viscosity of bioink and alginate were measured with the different concentration of ECM.As the ECM concentration increases, the viscosity was higher.To assess the biocompatibility of the bioinks, bio-ink/cells (NIH3T3 fibroblast cell line) printed structures were measured by live/dead assay and WST-1.Practically no dead cells were observed in the structure contained 10mg/ml ECM, which indicates that proper amounts of ECM bio-ink for nontoxic. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the dermis decellularized ECM is as a bioink candidate for 3D bioprinting.

Biography

Dr. Wan Doo Kim is a distinguished principal researcher of KIMM, and a professor ofUST(University of Science and Technology). He was a former vice president of KIMM, and asteering committee member of National Science and Technology Commission. He got his B.S,M.S and Ph.D degrees from the Department of Mechanical Engineering in Seoul NationalUniversity. His research interests are 3D bioprinting and nature-inspired technology based onmechanical insight. He is a founder of International Symposium of Nature-Inspired Technology(ISNIT), a vice president of Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Speaker
Wan Doo KIM / Korea Institute of Macjinery and Materials, South korea

Abstract

Organic-inorganic perovskite materials have received substantial research attention in the last years. Besides the increase research in solar cells, perovskite show great promise on light emitting diodes (LEDs), photodetectors and laser. In this paper, we synthesis CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskite nanostructures using one step deposition method. The morphology of these nanostructures were characterized by SEM and X-ray diffraction to determine the composition information and the structure. The SEM observations shows nanorode and cubes structures with few microns length. The optical properties were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer and photoluminescence. This perovskite prepared using one step deposition method is cost effective and can be used for inorganic–organic hybrid heterojunction solar cells in the future. Keywords: Perovskite, Solar Cell.

Biography

Adel Najar received his PhD in Physics at ENSSAT- Rennes 1 University in France and MBA from Beuth Hochschule Fur Technik Berlin in Germany in 2007 and 2016, respectively. He served as a post-doctorat at Saint-Gobain Research Company in collaboration with Grenoble Institute of Technology in France, a Research Scientist at LETI at the Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) in France as well as at KAUST in Saudi Arabia, and Senior Research Scientist at Atsugi R&D Center, NTT Corp. in Japan. From 2015, Dr. Najar appointed as faculty in UAE University in UAE. His main research interests is the development of semiconductor nanostructure for photonics and nanophotonics application. Dr. Najar is an author and co-author of more than 50 papers in peer-reviewed journals, conferences, book chapter and patents.

Speaker
Adel Najar / United Arab Emirates University, UAE

Abstract

Recent advances in nanotechnology have led to the development of biocompatible nanoparticles for in vivo molecular imaging and targeted therapy. Many nanoparticles have undesirable tissue distribution or unacceptably low serum half-lives. Pharmacokinetic (PK) and biodistribution studies can help inform decisions determining particle size, coatings, or other features early in nanoparticle development. Recently, polymeric nanoparticles (NPs), that predominantly scavenge upregulated concentrations of extracellular reactive oxygen species, have been developed. This study aimed to assess the blood half-life and tissue distribution of 50 nm NPs in healthy mice (male C57BL/6). Based on the surface modification of the NPs with the synthetic polymer polyethylene glycol, which is known to minimise non-specific binding and prolong circulation time, we hypothesised that the NPs would have a high circulation half-life and would predominantly distribute to the liver and spleen due to their 50 nm size. Ex vivo whole organ imaging (IVIS spectrum imaging system) of mice showed that Cy5.5 fluorescent NPs primarily distributed to the liver and spleen. Significantly more NPs were present in the liver and spleen at 24 hrs when compared to 1 hr. Signal was also present in the kidneys. Whole body imaging revealed that the fluorescent signal increased over the 24 hour period and this correlated with the decreasing signal in the blood, suggesting that the NPs are leaving the blood and entering the organs over a 24 hour period. The signal decreased after 24 hrs suggesting that the NPs are being excreted. The biodistribution study has also been carried out in mice induced with cerebral ischaemia. NPs were injected intravenously and were shown to accumulate in the brain after acute ischaemic stroke. The blood half-life of 50 nm NPs-Cy5.5 is 9.5 hr, which is within the ideal therapeutic range. We attribute the prolonged blood half-life to the PEG surface coating. Biodistribution studies revealed expected localisation in liver, spleen and kidney.In addition, NPs accumulate in the ischaemic brain showing their potential as a stroke therapeutic.

Biography

Olivera Rajkovic is doing PhD at University of Manchester, UK. Her PhD research focus: reactive oxygen species responsive nanotechnology. Currently examining the therapeutic action of nanoparticles in ischaemic stroke. she works within the brain inflammation laboratory at the University of Manchester.

Speaker
Olivera Rajkovic / University of Manchester, UK

Abstract

This work is concerned with the study of the effect of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanofillers on the optical, mechanical and electrical properties of poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) networks as a function of TiO2 concentration and crosslink density. The structure of the prepared samples was investigated by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Transmittance Electron Microscope (TEM). XRD results showed a single phase for the nanocomposites indicating that no large TiO2 aggregates in the polymer matrix. The optical properties of the prepared samples including the absorption, transmittance, energy band gap and refractive index were explored using Spectrophotometer. These measurements showed that there is a red-shift in the absorption caused by the increase of TiO2 concentration. However, the crosslink density in the polymer plays no role in changing the absorption. The energy band gap (Eg) decreases with increasing the concentration of TiO2 in the polymer matrix; whereas Eg increases with increasing the crosslink density. Moreover, the mechanical properties of PMAA/TiO2nanocomposites by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) showed that the viscoelasticity of PMAA decreases with adding TiO2 nanoparticles and the glass transition temperature (Tg) was also found to drop from 130 C to 114 C. Finally, the DC conductivity of the obtained systems was found to increase with increasing TiO2 nanoparticles in the matrix.

Biography

Dr Ateyyah AL-Baradi is Head of Research & Consulting Center and Associate Professor of Nanotechnology and Polymer Physics, Department of Physics,Taif University, Saudi Arabia.

Speaker
Ateyyah Al-Baradi / Taif University, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is an important reaction for fuel cells. Platinum on carbon (Pt/C) is a typical electrocatalyst for ORR in industrial applications. There is a constant search for a replacement for Pt/C with better ORR electrocatalytic performance but thus far, most materials showed poorer electrocatalytic activity than Pt/C. Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are a class of nanomaterials recently explored for ORR. Herein, we present electrocatalytical and cytotoxicity studies of the TMD, platinum (Pt) dichalcogenides. Electrocatalytical studies were conducted to investigate ORR capabilities of Pt dichalcogenides while cytotoxicity studies were conducted to evaluate toxic implications of Pt dichalcogenides to human health as its toxicity has yet to be known. From our results, we have found that out of the three Pt dichalcogenides, PtTe2 have very similar electrocatalytic ORR performance to Pt/C. This shows that PtTe2 possess great potential in ORR applications. Thereafter, the exploration on the toxicity trend of Pt dichalcogenides had found their toxicity increasing down the chalcogen group but they are significantly less toxic than Pt/C. Hence from these studies, we can denote PtTe2 as a safer alternative electrocatalyst for ORR. In overall, these studies can allow better understanding of electrocatalytic performance and toxicological profiles and of Pt dichalcogenide nanomaterials in comparison to Pt/C to aid future mass application and commercialisation in clean energy reactions such as ORR.

Biography

Nur Farhanah Binte Rosli is PhD student in Nanyang Technological University (Singapore). Nur Farhanah's research interest is geared towards studying the toxic implications of new layered nano materials which has promising potential as electrocatalyst in clean energy applications. She hopes to extend the research further by studying methods of improving the safety of the nanomaterial or venturing into possible applications of toxic materials.

Speaker
Nur Farhanah Binte Rosli / Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

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