Scientific Program

Sessions:

Nursing & Healthcare

Abstract

Nurses, Leaders and Healthcare Champions role to prevent and control infections in healthcare facilities by using advance strategies and to decrease transmission of infectious diseases from healthcare workers to patients and vice versa is very crucial. Hand hygiene, Isolation Precaution and correct use of personal protective equipment (PPE) during the patient care are important, to reduce healthcare associated infections and Occupational health hazards. To improve quality care, implementation of MEWS and PEWS in the hospitals and bringing down, the number of cardiac and respiratory arrests. Our discussion will be about post exposure Interventions to infectious disease in healthcare field and how to prevent and treat employee. Guidelines for work restrictions to healthcare workers suffering from infectious diseases like Meningococcal Meningitidis, HAV, HBV, HCV, HIV, MDRO, RSV, Varicella, TB and Influenza. According to Centers for disease control and prevention (CDC), in 2014, results of a project known as the HAI Prevalence Survey were published. The Survey described the burden of HAIs in U.S. hospitals, and reported that, in 2011, there were an estimated 722,000 HAIs in U.S. acute care hospitals. Additionally, about 75,000 patients with HAIs died during their hospitalizations.

Biography

Dr. Muhammad Wasif Rashid Chaudhary is currently the Medical Director of Ahalia Hospital Abu Dhabi UAE, where he has served for more than 13 years in various capacities namely, ER doctor, Casualty Medical officer, Administrator of Corporate Service Division, Medical Superintendent, Quality Manager, and Assistant Medical Director. Additionally, he is the Director of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) at Ahalia Medical Group. He is licensed general practitioner and continuing his responsibility as a physician. He has certification in Total Quality Management, Six sigma green belt. He is also holding a prestigious credential i.e., Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ). His passion in Healthcare is to improve existing processes and systems which lead to Safe, Timely, Quality and Effective care of the patients. He has attended many International Healthcare Conferences in USA and Canada. He was the Chair and Key note Speaker

Speaker
Muhammad Wasif Rashid Chaudhary Medical Director Ahalia Hospital UAE

Abstract

Purpose: This study aims to evaluate sleep quality and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and to examine the association between sleep quality and HRQOL in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: A cross-sectional design using a cluster sampling approach was used to assess sleep quality and HRQOL in patients with T2DM. A total 268 patients were recruited from community-healthcare settings over six months. General demographics were taken by the researchers and recent values of glycated hemoglobin were recorded from patients' charts. Each patient completed the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) to assess HRQOL of participants. A PSQI global score >5 was defined as poor sleep. A global WHOQOL-BREF score of 60 was defined as poor HRQOL. Findings: Of the 268 participants, 34% were poor sleepers according to their PSQI and 55% had poor HRQOL. Poor sleepers showed significantly lower HRQOL than good sleepers (P < 0.001). The global PSQI was found to be an independent predictor of global HRQOL (R = 5.87, P < 001). Subjective sleep quality, use of sleep medications and daytime dysfunction were independent predictors of HRQOL in participants with subjective sleep quality the most significant (OR = 2.2, 95%CI = 1.44-3.38, p =.001) Conclusions: This study suggests that poor sleep is common in persons withT2DM and a significantly predict poor HRQOL. It is important to include sleep awareness programs in diabetes management in community healthcare settings to improve HRQOL of patients.

Biography

Education Doctoral of Nursing Sciences, University of Kansas Medical Center, USA Masters of Nursing Sciences, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada Bachelor of Nursing Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan

Speaker
wegdan university of sharjah, UAE

Abstract

Legal Medicine consists of a broad range of legal, medical, and ethical issues, as well as human rights and rights of individuals. This discipline specialty is necessary in the healthcare profession because healthcare providers have a duty to act in a patients’ best interest always. If healthcare professions fail to meet this duty they can and will be charged in a court of law. Medical Malpractice is defined as the legal cause of action that occurs when a healthcare professional deviates from the standard of care in his or her profession, thereby causing harm to a patient and happens when a patient is harmed by a healthcare professional who failed to meet the standard of care. When a healthcare provider does not meet the standard of care, they have breached their contract with their patient. The concept of the standard of care is often discussed among healthcare providers, and yet the legal definition of this term is frequently not understood. It is estimated that 7–17 malpractice claims are filed per 100 healthcare providers every year and with emergency healthcare providers on the front lines of healthcare provision they are frequently involved in medical malpractice cases. Many healthcare professionals need to review evidence-based practices that focus on standard of care and review the best research and clinical expertise to assist them in meeting the needs of patients; the needs far beyond optimum care provision to help them avoid any mishaps along the way.

Biography

Dr. Edwards is a medical professional with more than 35 years’ experience in healthcare provision. She is a registered nurse, a certified medical investigator, a certified legal nurse consultant and a medical writer. She holds a MS in Health Administration, a MS in Biological Sciences, and a MD degree from a WHO affiliate. She completed post-doctoral training in researching and analyzing medical data at the CDC in Atlanta. Her passion lies in caring for the elderly and investigating what happens when medicine and law collide. She is a Board Accredited Investigator (BAI), and works as a detective with Locator’s International.

Speaker
Geneva M Edwards Unlawful Medicine LLC, USA

Abstract

In Japan, governments are providing employment assistance for welfare recipients considered capable of working. The recipients of these services, who might have long-term complex issues, may also have physical, mental, or social health concerns, which might be barriers in finding employment. The aim of this study is to identify these perceived barriers of Japanese welfare recipients in search of jobs. Simi-structured interviews were conducted with middle aged participants currently receiving public assistance. The interview questions asked about physical and mental conditions, and the barriers in finding and continuing employment. Using the content analysis technique, interview transcripts were coded and categorized. Data was provided by 25 males and 6 females, ages 30 to 60. Out of the 31 participants, 22 lived alone. Six worked in an office and six worked in manufacturing. While job searching, health related barriers were classified into eight issues: “Orthopedic disorder”, “Physical disorder”, “Chronic disease”, “Anxiety”, “Depression”, “Insomnia”, “Suicidal thought” and “Social phobia”. All of the participants who had these health related issues, perceived them as barriers in both finding and continuing to work. Most of them are looking for work in their previous field, but find their physical and mental conditions won’t allow them to back into the workplace. Most of them visit the clinic regularly but find there is no support in connection with the participants themselves to eliminate these barriers, while they were in search of jobs. Further studies are needed to find effective supports by health care professionals.

Biography

Ruriko Yamashita has completed her PhD from International University of Health and Welfare. She is an associate professor of the department of nursing of International University of Health and Welfare. Her specialty is in home visit nursing, public health nursing and disaster nursing.

Speaker
Ruriko Yamashita1 International University of Health and Welfare, Japan

Abstract

Robotic telepresence has been used for outsourcing of healthcare services for more than a decade; however, its use within a Surgical and Medical Oncology ICU is not yet widespread. Intensive care unit (ICU) robots can be used to increase access to off-site supervising ICU physicians, surgeons, oncologists and other specialists, reducing possible wait time for difficult admissions and procedures. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of ICU robots through a pilot program in A Surgical & Medical ICUs, KCCC and examine provider attitudes toward the usability and effectiveness of an ICU Robot Physicians. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was done as a pilot project to use Robot Physicians in Surgical and Medical ICUs in KCCC. The Robot Physician has been used for the ICU Management and car of the more 1500 ICU Oncology Patients. Participants were attending Oncology Surgeons, Medical Oncologists and ICU physicians, clinical pharmacology physicians and microbiologists, radiologists, fellows, residents, nurses, and respiratory therapists. RESULTS: Users of the ICU Robot Physicians reported satisfaction with communication, and improved oncology patient s ICU care. They also reported perceived improved quality of care with the use of the Robot Physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Findings show the importance of a whole-team approach to the installation and implementation of an ICU Robot Physicians. The ICU Robot Physician is an effective tool when it is used to visualize and communicate with patients, bedside staff, and families. However, a number of specialist’s providers are still on the continuously trained or have been shown how to use the ICU Robot Physicians, which affects the highest utilization rate

Biography

We will be update it soon

Speaker
Alisher Agzamov Ministry of Health, Kuwait

Abstract

To clarify the relationship between the awareness of psychological violence committed by those in relationships with students and students’ attitudes toward love. A self-administered questionnaire survey was distrusted among 151 nursing students at University Z in Japan. Their awareness regarding psychological violence from romantic partners are 10 items. Toward love scale is composed of six subscales: Eros (passionate and aesthetic love), Agape (altruistic love), Mania (manic and obsessive love), Storge (fraternal love), Ludus (fun and playful love), Pragma (practical love). 90% of the subjects were women, with a mean age of 20.3 years (SD 1.2). Those students in the Agape group were found to have significantly higher rates of ‘not violent’ responses than those in other attitude groups for two items: ‘He/she shouts loudly and swears at me.’; ‘He/she threatens me by thrusting a knife or other objects toward me.’. The Mania group was also found to have a significantly higher rate of a ‘not violent’ response for ‘He/she threatens me by thrusting a knife or other objects toward me.’ in comparison with other attitudes groups. It would be useful to carry out education programs firstly by providing students with opportunities to increase awareness of their own attitudes toward love, and based on this understanding of their own attitudes, help them to increase awareness toward potential violence committed by romantic partners.

Biography

Mika Hasegawa has completed her MSN from Fukui Medical University in Japan. She is the Professor of dep. of community health nursing, University of Fukui in Japan. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Mika Hasegawa University of Fukui, Japan

Abstract

In most sub-Saharan countries and other developing parts of the world, children who are admitted to the public healthcare facilities receive sub-standard care. This has resulted in increased infant and child mortality rates that could be avoided if factors related to provision of quality care to patients could be identified and improved. The purpose of the study was to explore and describe factors affecting quality nursing care in paediatric units of rural Vhembe District in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. A qualitative approach, explorative, descriptive, and contextual design was adopted. The population comprised of all care givers of children admitted to Paediatric units for seven days and above, and all nurses working in Paediatric units for over one year. Non-probability purposive sampling was used to select 16 participants who were interviewed until saturation. Purposive sampling was used to select four hospitals with Paediatric units and have high admissions of children and high mortality rates. Data collection was done using unstructured individual interviews. Data was analysed qualitatively using Tesch’s eight steps. Ethical considerations and measures to ensure trustworthiness were observed. The findings revealed two themes namely: inadequate provision of quality care to patients and experiences of caregivers in paediatric units. Sub-themes that emerged from the two themes were discussed. Recommendations based on findings were made for the Department of Health, institutions and paediatric units.

Biography

J Ramakuela is a Healthcare Professional who specialized in Community Health Care with her PhD Model entitled, “A model to facilitate women’s coping with menopause”. Her model is being utilised by rural community based women to help cope with menopausal challenges they encounter. She is also a Lecturer in the university providing teaching and learning to undergraduate students, while supervising research to both Master’s and PhD students and other Post-graduate students. She is an active Researcher who publishes papers every year in accredited journals. She travels in and around the country to present scientific research papers at national and international conferences. She also empowers rural community women with reproductive health issues.

Speaker
Ramakuela Nditsheni Jeanette University of Venda,South Africa

Abstract

Verbal communication between elderly person and caregivers are of two types: Type I, associated with nursing care tasks, and Type II, daily conversations in social life. This study aimed to develop a QOCE scale for evaluating type-II communication in home Care. The survey participants were 21 persons from home care. The average age was 83.0 years (SD 5.44). The survey contents were basic participant attributes, utterance duration type per day by older adults, QOCE, motor function (FIM), cognitive function (HDSR), depression score (CESD), and life satisfaction (PGC). As the interim QOCE, we chose 16 items consisting of topic (9), older adult spontaneity (3), and conversation prompt by family (4) and created a four-point Likert scale. We excluded two items and made a 14-item QOCE scale following item analysis by item distribution, inter-item correlation, and item-total correlation. Internal consistency was observed, and Cronbach’s α = .87. We examined the stability of test–retest, construct validity and criterion-related validity of a 14-item QOCE scale.

Biography

Yasuko Fukaya has completed her PhD at 1999 from Tokyo University, Japan. She is Professor, Department of Home Care Nursing, at Kanto Gakuin University,Japan.

Speaker
Yasuko Fukaya Kanto Gakuin University,Japan

Abstract

As more post-secondary institutions and schools of nursing develop international practicums as an option during undergraduate nursing education, one needs to consider the preparation of the nursing students for such a practicum. Nursing students today, when compared to students just twenty years ago, have greater exposure and access to the world through television, internet, all forms of social media, and travel to name a few. Nursing students are eager for an international opportunity during their undergraduate education and often think of themselves as globally ‘savvy’ and experienced. The concepts of cultural sensitivity and cultural safety are embedded within undergraduate nursing curriculum and it is imperative that international practicums ensure these concepts are included and practiced. Given the above, what is the role and responsibility of the school of nursing and faculty to prepare the students for an international practicum? This presentation will discuss how Thompson Rivers University (TRU) prepares students for international practicums, including how the concepts of cultural sensitivity and cultural safety form the basis of this preparation. TRU has over 10 year of experience in providing nursing students the opportunity to participate in international practicums. We have found that in-depth preparation is a key to a successful learning experience for the student, teaching experience for the faculty member, and sharing experience with the host country citizens, including nursing students and faculty.

Biography

Donna L. Petri completed her MNS from Deakin University, Geelong, Australia. She was a faculty member in the School of Nursing at Thompson Rivers University for 27 years with a focus on communication, cultural safety, cultural sensitivity, and international practicums. She developed and led international practicums in four different countries over 10 years. She has numerous local, national and international presentations, including keynote addresses related to the pedagogy of international practicums.

Speaker
Donna L Petri Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, BC

Abstract

Parallel with vasodilatation, plasma volume increases approximately by 35 %; blood pressure (BP) remains stable throughout normal pregnancy. Hypertension complicates about 5 – 7 % of pregnancies. Preeclampsia is one of the most serious hypertensive complications of pregnancy. Since cardiac output (CO) = pressure / resistance, BP increases when either resistance or blood volume (measuring as CO) increases. The circulatory resistance can originate from vasoconstriction, diminished capillary low, or worsened blood rheology. In early-onset preeclampsia, agents from the under-perfused placenta result in generalized maternal endothelial cell injury producing less vasodilators and releasing vasoconstrictors. Signs of organ damages and fetal growth restriction are classical hallmarks of this under-perfused condition. Hypertension is caused by vasoconstriction and the CO is low. Late-onset preeclampsia is rather a maternal disease. Obesity, edema, and increased gestational weight gain are characteristic features. Recent examinations confirmed the abnormally augmented CO, which likely explains hypertension, edema, and high weight gain. Catastrophic events in preeclampsia are usually associated with extremely high BP. Therefore, it seems obvious that the decrease of BP improves both maternal and fetal conditions. Antihypertensive medication in pregnancy is recommended if the BP reaches the level of 160/110 mmHg. The high BP is known to increase shear stress causing further endothelial damage. However, organ perfusion will likely decline by lowering pressure. Additionally, antihypertensives also decrease fetal BP. Careful administration of medication through early-onset preeclampsia generally is defined as the use of vasodilators including a large fluid intake. In late-onset preeclampsia, the use of diuretics seems to be justified. This new medication shows promising results, however, only in case of high CO. Additionally, a salt-restricted diet is suggested. Quality nursing care is essential to recognize gestational hypertension or preeclampsia, and involves routinely monitoring the patient’s BP, checking the patient’s diet, reviewing the ingestion of medication, and sending the patients to a hospital in timely manner.

Biography

Péter Tamás MD, Ph.d. is a professor at University of Pécs, Hungary. He is the chief of both the Pregnancy Pathology Word and also the Midwifery Education Unit. He has attended trainings, study trips, and researches also abroad including Perugia, Rotterdam and Barcelona, among others. Dr. Tamás owns more than 80 publications; one of them is in reference to diuretic therapy in preeclampsia, recently published in the journal of FIGO.

Speaker
Tamás Péter University of Pécs, Hungary

Abstract

Trying to improve quality in maternity services, this study describes the differences in obstetrical results and women´s childbirth satisfaction across two models of maternity care (the biomedical model and the humanized model of birth). A correlational descriptive study was carried out. A convenience sample of 406 women participated in the study: 204 of the biomedical model and 202 of the humanized model at two hospitals in Spain. In these hospitals, the two models of maternity care are used. A modified version of The Women´s Views of Birth Labour Satisfaction Questionnaire (WOMBLSQ) was used to measure women´s childbirth satisfaction. Women completed the questionnaire during their postpartum hospital stays. The results indicate that the humanized model of maternity care produces better obstetrical outcomes: a more spontaneous beginning of labour, more normal vaginal births, less instrumental deliveries, less length of labour, more intact perineum and fewer episiotomies (p< 0.005). Likewise, the humanized model scores a higher women´s satisfaction during the labor, birth and immediate postnatal period compared with the biomedical model. Statistical differences were found in 8 of the 9 subscales: professional support, expectations, holding the baby, support from the husband, pain in labour, pain after delivery, environment, and general satisfaction.

Biography

we will update it soon

Speaker
MARIA BELEN CONESA FERRER University of Murcia,Spain

Abstract

The PHC nurses face challenges of working with vulnerable group of people who have different values to those of practitioners providing care. Therefore, it is essential that nurses demonstrate an openness in their attitudes and values, as well as sensitivity in their interaction with the individuals participating in their care. Poverty and its consequences, including poor nutrition and sanitation, are the major factors reducing years of healthy life in the world. The question is: How can teaching roles and responsibilities be combined with those of a clinical practitioner in one position? The health education and promotion profession is facing a series of teacher preparation challenges related to the delivery of quality school health education/promotion programs. This paper will focus on the situation in Jordan where the Faculty are faced with preparing students for future practice that will be more complex and specialized, it will require extensive knowledge, critical thinking, cognitive and psychomotor skills and a value system for making ethical decisions. Many changes are occurring in the provision of health care and within the context of PHC. The uncertainty created by these changes, as well as by using different approaches to practice, will continue to contribute to challenges facing nurses working in PHC. Finally, program planners need to sustain community education programs in various health professions schools.

Biography

Prof.Jarrah demonstrated experience in teaching nursing students and administrative and leadership roles. In addition to experiences in accrediting nursing programs at universities, and supervising students in their graduate studies. Participated as key note speaker in national and international conferences. In her capacity as Vice President and Dean Prof. Jarrah is responsible for curriculum development and quality improvement projects. In her capacity as nursing director and vice-dean for hospital affairs, Prof. Jarrah is responsible for planning, directing, and administering all nursing department activities.Prof. Jarrah consulting experiences with different national, regional and international organizations and NGO's. In 2015 she was given the award of distinguished Professor in Nursing, the Scientific Society of Arab Nursing Faculties.

Speaker
Samiha Jarrah Vice President Applied Science Private University Jordan

Abstract

In general, older adults cope with visual problems caused by biological ageing or visual pathology. Little awareness exists in regard of the effect of lighting and environmental aspects on (behavioral) problems due to poor vision. As a consequence, visual problems are frequently unreported by professional caregivers in nursing homes. Thus nursing home residents might live in an environment with low or moderate quality of lighting conditions. The environment can hinder older adults suffering from an eye disease or visual impairment. On the other hand, a nursing home environment with adequate light conditions can have a positive effect on the circadian rhythm and may facilitate nursing home residents in their daily activities. A prerequisite for this is that the charting of relevant information in the client records is accurate. Another requirement is that nursing home physicians, geriatric nurse practitioners and nurses have a greater understanding and awareness of the quality of light conditions offered to the residents. Selecting the appropriate environment and light conditions for all residents can be a complex task. Visual problems differ among individuals, and therefore demand specific lighting solutions to support these individuals in their daily activities. The use of colors and specifically attention towards contrasts contributes to ease finding the location of doors, furniture and light switches. Furthermore reducing environmental hazards are recommended to prevent the incidence of falls. Personalized impaired vision care should be addressed further. However, in general there should be a greater awareness of the environment and vision problems of older adults.

Biography

Marianne Sinoo was teaching research methodology at the Master of Science in Nursing from 1986 till 1999 and in the courses of optometry and orthoptics from 2000 till present day. She has completed her PhD in 2017, at the age of 61, from the Technical University Eindhoven. She published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and is serving as an editorial board member of Nurse Academy: an reputed educational magazine for Nurses in the Netherlands.

Speaker
Marianne Sinoo University of Applied Sciences Utrecht, the Netherlands

Abstract

Welfare-to-work programs for welfare recipients have now become more prevalent worldwide. Along these lines, in Japan, governments are providing employment assistance for welfare recipients considered capable of working and, for unemployed people at risk of becoming welfare recipients. Poverty has been found to be related to poor health, and some countries provide healthcare professionals support for welfare recipients on welfare-to-work programs, but Japan has no clear standard intervention in this regard. This study aims to identify health-promoting behaviors and activities as a strength of Japanese welfare recipients seeking employment. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 25 men and 6 women who were receiving monetary assistance and employment support. We asked them to explain what they do to stay physically and mentally healthy. Using the content analysis technique, interview transcripts were coded and categorized. Of the 31 participants, 22 lived alone. Eleven men lived in accommodations especially for welfare recipients. Health-promoting behaviors and activities were classified into six categories. For physical behaviors, “maintaining physical activity”, “moderating one’s diet”, and “following doctors’ suggested regimens” were extracted. For mental and social health, “trying to effectively rationalize troubles”, “maintaining close interpersonal relations”, and “not overly relying on others” were extracted. Most participants who received employment assistance had health-related issues. The results showed they were attempting some degree of health-promoting behavior to maintain their health, despite their challenging financial circumstances. Further studies are needed to find the relation of those behaviors and activities with physical or mental condition, and attitudes toward seeking employment.

Biography

Maki Taniyama has completed her Master’s of Health Science from The University of Tokyo. She is an associate professor of the department of nursing of International University of Health and Welfare. Her professional interests are home visit nursing, public health nursing, nursing education.

Speaker
Maki Taniyama International University of Health and Welfare, Japan

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to describe the experiences and views of the pregnant women regarding the antenatal care services received in the Primary Health Care clinics that were implementing the Basic Antenatal Care (BANC) approach. The BANC approach is listed as one of the priority interventions for reducing maternal and child mortality in South Africa and is used in the public health institutions to provide health care services to the pregnant women. A descriptive qualitative design was used to conduct the study in the 12 primary health care clinics that were providing antenatal care services and implementing the BANC approach. Semi- structured interviews were conducted with 54 pregnant women. Although some participants highlighted how the BANC approach had brought about improvement in the quality of care, other participants were concerned regarding the waiting times, the intervals between antenatal care visits, integration of antenatal care with other primary health care services, limited space at the clinics and attitudes and performance of clinic staff. Most of the situations that the participants had encountered and their views regarding Antenatal care services highlighted specific areas of the BANC approach that needed attention. The recommendations from the study included special emphasis on compliance to service delivery guidelines and protocols by antenatal health care providers, availability of the clinic staff members who had been trained and oriented towards the implementation of the BANC approach, integration of services and reviewing human and material resources for adequacy when new programs are introduced.

Biography

Dr Thembelihle Sylvia Patience Ngxongo has completed her Doctor of Nursing degree from Durban University of Technology, South Africa. She is a senior lecturer in the postgraduate Nursing Department in the Faculty of Health Sciences. She is an upcoming researcher who has managed to publish eight papers in reputed journals since her graduation in Masters of Health Sciences in 2012 and is involved in postgraduate research supervision for Masters and Doctoral students.

Speaker
Thembelihle Slyvia Patience Ngxongo Durban University of Technology, South Africa

Sessions:

Nursing & Healthcare

Abstract

Background: Needle stick injury (NSI) is one of the major causes of blood borne infections in the present day healthcare system. Among healthcare professionals, nursing students will most likely be exposed to this dilemma. Interventions like institutionalizing educational programs to produce awareness and knowledge among nurses can depict positive outcomes in changing perceptions toward safety measures. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the incidence, perspectives, views, perceptions, and knowledge of NSIs among nursing students studying at Al-Hussein Bin Talal University. Methods: The sample population consisted of all undergraduate nursing students from second to fourth academic levels at the university who consented to participate in this study. The mode of data collection utilized a self-structured questionnaire apportioned into four parts. The first portion of the questionnaire presented the socio-demographic details of the respondents. The second part of the questionnaire demonstrated questions about needle stick incidences at the clinical units of the participants; frequency of occurrences (i.e., number, nature, and rationale); place of occurrence; and, whether the event was reported to higher authorities. The third part of the questionnaire entailed queries associated with the knowledge of the students with respect to needle stick injury. The last part focused on the student's knowledge and perception on the risks associated to needle sticks injuries and the relative precautions to prevent such. Results: The results showed that most of the students had positive perception of NSIs; while two thirds of the student nurses experienced NSI with increasing number of injured nurses occurring among second year students. This is due to the lack of knowledge regarding universal precaution guidelines and acupuncture safety device. Conclusion: Nursing students are at risks of getting infection. Proper steps are needed to promote awareness of NSI as well as the dangers and prevention from such events.

Biography

we will be update it soon

Speaker
Hani A. Al Nawafleh Dean, Princess Aisha Bint Al Hussein College of Nursing, Jordan

Abstract

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) first Quality Chasm report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System,1 stated that medication-related errors (a subset of medical error) were a significant cause of morbidity and mortality; they accounted “for one out of every 131 outpatient deaths, and one out of 854 inpatient deaths”1 (p. 27). Medication errors were estimated to account for more than 7,000 deaths annually.1 Building on this work and previous IOM reports, the IOM put forth a report in 2007 on medication safety, Preventing Medication Errors.2 This report emphasized the importance of severely reducing medication errors, improving communication with patients, continually monitoring for errors, providing clinicians with decision-support and information tools, and improving and standardizing medication labeling and drug-related information. With the growing reliance on medication therapy as the primary intervention for most illnesses, patients receiving medication interventions are exposed to potential harm as well as benefits. Benefits are effective management of the illness/disease, slowed progression of the disease, and improved patient outcomes with few if any errors. Harm from medications can arise from unintended consequences as well as medication error (wrong medication, wrong time, wrong dose, etc.). With inadequate nursing education about patient safety and quality, excessive workloads, staffing inadequacies, fatigue, illegible provider handwriting, flawed dispensing systems, and problems with the labeling of drugs, nurses are continually challenged to ensure that their patients receive the right medication at the right time. The purpose is to review the researches regarding medication error prevention in relation to nursing care.

Biography

Ph. Fatima Yousef Ali Ghethan: Master degree pharmacology “University of Jordan”, Head of Quality and Medication safety unit King Abdullah Medical City, Certified Medication Safety Officer from AIHQ USA, Certified key Performance Indicator Professional From KPI Institute Australia, Certified key Performance Indicator Practitioner From KPI Institute Australia , certificate Patient safety Program John’s Hopkins

Speaker
FATIMA YOUSEF ALI GHETHAN King Abdullah Medical City,Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Breastfeeding mother’s feediing The composition of breastmilk is partially related to the mother’s diet. If protein and carbohydrate composition of Human Milk, lipids minerals, vitamins and trace elements are highly depending of lactating mother’s feeding of question of an ideal diet suitable for breast feeding women arises, and also the necessity or not of a supplementation. We know that the energy requirements are unique to each mother (with a lower limit not to cross) and the distribution of macronutrients (lipids, proteins and carbohydrates) is identical to what is recommended for the population of non-breastfeeding women, ensuring an adequate and balanced contribution in various essential fatty acids. By giving priority to foods, which is nutritionally interesting and adopting a balanced diet, breastfeeding women can cover their nutritional

Biography

Claude Billeaud received his MD degree from the Medical University of Bordeaux ( France) in 1979 after a graduation in human cytogenetics (1976). He then studied pediatrics and has been the Clinical Assistant Director of Bordeaux University in the departments of Pediatrics, Neonatology and Intensive Care since 1983. He currently serves as a pediatrician in the neonatal unit at the Children’s Hospital of Bordeaux, as a scientific manager of Bordeaux-Marmande human milk bank, as a lecturer and head of research in neonatal nutrition at the Medical University of Bordeaux. His particular interest in research led him to graduate in Biology and Health (1988, Bordeaux), be awarded a master in statistics applied to clinical research ( 1991, Montreal) and complete a PhD in nutrition and food science (2000, Bordeaux). Along his career he has often been invited as a guest professor specialised in nutrition and neonatology in various universities abroad ( Montreal, Corrientes in Argentina). Over the last 35 years, he has been an active member of different scientific organisations, either French, European or American, specialised in perinatal medicine (neonatology, pediatrics and nutrition). In this instance, he has served as the President of the Association for Pediatric Education in Europe (A.P.E.E) since 2008. He has also been very involved in the French human milk banking association (ADLF) for more than 10 years, sharing his academic knowledge focused in nutrition and his long clinical experience in neonatology. He is currently carrying out several researches on the composition of human milk. As an expert in nutrition and perinatal medicine, he is also the author and co-author of numerous scientific publications.

Speaker
Billeaud Claude CIC Pédiatrique –CHU Pellegrin- CHU Bordeaux- France

Abstract

There has been a shift from traditional war fighting to insurgency, urban and drone warfare, which has resulted in a complex psychological and physiological presentation of both military and civilian veterans and their families returning from conflict, humanitarian and peacekeeping missions. The current trend in centralization of veteran care has meant that civilian healthcare providers are increasingly likely to find themselves working with this cohort. Therefore it is important to build awareness of the unique and common characteristics of this disorder, with a view to evidenced based collaborative intervention and research partnerships in for example newly classified presentations of trauma, such as moral injury. Moral injury has been classified and differentiated from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in that it places emphasis upon the psychological, cultural and spiritual aspects of trauma. While moral injury has been equated primarily with military personnel, the psychosocial manifestations of the disorders (e.g. chronic sadness, despair and anger) could be equally relevant to the civilian population following a number of life events (e.g. redundancy from employment, domestic violence, medical malpractice). Nurses as frontline practitioners are in a unique position to identify those vulnerable to moral injury and ensure early intervention.

Biography

Dr Baines graduated from Goldsmith’s, University of London with a Ph.D. in psychology. As an early stage researcher, Dr Baines was embedded with the solid organ transplant team at the Western Infirmary, Glasgow, where she established one of the first ward-based counselling services for organ transplant patients. Dr Baines continues her research into psychosocial aspects of solid organ transplant and digital healthcare at Imperial Healthcare NHS Trust, where she holds an honorary research fellowship. During Operation Iraqi Freedom Dr Baines was based with the Combat Wounds Team at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, USA. Her role included working with wounded veterans and their families returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Dr Baines continues her research collaboration developing global training education pathways for personnel preparing to deploy across national borders at the Uniformed Services University where she is the Director MSc Global Mental Health (distance learning). Dr Baines also leads on postgraduate education for veterans at Anglia Ruskin University, United Kingdom.

Speaker
Lyndsay S. Baines Anglia Ruskin University, UK

Abstract

Background: One out of seven teenage girls in developing countries marries before the age of fifteen. While the fertility rate of teenage girls is high, the rate of contraceptive use remains low; therefore, this group of teenagers needs reproductive healthcare. This study was undertaken to explore factors influencing the use of contraceptives from the perspective of teenage women living in the city of Ardabil in Iran. Material and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted with 14 married women aged 13-19 years who attended in urban-rural healthcare centers in Ardabil. Eligible women were recruited using purposive sampling and were invited to take part in individual in-depth semi-structured interviews. The duration of the interviews varied from 45 to 90 minutes with an average of 55 minutes. Sampling continued until data saturation was reached and no new data was collected. Each interview was tape-recorded after obtaining the participant’s permission, transcribed verbatim and analyzed for identifying categories and themes using conventional content analysis. Results: Three themes and eight subthemes were developed. The themes were as follows: “insufficient familiarity with contraceptive methods”, “pressure to become pregnant” and “misconceptions”. Conclusion: Despite the high prevalence of early marriage in Iranian society, teenage women are not empowered or prepared for marriage and birth control. Sexual and reproductive healthcare services to teenage women should be improved to meet their needs.

Biography

we will be update it soon

Speaker
Afrooz Mardi Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Abstract

Hablar de la finitud humana es hablar de la vida. Mismo en una sociedad, crecientemente globalizada, multicultural, consumista, donde estamos ligados mas allá de creencias y fronteras, estamos paradójicamente, desconectados de los más cercanos. Valoramos la juventud, la salud, la inmortalidad, la ley del consumo y del desechable, en que es más importante tener que ser, y la finitud humana se ha vuelto lejana y aterradora. Un evento de creciente sufrimiento físico y espiritual, consolidado por la deshumanización en las relaciones de la asistencia, de la aridez profesional y de la muerte solitaria en la inmensidad de los pasillos con el sonido de los bip de las máquinas hospitalarias. En este ambiente se exacerban las necesidades reales de los pacientes, en especial las necesidades espirituales. En los estudios antropológicos y holísticos, el hombre es un ser multidimensional y en su identidad se incluyen dimensiones biológicas, psicológicas, sociales, culturales y espirituales, y la enfermería todavía debe contemplar todas las dimensiones, para efectuar un cuidado integral. La finitud es una cuestión paradigmática, inquietante, una visita aterradora que no es bienvenida. Los profesionales de la salud cuidan a los pacientes, como distantes espectadores, ocultando las emociones y experiencias, con esto se pierden momentos de aprendizaje de la propia finitud. La nuestra finitud es única, propia, rica y llena de aprendizaje, pues la muerte más que la vida es un consentimiento. Ejercicio del desapego y de la resignación. De perdón y de aceptación. Es un recurso aun que parezca intrínseco, ayuda al equilibrio necesario manteniendo el bienestar, al enfrentarse a una enfermedad grave o terminal. En este camino, la espiritualidad es una herramienta poderosa que propicia el cuestionamiento del sentido de la vida, despertando la compasión, sin máscaras, dándonos la oportunidad de ser éticos y empáticos. Son humanos cuidando de otros humanos, superando valores materiales con objetivos de alcance de la madurez profesional y ser más felices en el desarrollo de la profesión. El olvido de la dimensión espiritual es fallar en el cuidado de la persona en su totalidad

Biography

Dra. Leoni Terezinha Zenevicz. Enfermera. Doctora en Gerontología Biomédica. Profesora Adjunta de la Enseñanza Superior II de la Universidad Federal de la Frontera Sur-UFFS. Brasil. Coordinadora del Grupo de Trabajo de Espiritualidad y Cuidados Paliativos. Integrante del Núcleo de Investigación: Estudios e investigación en gestión, cuidado y educación en salud y enfermería (GEPEGECE / UFFS). Autora de varios artículos y capítulos sobre la temática Espiritualidad en el cuidado de la salud

Speaker
LEONI TEREZINHA ZENEVICZ Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil

Abstract

Hablar de la finitud humana es hablar de la vida. Mismo en una sociedad, crecientemente globalizada, multicultural, consumista, donde estamos ligados mas allá de creencias y fronteras, estamos paradójicamente, desconectados de los más cercanos. Valoramos la juventud, la salud, la inmortalidad, la ley del consumo y del desechable, en que es más importante tener que ser, y la finitud humana se ha vuelto lejana y aterradora. Un evento de creciente sufrimiento físico y espiritual, consolidado por la deshumanización en las relaciones de la asistencia, de la aridez profesional y de la muerte solitaria en la inmensidad de los pasillos con el sonido de los bip de las máquinas hospitalarias. En este ambiente se exacerban las necesidades reales de los pacientes, en especial las necesidades espirituales. En los estudios antropológicos y holísticos, el hombre es un ser multidimensional y en su identidad se incluyen dimensiones biológicas, psicológicas, sociales, culturales y espirituales, y la enfermería todavía debe contemplar todas las dimensiones, para efectuar un cuidado integral. La finitud es una cuestión paradigmática, inquietante, una visita aterradora que no es bienvenida. Los profesionales de la salud cuidan a los pacientes, como distantes espectadores, ocultando las emociones y experiencias, con esto se pierden momentos de aprendizaje de la propia finitud. La nuestra finitud es única, propia, rica y llena de aprendizaje, pues la muerte más que la vida es un consentimiento. Ejercicio del desapego y de la resignación. De perdón y de aceptación. Es un recurso aun que parezca intrínseco, ayuda al equilibrio necesario manteniendo el bienestar, al enfrentarse a una enfermedad grave o terminal. En este camino, la espiritualidad es una herramienta poderosa que propicia el cuestionamiento del sentido de la vida, despertando la compasión, sin máscaras, dándonos la oportunidad de ser éticos y empáticos. Son humanos cuidando de otros humanos, superando valores materiales con objetivos de alcance de la madurez profesional y ser más felices en el desarrollo de la profesión. El olvido de la dimensión espiritual es fallar en el cuidado de la persona en su totalidad

Biography

Dra. Leoni Terezinha Zenevicz. Enfermera. Doctora en Gerontología Biomédica. Profesora Adjunta de la Enseñanza Superior II de la Universidad Federal de la Frontera Sur-UFFS. Brasil. Coordinadora del Grupo de Trabajo de Espiritualidad y Cuidados Paliativos. Integrante del Núcleo de Investigación: Estudios e investigación en gestión, cuidado y educación en salud y enfermería (GEPEGECE / UFFS). Autora de varios artículos y capítulos sobre la temática Espiritualidad en el cuidado de la salud

Speaker
LEONI TEREZINHA ZENEVICZ Universidade Federal da Fronteira Sul, Brazil

Abstract

Pressure ulcers is a common problem in all health care organizations because it has been associated with increased mortality rates particularly in elderly persons. The incidence of pressure ulcers differs greatly by clinical setting. However, the optimal incidence rate may vary depending on patient case mix, severity of illness, and other contextual factors. Pressure ulcers are now considered a good indicator of quality of care and its prevention falls within the domain of nursing practice. Failure to prevent or heal them might lead to litigation. As a result of a quality improvement survey which indicated both an increase in the number and prevalence of pressure ulcers in one of the Saudi Hospital, Pressure ulcer prevention program is modified. The aim of the revised pressure ulcer prevention program is to provide hospital's staff with strategies for improving patients' outcomes by decreasing the prevalence of pressure ulcers, identifying areas for improvement in prevention of pressure ulcers, and increasing the staff compliance to the pressure ulcer guidelines in the hospital. The tracking mechanism of The pressure ulcer prevalence is instituted every six months post implementation of the program in order to assess the program effectiveness. The literature supports collecting prevalence and incidence data as best indicators of prevention program effectiveness. In conclusion, it expected that following program implementation, awareness of the results and impact of prevention measures will increase; most nursing units will experience a decrease in the incidence of pressure ulcers and improve overall quality of care with a cost saving.

Biography

I have granted a bachelor degree in general Nursing Science from the Nursing College at King Abdulaziz University-Jeddah and then a Master degree in Nursing Administration from King Saud University-Riyadh in 1998. I have completed the PhD in Clinical Nursing Education from The University of Manchester-UK. I have Paediatric clinical Experience for about 15 years at KAMC-Jeddah. During that period, I worked as a Paediatric staff nurse I and then A Clinical Resource Nurse for Paediatric Units. Currently, I hold the position of Director of Nursing Education and assistant professor at King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Additionally, I am a member of the Nursing Scientific Board in Saudi Commission for Health Sciences-KSA and Peer reviewer in Rehabititation Nursing Journal.

Speaker
Elham Ali Bukhari Ministry of National Guard Health Affair- KSA

Abstract

Kingston University and St George’s University of London, in collaboration with St George’s University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, has developed a two-week ‘ECG assessment: an introduction for healthcare providers’ open access course aimed at both qualified and unqualified healthcare practitioners, including nurses and paramedics. The MOOC provides a simple step-by-step guide to undertaking and assessing a 12-lead ECG, using a variety of video demonstrations, quiz questions and discussion forums. Over 12,000 people from around the globe enrolled on the first course in October 2015 and it has continued to attract high numbers of participants during subsequent runs. It has been well evaluated, with a large number of learners reporting changing their practice as a result of undertaking the course. Recent runs of the MOOC have been timed to coincide with the ECG skills teaching on Kinston University’s pre-registration nursing course, with student nurses invited to complete the online activities in preparation for a timetabled practical session. This approach has also been positively reviewed by students, who report valuing the interactive materials and the opportunity to engage in online discussion with a range of other healthcare professionals from outside of the programme.

Biography

Jo Gregory is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing at Kingston University and St George’s University of London. She has over 14 years of experience within Higher Education, and has undertaken the development and management of a range of modules and programmes at both undergraduate and post-graduate level. A registered nursing, she has a background in cardiac care and maintains a keen interest in technology enhanced learning, having developed a range of online learning materials aimed at both pre and post qualified nurses.

Speaker
Joanne Gregory Kingston University, UK

Abstract

The UK postgraduate education of nurses moved from being hospital based to university back in the 1990’s but it is not clear what impact this education has had on the nursing practice. One way that enables to assess this impact is through Work Based Learning (WBL) model which acknowledges the learning that takes place in workplace alongside learning acquired in the university. WBL mostly culminates in projects, which involve changing practice and therefore knowledge of leadership theories as well as knowledge of manging change become vital to the process. The role of the academic supervisor is to help students identify the learning outcomes for WBL projects and name activities needed to achieve these learning outcomes. The students also propose assessment criteria and the assessment mode. Such student involvement promotes greater understanding of the learning process and encourages responsibility for own education. This presentation explains how the Masters programme enables students to learn academically while also changing healthcare practice.

Biography

Dr. Maria Ponto - biography Associate Professor, Faculty of Health, Social Care Sciences and Education, School of Nursing, Kingston University and St George’s, University of London Kingston upon Thames, Surrey, UK Dr Maria Ponto is an Associate Professor and the MSc Course Director at Kingston University and St George’s, University of London, as well as Visiting Professor to Health and Social Care Unit in Lapland University of Applied Sciences, Finland. Maria has also run Masters in Healthcare Education and Management in St. Petersburg, Russia. Trained as general nurse and a midwife, Maria has a considerable experience in medical and ITU nursing and also academic background in Developmental, Organisational and Health Psychology. Maria has been teaching healthcare education for 19 years with a focus on Masters Education since 1995. Maria leads Clinical Leadership team of 9 academics and researchers. Maria has wide research interests both clinical and academic and most recently co-authored 2 published studies concerning organ and tissue donation. She has also been running short courses on Healthcare Management for doctors from Kazakhstan

Speaker
Maria Ponto Kingston University, UK

Abstract

Background: An increasing trend of investigational new antineoplastic drugs has increased the occupational exposure among the clinical trial health workers. Most antineoplastic drugs are hazardous drugs. As a clinical trial nurse (CTN), managing research products is one of the important tasks to assess the research subjects’ compliance. Therefore, this project aimed to improve the accuracy of process in handling antineoplastic products to decrease the exposure rate and to facilitate positive clinical research practice environments. Materials and Methods: The project population primarily included members of clinical trial unit in a medical center representing clinical trial nursing which routinely managing investigational antineoplastic drugs in outpatient department. With observing and questionnaire investigation, there were 35 CTNs and each of them managed one to five oral antineoplastic drug trial. There were 66.7% of the respondents indicated that they had handled product without any personal protective equipment (PPE). Analyzing the causes of potentially exposed to hazardous drugs were (1) incorrect recognition of hazardous drugs, (2) lack of personal protective equipment (PPE), (3) lack of standard process and auditing system. After implementing the interventions included series of technical, educational and administrative support measures consisting of preparing PPE in out-patient clinics, holding education, establishing a standard of process for handling antineoplastic drugs and an auditing system, the exposure rate was 0% and the accuracy of administrate process improve from 16% to 92%. Conclusion: The project improved the safe practices of CTNs in handling antineoplastic drugs. In order to promote the positive practice environment and maintain occupational hygiene, keep managing auditing system is necessary.

Biography

Yu-Shang, Chen is a nurse student of master degree in school of nursing, majored in clinical research nursing..

Speaker
Yu-Shang Chen National Taiwan University,Taiwan

Abstract

The health care system is becoming increasingly complex due to advances in scientific knowledge and bio-medical technologies, which lead to ethical problems that require ethical decision making. Ethics education is important for all health care providers; however, teaching ethics is a challenge because of the abstractness of ethical theories and traditional teaching methods. Nurse educators need to incorporate innovative teaching strategies that improve students’ critical thinking and ethical decision making skills. Literature indicate that concept mapping is an innovative instructional strategy in improving students’ higher level reasoning ability. This pilot study aims to assess the effectiveness of concept mapping in teaching ethical theories to nursing baccalaureate students enrolled at the nursing history and deontology course of a nursing faculty. In this course, the content of ethics is composed by human and patient rights, ethical concepts and theories, specifically virtue ethics, deontology, and utilitarianism, nursing ethics, and case analyses on ethical dilemmas. For this study, students will be randomly assigned into two groups, and the control group will participate to case analyses, while the other group will participate to two hours’ concept mapping of ethical theories before participating to case analyses. Concept maps will be prepared by the nurse educator and students critical thinking and ethical decision making skills will be assessed by using the California critical thinking skill test and Nursing Dilemma Test. Results will be presented at the conference.

Biography

Leyla Dinç, has completed her PhD from Hacettepe University, Health science Institute, Nursing Program, Turkey. In addition, she has completed the Erasmus Mundus Master of Bioethics Program. She is chair of Fundamentals of Nursing Department and Deputy Dean at Hacettepe University Faculty of Nursing. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Leyla Dinç Hacettepe University Faculty of Nursing,Turkey

Abstract

The guidelines for feeding critically ill humans are becoming less and less well defined (Preizer JC and van Zantem AR, Berger MM et al. Crit.Care 2015;19:35) (Maric PE, Rice TW AJRCCM2017;195:555-6). It is evident that critically ill patients demonstrate a tremendous catabolic and a moderate hypermetabolic milieu. There is, also, no doubt that this catabolism predisposes patients to myriad complications and poor outcome. The most significant problems are immune depression and muscular weakness. This muscular wasting and weakness arises from disuse atrophy, rapid catabolism and, the increasingly pervasive, critical illness neuro- myopathy(Plasma from septic shock opatients induces loss of muscle protein Crit. Care 2011:15:R233). These vulnerabilities ultimately lead to pneumo-sepsis (poor cough, swallowing, inspiratory muscle function and failure to wean from the ventilator), skin breakdown, wound infection, line and tube site infections and to long term immobility. These are the predominant processes leading to poor outcome or death. It is also clear that, although fat is still well oxidized, carbohydrate is increasingly used, often purely for anaerobic glycolysis, with high lactate turnover. The route of feeding also seen to be clear. If the gut is available, enteral feeding should be started as soon as shock is adequately treated. The gut is dangerous when empty. In a large study many years ago, John border (Ann. Surg 1987;206:427-448) demonstrated that neither complex antibiotics, complex surgical techniques nor an array of ventilator or circulatory support techniques altered outcome. Food intake was the only factor positively affecting outcome of his surgical patients. However, the questions of optimal quantity, protein, carbohydrate, fat and micro-nutrient substrate quality and balance continues to remain enigmatic. In the recent Permit trial (Arabi et al. NEJM2015;372:2398-404), the provision of 60-70% of predicted caloric need did not reduce outcome in the critically compared to those receiving 80-100% of predicted caloric need. Secondary analysis of this trial also revealed that those patients receiving what was assumed to be optimal protein intake of 1.2-1.5 G/kg/day did not do any better than those receiving 0.8-1.0g/kg/d. The protein loss in the urine on day 1, was less in those receiving fewer amino acids, suggesting that the “optimal amount” initially suggested by Graham et al. was only producing expensive urine. This finding has also been demonstrated by the work of the group of van den Burgh (Casaer MP et al. Crit. Care 2013;187:247-55). The physiological mechanism of autophagy seems to be an important mechanism that requires further clarification in both normal and the critically ill. This mechanism, by which cellular breakdown products are further digested and returned to the substrate pool, seems central to the optimal health of all cells and organelles. Autophagy is diminished by food intake, though which nutrient most fully diminishes this process is as yet unclear. Cell anabolism is determined by the size of the cell (Finn PJ et al. The Lancet1996;347:654-56) and it has long been known that branched chain amino-acids and glutamine are most active in enhancing cell size and, thus, anabolism. Insulin is also central to this anabolic and metabolic control as well as having an effect on inflammation. Whether the use of an enteral nutrition containing predominantly these amino acids, while avoiding excess calories and other substrates, perhaps supplemented by insulin or other adipokine hormones will be more effective in preventing muscle and immune breakdown in the critically ill is in need of urgent assessment.

Biography

Gwynne Jones has been an Intensive Care Specialist for the last 35 years. He has a special interest in the metabolic consequences of critical illness. He qualified in medicine from St. Mary’s hospital medical school, University of London in 1969. He completed his internal medicine residency in the UK with Fellowships in respiratory medicine in McMaster University, Canada and gastro-enterology in the Case Western University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. He was a consultant physician in the NHS for 5 years before moving to Canada. Publications are related to Sepsis, pulmonary embolism and nutrition.

Speaker
Gwynne Jones University of Ottawa, Canada

Abstract

This paper deals with the study of the perceptions and attitudes that second year students of the teaching degree in Florida Universitaria (Spain) had about alternative and complementary medicines and the scientific communication of this issues in the classroom. In Spain, alternative and complementary medicines are being questioned and analyzed, in the absence of scientific evidence. The qualitative focus group methodology was chosen, creating four groups to this effect, with five students in each and using a script of 10 questions, grouped in the thematic category of "alternative and complementary medicines". The average age of the participants was 27 years; females were predominant (85%). With the answers, different categories were established. In the category of "relationship between emotions and health/illness", we found terms such as mood (15), anxiety (10), stress (10), depression (5), sadness (5) and suffering (2), alluding to emotions, additionally, respondents considered that there are internal and external causes of the diseases, understanding that the internal ones are the negative emotions and the stress and the external ones, the habits of life and feeding. The participants referred to the doctor as a professional who does not attend to the emotions and who does not personalize the treatments, that is to say, treats with the same means to all patients and as a figure with which communication is not easy, which, could be interpreted as negative opinion about official medicine. They give an opportunity to alternative and complementary therapies by the attention that lend to the emotional aspects.

Biography

Ramón Camaño-Puig has completed his PhD from Leeds Metropolitan University (UK) actually is working as a full professor in the University of Valencia (Spain). He is the director of the Master in Clinical Essays of the University of Valencia and has published more different articles and books. Mavi Corell Domenech has completed his PhD from the University of Valencia. She is working actually as professor in Florida University, Valencia (Spain).

Speaker
Ramón Camaño Puig University of Valencia & Florida Universitaria, Spain

Abstract

Introducción: La esclerosis múltiple (EM) es una enfermedad causada por un proceso desmielinizante, inflamatorio y neurodegenerativo en el Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC) que se acompaña de pérdida progresiva de los axones, oligodendrocitos y cicatrización astroglial en pequeñas regiones que conforman “placas” de 1 a 2 cm. Los síntomas de presentación más frecuentes son parestesias en una o más extremidades, el tronco o un lado de la cara; debilidad o torpeza de un miembro inferior o la mano; o trastornos visuales, amaurosis parcial, neuritis óptica retro bulbar, visión borrosa o escotomas, parálisis oculomotora con visión doble (diplopía), debilidad muscular transitoria en uno o más miembros, pesadez o fatigabilidad , alteraciones de la marcha, dificultad en el control vesical, vértigo, síntomas de pares craneales, incremento de los reflejos tendinosos profundos ,síntomas sensitivos y síntomas autónomos. Se presenta mayormente en edades tempranas de la vida. Por ello la EM es la principal causa de grado de discapacidad neurológica en adultos jóvenes, Objetivos: • Evaluar la calidad de vida antes y despues de administrase el interferon beta 1 a o Rebif 44mcg . Metodología Y/O Estrategias: • Se seleccionaron 30 personas con Esclerosis Múltiple en la forma Brote Remisión atendidos en el CIREN • Se aplicó la escala de calidad de vida MSQL-54,la cual consta de 54 ítems, antes y 6 meses después de administrarse el interferón beta 1 a ó Rebif 44 mcg • Tabulación de los resultados de la escala utilizando . Scoring Forms for Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life (MSQOL) -54 Resultados En cuanto a la salud física antes de administrase el medicamento la media era de 67,5 ± 9.08 y 6 meses después de administrase el medicamento la media fue de 90.4 ± 7,77. En cuanto a la salud mental la media fue 61.1 ± 11.5 y después de administrase el medicamento la salud mental fue de 90.5 ± 7,7. Conclusiones La administración de Interferón beta 1 a o Rebif 44mcg en personas con EM BR produce una mejoría en la calidad tanto en los aspectos relacionados con la salud física como mental. Title: QUALITY OF LIFE IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS BEFORE AND 6 MONTHS AFTER ADMINISTRATING INTERFERON BETA1A Subject: Multiple Sclerosis Authors: Lic. Daymet Grass Fernandez daymet@neuro.ciren.cu Institution: International Center for Neurological Restoration Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease caused by a demyelinating, inflammatory and neurodegenerative process in the Central Nervous System (CNS) that is accompanied by progressive loss of axons, oligodendrocytes and astroglial scarring in small regions that form "plaques" of 1 To 2 cm. The most frequent presenting symptoms are paresthesias in one or more extremities, the trunk or one side of the face; Weakness or clumsiness of a lower limb or hand; Or visual impairment, partial amaurosis, retro bulbar optic neuritis, blurred vision or scotomas, oculomotor paralysis with double vision (diplopia), transient muscle weakness in one or more limbs, heaviness or fatigability, gait abnormalities, difficulty in bladder control, Vertigo, symptoms of cranial nerves, increased deep tendon reflexes, sensory symptoms and autonomic symptoms. It occurs mostly in the early ages of life. Therefore, MS is the main cause of degree of neurological disability in young adults, Goals: • Evaluate quality of life before and after administering interferon beta 1 to or Rebif 44mcg. Methodology Y / O Strategies: • Thirty individuals with Multiple Sclerosis were selected in the Outcome Referral form attended at the CIREN • The MSQL-54 quality of life scale was applied, which consists of 54 items, before and 6 months after the administration of interferon beta 1 a or Rebif 44 mcg • Tabulation of scale results using. Scoring Forms for Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life (MSQOL) -54 Results Regarding the physical health before the medication was administered the mean was 67.5 ± 9.08 and 6 months after the medication was administered the mean was 90.4 ± 7.77. As for mental health, the mean was 61.1 ± 11.5 and after administering the medication the mental health was 90.5 ± 7.7. CONCLUSIONS Administration of Interferon beta 1 to or Rebif 44mcg in people with MSR produces an improvement in quality in both physical and mental health aspects.

Biography

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Speaker
Daymet Grass Fernandez Centro Internacional de Restauración Neurológica, Cuba

Abstract

Background: Blood pressure is commonly measured in the seated or supine position; however, the two positions give different measurement values. With that in mind, any time a value is recorded, body position should also be recorded (2). AIM: - The aim of this study was to evaluate affect of sitting and supine position on measuring blood pressure for healthy adult students. Method: - Comparative analytical study done during the period from March to June 2017 from Faculty of nursing science .A total of 205 healthy young students who had accepted to participate in the study were randomly selected.. In all subjects the blood pressure was measured subsequently in two positions: Sitting supine, with the arm supported at the elbow and the cuff at the heart level. The data was analyzed by (SPSS), and presented in forms of tables and figures. Result: - The blood pressure tended to drop in the setting position compared with the supine. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure was the highest in supine position (120/74mm/hg) when compared the setting positions (116.2/74.5mm/hg). All blood pressure measurement in supine and setting position was not statistically significant with age (3). Recommendation: -The study recommended that:-suggested to use supine position when measuring blood pressure if there is no contraindicated. The nurses and other health worker personnel must be documented reading when measuring blood pressure. The study have to be done in large population to give scientifically evidence.

Biography

Associate professor of medical surgical nursing 2008-2012 Ph D in Nursing sciences (Medical – Surgical Nursing ) Faculty of graduate collage and scientific research –Shendi University -River Nile state- Sudan

Speaker
Higazi shendi university, Sudan

Abstract

In Japan, governments are providing employment assistance for welfare recipients considered capable of working. The recipients of these services, who might have long-term complex issues, may also have physical, mental, or social health concerns, which might be barriers in finding employment. The aim of this study is to identify these perceived barriers of Japanese welfare recipients in search of jobs. Simi-structured interviews were conducted with middle aged participants currently receiving public assistance. The interview questions asked about physical and mental conditions, and the barriers in finding and continuing employment. Using the content analysis technique, interview transcripts were coded and categorized. Data was provided by 25 males and 6 females, ages 30 to 60. Out of the 31 participants, 22 lived alone. Six worked in an office and six worked in manufacturing. While job searching, health related barriers were classified into eight issues: “Orthopedic disorder”, “Physical disorder”, “Chronic disease”, “Anxiety”, “Depression”, “Insomnia”, “Suicidal thought” and “Social phobia”. All of the participants who had these health related issues, perceived them as barriers in both finding and continuing to work. Most of them are looking for work in their previous field, but find their physical and mental conditions won’t allow them to back into the workplace. Most of them visit the clinic regularly but find there is no support in connection with the participants themselves to eliminate these barriers, while they were in search of jobs. Further studies are needed to find effective supports by health care professionals.

Biography

Ruriko Yamashita has completed her PhD from International University of Health and Welfare. She is an associate professor of the department of nursing of International University of Health and Welfare. Her specialty is in home visit nursing, public health nursing and disaster nursing.

Speaker
Maki Taniyama International University of Health and Welfare, Japan

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer death in Iran and New Zealand. All people living with cancer or affected by cancer are cancer survivors. The burden of caring for cancer patients frequently falls on family and they are at the frontline of primary care, and a backbone of social care delivery. If families have significant unmet needs, their ability to support the patient is compromised. However, little is known about the supportive care needs (SCNs) for families of patients with CRC and their experiences during different phases of the cancer journey or whether these needs are met. Understanding SCNs is important to develop cancer care services. Additionally, the literature suggests reported SCNs are related to culture, delivery of cancer care services, and personal factors. The focus of this research was to explore the SCNs of families of patients with CRC undergoing cancer treatment in Iran and New Zealand, and to identify any differences between families’ priority of needs in both countries. Method The design of this study was a qualitatively driven, convergent mixed method research study, incorporating a parallel quantitative component. Participants were recruited from two tertiary hospitals, one in Iran and one in New Zealand. A total of 40 people participated in this study, 27 from Iran and 13 from New Zealand. Supportive care needs of participants were measured by the Supportive Care Needs Survey for partner and caregivers (SCNS-P&C39). A semi-structured interview was conducted followed with the descriptive cross-sectional survey to gain more detail about participants’ supportive care needs. Data from quantitative and qualitative approaches were analysed using descriptive statistics and content analysis respectively. Results Iranian family participants expressed higher SCNs in all dimensions when compared to New Zealand family participants except for the dimension of psychological needs where SCNs were equal to those of New Zealand family participants. Iranian family participants used spiritual/religious resources more often and received more support from their families, while New Zealand family participants demonstrated a greater reliance on the health care system. Iranian family participants reported the informational, psychological and financial domains as the highest areas of needs while New Zealand family participants reported the psychological and informational domains as the areas of highest unmet needs. Discussion This study has generated insight into the perceived SCNs of families of patients with CRC during the treatment phase of the cancer journey in New Zealand and Iran. Differences and similarities between perceived SCNs and supportive care resources in Iran and New Zealand were noted. The similarities between SCNs may be related to cancer as a life-threatening disease; a universal phenomenon. Differences between SCNs and use of supportive resources may be related to differences in culture, provision of oncology services, and the health care system in Iran and New Zealand. These findings are important as they suggest that families of patients with CRC in both countries experienced unmet SCNs, and, further indicates how well cancer care services met participants’ SCNs. Additionally, these findings provide knowledge on resources that families used to cope with their cancer journey. The findings provide some direction to inform the development of cancer care services, especially in the provision of supportive care based on culture and health care provision, and inform recommendation for an integrated approach to the supportive care provision.

Biography

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Speaker
Nazi Nejat Arak university of medical sciences,Iran

Abstract

Objective: to describe mothers’ experience of relationship with midwifves during childbirth. Design: A qualitative content analysis approach was employed. Data were collected with face-to-face, in-depth semi-structured interviews. Those were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data saturation was achieved. Setting: Post psrtum ward of an educational hospital of Arak, Iran in 2013-14. Participants: 20 primiparous and multiparous women. Findings: Two main categories emerged from women’s accounts: theraputic alliance and expectation. Emotional support and active participant were subcategories of theraputic alliance. The subcategries of expectation were: continued presence of midwives, paying attention to physical needs, training and guidance and having communication skills. Conclusion: These findings illustrate although many women wanted to say in the type of care they received, they did not always know how to communicate their needs. So it is important for maternity care staff recognizing women’s psychological and emotional needs during the childbirth process.

Biography

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Speaker
Mahtab Attarha Arak University of Medical Sciences, Iran

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