Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Complex PTSD caused by human-made disaster such as the war combat, being taken as a hostage, terrorism, and brutal or repeated rape, could affect all structures of the victim’s personality. Severe trauma overwhelms the ordinary human adaptation and resistance as it is usually the threat to life or bodily integrity and confronts the victim with feelings of powerlessness, hopelessness, and helplessness. In case of severe trauma, the personality usually suffers the long-term alterations of the self-cohesion and self-continuity. As an aftermath, the trauma victim is flooded with intrusive memories of the traumatic event(s), as well as distorted thoughts, images, and self-values with compounded levels of the hyperarousal or flashbacks. The Dynamic Therapy model is developed as a result of over a decade of clinical practice and research (Zepinic, 2011). It is a three-phased multimodal system and originally casts as the cognitive-behavioural-analytic approach towards complex trauma. The goals of this individual designed trauma-focused therapy are achieving an emotional and cognitive regulations, inter and intrapsychic effectiveness, tolerance to the distress imposed by the inner conflict drives and traumatic memories, and coping strategies and self-management. The Dynamic Therapy model aims three main goals: (1) restoration of a form of relatedness (Interconnectivity), (2) restoration of a sense of aliveness/vitality (Dynamism), and (3) restoration of an awareness of self and inner events (Insight). The model applies to the holotropic(oriented towards wholeness) integration of the consciousness.

Biography

Dr Zepinic is a clinician having over 30 years of experience in clinical practice, teaching, research, and publishing in mental health, in particular PTSD and personality disorders. After finishing undergraduate study in Sarajevo, he continued further study at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia, where he finished Master degree and then PhD in psychiatry. He also finished LL.B in London,UK. He was Conjoint Lecturer at the University of Sarajevo, Clinical Associate/Supervisor at the Sydney University and Macquarie University Sydney. He was a Senior Lecturer in Psychiatry at Queen Mary University of London, UK. He is a member of The Royal Society of Medicine (UK), and The European Society for Traumatic Stress Studies. He is a member of the Editorial Board for the American Journal of Applied Psychology. Dr Zepinic is author of six professional books and over 50 papers published in professional journals in the fields of psychiatry and clinical psychology.

Speaker
Vito Zepinic PsychcClinic,United Kingdom

Abstract

Academic nursing leaders are providing strategic and innovative leadership in the advancement of research and scholarship within the Schools of Nursing. The leadership strategies and practices to support and strengthen the culture of research and scholarship within nursing education are varied. The Saskatchewan Polytechnic School of Nursing established a Centre for Research and Scholarship in Health (CRSH) to support the advancement of scholarly work in both nursing education and practice. The CRSH provides a resource hub for the engagement of faculty regarding all aspects of research, scholarship and innovation. Founded largely on the Boyer Model of Scholarship and its scholarly pillars of discovery, application, integration, teaching, and service, faculty access support for research, grant writing, preparation of publications, presentations, and innovative initiatives. Positioned within a richly diverse nursing education environment, the CRSH facilitates educational sessions on a variety of scholarly topics. Visiting scholars also contribute to the engagement of collaborative research and scholarship. This presentation will discuss the leadership practices and strategies employed to successfully establish a culture of research and scholarship. The driving forces and foundational components that led to the successful establishment of the CRSH will be discussed, along with the influence of the CRSH on the dramatic increase in faculty engagement in research and scholarship. What will the audience take away from your presentation? • You will learn about leadership practices effective in advancing research and scholarship • You will learn about the role and benefits of the Institute for Nursing Scholarship • You will discuss strategies for engagement of faculty in research and scholarship

Biography

Dr. June Anonson has practiced nursing in acute care and in the community setting. She has been awarded the Centennial award for Nursing in Saskatchewan that was presented by Prime Minister Stephen Harper. June was also awarded the Nursing Leadership in Education award for Saskatchewan and the Saskatchewan Registered Nurses’ Association (SRN) Centennial Diamond Award for Education/Research in 2017. June received the University of Alberta Alumni Leadership award. June was honoured by the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA) as one of Canada’s 150 Nurses 2017 and was also identified by Canadian Nurse Journal as one of the 150 Nurses to Know 2017. Along with these awards she has won other awards for outstanding nursing in Leadership and Education. She is currently a Full Professor with the University of Saskatchewan and the Director for the Centre for Research and Scholarship in Health at Saskatchewan Polytechnic. June’s research and work with interprofessional teams began in the 1980s and her career has led her to work within many different interprofessional teams. She has also been a Dean of Health Sciences which included six different health care disciplines. Her research projects include examining the health-care issues faced by Aboriginal, Hutterite and marginalized populations, along with the globalization of nursing. Anonson is a tireless advocate for excellence and leadership. Since 2002, she has worked in South Korea and China, helping to educate nurses about the Canadian health-care system, offering preceptored experiences for senior Canadian nursing students and sharing best practices. Anonson helps to lead an innovative nursing degree program at the University of Saskatchewan that includes third and fourthyear nursing students from the First Nations University of Canada. June’s many publications, chapter in books, yearly leading or participating in teams to review University programs and successful grants have contributed to her success as a Nursing leader in Canada. Anonson plans to dedicate the remainder of her career to the support and mentoring of the next generation of nurses, to assist them to strive for excellence and become leaders wherever their career takes them.

Speaker
June Anonson University of Saskatchewan Polytechnic, Canada

Abstract

Evidence-informed decision making in clinical practice and public health requires distilling and disseminating the best available evidence from research, context and experience, and using this evidence to inform and improve practices and policy. Systematic reviews are essential for decision making that improves health, and addresses current and future challenges. Amongst global challenges, elder abuse is a significant health problem which is destined to grow as populations’ age. Many health providers and governments are contemplating how best to respond. Care for the elderly can at times be frustrating. To address this challenge, both an understanding of the complex causal mechanisms contributing to its occurrence is required; and also the high quality synthesis of evidence of the effects of interventions. Governments such as Australiahave requested evidence about effective strategies, and identification of current research gaps. This presentation details the findings of a recent Cochrane review which sought to address gapsby identifying the evidence of what works to prevent and reduce abuse of the elderly (Baker et al 2016). From a systematic and comprehensive search we identified 7 studies of 1924 elderly participants and 740 other people such as caregivers and family members. We assessed the trustworthiness of these studies by examining their risks of bias and then summarised the results. Although much of the evidence to date is of low quality, there is moderate quality evidence that the teaching of coping skills to family members caring for elderly with dementia may conceivably lead to better outcomes.

Biography

Dr Philip Baker is Professor of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology.Prior to QUT he was Director of Epidemiology in Queensland Health leading the delivery of Epidemiological services,also active in research and teaching. He has a PhD in Clinical Epidemiology and Health Technology Assessment from the University of Queensland. Prof Baker has extensive experience in epidemiology related to clinical research, public health settings and health policy. He is an author on seven Cochrane systematic reviews, and is a journal editor for the Cochrane Public Health. Much of the review his work focuses on public health issues such as community wide interventions to increase physical activity. He received Vice-Chancellors Performance Award 2013 for innovations in teaching and QUT Teaching and Learning Grant 2014-2015 and also a Career Mentor Nominee 2013. Dr Baker is a member of the American College of Epidemiology and a Senior Fellow in the Higher Education Academy.

Speaker
Philip Baker Queensland University of Technology, Australia

Abstract

Producing high quality healthcare is highly disputed to improve individuals’ quality of life. Healthcare delivery organization becomes the crucial part of the national asset to maintain healthy nation. Advancement of health technology in medical diagnostic and treatment has help people live longer. However, many more end up with living longer with chronic disease and disability. Disease trend pattern shifting from communicable diseases to non-communicable diseases has require early preventive measure from getting risk, early management of disease and continuity of care during rehabilitation. Primary health care is an integral role in promoting universal healthcare towards strengthening global healthcare. The fact that current disease manifestation on human has shown its relation to environment and other living things like animal has alert for more inter-professional collaboration effort. With the current healthcare demand and meeting the quality of care, filling the human resource gap is always an issue. Furthermore, people begin to exercise their right to choose and engage for their healthcare. Challenges to fulfill clients’ demand for quality of healthcare require the realignment of human resource. The use of internet and social media has influence people behavior. The public health nursing promotes and protects the health of populations through a combination of knowledge derived from nursing, social and public health sciences. Access to the health information and disease management has answering their needs, fears and aspirations. People are more aware and involved in their health concern than before. However, the healthcare providers do need to provide appropriate information for the people to make inform choices of the healthcare. Enhancing the competent skills to deliver right information and management of risk of getting diseases is the priorities. It urged the government to have scaled up their efforts to address health workforce shortages especially at the primary healthcare. The public health nursing is the basic human resource component of primary health care. Many health intervention programs required the public health nurse to do monitoring and evaluation of cases and community together with the multidisciplinary public health team. Inter-professional and multidisciplinary approaches to harness the public health concerns require shared policy to be usedin order to address complex challenges at every level of individuals in the community.

Biography

Rosnah Sutan is a medical doctor and completed master of public health and PhD in public health. She had been working in family health of public health department Ministry of Health for 10 years before joining in academic career in UniversitiKebangsaan Malaysia. She has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as reviewers for many journals related to women and child health. She is actively developing an intervention health education package in area of sexual and reproductive health for the youth prevention risk activities.

Speaker
Rosnah Sutan University Kebangsaan Malaysia,

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

Frozen shoulder occurs in approximately 2-5% of the general population which is 2-4 times more common in women than men, and is most frequently seen in individuals between 40 and 60 years of age. Frozen shoulder has many complications such as sleep disturbance, impaired performance in daily activities, and personal grooming. Without surgical treatment, it has reported over 60% of patients still have limitation of shoulder movement at 5- to 10-year follow-up. Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) appears to be a promising treatment in tendinopathy but there are only a few literatures focused on its effectiveness on frozen shoulder and the results were not consist. This study was created to determine the effectiveness of ESWT in frozen shoulder. Ten frozen shoulder patientswho received physical therapy and medicationfor 3 months without definite improving were included in this study. They received ESWT treatment once a week for 1-2 times, which depends on patient’s response. In short period of follow (8.2 ±3.5, 2-12 weeks), most patients showed significant improved in pain (visual analogue scale [VAS; 0-10] score from 8.67 to 2.11) and Oxford shoulder score (from 25.2 to 35.0; scale 0-60). Moreover, range of motion in all directions also showed marked increase. Up to 2 ESWT treatments can result in effective improvement on intractable frozen shoulder in short time period. Thequicker patient can return to quality of life, relief of pain and restore daily activity in patient the more improve nursing health care quality.

Biography

Wei-Tso Chia has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from National Defense Medical Center,, Taiwan (R.O.C.). He is the director of Orthopaedic department of National Taiwan University Hospital Hsin-Chu Branch. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as a reviewer of Clinical Nursing Research.

Speaker
Wei-Tso Chia National Taiwan University Hospital, Taiwan

Abstract

Occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs first became an issue for healthcare workers in the late 1970s and early 1980s when cancer patients developed secondary cancers following treatment with these drugs and workers experienced acute health effects when preparing them. A wealth of information has been published concerning the carcinogenicity of anticancer drugs, workplace contamination, worker exposure, genotoxic effects in workers, and adverse health effects associated with exposure. The International Agency for Research on Cancer currently lists approximately two dozen antineoplastic drugs as known or suspected human carcinogens; many of which also have adverse reproductive effects, both in patients and in workers exposed to them. Surface contamination with these drugs has been documented in healthcare facilities worldwide and uptake of the drugs has been identified by the measurement of antineoplastic drugs and/or their metabolites in the urine of exposed workers.Many antineoplastic drugs used to treat cancer, particularly alkylating agents and topoisomerase inhibitors, are known to elevate biomarkers of genetic damage in cancer patients, specifically inducing chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei. Elevations in these same biomarkers of genetic damage have been reported inmore than half of the 100-plus published studies in the literature, supporting the statistically significant association between worker exposure to antineoplastic drugs and the endpoint being investigated. Given the potential for increased cancer risk linked to increases in chromosomal aberrations, the results of recent conclusive meta-analysis’ support the need to limit occupational exposure of healthcare workers to antineoplastic drugs as much as possible.

Biography

Christine Roussel, PharmD, BCOP is a Board Certified Oncology Pharmacist with a Bachelors in Toxicology and Doctorate in Pharmacy from Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. She is Assistant Director of Pharmacy at Doylestown Hospital (Pennsylvania),Assistant Professor at USciences and facilitator/content author for Medisca/LP3 Network.Providing over 100 hours of education to pharmacists, physicians and nurses each year, she focuses on occupational exposure to hazardous drugs, sterile/non-sterile compounding, clinical and legislative topics such as medical cannabis, opioid stewardship and drug diversion prevention.She has authored articles on occupational exposure to hazardous drugs, as protecting healthcare providers’ DNA is her primary passion!

Speaker
Christine Roussel Doylestown Hospital, USA

Abstract

The nursing round system (NRS) means checking patients on an hourly basis during the A (0700–2200 h) shift and once every 2 h during the B (2200–0700 h) by the assigned nursing staff. The overall goal of this prospective study is to implement an NRS in a major rehabilitation center—Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City—in the Riyadh area of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The purposes of this study are to measure the effect of the NRS on: the use of patient call light; the number of incidences of patients’ fall; the number of incidences of hospital-acquired bed sores; and the level of patients’ satisfaction. All patients hospitalized in the male stroke unit will be involved in this study. For the period of 8 weeks (17 December 2009–17 February 2010) All Nursing staff on the unit will record each call light and the patient’s need. Implementation of the NRS would start on 18 February 2010 and last for 8 weeks, until 18 April 2010. Data collected throughout this period will be compared with data collected during the 8 weeks period immediately preceding the implementation of the NRS (17 December 2009–17 February 2010) in order to measure the impact of the call light use. The following information were collected on all subjects involved in the study: the Demographic Information Form; authors’ developed NRS Audit Form; Patient Call Light Audit Form; Patient Fall Audit Record; Hospital-Acquired Bed Sores Audit Form; and hospital developed Patient Satisfaction Records. The findings suggested that a significant reduction on the use of call bell (P < 0.001), a significant reduction of fall incidence (P < 0.01) while pressure ulcer reduced by 50% before and after the implementation of NRS. Also, the implementation of NRS increased patient satisfaction by 7/5 (P < 0.05).

Biography

Bassem Salah Saleh has completed his BS in Nursing 1991 from USA. Completed his Master on Health Care Administration, Leadership from Bellevue, Omaha, Nebraska, USA. PHD Candidate. Work as Executive Director of Nursing Affairs at Security Forces Hospital Program – Makkah- Saudi Arabia.

Speaker
Bassem Saleh Security Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Nursing is well placed to plan, respond and lead in these current times of significant change and through the future predicted changes within the healthcare landscape. There is a need to look inside and outside health literature and the nursing frame of reference to inform our thinking about the opportunities and challenges into the future for nursing practice and nursing leadership. “Disruptive changes to business models will have a profound impact on the employment landscape over the coming years”. What might this mean to nursing? This will require a proactive approach to service planning, delivery and evaluation of patient care from both the patient and health care provider perspectives. Nursing requires leaders who are highly creative in their thinking, to be able to piece together multiple pieces of seemingly unrelated information, and test out new approaches in the pursuit of new meaning in support of nursing patient care. It will no longer be about the “nursing leader”; rather it will be about nursing leaders working with other health-related leaders and consumers. Global predictions of essential skills for occupations required by 2020 encompass complex problem solving, critical thinking, creativity, people management, coordinating with others, emotional intelligence, judgment and decision-making, service orientation, negotiation and cognitive flexibility. With the increasing complexity of health care, we need adaptive leadership approaches which critically analyze the complex problem-solving required within an ever-changing health context. Adaptive leadership brings together people from different fields and levels of experience to work through the “wicked problems” (those problems that do not have one answer or known answers). Adaptive leadership is a collaboration of key stakeholders to identify and test possible approaches towards shedding light on complex challenges. Organizations do not necessarily have the connective tissue required for the breadth of leadership development strategy solutions required into the future. They recommend viewing the leadership development strategy and resource requirements as one system, to establish the connective tissue required for success. This approach supports the development of leaders in a systematic way with visibility of the resources required for the pipeline of leaders into the future. Let us draw together some of the threads of the healthcare tapestry: the nursing profession is in a unique position to influence, lead and work with other professionals and patients to plan and inform the preferred future state of patient healthcare.

Biography

Dr. Mohamed Ahmed Hamdy , Executive Master of Business Administration from Georgia state University Atlanta, Six Sigma Green Belt holder from World Class Training Institute (WCTI) ,Diploma in Marketing Communications from International Advertising Association NY, hospital management diploma from AUC and a member of OSHA Organization for Occupational Safety and Health Administration.He is a registered healthcare business development & hospital management consultant in the roster of Medex healthcare company.Dr. Mohamed was Egypt projects and business development director at Andalusia group for medical services.Previously the operational manager at Andalusia Smouha and Maadi hospitals. Dr.Mohamed worked as medical director of Life healthcare. He also worked as the Dental Clinics Manager, Faculty of Dentistry,Vice president of infection control & occupational health and safety committees MSA University,He was the Clinics manager at Allied doctors medical administration company.Dr. Mohamed worked as the Deputy Manager of ER department As-Salam International Hospital Maadi, where he managed the fulfillment of quality requirements for the ER Department accreditation by the Joint Commission International (JCI), July 2010. Dr.Mohamed is a renowned international speaker in healthcare facilities & Design conference and participated as a speaker ,moderator and awards judge in Healthcare Management Asia conference in Vietnam. Specialties: Executive business administration and development, Hospital management, Six sigma, Occupational health and safety, TQM, Six Sigma, and medical tourism.

Speaker
Mohamed Ahmed Hamdy Georgia state University, Egypt

Abstract

During the past decade, we have attested tremendous applications of biomedical devices in healthcare and biological research. The advances of fabrication techniques and microelectronics dovetailed with novel biomaterials have enabled biocompatible miniaturized sensors and systems with significant improvement in sensitivity, selectivity, longevity and reliability. Consequently, numerous wearable devices and medical implants have been developed, optimized and utilized, enhancing humans’ life quality to a great extent. Cost and care efficiency, quality and efficacy in hospitals, as well as pharmacology and science discoveries have obtained great benefits from multidisciplinary researches. In the HERO lab at UW, cutting-edge sensing and wireless technologies have been leveraged to develop novel devices that could be used to monitor physiological information of both patients and healthy populations in the home setting or in extreme conditions. The lessons learnt from previous research work with small animal models have provided extensive experiences to deal with the weak and noisy signals in practical scenarios. Further, rigorous signal processing and innovative data approaches have been utilized to enable new applications. In this presentation, Dr. Cao will present integrative approaches to provide outof-clinic physiological monitoring, such as electrocardiogram (ECG), blood pressure, and esophagus refluxes; wireless and data communication, as well as machine learning algorithms to establish e-nurse, e-doctor and mobile health.

Biography

Dr. Cao obtained his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from UT Arlington in 2012 and then he spent 2 years for trainings in Biomedical Engineering and Cardiology at University of Southern California and UC Los Angeles. He joined UW as an Assistant Professor in Electrical/Biomedical Engineering in 2015 after more than a year at ETS Montreal, working as a research faculty. Dr. Cao’s research has been focusing on the applications of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro/nanotechnologies and wireless communication for healthcare and biological research. He has worked with scientists, engineers and medical doctors worldwide in numerous high-impact biomedical projects, which helped amass his credentials in the fields of biomedical micro-devices, neuroscience and cardiovascular engineering. He is one of the pioneers in applying micro-devices and microelectronics for small animal models for heartdisease investigations. His HERO Lab at UW focuses on the applications of flexible and stretchable microelectronics for health monitoring in humans and biological studies in animal models. He has published ~50 peer-reviewed articles in the related fields. Dr. Cao is the recipient of the UW’s Royalty Research Fund in 2016, NSF CAREER Award 2017 and one of the two nominees under UW competing for Moore’s Inventor Fellows 2017.

Speaker
Hung Cao University of Washington, USA

Abstract

Ward Rounds are a fundamental process in the care of hospital inpatients. Little attention has been paid to the organisation of ward rounds. Effective communications between patient, doctor and nurse are vital to the planning, delivery and review of progress. Since 2009 I have audited whether the Doctors on the round have been briefed by the Nurse in Charge prior to the round, whether there is a nurse present at the bedside and whether a report is given back to the primary nurse after the review. There has been a progressive fall in Nurse at the Bedside but improvements in reports before and after reviews. The main factors contributing to the improvements were moving from two wards to one and a Hospital mandate for a pre-round meeting of doctors and nurses. Understaffing appears to be the main contributor to deterioration in the statistics for nurse at the bedside. The importance of the presence of an actively participant nurse remains undervalued to the detriment of rich communications and effective patient care.

Biography

Dr Caldwell qualified from Oxford University and Kings College Hospital Medical School in 1980. He worked in Kings, Brighton, Edinburgh, Hammersmith and Newcastle Hospitals. Since 2004 he has developed an interest in the organisation of Ward Rounds. This resulted in a joint publication in 2012 by the Royal College of Physicians and Royal College of Nursing on recommendations for effective ward rounds in medicine. Dr Caldwell has published papers on the use of a Ward Round Checklist.

Speaker
Gordon Caldwell Worthing Hospital, England

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Construction and renovation of hospital division always presents a challenge. Having a suitable working environment for the project is always offset by the precautions necessary to protect the patients. As medical science progresses, the immune-compromised patient population is growing larger, living longer and represents a larger portion of the patient population. The most vulnerable immune-suppressed patient population is the bone marrow transplant (BMT) population. This means that any renovations done on the unit housing these patients must follow the most stringent infection prevention (IP) precautions to protect these patients. Often the tendency is to scrimp on these precautions, thereby decreasing cost and duration of the project. METHODS: Plans for the renovation and expansion of a 26 bed BMT unit began, the Infection Prevention Specialist (IPS) was involved in the project long before construction began. Education for the General Contractor (GC), Project Manager (PM), subcontractors and healthcare workers (HCW) on the BMT division was started before the first barrier was erected. The contractor safety policy at this large, tertiary care facility has a strong IP program. The GC, PM and subs were educated regularly about IP precautions. All barriers were checked by the IPS prior to any work beginning. Frequent checks of the project were completed by the IPS. Anyone working inside the project was required to wear a cover gown for any movement outside of the project on the patient unit. One elevator was dedicated explicitly for construction. No patient transport was allowed in that elevator. As banks of rooms were taken out of service for renovation, it was imperative that there was a “barrier” room between the rooms being actively renovated and occupied patient rooms. Patients were restricted from ambulating in the hallway near the construction areas. HCW were not allowed inside of the construction barriers. RESULTS: The project duration was 15 months. During that time, the rate of hospital associated (HAI) invasive fungal disease decreased slightly. The project was completed, the expanded unit is open, and the patients are very satisfied with their beautiful new “home.” CONCLUSION: IP precautions are effective. While true they may be costly and cumbersome, that cost cannot be compared to the cost of even one human life.

Biography

Speaker
Loie Couch Barnes-Jewish Hospital, USA

Abstract

Introduction to Complementary and Alternative Medicine(CAM) offers a unique and comprehensive review of the most common CAM. Definitions of CAM and IntegrativeMedicine are given, and the possible reasons for more and more patients relying on CAM vs Conventional Medicine are explored. Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ayurvedic Medicine including Meditation, Homeopathy, and Functional Medicine are described and explained. An example of integration of some CAM methods intogroup visits for prediabetes and diabetes and the use of simple, affordable approaches for common primary care problemsand waysto improve our daily life are explored with a review of evidence whenever possible. An experience of mindful eating using a revised model from Dr. Jon KabatZinn adding gratitude and smiling is offered at the end for those who desire to participate as well as a brief group meditation experience.

Biography

Maryse Pedoussaut, MD is a Board Certified French-American Family Physician, AAFP member since 2000, and an Accredited Functional Medicine Practitioner. She received her medical doctor degree from Paul Sabatier University of Medicine in Toulouse, France. She relocated to the United States and graduated from the University of Miami school of medicine in 2001 after completing her family practice residency at UM/Jackson Memorial Hospital(JMH). She Worked as a clinician at JMH until she joined FIU Hebert Wertheim college of medicine as an assistant professor In the department of medicine in december 2011 and practiced at Jackson North Hospital. In January 2014 she transferred to the department of humanities, Health and Society. Her main interest is to improve the health and well-being of the local and especially underserved community. She specializes in mind and body medicine, functional medicine, and complementary alternative medicine such as homeopathy, Acupuncture, Ayurvedic medicine and meditation.

Speaker
Maryse Pedoussaut FIU Hebert Wertheim college of medicine, Florida, USA

Abstract

Self-directed learning had been known to be beneficial to the adult learners in improving their professional efficiency. It is an essential skill for the nurses who wants to operate in today’s complex health care environment where social, technological and medical changes present them with challenges. Self-directed learning will be one of the ways for them to be able to adapt and respond to these challenges. In this presentation, discussion is done on how to become a self-directed learner and the potential benefits of being self-directed learner in the future carrier like increased confidence, autonomy, motivation and preparation for lifelong learning.

Biography

Khin Saw Yu had finished MBBS in December 1982 from University of Medicine (1) Yangon and started to join the Diploma programme of Anaesthesia in 1987 and worked as an anaesthetist since 1988. Finished the Master of Anaesthesia in 1994 and Doctor of Medicine (Anaesthesiology) from Defence Services Medical Academy (Yangon) in 2006.She had served as a consultant anaesthetist under the government service until 2007. She took part in teaching Basic Science subjects and Clinical Anaesthesia to the Master Programme of Anaesthesia trainees of Defence Services Medical Academy, basicprinciples of anaesthesia and perioperative care to the Bachelor of Nursing students and operation room assistantstraining and working under the Ministry of Defencewhile serving as a clinician. She started to join as a full time academician in Malaysia since 2008.

Speaker
Khin Saw Yu International Medical University, Malaysia

Abstract

As a professional, nursing professionals constantly acquire new knowledge and skills, need continuous learning as an individual's responsibility to provide higher quality nursing, and strive to maintain and develop their abilities. However, due to the role and obligation as a nursing profession, giving priority to work rather than living has become a challenge. Therefore, we hope that self-control towards the goal set by herself and thinking the ability to educate the self can be exerted more to harmonize the work of the nurse and the life, in this research, we clarify the harmony between the work of the nurse and the life, and the self-educational ability. In conclusion, first of all, it is important that harmonization of the work and life of nursing jobs is a significant related factor to promote self-educational ability, and secondly, it is clarified that support of work and challenging workplace, fulfilling family life and family will enhance the pride of herself and thought for stable growth and development.

Biography

Fumie Nakamura received her Master of Nursing from International Medical Welfare University Graduate School. Also, she received her Bachelor of Nursing from Griffith University, Australia. She worked for Tochigi Medical Center of Shimotsuga for 15 years as Deputy of Director. She is now working for Department of Nursing, Ashikaga Institute of Technology as Associate Professor. Minoru Yamakado is Dean and Professor, Department of Nursing, Ashikaga Institute of Technology. He received his Medical Doctor from Department of Medicine University of Gunma. Also, he received his Doctor of Philosophy from Department of Internal Medicine, University of Tokyo.

Speaker
Fumie Nkamura and Minoru Yamakado Ashikaga Institute of Technology, Japan

Abstract

The specific symptoms which were observed with Vietnam-Veterans led to the establishment of the new diagnostic category „postal-traumatic stress disorder“(PTSD). Thereby for the empiric research a new frame of reference was created with which the effects of traumatic events could be better examined and be understood. In many studies it could be shown that after extraordinary events (for example war, flight, torture, sexual violation) people developed a Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as well as for the affected Persons and professional staffs. In connection with the Trauma different kind of comorbidity like depressions, fears and different physical complaints could be observed that’s important to take in account for professional in the health care systems. Therefore a specific trauma treatment is important and a sufficient knowledge beside therapists and physicians.

Biography

Prof. Dr. Dr. Jan Ilhan Kizilhan, psychologist, psychotherapist, trauma expert, orientalist head of department of Mental Health and Addiction at the State University in Baden-Württemberg, Germany, and is chief psychologist of the Special-Quota Project, a programme funded by the State Government of Baden-Württemberg. The project aims was to bring 1100 women and children who have been held hostage by Islamic State to Germany for medical treatment. He is also the Founding Dean of the Institute for Psychotherapy and Psychotraumatology at the University of Duhok/Norther Iraq

Speaker
Jan Ilhan Kizilhan State University in Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany

Abstract

One of the major challenges of the Brazilian Ministry of Health is to foster the interest in breast cancer screening (BCS), especially among women at high risk. Strategies have been developed to promote the early identification of breast cancer (BC) mainly by Pink October (PO) campaigns. Massive number of queries conducted through Google creates traffic data that can be analysed to show overlooked interest cycles and their seasonalities. We hypothesize that this data may be correlated with public interest cycles leveraged by national BCS campaigns, like PO. Methods: Google Trends tool was employed to normalise traffic data on a scale from 0 (<1% of the peak volume) to 100 (peak of traffic) presented as weekly Relative Search Volume (RSV)concerning Mammography (MG) and breast cancer (BC) as search terms. A time series covered the last 261 weeks (November, 2011 to October, 2016) and RSV of both terms were compared to their respective Annual Means (AM). Polynomial trendlines (2nd order) was employed to estimate overall trends. Results and discussion: we found an upward trend for both terms over the five years, with almost parallel polynomial trendlines. Remarkable growing peaks were also found along PO months - for MG: ↑17%, 54.5%, 57.1%, 97.4% and 119.1% above AM; for BC: ↑54.9%, 115.5%, 146%, 196.8% and 140.9% above AM. Along all period studied, a short downward trend along December-January bimester was also noteworthy – MG:↓11%, 19.6%, 11%, 27.1% and 15% below AM and BC:↓26.9%, 34.7%, 25.4%, 36.6% and 26.5%. These trends traced a N-shaped pattern with higher peaks in PO months and sharp falls along subsequent December/January. Recent papers have described the same pattern - campaign months with highest RSV and lowest along December-January. Considering these findings, it would be plausible to move Pink October to the beginning of each year, extending the beneficial effect of the campaigns. It would be more suitable to start screening campaigns at the beginning of year, when new resolutions are taken and new projects are added to everyday routines. Conclusion: Several recent studies seem to support the present assumption that GT is useful to foresee cycles of public interest after targeted interventions. Our work raises attention to the study of traffic data to encourage health campaign analysts to undertake better analysis based on marketing practices.

Biography

Paulo R. Vasconcellos-Silva 1 2, Dárlinton B. Feres Carvalho 3 1 Oswaldo Cruz Foundation/IOC/LITEB; 2 National Cancer Institute; 3 Computer Science Departament, Federal University of São João del-Rei, Brazil.

Speaker
Paulo R. Vasconcellos-Silva Oswaldo Cruz Foundation/IOC/LITEB, Brazil

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson's disease must face changes in their physical, mental, and social functions. One such critical changes is that in the psychological dimension; psychological changes that can produce fatigue and depression. This study explored depression and its associated factors in patients with Parkinson's disease. In this cross-sectional correlational study, 130 participants were recruited for interview. Four inventories, namely the geriatric depression scale, fatigue inventory, social support, and basic demographic data, were completed. Data were analyzed using independent t tests, analyses of variance, the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient, and linear multiple regression. The multiple regression analysis results revealed that marital status, Hoehn and Yahr stage, number of comorbidities, social support, and degree of fatigue could explain 28.3% of depression variance and were related to depression severity. Marital status had a significant influence on depression. Patients without spouses had higher depression scores than did married patients. The factors of having a spouse, a lower Hoehn and Yahr stage, fewer comorbidities, more social support, and a lower degree of fatigue were all correlated with a lower degree of depression. Nurses should note that patients with Parkinson's disease may experience depression and subsequent fatigue in different stages of disease progression. The rigorous provision of advice to patients with Parkinson's disease is necessary. Nurses should encourage patients to attend hospital and community activities, improve their social lives, and reduce their loneliness to enable their depression and subsequent fatigue to be reduced to the lowest possible degree..

Biography

Yi-Tung Lin has completed her Master from I-Shou University. She is the Senior Specialist of Department of Nuring, E-DA hospital. She has published more than 5 papers in journals.

Speaker
Yi-Tung Lin E-DA hospital, Taiwan

Abstract

From an intern nurse to a registered nurse is a phase of transition. The transitional phase requires intern nurses to assimilate in to the nursing culture, develop clinical expertise through gaining clinical skills and knowledge through new experiences. The transitional experiences can be perceived as a phase of new discoveries, frustrations, happiness and accomplishments which moulds how the intern nurses will work when they become registered nurses. The main aim of this study is to explore the experiences of intern nurses at Labasa Hospital.This qualitative study is conducted among 20 intern nurses who were currently employed at Labasa Hospital, Fiji. A non‒probability method using convenience sampling was used to select the sample. After ethical approval has been sought, data was collected using semi‒structured interviews. The content of the interview was transcribed and the data was coded, sorted and categorized into themes.The results of the study showed array of challenges including; lack of knowledge and confidence, meeting the physical demands of shift work, adapting to new roles/relationships and accepting professional accountability. The results of this study showed the challenges for intern nurses transition into the workforce at Labasa Hospital in Fiji. Further knowledge will enable management to create better experiences for all intern nurses and for capacity building for future nurses in Fiji.

Biography

Dr. Masoud Mohammadnezhad is an Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care and is program coordinator of Health Promotion at Fiji National University (FNU). He received his BSc in Nursing and his MSc in Health Education from Iran. He finished his PhD in Public Health at Flinders University, Australia. He has strong teaching experience from the undergraduate to doctoral levels. He is specifically interested in the use of tailoring in behavior change interventions and the use of behavioral change models and health promotion.

Speaker
Masoud Mohammadnezhad Fiji National University , Fiji

Abstract

Point of care testing (POCT) is the rapid diagnostic test that can be used in anywhere outside the laboratory. Nowadays, POCT is widely used in various healthcare setting such as nursing home, primary and community health centers, general practitioner clinics and even at the patient’s home. The usage of POCT in healthcare system range from simple test like blood glucose level & urine pregnancy test to more complex tests like cardiac markers and INR. These POCT tests are usually done by healthcare professionals; doctors, paramedics and especially nurses and not by the laboratory personnel. These tests are simple, easy and very rapid to get the results without sending patient’s sample to the laboratory and have dramatic influence on patient care. However, when these tests are done by people other than laboratory staffs who might not have awareness of quality control and adequate background knowledge on test principles, still all the tests results will be accurate and reliable is questionable. This scientific talk will emphasis on common errors that occur in POCT and how to overcome these errors, obtaining reliable results and role of nurse in performing POCT.

Biography

Dr Saint Nway Aye, a histopathologist, got MBBS and Master Degree specialized in Pathology from University of Medicine 1, Yangon, Myanmar. She is currently working in School of Medicine & Health Sciences, International Medical University in Malaysia. She is interested in not only cancer diagnosis and prognosis but also evolution of rapid diagnostic tests that could aid in patient timely management in clinical setting.

Speaker
Saint Nway Aye International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract

Benchmarking is usually considered to be a process of seeking out and implementing best practices at best cost. Introduced by the Xerox Company in an effort to reduce its production costs, benchmarking methods spread throughout the industrial sector in the 1980s and underwent several changes that, upon analysis, are highly instructive. First used as a method for comparing production costs with those of competitors in the same sector, benchmarking later became conceptualized and used as a method for continuous quality improvement (CQI) in any sector. For more than 10 years now, the demand for performance has become a major issue for the healthcare system. This is due to three factors: the imperative to control healthcare costs; the need to structure the management of risk and of quality of care; and the need to satisfy patients' expectations. These demands have spurred the development of many national and international projects for indicator development and comparison. The term benchmarking emerged within the context of this comparison process. Subsequently, the concept of benchmarking became more tightly defined as referring to the analysis of processes and of success factors for producing higher levels of performance. Finally, benchmarking was directed towards the pursuit of best practices in order to satisfy patients' expectations

Biography

Mr. Mohammed Shawky is a Certified Professional for Healthcare Quality with more than 10 years of experience in developing healthcare quality programs in Saudi Arabia where he has led many different projects for improving hospitals’ operations and preparing healthcare facilities to practice up to the level of the national and international standards. He extended his services to different sectors by taking leadership positions in the Ministry of Health, Ministry of Defense and the Private sector. He is a Leadership and Quality Management surveyor and a member of the Survey Technical Committee at the Saudi Central Board for Accreditation of Healthcare Institutions.

Speaker
Mohamed Shawky Medical Core Quality, KSA

Abstract

Nursing has always been an evolving profession, be it in practice or in education. The advancement of new technologies is an inevitable corollary to prompt regulatory bodies and nursing leaders to cautiously perform curricular review on the scope of nursing practice and standards of care. Without accepting these new challenges, nursing will be a status quo. The conception of Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) has totally transformed the direction and future of the nursing profession. The nurse at the forefront co-equally embraces the emerging demands of the expanded roles as the practice of nursing continuously evolves. The trend of nursing specialties which has evolved since the 20th century has initiated the advancement of nursing practice to the advanced practice level to perform specialty functions with role expansion in patient care. The demand for this continuing challenge is driven by changes in and increasing patient care needs, newer technology and state-of-the-art facilities and changing opportunities within the workforce as well as a diminishing physician supply. Advanced Practice Nursing (APN) will evidently address the aforementioned by embracing the expanded nursing roles encompassing knowledge and competence based on substantial experience and graduate education in the promotion of health and prevention of disease which can primarily serve the marginalized population.

Biography

Dr. Mary Grace F. Dauz obtained a BS degree in Civil Engineering in 1985 and a BS degree in Nursing in 1992. She pursued higher education and earned her Master of Arts in Nursing in 1996 and eventually, a Doctorate Degree in Philosophy Major in Educational Management in 2005 at the Angeles University Foundation. She also attended the Trainer’s Training Methodology Course in 2003 provided by the TESDA, the Leadership and Managerial Excellence in Health Systems: Nursing Leadership Program by the Ateneo de Manila University, Graduate School of Business in 2006 and the Train the Trainer Programme for Nurse Teachers and Leaders in the Philippines sponsored by Temasek Foundation, NUHS and Ngee-Ann Polytechnic, Singapore in 2012. Dr. Grace is a nursing administrator and educator with top notch performance. She is the embodiment of a unique combination of expertise and experience in Nursing Education, Administration, and Practice. Backed by more than 24 years of nursing experience in various capacities, she is a strong strategic planner, with keen quality assurance, operational and administrative nursing skills and practice. She is a dynamic nurse educator who has regularly shared her expertise in the different fields of nursing as a speaker, lecturer and resource person. She also serves as an adviser and a panel in various nursing- related researches and case studies. Dr. Grace is highly committed to delivering results. She is a cross-functional team player, a highly effective leader, and a consistent results-oriented performer. Her leadership in nursing practice has been recognized by her contemporaries in the field and was nominated for two consecutive years for the Search for Nursing Excellence in the Philippines where she landed as a finalist. As an adopted daughter to some Rotary Clubs, she gave her share to community relations and community service by actively participating in their notable Corporate Social Responsibility Programs. Outside of this club, she is also involved in community service and civic-oriented activities on career development.

Speaker
Mary Grace Flores Dauz Angeles University Foundation Medical Center,Philippines

Abstract

Healthcare is a Complex System that is composed of multiple, interconnected components as People, Machines, Processes, Data and Information. All of these components are interacted to produce specific outcomes, in a specific work environment within a specific organizational culture Increase complexity of the system makes healthcare field more error prone. Major Factors Contributing to System Failures include organizational culture, Teamwork, knowledge and skills as well as the Technology use, so we must “Being a “system detective” We need to Think about the system factors that came into play—either to increase or decrease the risk for harm to patients. Human Factors Engineering play great role in build common understanding about how we can build safer systems. The HFE is the discipline that attempts to identify and address human Issues that affect the people performance To Build Safety in Healthcare, we must emphasize three principles, 1) standardize care 2) create independent checks and 3) learn from defects approach. Designing the healthcare processes and systems without good understanding of all factors that may contributing in the reliability of the outcome especially the human factors lead to system flaws or failures to yield safe care or services Technology today can sometimes –but not always –be helpful, the most of advanced HIT is designed based on HFE principles and provide great help to all healthcare providers especially Nursing care to provide safer care to their patients . I will focus on these principles and building safer HIT systems that are widely used in our facilities

Biography

Abouelfetoh Mohamed shahin, 42years,Married and currently working as Member of Accreditation Preparedness Team, PMP ,PS and QI specialist , Senior Hospital Pharmacist at Dallah Hospital,Riyadh. He has more than 25-year’s experiences in healthcare field.Tanta University Bachelor (BSc) Jun1996, Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1991 - 1996 Grade: very good,OXFORD, United Kingdom,HQMPD (HEALTHCARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT PROFESSIONAL DIPLOMA), HEALTHCARE QUALITY MANAGEMENT, 2015 2015,Grade: Very Good,Cambridge ,United Kingdom Diploma of Business Administration (D.B.A.), Business, Management, Marketing, and Related Support Services Grade: Good, Certified Kaizen Lean Manager, CKLMASCB (E) Accreditation Service for Certifying Bodies (Europe) Ltd, AIQM License A-3741 February 2017,Certified Professional in Patient safety, CPPS National Patient Safety Foundation, NPSF October 2016 to October 2019,Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality, CPHQ,National Association of healthcare Quality, NAHQ License 00301855 March 2016 to December 2018, Leading Healthcare Quality and Safety,Course Certificates License J27CCJH68EJU June 2016,Team STEPPS Master Trainer, AHRQ Org., United States October 2015, OSHA Compliance Certificate Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) March 2015

Speaker
Abou El Fettoh Shahin Healthcare quality and patient safety professional, Senior Hospital pharmacist at Dallah Hospital, KSA

Abstract

Culture is the work of a human being that is born along with the creation of man as well as a documented hereditary in accordance with periodization. Culture is born and develops and changes along with the changing times. The culture of a region will be very important against the level of development of public health in the region. The very culture played an important role in increasing the degree of the health of a community. This research aims to get an idea how health workers have good self-efficacy ability to culture communities in mountainous regions, the Valley, and the coast in the province of Papua. This research is divided into independent variables namely the culture of the community, the community's culture of the Valley, as well as the culture of the community in the coastal province of Papua and the Dependents Variable is the health officer self-efficacy. This research uses Multi Concurrent Design Method with Embedded Strategy approach where researchers use quantitative and qualitative methods together with the use of primary and secondary methods. The primary method used to obtain data, and a secondary method used to obtain data in support of the data obtained from the primary method. The research results obtained that about 32% who said very less confident and less confident as well as about 41% stating neutral in understanding the culture of Papua in the context of the public beaches, valleys and mountains. The existence of these data give an overview that the importance of supply self-efficacy about understanding the culture in which they will be on duty or placed in a working area which is recommended

Biography

I completed my Doctor of Nursing Science (DNS) in 2015 from St. Paul University Philippines, Tuguegarao City. I am working as leader of Community Outreach of Health Polytechnic of Jayapura Under supervision of Ministry of Health of Republic of Indonesia. At this time I completed book about Transcultural Nursing, and Medical Surgical Nursing. Another side is conducting research about culture in Papua. In my another work is train the Health Practitioner related to service excellent and effective communication in the hospital related to Interprofessional Collaboration. As transcultural practitioner, many invitation as speaker around the country has been fulfilled as share and train health practitioner related to transcultural nursing especially in Rural and Remote Area like Papua, Indonesia.

Speaker
Agussalim Health Polytechnic of Ministry of Health of Jayapura, Nursing School. Papua Province, Indonesia.

Abstract

The role of the Nurse Specialist has been demonstrated in several aspects leading to improvement in patient care, including disease management programs. In our hospital, we have established a multi-disciplinaryprogram for patients with Heart Failure (HF) to improve the delivery of care. Furthermore, we wanted to show the role of the Nurse Specialist among the team in improving the adherence to Guideline-Directed Medical therapy (GDMT)which by itself improves HF patient outcomes. A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate the adherence to GDMT prior to (January to December 2014), and after (January to December 2015) the establishment of the program for patients with HF at King Fahad Cardiac Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. This was assisted by applying a local checklist to measure, in particular, the utilization of ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers, immunizations. The 30-day readmission rate was 10.53% in 2014 and down to 2.41% in 2015 with a p-value of 0.003. Our data shows the positive effect of a multidisciplinary heart failure program with the inclusion of the Nurse Specialist on the adherence to GDMT in one-year time which has positively reflected on patient care and outcome

Biography

Ahmad Hayajneh has completed Bachelor degree 2005 in Nursing, hired in King Saud University (King Fahad Cardiac Center) 2008, I am the one of the team established Heart Failure program in the kingdom (multidisciplinary team), ACLS instructor in 2014, presented in several conferences, keen in building Heart Failure Programs around the country

Speaker
Ahmad Muhyialdeen Hayajneh King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

United Nation’s sustainability goals identify health and well-being as one of the areas that require immediate action. Efficient solutions demand active participation and foresight to repurpose our resources in a timely and sensitive manner. Technology has already been taken on board as an important transformer in healthcare; perhaps, has not been used to its full potential yet. In addition to pursuits for telemedicine and other technology based interventions in healthcare, games have potential to offer a strong transformative power to meaningfully support public health and well-being both within the healthcare facilities under the supervision of healthcare professionals and at people’s homes. Over the last decade, there has been significant research on the potential of games for rehabilitation of a large demographic from children with specific disorders to elders with neurodegenerative diseases. Such research presents approaches, solutions and further challenges to all levels of healthcare sector while also requesting participation from specialists. In the light of the technological developments and societal changes, healthcare is at a cross section to contemplate on future’s challenges before future becomes today. Transitions take time, but require forward thinking and immediate action for the creation of smart solutions. While projecting future under the light of well-being goal of United Nations, this presentation aims to present challenges and opportunities for how games can be utilized for a reform in healthcare and how they can be useful in the healthcare researchers’ toolbox.

Biography

Aslihan Tece Bayrak is an aspiring games scholar, currently teaching game development as a senior lecturer at Media Design School. She has a Master’s in Computer Engineering, and currently a PhD candidate in Computer Science at University of Auckland. Her core research area is utilizing games for preventative therapy and rehabilitation of Parkinson Disease. She sees gameplay programming as art, also believes in the power of games for change. Her area of interest includes socio-cultural and emotional context of games, experience design, games for health, design and development methodologies, real time systems and HCI

Speaker
Aslihan Tece Bayrak Media Design School,Auckland, New Zealand

Abstract

Problem description Aging population is widely increasing throughout the world. Therefore it has been progressive growth in the incidence and prevalence of diabetes.Several studies showed that the presence of comorbidities, specifically diabetes, may have a negative effect on surgical outcome. However, due to a significant proportion of diabetics, it is important to review the outcome, risks, and complications in these patients undergoingsurgical procedures. Method The database PubMed was searched to access relevant articles. The keywords were “diabetes”, “elderly”, “peri-operative nursing” “surgical procedures”, “complications” Results Surgery in elderly people becomes a bit complicated when diabetes is present. Diabetes has been known that affects all body systems, particularly,delays collagen synthesis and impairs phagocytosis. Studies have shown that major surgery leads to metabolic stress, with an increase in catabolic hormone secretion and inhibition of anabolic hormones, particularly insulin.In patients without diabetes this can lead to transient hyperglycaemia. All these factors may lead into higher risk of various infections and delayed wound healing after any surgical procedure. It is important for diabetics to have carefully managed glycemic control prior to any kind of surgery. The key point for diabetics undergoing surgery is to avoidhypoglycaemia and ketoacidosis. Concerning the perioperative care, measures need to be taken by the surgical team, in order to minimize and optimize patient outcomes (skin preparation, antibiotic prophylaxis, avoid feet pressure, etc.). Moreover, patients to avoid or minimize complications should be carefully managed by the diabetes specialist team. The diabetes specialist nurse has been shown to reduce the length of stay for patients with diabetes, whatever the reason for admission. Conclusion Good glycaemic control is the key for avoiding delays to surgery, complications, postoperative infections and delayed healing.The diabetes specialist nurse or team can play animportant role through teaching, training and support, to ensure that all health professionals are able to facilitate the whole procedure.

Biography

Associate Professor, Nursing Department, Athens University of Applied Sciences (TEI of Athens), Greece

Speaker
Eugenia Vlachou Associate Professor, Nursing Department, Athens University of Applied Sciences (TEI of Athens), Greece

Abstract

Population ageing has major consequences for the planning and delivery of health care. One of these consequences is an increase in the number of frail older people. The Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) is a self-report questionnaire for assessing frailty in older people. The TFI is based on an integral conceptual model of frailty,which defines frailty as a dynamic state affecting an individual who experiences losses in one or more domains of human functioning (physical, psychological, social). The original TFI was developed and validated for assessing frailty in Dutch community-dwelling older people. Subsequently, the TFI has been validated in seven countries including China, Germany, Brazil, Denmark, Italy, Portugal, and Poland. Currently, there is robust evidence of its reliability and validity. The predictive validity of the TFI for disability in activities of daily living, indicators of healthcare utilization (e.g. receiving personal care, receiving nursing, visit to a general practitioner), falls, and lower quality of life, has been established in several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies using different samples. Moreover, the TFI is easy and quick to administer. However, more studies are needed to establish whether the TFI is suitable for intervention studies and for specific target groups, such as patients with a particular chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus or cancer. This review aims to showthe results of assessing frailty using the TFI. In particular, determinants and adverse outcomes of multidimensional frailty will be addressed. In addition, a critical consideration of current instruments for assessing frailty will be given. Robbert J. J. Gobbensis professor Health and Well-being of frailty elderly at Inholland University of Applied Sciences, the Netherlands. He is involved in research on frail older people since 2005 and has published more than 40 international scientific articles on frailty. He is chief editor of Verpleegkunde, a Dutch-Flemish scientific journal for nurses, and associate editor of BMC Geriatrics. The product of his PhD project was the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI), a self-report questionnaire for assessing frailty. Currently, the TFI has been translated and validated in a lot of countries spread out over the world.

Biography

Faculty of Health, Sports and Social Work, Inholland University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands Zonnehuisgroep Amstelland, Amstelveen, the Netherlands Department of General Practice, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

Speaker
Robbert J. J. Gobbens University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium

Abstract

Prior to 1986, emergency department staff was both morally and ethically obligated to provide care that included the stabilization and treatment of all patients who presented to the emergency department, regardless of their ability to pay. In 1986, this moral and ethical obligation became federal law with the passage of the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA), which required any patient coming to an emergency department be stabilized and treated regardless of their insurance status or ability to pay [1] [2]. Hospital emergency departments are a critical entry point into the American health care system. The patient population is a combination of the privately insured, including high deductible health plans, the uninsured, and the underinsured. Although emergency treatment is covered under EMTALA, hospitals are left to deal with the bills accumulated from non-emergent daily medical care. The increase in volume places tremendous burden on hospital emergency departments, with high overhead and fixed costs. Many facilities cannot keep up with costs and are forced into bankruptcy, leading to overcrowding in nearby hospitals. More thought must be placed on how hospitals can bear the burden of uncompensated care. Access to care is not enough; it’s crucial that care be affordable. Addressing uncompensated care in the emergency department can be done successfully. The staff is proficient in saving lives, now they must learn to put the same effort into saving money.

Biography

Pamela Treister completed her BSN, MS, and CNS from Hunter College in New York, and doctoral studies – DNP in Leadership, from Quinnipiac University in Connecticut. She has been a nurse for more than 30 years, having worked in medical/surgical, trauma, and neurosurgical intensive care units. Dr. Treister is a textbook reviewer, and has volunteered to be a peer reviewer for several journals. She is certified in Medical-Surgical Nursing and currently works as a Clinical Assistant Professor. Dr. Treister has published, presented and spoken at more than a dozen conferences, nationally and internationally, and is considered to be a clinical expert in her field.

Speaker
Pamela Treister New York Institute of Technology, New York,USA

Abstract

Dr. Hassan Kasim Haridi completed his Doctorate degree from Ain Shams University, Cairo and postdoctoral studies in Infection Control and hospital Epdemiology from the same university. He is a Consultant Public Health Medicine & Epidemiology and Head of the Research Department in Health Affairs, Hail Region, Saudi Arabia. He has more than 20 scientific publications and being a reviewer/ editorial board member for a number of reputed journals. He has managed programs in hospital epidemiology and infection control, risk management, occupational health, clinical and community research, education, and care management services as well community programs for screening & early detection of diseases

Biography

Dr. Hassan Kasim Haridi completed his Doctorate degree from Ain Shams University, Cairo and postdoctoral studies in Infection Control and hospital Epdemiology from the same university. He is a Consultant Public Health Medicine & Epidemiology and Head of the Research Department in Health Affairs, Hail Region, Saudi Arabia. He has more than 20 scientific publications and being a reviewer/ editorial board member for a number of reputed journals. He has managed programs in hospital epidemiology and infection control, risk management, occupational health, clinical and community research, education, and care management services as well community programs for screening & early detection of diseases

Speaker
Hassan Kasim Haridi Head of Research Department, Ministry of Health, Hail Region, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

In order to maintain students’attention, curiosity, interest, optimism, and passion educator’s need to engage millennial generation students in a variety of pedagogies. The traditional classroom is being replaced with virtual learning environments. Literature affirms that blended learning (BL) is the predominant model of the future, given the increasing diversity of faculty and students.BL is a combination of traditional face-to-face classroom instructions with the use of technological toolsand has transformed the pedagogy of teaching and learning. It is a process whereby teaching learning pedagogies are transformed; students are more engaged in learning thereby improving student learning outcomes. The focus of this paper is to share how the Post RN baccalaureate nursing program was transformed into a blended modality. Students were more satisfied as they feel empowered when given the freedom to plan the pace and place of their study, as well as they feel that the interaction with peers and teachers have increased beyond classroom hours.Success factors included; institutional support, faculty motivation, funding, resources and infrastructure. Time and resource challenges like internet connectivity, and availability of electricity were encountered by faculty and students alike. Additionally, the role of faculty development will be highlighted along with mentorship of faculty to transform their teaching pedagogy will be outlined. In conclusion, BL has been seen as an exciting innovation in nursing education. The lessons encountered can go a long way in developing and implementing blended learning programs nationally and regionally.

Biography

Dr. Jacqueline Maria Dias completed her BScN from McMaster University, Canada, MEd from the University of Wales, UKand acquired PhD in Nursing Education from Ambrosiana University, Milan, Italy. She currently holds the rank of Associate Professor and is also working in the capacity of Director, Post RN, BScN and Blended Learning.Furthermore, Dr. Dias also received the Universityaward of “Excellence in Education”. Her previous appointments include founding Interim Co- Director for Centre for Innovation in Medical Education in AKU Medical College, Director of BScN Nursing and General Nursing Diploma Program. She has several international presentations and publications to her credit.

Speaker
Jacqueline Maria Dias Aga Khan University School of Nursing and Midwifery, Pakistan

Abstract

Today, nurses and community health workers (CHWs) are often regarded as global citizens and community heroes. In the last few decades, with rapidly aging populations, major destabilization of global economies as well as ongoing environmental disasters and other unpredictable events such as the Fukushima accident, global climate change impacts, ongoing terrorist activities and warfare, the need for cost-effective and time-efficient community healthcare services globally is overwhelming. In an era of smart applications of cell phone technologies and e-health informatics capabilities, governments of many countries will now be looking at the need for a new generation of well-trained and engaged nurses and CHWs with e-health informatics competencies to realize the ongoing maintenance of the health and well being of their citizens via secured networks and infrastructures. Not only will e-health informatics competencies provide a significant advantage over wasteful, poorly coordinated and expensive conventional medical procedures, but also hold the potential for leveling the playing fields in terms of delivering care where it may be most critically needed, especially for the underserved. Understanding the e-health informatics competency challenges and trends is therefore a critical step towards identifying the various roles that could or should be played by nurses and CHWs to aid policymakers, vendors, physicians and other health care professionals and/or researchers, and even patients in this age of the Internet of Things. This talk overviews the prevailing e-health informatics competency challenges and trends for practicing community nursing. Starting with the major reference disciplines contributing to the evolution of e-health informatics competencies, the talk will survey current developments, provide insights on new opportunities and ongoing challenges arising from use of these newer technologies, including the need for securing networks and infrastructures. In contrast to the centuries old traditional practice of conventional medicine, the discussion will offer the audience important directions and insights related to the next phase research, developments and practices of community nursing and trends. Among other things, key challenges include knowledge to translate lean and technology-based thinking into community healthcare practices, envisioning the power and convenience of an interoperable Information and Communication Technology(ICT) infrastructure for e-health and m-health applications, incorporating the design of intelligent and appealing interfaces, deploying emerging m-health & cloud-based strategy, understanding the influence of social media, and debating on the value of digital alerts, monitoring and patient assisted self-care interventions. While identifying the different e-health informatics competencies, challenges and trends needed by new generations of nurses and CHWs, I will also attempt to provide critical thoughts and lessons gleaned from a few ongoing studies conducted at McMaster University and elsewhere. For example, we are looking at health informatics competencies for paramedical professionals across all Canadian Provinces. Finally, the talk will conclude with the observation that regardless of how e-health and m-health technologies evolve, it will still be limited within the confines of regulatory policies, sustainable paradigm changes, the challenge of interoperability, standards, privacy, security, socio-political, legal and ethical concerns

Biography

Joseph Tan, Dip (Civil Engr.), BS (Math & Comp. Sc.), MA (Ind. & Mgmt Engr.), and PhD (MIS) is Professor of eBusiness Innovation and eHealth Informatics, DeGroote School of Business, McMaster University. Prior to joining McMaster as an endowed chair professor in 2002, he was Associate Professor and Acting Director of the MHA program, Department of Healthcare & Epidemiology, UBC Faculty of Medicine, Adjunct Faculty at the UVic School of Health Informatics, Research Fellow at BCIT Technology Center, and Professor & Chair of the ISM Department, SBA, Wayne State University, USA. Professor Tan is also the founding and ongoing Editor-in-Chief, IJHISI and has served as distinguished faculty, invited speaker, panel moderator, research fellow and keynote for numerous local as well as major national and international conferences across North America, Asia, Middle East and Africa. Professor Tan has also been named as among the “top 10 most influential informatics professors” on HealthTechTopia website, invited to publish in the scientific journal, Nature, and sits on multiple peer-review federal grant agencies and journal editorial boards. He has a professional background that spans a broad spectrum of interdisciplinary and trans-disciplinary research area. A lead investigator in redefining the frontiers of multidisciplinary Business and Health IT knowledge development, management and expansion, including active involvement in collaborative research and multidisciplinary joint-grant submissions, Dr. Tan has demonstrated skills and ability to serve in both academia and industry. Dr. Tan has been widely cited among various academic research communities, is among bestselling authors of scholarly books in health IT/IS areas, and has achieved recognized scholarship in teaching and learning with students’ nominations for teaching excellence awards. His overall career focus is on reshaping the landscape of IS/IT applications and promotion in e-Health informatics through cross-disciplinary thinking/project partnering with diverse practitioners, clinicians, researchers, and a variety of user communities.

Speaker
Joseph Tan McMaster University, Canada

Abstract

Accrediting bodies work as a pivotal vehicle for raising the bar of performance and patient safety. As Saudi national accrediting body, CBAHI lead an initiative to screen all kingdom hospitals against essential safety requirements which are 20 standards selected based on their impact on patient safety. CBAHI team surveyed 449 hospitals within 5 months period with one trained surveyor. Data analysis of results were used to rank and to prioritize improvement plan for both governmental and private sectors. 1. Learn the objective and the details of this national initiative, how it balances between the consultative and regulatory arms of CBAHI. 2. Learn how this initiative help to participate in creating an urgency to change and help organizations in addressing Essential Safety Requirements. 3. Learn the outcomes of the initiative, in addition to challenges and opportunities for improvements.

Biography

Over the past 15 years, He focused on consultation for healthcare quality in healthcare facilities, analyze and provide advice on the managerial methods and organization of governmental and private healthcare facilities. He has great experience in Performance Improvement, Risk Management, Utilization Management, improving Patient/Customer Satisfaction and Quality, while involving teams from the facility, including physicians and administrative staff. As a Six Sigma Black Belt Certified and senior member of ASQ, He worked internationally as a Prelim Judge in the international Excellence Teams Award for ASQ and is recognized as a certified ASQ “American Society of Quality” trainer.

Speaker
Mostafa Ghalwash Saudi Central Board for Accreditation of Health Care Institutions, Saudi arabia

Abstract

Most clinical and public decision-makers are increasingly relying on evidenced-based approach using information extracted by analysing exponentially growing data. Systematic reviews and statistical methods areintegral parts of analysing and interpreting simple or complex data to make valid and accurate decisions by most of the healthcare professionals and public leaders. Combining results on the same effect size measure from independent studies using meta-analytic methods are crucial for numerical data. Because of its power to uncover, otherwise unavailable, valuable information from data, and inherent power to convince people and motivate stakeholders, statistics is being widely applied for both. Unfortunately, many decision-makers are not evidence-informed and common people are not well informed about statistical methods, the power of statistics has been often misused and abused by many dishonest and powerful people for self-serving purposes. Increasingly decision makers are adopting evidence-based approach through systematic review of literature, and the statistical meta-analysis has been extensively used to synthesise published summary data on a particular topic of interest from a number of independent studies, including clinical trials in order to make credible and scientifically valid conclusions. Meta-analysis provides a scientifically valid synthesis to estimate the common effect size as a pooled statistic for any selected outcome variables through merging of relevant data. This talk covers several estimators of the common effect size and some of their major impacts in the meta-analysis and redistribution of weights to the individual studies. Some examples from recent literature on randomised clinical trials in medical studies are used to illustrate the alternative estimators and discuss their comparative usefulness in analysing data on binary and continuous outcome variables. The workshop will use a free statistical package, MetaXL, an add on to MS Excel to perform meta-analysis for illustration and hands on training. Key Words: Evidence-based Decision, Clinical and Public Decisions, Evidence-Informed, Meta-analysis, Statistics and Data Analysis.

Biography

Shahjahan Khan is the professor at University of Southern Queensland (USQ),He Published over 150 peer reviewed papers, and presented 12 workshops, 23 keynote addresses, and over 45 invited and 55 seminars/scholarly meetings.He is also a Founding Chief Editor, Journal of Applied Probability and Statistics (JAPS), USA, since 2006; Public speaker in various community and professional events. Lived and worked in 9 different countries in Asia, Australia, Middle East, Europe and North America.

Speaker
Shahjahan Khan University of Southern Queensland,Australia

Abstract

Technology is continue to progress more rapidly and it affect all sector in the world, including education. The lecturer’s role as a facilitator should be able to facilitate the students to find their own way of learning. Lecturer need to facilitate students discovering their own way to learn without limited time and space (anytime and anywhere). E-learning will encourage students to learn more active and creative. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of internet usaage with student’s motivation and also factors that influence e-learning implementation. This study used descriptive method with causal design. Respondents in this study were 338 students with questionnaire from Watkins about e-learning which has been translated into Bahasa.Through Structural Equation Model (SEM) analyse that the internet usage on student can significantly influence student’s motivation in using elearning shown with significancy level 8.31(>2) with 95% confidence level and value R2 0.49 (error vaeiance 0.75). The development of the pedagogical content by lecturer should be more creative in accordance with the technology used. Keywords: e-learning; nursing; motivation

Biography

Kristina Lisum has completed his MSN Loyola University of Chicago, USA. She is the Head of Learning Resources of Sint Carolus of Health Sciences. She has published more than 5 papers in National and International journals.

Speaker
Kristina Lisum Sint Carolus School of Health Sciences,Indonesia

Abstract

Biography

Speaker
Ekhlas King Saud Bin Abd Al Aziz University for Health Sciences, Saudi arabie

Abstract

The value in understanding the complexities of Lateral Violence is of great importance to us in Nursing. Productivity and safety toward nursing practice can hampers the very fabric of positive energy in our nursing professional practice when lateral violence is not dealt appropriately. Hence, to bring about the attention and stand tall to a one plight of campaign for our nursing workforce is made to aware. The Lateral violence in many layers has a disturbing and damaging outcome. From the vast retention problem issue, towards cost, medication and clinical practice issues and staff morale – yet many of our leaders are moving away with the real purpose to end….This maybe be an ambitious journey but to start as a “wake up” banner could be a primordial step for us and a promising future. We are all vignettes in our idiosyncratic ways….. and there is life better out there (really) when we understand fully the overall statement, concept, mysteries of LATERAL VIOLENCE. Too much said and yet little has been done – so do joins us to struggle and end incivility in nursing profession as we face the real challenges (lateral violence) in nursing.

Biography

Dr. David Hali de Jesus is currently the Director of Nursing & CQI Affairs of Makkah Medical Center Hospital (the biggest Private Hospital in Holy Makkah, KSA). He holds a PhD and earns two post graduate diploma in Modern Management in UK. He graduated his BScN in Western Mindanao State University in Philippines and earns a FELLOWSHIP in International Society for Quality Healthcare (ISQUA, based in Dublin). He is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International (The highest Nursing Honor Society).

Speaker
David Halide Jesus Makkah Medical Center Hospital, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Neurosurgeons are obviously concerned with child abuse in cases/emergencies of severe cranio-cerebral trauma. Aim of the present paper is to highlight the clinical picture and symptoms in a neglected case of child abuse and our multidisciplinary approach towards a solid diagnosis. Important aspect in neurosurgery is to determine the cause of actual assault and to treat the patient to save the life first. We here discuss a case with head injuries of intentional type in jealousy that causing permanent signs of traumatic injury. Such cases not timely diagnosed and are treated by the general physician as cases of epilepsy or seizures. Key words: child abuse, traumatic injuries, social injustice

Biography

Speaker
Hamzullah khan Nowshera Medical College, Pakistan

Abstract

Total Quality Management (TQM) is not a new concept. In 1931; W.A Shewhart recognized that variability within Industry production could be understood using the principles of probability and statistics (Schultz, 1988). Variability is the dispersion exhibited by evaluations of successive events resulting from a common process. During the 1950’s, Joseph J.Juran tackled the cost of achieving quality and discovered it could be divided into avoidable and avoidable cost (Crosby ,1987).W. Edward Deming, in the 1950’s, asked “Who can put a price on a satisfied costumer, and who can figure the cost of dissatisfied one?”(Strickland, 1989). TQM is just a program but an active corporate strategy to optimize resources and reduce inefficiencies, rework cost and costumer complaints. TQM seeks to raise the collective vision of quality and change the focus from the product to all the contributing processes that determine the quality of the product (Strickland, 1989). TQM applies to all facets of clinical and administrative operations .Its implementation within health care is unique; therefore, to fully understand this environment, three fundamental assumptions must be made. The first is that medicine is a service field, not just technical or industrial. Second, is the linear process of medicine, all parts must come together at the right time and place for the process to progress. Third, the limiting steps in each process are either process or resource – driven (Wright-Patterson AFB Study, 1989). TQM in health care strives to refine systems to meet or exceed goals for achieving quality technical outcomes, maintaining cost effectiveness, and for ensuring the most effective use of resources for providing continuous quality service to all customers

Biography

Professional with strong quality management and Hospital Management, planning and interpersonal skills possessing 26 years of rich experience in the health industry, Experience in JCI with an established hospital. o Member of Medical Education Committee, Ministry of Health, UAE Abu Dhabi,he is a Team Leader and he got Sheikh Khalifa Excellence Award form 2002 till date and also Team Leader Abu Dhabi Award for Excellence in Government Performance – ADAEP,Lead Auditor For ISO 9001:2015,he was Certified with Six Sigma Black Belt ,Diploma in Risk Management

Speaker
Essam Hamed Amin Ali Universal Hospital, UAE

Abstract

While the health policies are implemented in order to attain the equitable healthy community, those living in remote highlands area where health resources are scarce are found to be the most underserved due toconstraining socio-economic andconservative cultural practices. For the health providers, limited resources and shortage of staff in addition to limited understanding of health uptake culture of ethnic locals led to ineffective service provision while the community’s limited socio-economic status and rigid cultural traditions combined with low confidence to communicate with the health personnel undermined their political strength to acknowledge and speak up for their entitled health. Thus in order to understand these systemic forces shaping maternal health life of rural ethnic women living in Eastern Myanmar highlands,a critical ethnographic research design was conducted by extensive literature review on the maternal health context of research community, observations, interviews and reviews on policy statements and cultural artifacts manifesting the maternal health practice of that ethnic community. Findings showed that geographical remoteness combined with limited literacy and economic opportunitiesand ethnic women being regarded as shy, gentle and reserved misled them to be silent in expressing and voice for their reproductive health rights and the health service which acknowledged their ethnicity and culture was found to be more preferred. Thus health service providers need to understand the health care practice culture of the community in relation to systemic forces shaping their health care practice in order to formulate the health policy which best bring the health outcome of these ethnic locals.

Biography

Major Nang Kathy Aung is a Senior Nursing Officer conducting PhD research in promoting maternal health life in rural ethnic area of Eastern Myanmar Highlands. Her BNSc (group) research was promoting school health and her research for MPA was to study the clients’ satisfaction towards public health service. Her MNSc research was strengthening nurse’s care practice development with Participatory Action Research. She is the author of more than 5 articles in academic journals and contributed as visiting lecturer, external research examiner and thesis supervisor. Now she is the Deputy Nursing Superintendent in Defense Service Obstetrics, Gynecology and Children hospital, Yangon.

Speaker
Major Nang Kathy Aung Military Institute of Nursing and Paramedical Sciences, Yangon, Myanmar

Abstract

The Falls Life Cycle Sessions were developed as an initiative to bring together Governance and Clinical Practice with a holistic approach to managing and preventing patient falls. The introduction of a New Falls Bundle within London North West Healthcare NHS Trust provided the basis upon which to structure the initial part of the session. A noticeable reduction in the reporting of incidents within a ward influenced the completion of the Falls Life Cycle by generating a discussion on incident reporting. The target audience for the sessions were staffon one of the Acute Hospital sites and Community Inpatient Bedded Units. The purpose of the sessions was to increase awareness and provide knowledge to staff on how to use the new Falls Bundle documentation. The sessions commenced by using the Falls Bundle as a discussion tool to address the risk management and prevention of a patient fall. Once the use of the Falls Bundle had been discussed an open discussion followed identifying incidents to be reported and how to escalate Serious Incidents thus completing the Life Cycle. Feedback from the sessions suggested better collaborative working and inter-dialogue between multidisciplinary teams and provided an enhanced knowledge of incident reporting and an increased awareness in the use of the New Falls Bundle.

Biography

Speaker
Faisal Ahmed London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust, U.K

Abstract

This study aimed at finding out the relationship between transformational leadership and organizational health level from directors of nursing point of view. The study population consisted of (82) nursing managers & deputy nursing mangers in hospitals. The study sample was inclusive of the study population. Two questionnaires were used: the first was to measure the degree of transformational leadership, the second was to measure the level of organizational health. The data were manipulated statistically by using means, standard deviations, ranks, Pearson correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha equation, and "t" test, for two independent samples, analysis of variance ( One – way ANOVA), and Scheff'e test. The main findings of the study were: There was a positive significant relationship at a level (α ≤ 0.05) between the degree of practicing transformational leadership in Jordanian hospitals and the organizational health level. Among the recommendation of the study were: Maintaining to hold training courses in transformational leadership for the nursing managers in hospitals.

Biography

Moayad Wishah has completed his MSN from Middle East University in Jordan and his Bachelor degree in Nursing from Alzaytooneh University in Jordan. He has more than 18 years of experiences on nursing practice and lecturer in university and educational centers. He is professional Healthcare trainer in Life Support, Trauma and leadership. He is international instructor certified by American Heart Association and American collage of nursing.

Speaker
Moayad A. Wishah Middle East University Amman, Jordan

Abstract

The issue of sexual harassment on nurses at the workplace is gaining gradual recognition as a problem of discrimination against women as workers at the workplace. It is an issue that interfaces with two concerns: violence against women and rights of women in the workplace. Patients, their relatives and co-workers are considered as main perpetrators on this issue. This study aimed to access the magnitude and prevalence rate of this problem, its characteristics and consequences among the nursing staff of Kathmandu working in hospitals. A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out among 114 nurses of different hospitals using a semi structured self-administered questionnaires. With the response rate of 85.96%(N=98), 72.44% of the respondents had experienced the sexual harassments during their nursing career. The most common form of harassment was sexual teasing and jokes (43.9%) followed by unwanted telephone calls (35.71%) and pressure for date (23.46%). The co-workers and doctors are the most common perpetrators followed by the patient relatives and patients. The most common form of immediate response on the action was ignoring the behavior (43.87%), avoiding the person (17.34%) and joking about the action was 13.26%. 95.91% of the respondents claimed the decrease in work productivity due to the harassment. 86.73% of the respondents had discussed the incidence with the friend of same hospital. 3.06% of the participants had complained the incidence with the management of hospital. None of participants had taken the training on safety measures on the harassment. The prevalence rate of sexual harassment among female nurses are extremely high in least developed country like Nepal which leads to significant decrees in the work productivity as well as increase psychological effects on nurses hence the protective legislation and measures should taken by the hospital management and government for the prevention of this problem in future.

Biography

Speaker
Pradip Lamsal Helping Hands Community Hospital, Nepal

Abstract

The diagnosis of cancer in pediatrics is a life-altering event, not only for the children, but also for their families. Even though the overall survival rate in childhood cancer has dramatically improved over the last few decades to reach 80%, it is still the second leading cause of death, after accidents, in children aged less than 14 years. In King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Nurses’ efforts and strive for excellence have led them to two innovative performance improvement projects: proactively recognizing and managing early warning signs of deterioration and reducing PICU admissions. Nurses caring for pediatric hematology/ oncology patients necessitate having specialized knowledge, as they are expected to deal with a complex patient population. Nurse’s proficiency in General Pediatric is a must, their expertise in hematology and oncology is conclusive, critical care is their second nature, and their palliative care skills are definite. A nurse’s assessment skills and clinical judgment play an essential role in identifying early signs of imminent emergencies. All hematology/oncology nurses ought to have a critical eye in determining the severity of a patient’s situation, formulating both qualitative and quantitative assessments. Life-threatening events in pediatric oncology can occur at diagnosis or may evolve during the course of treatment or relapse. These life-threatening oncology emergencies could be related to metabolic illnesses, bone marrow dysfunction, and hematologic or endocrine disorders. To reduce the morbidity and mortality of these patients, a rapid response team (RRT) was generated. The RRT is a formally designated multidisciplinary team that responds to the assessment and management of early signs of deterioration of patient’s condition. The RRT is composed of a PICU nurse and a respiratory therapist as primary responders, then a PICU Consultant/Fellow/Assistant as a second responder. All RRT members must be PALS certified, the RRT shall arrive within 15 minutes from the time of activation. Criteria to activate the RRT would include primary nurse concern about a patient, compromised respiratory status, acute variation in heart rate or systolic or diastolic blood pressure, change in oxygen saturation despite oxygen administration, acute change in level of consciousness, or altered mental status. The RRT is activated by the primary nurse through a defaulted telephone number as 3333. The primary nurse report the patient’s condition to the RRT nurse using the ISBAR (Introduction, Situation, Background, Assessment, Recommendation), all calls are recorded for auditing and improvement purposes. An RRT form is initiated by the primary nurse, and will include primary nurse’s assessment, initial vital signs, RRT assessment, RRT interaction, and 28-day outcome. A primary nurse could rely on the pediatric early warning signs (PEWS) scoring system to activate the RRT. The PEWS scoring system started as a PI project built and piloted in a pediatric/ oncology setting. The PEWS is a physiological scoring system that assigns risk of clinical deterioration based on vital signs and clinical observation for pediatric patients, and indicates the care required at the onset of clinical decline. The scoring system identifies an action plan for the primary nurse for managing patients acknowledged at risk for compromised health status. This action plan may include, informing charge nurse, physician on call, change in patient-nurse ratio, frequent monitoring of PEWS, or activating the RRT. Side effects of fever and infection, such as tachycardia and tachypnea are highly anticipated in pediatric hematology/ oncology, thus indicating them at risk for deterioration, which is reflected in their PEWS score. The pilot study showed that the tool was reliable and valid in identifying patient at risk for clinical deterioration evidenced by the reduction in code blue calls and PICU admissions. RRT is a resource for pediatric oncology nurses to utilize and proactively manage oncology emergencies.

Biography

Mohamad younes has completed his Bachelor in Nursing Sciences in 2007 in Lebanon; he has been a Certified Pediatric Hematology Oncology Nurse by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation (ONCC) since 2012. Mohamad is currently working as a Senior Triage Oncology Nurse at Carle Foundation Hospital, which is ranked in the top 1% hospitals in USA. Mohamad has been a member of the Editorial Board of the ONCC Certification News since 2015, and has published multiple articles related to new challenges in Pediatric Oncology Nursing.

Speaker
Mohamad Younes Carle Foundation Hospital, USA

Abstract

Dr. Behen will present data from a set of studies focusing on the functional and structural neural correlates of differential care settings (orphanage, kinship care, community group homes) (NIH: 5R21HD087108-02) in children double orphaned by AIDS. The talk will highlight the behavioral and neural phenotypes associated with such early adversity and across care settings, and also predictors of such outcomes, especially focusing on timing and care setting parameters. Objective: Studies investigating the effects of early social deprivation associated with institutional rearing reveal increased incidence of cognitive/behavioral problems and altered neural structure/function, raising concerns about the use of institutional settings (i.e., orphanages) in the care of orphaned children, and prompting study of alternative programs (i.e., foster care) for the care of such children. However, empirical scrutiny of neurodevelopmental outcomes across care settings (and timing/care setting parameters associated with outcomes) is critical before a global push to foster care is undertaken. Method: We applied neurocognitive/behavioral assessments, and structural/functional MR imaging in 124 Chinese children double-orphaned by HIV/AIDS (mean age=14.7+SD=1.5 years), across three care settings (orphanage, community group home, kinship care), and two age groups (onset of adversity <3years, >8 years of age). Data analyses included between-group comparisons on cognitive/behavioral outcomes and structural/functional neural connectivities. Regression analyses were used to identify/determine relationships between duration in care and outcomes across settings, and whether relationships are moderated by age of onset of adversity. Results: Analyses revealed increased incidence of cognitive/behavioral problems in children raised in orphanages and kinship care compared to those in community group homes. Further, orphanage rearing was associated with altered neural connectivities, especially involving frontal and temporal regions, compared to community group home. Outcomes were associated with duration in care (longer duration in orphanage was associated with poorer outcomes over time; care in group homes was associated with improved outcomes over time); findings were accenuated in children with onset of adversity before 3 years. Conclusions: Community group care was associated with improved neurodevelopmental outcomes compared to orphanage care. Such outcomes appear to be strengthened over time in such settings, particularly in children with early onset of adversity. Such data may have important implications for policy for how growing numbers of children, worldwide, can be best cared for following early adversity.

Biography

Speaker
Michael E. Behen Children’s Hospital of Michigan,US

Abstract

Critical thinking is defined as the intelligent evaluation and analysis of data from many sources including objective, subjective, and communication that results in a safe nursing judgment. Historically, most hospitals retained experienced nurses who helped provide guidance for new graduate nurses during the first couple of years to develop their critical thinking skills. Nursing has become a profession of greater opportunities that more experienced older nurses have chosen advanced practice areas leaving the clinical arena void of this much needed experience and skill. The new normal for the vast majority of hospitals are new graduates. As a result, the ever increasing need of well-trained preceptors and clinical educators to fill the gag of experience and knowledge to help guide and develop the critical thinking skills is needed for optimal outcomes.

Biography

Lorrie Blitch has her master’s degree in nursing education and pursuing a doctorate in nurse anesthesia. Lorrie has had an impressive and diverse background in nursing and management. She owns The Magellan Christian Academy for the past 18 years, acute care nursing educator, Board of Directors for the Banyan School, formernaval officer, critical care nurse, professor, medical-legal consultant, and toxicology. Lorrie has written in professional journals. She is an author of children’s books achieving book of the month on Amazon. Lorrie is currently owner of Magellan Christian Academy, acute care educator for Banner Health System in Phoenix, AZ and sits on the Board of Directors of the Banyon School New Deli, India.

Speaker
Lorrie Blitch Magellan Christian Academy Phoenix, USA

Abstract

Work ability is commonly measured with self-assessments, in the form of indices or single items. Prospective studies have reported associations between work ability and sickness absence and disability pension, but few examined why these associations exist. Several correlates of work ability have been reported, but their mechanistic role is largely unknown. What extent individual's own prognosis of work ability predicts labor market participation and whether this was due to individual characteristics and/or working conditions. According to the panellists, factors related to the individual such as motivation, positive attitude towards return to work, assessment of cognitions and behaviour, an early start to vocational rehabilitation in an early stage and instruction for the sick-listed employee to cope with his disability promote return to work and should be considered in the evaluation of work ability. Barriers for return to work that also should be addressed in the assessment of work ability are inefficient coping strategies, secondary gain from illness, negative illness perceptions and inadequate advice from treating physicians. The early identification of nurses with compromised work ability and who are in need of assistance in order to prevent early retirement is important. As retirement age is currently advancing, keeping elderly workers in the workforce is of prime importance. Public policies related to workplace health promotion need to be implemented in public hospital and health centre to improve the work ability of nursing staff.

Biography

Dr. Mounira Hajjaji, Associate Professor at Sfax University School of Medicine, Tunisia, specialist in Occupational Medicine and diseases, department of occupational medicine and occupational diseases. I have published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and have been serving as an editorial board member.

Speaker
Mounira Hajjaji Sfax University School of Medicine,Tunisia

Abstract

Quick Tour • What is Accreditation, certification and Licensure • Benefits of Accreditation (Why) • Common Base of Accreditation • Philosophy of Accreditation versus System implementation • Quality Evaluation in Health Care

Biography

Marwa ElSaidy graduated from the Faculty of Pharmacy, Ain Shams University in 2002. Marwa began her journey through Healthcare Management at the AUC, where she earned a diploma in 2004. In 2005, she was accredited by the Healthcare Quality Certification Board as a Certified Professional of Healthcare Quality, and moved on to develop her status in the field. In 2009, Marwa won first place prize worldwide for her presentation at the NAHQ conference in Texas, USA. Marwa has been an instructor of Quality and Management in Egypt and a CPHQ instructor in Malaysia. She has published many of her works in National and International Journals such as the British Medical Journal and the German IHI International Forum. Alongside countless visits she has made to Hospitals around the world in the USA, Germany, Denmark, The UAE, and Sweden. She has worked at Dar El Fouad Hospital for eight years as Deputy Quality Director, awarding the hospital a JCI accreditation and sustaining it for three consecutive evaluations. Today, Marwa is a consultant of Healthcare Quality at different leading Healthcare facilities in Egypt. Marwa believes that in the field of Healthcare, the proper utilization of resources and reduction of waste is the optimal way to elevate productivity, efficiency, and raise the standards of quality healthcare delivery within her community.

Speaker
Marwa ElSaidy Healthcare Quality Consultant, Egypt

Abstract

Ineffective communication among health care professionals is one of the leading causes of medical errors and patient harm. A review of reports from the Joint Commission reveals that communication failures were implicated at the root of over 70 percent of sentinel events. When asked to select contributing factors to patient care errors, nurses cited communication issues with physicians as one of the two most highly contributing factors, according to the National Council of State Boards of Nursing reports. In a study of 2000 health care professionals, the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) found intimidation as a root cause of medication error; half the respondents reported feeling pressured into giving a medication, for which they had questioned the safety but felt intimidated and unable to effectively communicate their concerns. Ineffective or insufficient communication among team members is a significant contributing factor to adverse events. In the acute care setting, communication failures lead to increases in patient harm, length of stay, and resource use, as well as more intense caregiver dissatisfaction and more rapid turnover. It has been found that communication problems were relatively straightforward and fell into four categories: (1) communications that were too late to be effective, (2) failure to communicate with all the relevant individuals on the team, (3) content that was not consistently complete and accurate, and (4) communications whose purposes were not achieved—i.e., issues were left unresolved until the point of urgency. Examining the outcomes of communication, we found associations between better nurse-physician communication and collaboration and more positive patient outcomes, i.e., lower mortality, higher satisfaction, and lower readmission rates.

Biography

Speaker
Mujahed Ishaq Hamed Dallah Hospital,Jordan

Abstract

Background: Diabetes occurs when the level of oxidative stress increases, which then triggers a decrease in insulin function resulting in an uncontrolled rise in blood glucose (hyperglycemia). In this case, the habit of consuming caffeinated coffee is said to worsen the diabetes problem. Otherwise, α-Lipoic Acid (ALA) can suppress the increase in oxidative stress levels so that the potential complications of diabetes can be reduced. This study aims to investigate the effect of caffeine and ALA intake on the level of liver’s oxidative stress of diabetic rats by identifying MDA and GPx-1 levels in liver as parameters. Method: This study employs a pure-experimental study design with post-test only with control group design. The subject of this study consisted of 30 male Wistar rats which are divided into 5 groups, and were induced with streptozotocin 60 mg/kg Body Weight (BW) to make the rats being hyperglycemia. The caffein with ALA intake was given daily for 6 weeks. The test of MDA and GPx-1 was carried out using ELISA technique. Results: The level of MDA in the diabetic group with caffeine and ALA intake is lower when compared to the diabetic group without caffeine and ALA intake, but is insignificant (p>0,05). While, the level of GPx-1 in diabetic group given with caffeine and ALA intake is higher than it of the diabetic group without caffeine with ALA intake, but is insignificant as well (p>0,05). Conclusion: ALA supplementation to caffeine intake in diabetic can either decrease the MDA level or increase the level of GPx-1 although the the results are statistically insignificant. Therefore, caffeine does not negatively affect the status of oxidative stress level in diabetic. Keywords: Diabetes mellitus, caffeine, ALA, MDA, GPx-1

Biography

Khoirul Rista Abidin is a master student at Biomedical Science Department, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia. He graduated from Universitas Tanjungpura with bachelor of nursing (Ns.) as degree in 2014. His research is focused on diabetes treatment and wound care management. He is one of LPDP Indonesia finance ministry scholarship awardees

Speaker
Khoirul Rista Abidin Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia

Abstract

Background: Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) it’s the way to save someone life after he suffer of cardio-pulmonary arrest, this need good knowledge from many aspect like: Human Anatomy and Physiology, awareness of ECG and its arrhythmia, skills of IV/IO lines and correct practice of hand chest compression and ventilation. Objective: This study approve the impact and positive outcome of CPR mock drills which use in hospitals premises. Methods: A schedule training was conducted frequently for nurses who’s employee in hospitals, clinics, education facilities and who attend outside camps and big community events. By providing life support courses as initial step, then after few weeks or months conduct sudden mock drills by using CPR manikin and monitor the performance and critical thinking of the team leader and CPR team. Finally conduct summarize and review of mock drill out come with positive and negative points. And if necessary we will do refreshing classes based on each task performance. Results:The result show that CPR mock drills is indispensable to maintain high quality CPR skills and knowledge which increase the post cardiac arrest neurological outcome and discharge planning. In the same time it’s decrease of mortality and morbidity rate. Also Mock drills outcome reflect and measuring the understand of health care workers in taking the life support courses (BLS, ACLS and PALS). And the influence of instructors in teaching and increasing the knowledge and confidence of providers. Conclusions: Quality of life support skills is mandatory in maintaining life of patients and minimizing potential errors which could be happen because lack of knowledge and training.

Biography

Speaker
Mohammad shaban Universal Hospitals, United Arab Emirates

Abstract

Objective To estimate the prevalence of sexual abuse among married female healthcare (nurses and doctors) providers in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan perpetrated by family members. Design A descriptive cross-sectional study wasdone by using a random sample technique. Setting One public and two private tertiary healthcare hospitals from Karachi, Pakistan Population 350 married female nurses and doctorswere recruited. MethodsDescriptive and unvaried statistical methods used to analyzedata. Main Outcome MeasuresParticipant’s and husband’s socio-demographic variables, types of domestic violence (DV), sexual abuse by husband and in-laws, response to sexual abuse, most frequent perpetrator, and reason of last violence. Results The study revealed that of the total sample of 350 married female nurses and doctors, 97.7%(n= 342) were reported one or more types of DV at some point in their life. Whereby, 59.6% (n= 204) reported sexual abuse by their family members at some point in their married life. Out of which mainly the husband94.6% (n=193) created sexual abuse, followed by brother in- law17.6% (n=36). Participants living in extended families [72.2% (n=26)], those who were undergraduate [50% (n=18)] and nurses [61.1% (n=22)] experienced sexual abuse by in-laws. ConclusionsIn conclusion,nurses and doctors are victims of sexual abuse, because of socio-demographic factorssuch as extended family, educated and professional. The study participants were confronting to sexual abuse as the same level as those who were uneducated and poor. DV (Prevention and Protection) Act 2012has been passed but needs strategies and commitment for enforcement. Key words Domestic violence, sexual abuse, nurses and doctors, sexual abuse by family in-laws

Biography

Speaker
Ms. Azmat Jehan Khan Aga Khan University, Pakistan

Abstract

Identification of concomitant injuries of the postero-lateral corner (PLC) is important to get good surgical and clinical outcomes. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries have more often associated with PLRI injury( 43 %- 80%). The causes of PCL reconstruction failure are multifactorial but one of the most common cause is neglected PLRI( 40 %-67% Am. J. sport med. 646, 2005 Noyes & Barber-westin, Jung YB et al. KSSTA 2008 , Jung et al,JBJS-A. 2012 Mar 21;94(6):516-22.). and next is tunnel misplacement. Factors contributing to the failure of Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) operative procedures are similar to those reported for ACL failures, that is, graft placement, tensioning, and fixation issues; use of grafts of sufficient tensile strength and size; and the need to correct associated ligament instabilities and lower limb alignment. ACL injury have also often associated with PLRI injury ( 11-12.5% Lee SH et al. KSSTA 2010 ). Why it is common to miss the diagnosis of the PLRI, especially in grade II PLRI? The reason is that in PCL and PLC combine injured patient, lateral tibial plateau is subluxated posterolaterally at 90 degree flexion of the knee. At this posterolateral sagging state, when we do dial test or posterolateral external rotation test, it is more difficult to detect the external rotation of the leg or to sublux of the posterolateral tibial plateau. Therefore, reduction of the knee to the normal position is important to diagnose of the PLRI using dial test and posterolateral external rotation test in the PCL–PLC combined injured patients. Our evaluation showed that a reduction of the posterior sagging knee in AP (Anterior-Posterior) direction would increase the degree of tibial external rotation in combined PCL-PLC injury. In my experience, posterolateral corner sling through fibular head technique is one of the good choice of treatment methods in grade II PLRI (KSSTA 2008, Jung et al). But in grade III PLRI, we should do anatomical reconstruction as described by Dr. Laprade even we need more strong reinforcement for the LCL.

Biography

Speaker
Young Bok Jung Chung Ang University, South Korea

Abstract

Psychological care for mothers during postpartum is a neglected part of Jordanian health care services. Postpartum anxiety increases the risk of maternal and infant morbidities. The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between selected factors (mainly the socio-cultural) and the development of postnatal anxiety among Jordanian women. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with a sample of 324 participants from four primary health care centers in the south of Jordan. Participants completed the Anxiety sub-scale of Depression Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-Anxiety) at 6-8 weeks postpartum in addition to demographical data form. Women whose newborns have died were excluded from the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. Results indicated that 45.4% of women scored above mild level (>9) on DASS-Anxiety sub scale. The findings revealed that postnatal anxiety was significantly associated with employment, financial problems, multiparty (4 babies or more), poor postnatal support from mother's and husband's families, and giving birth to female baby. Findings revealed a high level of postnatal anxiety among Jordanian women which needs immediate action, particularly commitment in psychological assessment, in addition to providing psychological counseling and care. Implementation of evidence based practices in maternity units is important to enhance maternal satisfaction and psychological well-being.

Biography

Khitam Mohammad is associate professor of midwifery research and practice. She received her BSN degree in 1997 from Jordan University of Science and Technology, her first master degree was in Anthorpology in 2003 from Al-Yarmouk University in Jordan, her second master degree was in Midwifery in 2004 from Griffith University, and her PhD in Midwifery from Griffith University in 2008 Australia. Khitam is the second associate professor in midwifery at the faculty of nursing, Jordan University of Science and Technology.

Speaker
Khitam Ibrahem Shlash Mohammad Jordan University of Science & Technology, Jordan

Abstract

Previous research on periodontal structure and function has shown a significant relationship between periodontal tissue and teeth. This study assessed dentist's beliefs about the relative efficacy of the health of periodontal tissue. A total of 505 patients in general pracrice were asked to respond to a list of 25 obligatory nourishment for a child while going to have the first teeth, for its effectiveness in dealing with patient's periodontal health especially include chewing hard food. They were also asked to select the three most effective nutrition for periodontal tissue. The imdices of patient perceived importance of the periodontal health were derived and each compared with actual effectiveness as determined from a sample of 250 patients. Although the majority of patient's rated 18 of 25 nutrition as being very effective, there was no significant association between patient perceived nourishment effectiveness and actual effectiveness. The implications for patient training are discussed. This study supported by only me and my supervisor Alla grigorivna demitrova.

Biography

NIMA SABZCHAMANARA has completed his dental study from National Medical University Kiev Ukraine. He is the student of first year of Residency program, in the Department for Therapeutic dentistry. He has published only one abstract in a dental journal.

Speaker
Nima Sabzchamanara National medical university, Ukraine

Sessions:

Scientific Sessions

Abstract

The role of nurses in the Health 4.0 era (in parallel with the Industry 4.0) represent the most essential change in healthcare. Health 4.0 (anytime-anymeans-anywhere-anyhow) relay on Deep Learning (DL). It takes any kind of relevant data (your body, the environment, the weather, the news, the medication, the pollution, type of food you eat or what you drink etc…) to be able to DISCOVER, in case something wrong is measured in your body, HOW the failurehas occurred to be prevented it nexttime. DL is carrying a HOLISTIC MEDICINE, is putting into practice the 10 requirements for the REAL LIFEEVIDENCE (RLE) of the social determinants as the WHO stated. Data will be then bePredictive- Personalize- Participative. The organization and data flow require an organization on which nurses will become the personal health assistants, in an open HealthFOG and non-intrusive IoTs. Deployment of this new way to deliver health at distance is explain in the H2O scenario

Biography

Born in Barcelona, Spanish nationality.Background: Doctor in Medicine graduated in the Central University of Barcelona where got the PhD both “with honors”1972. Specialized in Pathology has been trained in USA(general), UK( lung, thyroid, tropical pathology), FRANCE (osteoarticular), SWEDEN (breast cancer), GERMANY (lymphomas). Working in IT applied to medicine since 1979 and in innovation & transfer technology since 1992. Full professor of Pathology since 1982 in Canary Islands. Obtain the first Unesco Chair of Telemedicine in 1996. Speaks: Spanish, Catalan, French, English, German, Italian, Portuguese, Bulgarianand Russian.Published: 16 books, including the first “Handbook of Telemedicine”in 1998 and 400 scientific papers.

Speaker
O.Ferrer Roca University of La Laguna, Spain

Abstract

Patient safety culture is an ad hoc topic in healthcare organizations. Assessing the existing patient safety culture gives hospital management a clear view of an organization’s strengths and weaknesses. Safety attitudes questionnaire (SAQ) developed by Sexton et al. with good psychometric properties and great internal consistency has been widely used to assess the patient safety culture in healthcare organizations.Physicians and nursesform the core staffs, and physicians and nurses with different demographic variablesmight perceive patient safety culture differently. This study adopts linear regression with forward selection to identify critical demographic variables having significant impacts on each dimension of the Chinese version of SAQ with internal survey results in 2016 from a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. Ten demographic variables are the independent variables, while eight dimension of the Chinese version of SAQ are dependent variables. Supervisor/manager is the most essential demographic variable that influences seven of eight dimensions except for emotional exhaustion. Physicians and nurses who are not supervisors/managers have relatively poor perceptions on teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, stress recognition, perceptions of management, and working conditions, whereas physicians and nurses who are supervisors/managers have better perceptions on work-life balance. Experience in position, the second important demographic variable, has the impacts on perceptions of management, working conditions, and work-life balance. Interestingly, physicians and nurses who have much experience in position tend to have negative perceptions on these dimensions. Finally, hospital management should take heed of the suggestions regarding these characteristics to continuously enhance their patient safety culture.

Biography

Hsin-Hung Wu received his Ph.D. degree from Department of Industrial & Systems Engineering and Engineering Management at University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL, USA in May 1998. He has been with Department of Business Administration at National Changhua University of Education, Changhua City, Taiwan since August 2004. Beginning August 2014, Dr. Wu has been elected as University Distinguished Professor. Currently, he has published 157 journal papers and has been serving editorial board members in some international journals.

Speaker
Hsin-Hung Wu National Changhua University of Education, Taiwan

Abstract

Health delivery over the years has gone through a lot of changes to enable the service improve the health citizens. Governments of various countriesdedicateenormous amount of their yearly budget to the sector, the investment in health has led to building of huge infrastructures (hospitals and other) and increase in training of the health workers to specialize in particular field. Though authorities are quick to measure health improvement by the amount they invest in the sector, researches have shown that the huge hospital and highly qualified professionals did not translate to quality health delivery. The profession have been centered on the professionalism and gigantic investment with less attention given to the non-billable items which matters most to patients. Customer service, a marketing tool that organizations use to create, maintain and satisfy their customers, has been somehow ignored in the healthcare industry. The healthcare industry has remain static as nurses and doctors still give instructions to patients instead of involving them. There are enough evidence to show that countries with huge health budget have not offeredthe best form of healthcare services to their people.My last published research shows that patients’ satisfaction does not depend mostly on high professional and sophisticated machine, but the patient pay attention to the non-billable items (respect, empathy, hygienic environment, involvement and others).

Biography

AhotoAhotovi Thomas completed University of Ghana School of Public Health in the year 2015, with Masters of Science in Applied Health and Social Sciences. Before going in to health I was an established marketer (holding Higher National Diploma and BSc in Marketing from a well-respected institutions) with focus on the service industry. Being expert in customer care, I am currently translating some of marketing principles to health with the sole aim of developing patient centered healthcare systems. I am also a researcher and have published peer review articles in relation to healthcare improvement in some popular journals. I am currently preparing PhD for health policy and health promotion.

Speaker
Ahoto Ahotovi Thomas WEST AFRICA HEALTHCARE SERVICE IMPROVEMENT CENTRE, GHANA

Abstract

Research question This study was to explore how faith-based leaders cared for community-dwelling older adults in a natural disaster. This research focused on Hurricane Sandy, which affected Long Island, New York, in October 2012. The research question was: How do faith-based leaders care for community-dwelling older adults affected by a natural disaster, such as Hurricane Sandy? Back ground information (literature review and theoretical framework) Natural disasters are often unexpected and can cause disruption, trauma, loss, and devastation of communities. A review of the literature identified that local faith-based leaders have a major role in the recovery process before, during, and after a natural disaster. Community-dwelling older adults have special needs after a natural disaster (due to comorbidities, special medications, lifesaving equipment that needs power to operate) and may rely on their own communities for support. Uncontrollable forces of nature can devastate and obliterate communities and individuals, regardless of preparation. Disasters are destructive events and often require help from outside the affected community. Faith-based leaders and the faith community is an integral part of society. Community members, especially older adults and the elderly rely on faith leaders and faith institutions for coping and healing in a natural disaster Faith-based organizations are active in disasters. The role of faith-based leaders becomes an important factor in a natural disaster, especially for community-dwelling older adults who have special needs in comparison with younger adults. SignificanceThe basic psycho-social problem identified by the faith leaders for older adults was disempowerment, which took the form of depression, feelings of abandonment, loss of hope, and deterioration in physical health. The way faith leaders tried to solve these problems were by the social process of “FAITH-BLIND CARE” provided to the older adults as well as to the community. Primary intervention (pre-disaster planning) is one of the key factors for disaster management and recovery. Pre-disaster planning with identification of vulnerable populationolder adults can be done through faith-based institutions and government and nongovernmental organizations. Faith community nursing can play a vital role in disaster preparedness. The secondary intervention in a disaster management plan can include meeting the physical needs, providing need based care and organizing volunteers. Faith-based leaders may be needed to help community-dwelling older adults during the assessment phase, during post-disaster management, and while rebuilding is taking place after a natural disaster (tertiary intervention). Methods Design/methodology/approach: This qualitative study utilized the grounded theoretical approach of Strauss and Corbin (1998) to understand the process of faith-based leaders caring for community-dwelling older adults in a natural disaster: Hurricane Sandy in October 2012.Data were collected through in-depth interviews of a diverse sample of faith-based leaders who cared for, community-dwelling older adults during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. Participants were male or female faith-based leaders who were involved in caring for community-dwelling older adults on Long Island, New York, during Hurricane Sandy in 2012. A total of 16 Faith based leaders were interviewed and data analysis done by constant comparative analysis as explained by Strauss and Corbin.(1998). ResultsThis study led to the development of a substantive theory about the process of how faithbased leaders cared for older adults in a natural disaster and identified disempowerment as the basic psychosocial problem in the older adults in a natural disaster. The substantive theory that originated from this study is “Faith-Blind Care.” The four major categories that led to faith-blind care were: providing presence to the community by the faith leaders (contacting the community), need-based care, rebuilding the community, and universal brotherhood and sisterhood. Implications for practice Findings from this research will lead to better disaster preparedness, policy changes to help older adults and primary, secondary, and tertiary interventions in a natural disaster. This study will help the development of registries for older adults and vulnerable populations and more faith based community nursing participation in disaster management.

Biography

Mercy Joseph PhD ANP-C, RN Assistant Professor Nursing New York Institute of Technology

Speaker
Mercy Joseph New York Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract

Increasing work efficiency, improving psychological health, decreasing turnover, turnover intention, and absenteeism may be depended on organizational commitment of an employee. A cross-sectional analytical study was carried out for identifying the predictors of organizational commitment among 197 university nursing faculties of Kathmandu valley. Proportionate stratified random sampling technique was used for selecting samples from 18 colleges of nursing. Structured questionnaires were used for the collection of data. Data entry and data cleaning was done by using Epi-data software and data analysis was done using SPSS version 16 software. Regression analysis were done for identifying the predictors of organizational commitment. The findings of this study showed that nursing faculties had moderate level (68%), high level (28.9%) and low level (3%) of organizational commitment.Moreover, this study also revealed that the nursing faculties who were having master level of education in nursing, who were in the position of assistant instructor to assistant lecturer level, had permanent appointment, having greater than 5 years of work experience in same organization and job satisfaction had high level of organizational commitment. On the basis of this findings, it is concluded that nursing faculties had moderate level of organizational commitment. The predictors of organizational commitment are higher education in nursing, position, type of appointment, current organizational tenure and job satisfaction. Therefore, organization must pay attention to the modifiable predictors of organizational commitment for enhancing organizational commitment of nursing faculty members. So that it may reduce turnover, increase efficiency in quality of teaching and student’s satisfaction. Key Words: Nursing Faculties; Organizational Commitment; Predictors.

Biography

Patan Academy of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Lalitpur Nursing Campus, Lalitpur, Nepal.Currently Graduated from Lalitpur Nursing Campus.Currently Graduated from National Academy for Medical Sciences

Speaker
Timalsina, Rekha School of Nursing and Midwifery, Lalitpur Nursing Campus, Nepal

Abstract

The thrust of this essay is nestled in Cuba's complimentary approach to the treatment of the HIV/AIDS virus. In a comprehensive and comparative fashion the contents therein give credence to a developing nation that demonstrates expediency and emphasizes a history of continuity with remarkable results. Underlying the report is a journey that enlightens the reader to a process rich in application and outcome during a period in which the plague has transformed the Caribbean and Latin American community. Meanwhile it also speaks to collaborative effort inclusive of government, medical agencies, laboratories, international organizations and the public toward a common good. The country nonetheless is not without its shortcomings and therefore monetary constraints and matters of confidentiality and discrimination are pivotal to the presentation. In fact an elaborate characterization accentuates a 50 year old commercial interdiction as a detterent that contributes to the disruption of affordability and accessability to the exchange of goods, services and information. Against all likelihood a contrasting analysis of regional states inclusive of America aided with the utilization of charts and graphs documents astonishing success in restricting HIV/AIDS. The Cuban model as described is an exemplary work in progress but likewise the fulfillment of the socialist philosphy towards humanity.

Biography

Leroy A. Binns Ph.D. is an International Relations specialist whose areas of concentration are East/West Relations & Caribbean and Latin American Affairs. He served as an adjunct lecturer within the Africana Studies Department at Rutgers, The State Unniversity of New Jersey, associate faculty member within the External Graduate Division at Central Michigan University and as an advisor on doctoral committees at the Union Institute. Dr Binns currently lectures within the Department of Government at the University of the West Indies, Mona (WJC) and provides the service of a business consultant authoring manuscripts, proposals (e.g., grants and business plans) and policy documents

Speaker
Leroy A. Binns University of the West Indies, Mona (WJC), Jamaica

Abstract

The relationship found between physical and chemical problems of brain tissue especially cerebral neurons has very close relation with mental problems and therefore wide variety of our social behaviors including encounter with life difficulties, marriage, divorce, relatives' death, envy, patience and main decisions of life such as purchasing house and automobile and others. This difference can be affected by chromosome, environmental or both problems before or after birth. Addiction can be involved in the above-mentioned antisocial cases. Generally, addiction to drugs is one of the subsets of "addiction" definition. Brain problems as one of the important risk factors can directly and indirectly play a significant role in individuals' tendency-and-increase of their tendency toward addiction. At the first stage, through recognizing disease causes and at the second stage, treatment of the disease will be easier .Considering articles presented in the congresses held from 2008 to the beginnings of 2010 on neuronal problems and addiction, it is conclude that the information has quantitatively and qualitatively grew and scientific content of the more novel articles has enhanced than before. During two years, the problem and its title was the same but the content has undergone changes corresponding with medical progresses through time and they have become richer from scientific viewpoint. The present article is the most complete and perfect of them. These researches and recognizes can open a new horizon in significantly treating and preventing from addiction. The present study poses a question regarding whether some of addicts, no all, suffer from brain disease before tending to this antisocial behavior. Purposes: Why people become addicted? How they can be treated? To find answers, the process of this problem should be scientifically, environmentally and socially studied. This article considers its origin reasons from medical perspective. . Introduction: "Addiction can be defined as kind of malfunction of human ordinary needs to a stimulant". Some believe that drugs and addictive habits root from our other internal deep powers; our need to innovation, revival and being alive. There is a power inside us.

Biography

MAHDI AKHBARDEH, had board in Nutrition from Tabriz Medical Sciences university. Clinical nutritionist. Medical researcher .Medical council NUMBER: 1434 First Iranian member of American Dietetic Association (ADA),First Iranian Active member of medical research council in American Academy of Anti Aging society, Member of medical research council in European Union anti Aging, Top selected in national student research Festival in in 2010, Top selected in international medical scientific festival in IBN SINA in 2010,Having more than 130 medical papers in all medical areas (psychiatry, cardiology, dermatology, addiction,stemCELL , depression and anxiety and specially about Stomach Cancer in the global and state medical congress from (Norway. USA, France…) and having 40 medical articles in valid medical researches journals and 9 medical abstract in the journal with ISI-Index rank ,Continuous senior research member of IRAN Nutrition Association ,Member of Iranian society for reproductive MED , Member of the American federation of Youth medical scientists,Active member of administration of IRAN genetics association,Member of the research center on endocrinology and obesity at university of ShahidBeheshti,Top selected of medical article in the scientific journal about anti-aging process ofettla. at newspaper 2007.

Speaker
Mahdi Akhbardeh, Tabriz Medical Sciences university, Iran

Abstract

Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is the most frequent in the late phase of evolution of malignant disease in up to 50% of cases. Yearly, there are more than 100 000 new registered cases of MPE in USA, out of which 75% are caused by the bronchial or breast cancer. The patients with MPE are treated mainly symptomatically. Dyspnea is the most frequent symptom and efficient palliation of dyspnea should be the main objective of the therapy.Palliative treatment is initiated by the thoracocentesis. If the dyspnea jeopardize the quality of the patient’s life it is necessary to conduct one of the following procedures: 1. Standard thoracostomy (large bore drain: 24F-30F) with instillation of sclerosanse 2. Thoracoscopy with pleural abrasion and/or by application of sclerosanse, 3. Thoracostomy with pleural catheter (7F-16F) and pleurodesis or 4. Embedding of the pleuroperitoneal shunt. Chemical pleurodesis is often sufficient option for control of re-accumulation of pleural liquid, alleviation of pain and dyspnea and improvement of the quality of life.The most frequently used agents are talc. Chemical pleurodesis should be conducted in the most efficient, the most comfortable and the most humane manner for the patient. Since the patient places full trust in the nursing professionals, the relationship between them should develop as a very dynamic and personal one. Nursing professionals must continuously educate themselves in order to be able to provide a quality assessment of the patient's ability to express himself, his mechanisms for coping and level of understanding about his condition.

Biography

Dr. Alma Alihodzic-Pasalichas completed specialization of the General Surgery and Sub-specialization of Thoracic Surgery University of Sarajevo. She completed her Master degree in Medicine from University of Sarajevo and she expects to complete her PhD study by the end of 2017. She has published several scientific papers as author and co-author.

Speaker
Alma Alihodzic-Pasalic Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University, Bosnia

Abstract

In nursing curricula, divisions are created according to specialty areas, such as Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing, Geriatric Nursing, Adult Nursing, and so forth. As societies age, patients populations have grown older. In fact, on medical/surgical units, the average age of patients is 70 and above in Japan. In addition to patients’diagnoses, during nursing practicum students are required to review physiological changes taking place in older people at the same time. Instead of making divisions based on specialty areas, I propose the following: phenomena should be the focus. For example, let us consider the phenomenon of depression. When you look at life cycle, the phenomenon of depression can be observed throughout one’s life.In addition to major depression, situational depressions may be observed in people who have lost loved ones, postpartum depression, and so forth. In the case of a patient who is diagnosed as depression due to the loss of his/her souse, in addition to etiology of depression, signs and symptoms of depression and treatment modalities for depression, students are to learn about non-pharmacological approaches such as grief therapy, psychotherapy, music/art therapy. Post conferences may be conducted jointly with other students who are assigned to patients whose focus is not depression. Jointly , patient care may be discussed from multiple views such as geriatric, home care and community health. In this fashion, students are expected to learn about a patient’s situation in a comprehensive manner.

Biography

Mineko Yamashita earned her BScN at University of Alberta, MN from Memorial University of Newfoundland, and PhD in Nursing at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She has clinical experiences in all areas. She took Psychiatric Mental Health as her major stream at graduate school. Upon completion of MN, she worked as a community mental health and clinical nurse specialist in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing. She has taught Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing and Nursing Research in Canada. Now she is back in Japan. She has many research interests. A major area has been on family in Alzheimer’s Disease.

Speaker
Mineko Yamashita Ashikaga University, Japan

Abstract

To provide quality care at the end of life or for chronically sick patients such as cancer, nurses must have good knowledge, attitude and practice about palliative care (PC). In Democratic Republic of theCongo, PC is a new conceptand very little is known about the type of services offered and the readiness of nurses to provide PC. A cross-sectional descriptive study design was carried out using 112 nurses working in selected hospitals in Lubumbashi from February 2017 to March 2017, which were selected on the basis of the existence within the institution of Intensive Care Unit able of management of patients at the end-of-life with chronic diseases. A self-administered French questionnaire was used for data collection. The researchers used triangulation in their study method making use of: Frommelt’s Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) Scale, Palliative Care Quiz for Nursing (PCQN) and practice questions. This led to enhanced validity of the data. Excel and SPSS 23 software statistical packages were applied for data entry and analysis. Descriptive statistics and bivariate statistical analysis were fitted to identify significantly associated factors with knowledge and attitude towards palliative care. The majority of nurses 57(50.9%) had above 15 years of experience, 58% of them had less than 2 years of experience in terminal and 90.2% hadn’t obtained training course. Out of the total study participants, 69 (70.5%) had poor knowledge level of palliative care, and only 33 (29.5%) had good knowledge. The most respondents' attitudes levels towards palliative care were positive attitude 66 (58.9%) and 46(6.2%) negative attitude level. The nurses had poor knowledge, but their attitude towards PC was favorable. Educational status of nurses was significantly associated with Knowledge nurses towards PC. Furthermore, educational status of nurses, No PC training, Hospital institutions and the age of nurses were statistically significant with attitude of nurses towards PC. Palliative care training and continuous professional education should be regularly given for the nurses. Key words: Palliative care, Knowledge, Attitude, Nurse, Lubumbashi

Biography

Speaker
Astrid Katumbo INSTITUTE SUPERIEUR DES TECHNIQUES MEDICLES DE LUBUMBASHI,Zaire

Abstract

Background: Patient safety is a fundamental principle of health care, estimates show that in developed countries as many as 1in 10 patients is harmed while receiving hospital care with higher probabilities in developing countries. Aim: To assess knowledge, attitudes and practices of emergency staff about patient safety in Sana'a Capital City –Yemen Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of ED staff was conducted at the public hospitals in Sana'a City. We conducted a survey of all ED staff (physician and nurse) in the mean hospitals Data was collected using a structured questionnaire.Epi Info version 7.2 was used for data entry and analysis. Results: 329 participants were included,the nurses constituted 77%.75% haddocuments regarding hand-washing and hand-disinfection. The overall mean score of (all goals) was 65.8±30 out of 138, it was 66.5±30 out of 138 among nurses and 63.5±30 out of 121among physicians. The mean knowledge score of error and patient safety was 12.5±4 out of 20. It was 12.4±3.9 among nurses and 12.8±4.5 among physicians. The mean score of attitudes towards patient safety was 20.3±2.9 out of 25.It was 20.4±2.9 among nurses and 20.2±3.1 among physicians. The mean score of attitude towards patient safety culture elements was 51±8 out of 70. (nurse50.7±7.9 70, physicians 53±7.9 out 69. Conclusion: poor to moderate mean knowledge , moderate knowledge of errors and patient safety , good attitude toward patient safety, moderate practices of patient safety goals . Recommendations: Supply with patient safety documents, Strict implementation of patient safety rules regulation (polices / procedure)

Biography

Speaker
Khalid Al-Dar Yemen Field Epidemiology Training Program (Y- FETP), Yemen

Abstract

In the ED, patients will present with vague and non-specific complaints. They come with a fear that something is acutely wrong. Patients who present to the Emergency Department (ED) are typically unselected on arrival, a variety of techniques for assessing and sorting the undifferentiated patient on their arrival in the Emergency Department. Some will co-exist within a single department and a system that works for one department may not fit into the Urgent and Emergency Care System of another A critical function of all EDs is to have reliable processes that can sort patients, in accordance with their clinical need. These processes are likely to vary between Urgent and Emergency Care systems because of the differences between such systems in different locations. There is not, therefore, a “one size fits all” approach. This document aims to offer general principles to underpin local processes, and to standardize the terminology used. We hope that this paper will act as a stimulus to clinical leaders who recognize the value of early senior intervention and who have a willingness to try new approaches in the interest of their patients.

Biography

She earned her medical degree from Al Manar medical University-Tunisia in July 1994, completed her internship in Tunisia 1996 with a broad background and with depth knowledge in the fields of Cardiology, Intensive Care Unit, Emergency, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Paediatrics, General Medicine and Surgical wards. Specialist in emergency medicine and disaster management, She completed her master degree at Al Manar medical University- Tunisia, She also have a master degree in geriatrics. She have a deep professional experience in emergency and prehospital care since she worked for 6 years in emergency and prehospital care in Tunisia as the senior doctor on duty and She have been working for 10 years as medical director in Ambulance and Rescue section. Her last 7 years experience as head of emergency room in private hospital up to date. She hold international ( AHA and ERC ) BLS, BTLS, PALS, ACLS, MIMMS instructor certificates that offered me a satisfactory experience in lecturing as well as clinical training.

Speaker
Imen Debbiche Universal HospitaL,United Arab Emirates

Abstract

Diabetes, a global health emergency, is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Fiji. Despite advancement in diabetes management, a lot of diabetics in Fiji are still suffering from preventable complications and dying prematurely. This study is conducted to determine poor glycaemic control proportion and its associated factors among T2DM adults attending clinics at Suva health centres in 2011 – 2016. This quantitative study was conducted at three Suva health centres on sample size of 338 adult T2DM patients registered on August 1, 2011 – August 1, 2017 for the quantitative study and 18 health care workers working at the same diabetes clinics purposively selected for three focus group discussions. Data analysis included logistic regression analysis using SPSS version 22.0. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as the significant level. Out of the 338 participants, 261 (77.2%) had poor glycaemic control (HbA1C<7%). Patients had a mean age of 56 years, 59% were female, mean duration of diabetes was 4.7 years, 23.7% were treated with insulin and 70.7% were in overweight & obese categories. Patients who had poor RBS (AOR = 7.43, 95% CI 2.46 – 22.45) and poor FBS (AOR = 9.76 CI 3.11 – 30.58) had high odds of poor glycaemic control. Majority of patients had poor glycaemic control. Patients with poor random and fasting blood sugars were likely to have poor glycaemic control. Regular RBS monitoring could be a cost-effective way of monitoring glycaemic control in the absence of HbA1C testing.

Biography

Dr. Masoud Mohammadnezhad is an Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care and is program coordinator of Health Promotion at Fiji National University (FNU). He received his BSc in Nursing and his MSc in Health Education from Iran. He finished his PhD in Public Health at Flinders University, Australia. He has strong teaching experience from the undergraduate to doctoral levels. He is specifically interested in the use of tailoring in behavior change interventions and the use of behavioral change models and health promotion.

Speaker
Masoud Mohammadnezhad Fiji National University,Fiji Islands

Abstract

Background: Health care workers job satisfaction and burnout are constant public health concerns. Burnout predispose to rapid staff turnover, absenteeism or illness that ends in decreased job satisfaction. Burnout and satisfaction among nurses are serious conditions that threaten their own and patients health. Objectives :To explore levels and determinants of job satisfaction and burnout among nurses working in Primary Health Care facilities, Dubai Health Authority, Dubai, UAE. Methods: A cross sectional study targeting all nurses working at PHC centres (400) was carried out using self-administered questionnaires containing socio-demographic, work related, personal health status, burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) and satisfaction variables. Results: Overall nurses reported moderate satisfaction levels and low burnout state. Correlation between burnout and job satisfaction was significant, weak and of opposite course. Burnout increased in older and divorced nurses. Emotional exhaustion related significantly to high income level, performing physical activity and nurses’ intention to leave. Emotional exhaustion had intermediate correlation to job satisfaction. Depersonalisation was higher in nurses with chronic disease and had negative association to job satisfaction. Personal accomplishment had significant positive correlation to nurses’ job satisfaction. Perception of personal accomplishment increased with age, high BMI levels and in nurses with chronic disease. Conclusion: Findings from this study contributes to the understanding of the relationship between nurses' job satisfaction and burnout syndrome and points out that nurses burnout is not uncommon among nurses working in PHC in Dubai. Nurses burnout and satisfaction levels proved to have special characteristics relating to the unique composition of health care in the UAE. The study also indicates that some dimensions of job satisfaction and burnout had proven to be relevant to nurses’ turnover tension. Recommendations: There is a need to develop periodic screening for signs of distress, burnout or dissatisfaction, and to establish preventive strategies that are practical and can be implemented within the current healthcare structure. This will result in increasing nurses’ satisfaction, commitment and motivation which will in time reflect on the quality of healthcare services and daily performance indicators

Biography

Speaker
Hamid Yahya Hussain Magnetic Dubai Health authority, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Urgent care is not emergency care. In the advent of an increasing patient care demand for convenience, accessibility and affordable medical treatment, a new model for healthcare management is the urban care clinic setting which has evidently increased in more modernized and consumer-driven industrialized countries over the past decade. Built around patient convenience, urban urgent care centers have been created for supplemental, after-hours care and cases that are more urgent than day to day care. Misconceptions have brought about confusion on the essence of urban urgent care clinics with other medical facilities to treat a patient's medical need. Urgent care has been described as a "lower-cost alternative to the emergency room", or "after-hours/overflow for primary care". In the face of growing primary care physician shortage and emergency room overcrowding resulting in long waits to see a doctor, healthcare consumers see urgent care as their preferred "medical home". (Ayers, 2015) Consequently, the common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting is primarily for economic reasons, the study of Scott, et.al. (2009) on "Access and Care Issues on Urgent Care Clinic Patients" suggests that patients generally seek care in urgent care settings because it is more convenient than alternative care options, and the care provided is timelier. Convenience is the key. Increased access to medical service on its availability "anywhere, anytime" is a part of a growing trend where healthcare organizations evolve towards customer service, price transparency, provider ratings, and ease of use. Healthcare is now shifting to convenient care to suit varying customer preferences. In the results of a study conducted by Amiel, et.al. on the "Reasons for attending an urban urgent care center with minor illness: A Questionnaire Study, it was found out that out of 1112 participants, 72% of these were registered with a GP; there were more women (59%) who attended than men; and the majority of the participants rated themselves as healthy (81%). Access to care (58%) was a key reason for using the service as was expectation of receiving prescription medication (69%). GP dissatisfaction influenced 10% of participants in their decision to attend and 68% did not contact their GP in the previous 24 hours before attending. In conclusion, it was found out that the GP-led urgent care center was similar to walk-in centers in attracting healthy young adults, who were mostly registered with a GP and used services because of convenience and ease if access rather than satisfaction levels with their GP. Furthermore, Scott, et.al. (2009) in his survey study examined why people seek care at urgent care centers. A total of 1,006 people completed the survey while waiting for service in the urgent care clinic. The following were the reasons why they chose to receive treatment: no appointment was required (54%), clinic was convenient to visit (51.2%), same-day test results (43.9%), same day prescriptions available (42.7%), and co-payment was not mandatory (15.1%). Times are changing. Healthcare Management trends are also changing. While a shortage of primary care physicians may be driving some patients to urgent care, the challenge is that the same primary care physicians are needed to staff the urgent care center. The bottom line is increasing patient needs is now pressuring fewer available provider resources. The ability of urgent care centers to continue to grow and succeed depends on alternative measures in the operating environment, the impact on delivery models and how to devise plans to adapt and evolve. (Ayers, 2015)

Biography

Dr. Mary Grace F. Dauz obtained a BS degree in Civil Engineering in 1985 and a BS degree in Nursing in 1992. She pursued higher education and earned her Master of Arts in Nursing in 1996 and eventually, a Doctorate Degree in Philosophy Major in Educational Management in 2005 at the Angeles University Foundation. She also attended the Trainer’s Training Methodology Course in 2003 provided by the TESDA, the Leadership and Managerial Excellence in Health Systems: Nursing Leadership Program by the Ateneo de Manila University, Graduate School of Business in 2006 and the Train the Trainer Programme for Nurse Teachers and Leaders in the Philippines sponsored by Temasek Foundation, NUHS and Ngee-Ann Polytechnic, Singapore in 2012. Dr. Grace is a nursing administrator and educator with top notch performance. She is the embodiment of a unique combination of expertise and experience in Nursing Education, Administration, and Practice. Backed by more than 24 years of nursing experience in various capacities, she is a strong strategic planner, with keen quality assurance, operational and administrative nursing skills and practice. She is a dynamic nurse educator who has regularly shared her expertise in the different fields of nursing as a speaker, lecturer and resource person. She also serves as an adviser and a panel in various nursing- related researches and case studies. Dr. Grace is highly committed to delivering results. She is a cross-functional team player, a highly effective leader, and a consistent results-oriented performer. Her leadership in nursing practice has been recognized by her contemporaries in the field and was nominated for two consecutive years for the Search for Nursing Excellence in the Philippines where she landed as a finalist. As an adopted daughter to some Rotary Clubs, she gave her share to community relations and community service by actively participating in their notable Corporate Social Responsibility Programs. Outside of this club, she is also involved in community service and civic-oriented activities on career development.

Speaker
Mary Grace Flores Dauz Angeles University Foundation Medical Center,Philippines

Abstract

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) now control around two-thirds of the NHS budget, influencing healthcare provider priorities and playing a key role in implementing the NHS plan. However, significant failures in healthcare have highlighted a dissonance between expressed values of leaders and everyday routine practices. This research explores the leadership behaviour of commissioners and the role it plays in determining quality and safety in healthcare. The research took a two phase pragmatic mixed method approach: phase 1 used focused video ethnography to observe commissioners in a mock boardroom setting; phase 2 employed a quantative questionnaire to determine the leadership behaviours that subordinates would expect their commissioners to adopt. The focused ethnography method used examined small communicative behaviours using a unique coding system which cross referenced audible communication with non-verbal visible communication to identify the most dominant and assertive Commissioners. The findings of this research identified that the leadership style most prevalent within the commissioners was transactional in nature. The questionnaire to subordinates of commissioners identified that transformational leadership had the best outcome on staff performance if this was linked to positive leadership style. This confusion of leadership behaviours, allied with poor analyse of risk leaves commissioners prone to repeating previous healthcare failures.

Biography

Peter has a Masters degree in health and social care management, a BSc Hons degree in Health & Safety (H&S) and is a Chartered Fellow of the Institute of Occupational Safety & Health (CFIOSH). He is also the Chair of the Qatar Branch of IOSH; with significant experince in the public sector with over 30 years experience; which ncludes three local authorities, 4 NHS providers and more recently as a Director in the Middle East Healthcare system. He has a Masters in Philosophy (M/Phil); published papers on leadership behaviour in the British Journal of Healthcare Management (2012 & 2015); American Journal of Public Health (2014). Peer reviews papers for the British Medical Journal. Written a chapter on Management Culture within the NHS, Patient Safety Culture, Theory Methods & Practice (2014). Presented & chaired at International Patient Qulaity & Safety (Q&S) Conferences in the UK, Saudi Arabia & Abu Dhabi (2013) IOSH conferences (2014 & 2015). Presented findings of ‘Examining Commissioners Leadership Behaviour’ at the European Union of the Society of Preventative Research Slovenia October 2015 and presented in Oman IOSH Middle East Conference 2016. Public Health Conference UK 2016 and Doha Middle East IOSH conference 2017. Peter is passionate about improving Q&S in healthcare and keen to present at future confereces on his specialised subject.

Speaker
Peter Bohan Sidra Medical & Reserch Centre Doha Qatar, Qatar

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to decrease CVL infections in tertiary care hospital oncology unit Introduction: Catheters are the leading source of bloodstream infections for patient receiving chemotherapy or other long term treatment. Comprehensive unit-based programs have proven to be effective in decreasing catheter-related bloodstream infections. Central venous catheters (CVL)or central lines (defined as a vascular infusion device that terminates at or close to the heart or in one of the great vessels) are used in inpatient and outpatient clinical settings to provide long-term venous access for patients with a wide variety of illnesses and conditions. A CVL is a long, soft, thin, flexible tube that is inserted into one of the large veins leading to the heart. Methods/Discussion: Design: Pre intervention and post intervention observational study. Setting: The 31 bed medical & oncology unit in a tertiary care hospital. Between February 2014 and Auguest201, all patients admitted to the medical with CVL were surveyed prospectively for the development of catheter-associated bloodstream infection. A mandatory education program directed toward Medical & oncology unit nurses was developed by Clinical nurse instructor to highlight correct practices for the prevention of catheter-associated bloodstream infection. The program consisted of a unit in-service session including pre and post test based Presentations on risk factors and practice modifications involved in catheter-related bloodstream infections. Each participant was required to complete a pretest before Presentation and an identical test after completion of the Presentation Findings/Results: A fifteen episode of catheter-associated bloodstream infection occurred out of 50 catheters insertion in the 6 months before the introduction of the education program. Following implementation of the intervention, the rate of catheter-associated bloodstream infection decreased to 5 episodes out of 20 catheter insertion in the 6 months after the initiation of the education program. Conclusion: An intervention focused on the education of health-care providers on the prevention of catheterassociated bloodstream infections may lead to decrease in the incidence of primary bloodstream infections

Biography

Shazia Meraj ali has completed his RN and BScN from Aga Khan University & Master of Nursig at the age of 36 years from Walden University. I worked as a Clinical nurse instructor at Aga Khan Universiy medical surgical and Oncology Unit for 9 years and tyhen join Mediclinic Alain UAE and woked there for 6 years as a Charge Emergency Department and occationally worked as an Nursing supervisor, i attended many Nrsf ciferences natinally and internatioannly at UAE, Now Preparing to get admission in Ph.d program.

Speaker
Shazia Meraj ali Child Aid Association, Pakistan

Abstract

Waiting lists present one of the biggest problems and challenges of Croatian healthcare system. In 2015, Ministry of Health and Croatian Health Insurance Fund have implemented a set of activities on the supply side to increase availability of elective health care. Aim: To analyse effect of implemented health care interventions on waiting lists. Methods: Data was gathered by business intelligence system eWaiting lists of Croatian Health Insurance Fund. Data was analysed for period 11/2/2014 to 11/12/2015. Results: In 2015 reduction of 76,861 waiting lists orders was recorded. Beside decrease of orders, reduction of average waiting time and availability of earlier term for medical procedure was recorded (21 per cent average reduction in waiting time). Discussion and conclusion: Policy interventions for reduction of waiting lists in Croatia were primarily focused on supply side of health care system with a change in payment for medical services (pay-for-performance). 1,2 million services more have been provided. Increased number of services led to financial stability of hospital sector for the first time in 20 years.

Biography

Assist. Prof. Dragan Korolija-Marinić works as a consultant surgeon in a clinic specialized for tumours. Graduated at Zagreb Medical School in 1988, where he has finished his PhD in 2001, also. He has a list of original scientific papers with more than 300 citations of his work. In a period from 2012 to 2014 he was a CEO of Clinical Hospital in Zagreb, and then from 2014 to 2016 was appointed as Deputy Minister of Health in Republic of Croatia. During that time was responsible for the Hospital sector, where he has started various structural reforms and activities. These activities gave excellent results n 2015.

Speaker
Dragan Korolija-Marinic University Clinic for Tumours,CROATIA

Abstract

The disaster health education and training are not mandatory in many countries, but several kinds of program existed in the world. The disaster medical education and training has been mandatory in Korea since 2014, so newly developed official disaster medical education and training system which should be applied from 2015 was necessary. We reviewed the disaster health education and training program in advanced countries including USA, EU and Japan, and compared with the existing progam in Korea. After analysis and comparison of disaster helath education and training programs, adequate contents and program for Korean situation were developed and they were applied to the pilot program repeatedly for confirmation of adequate educational effect. Now it has been spread nationally. Additionally NBC(nuclear, biological and chemical) type disaster response training was added after repeated chemical disaster and geopolitical nuclear threat.The current level can be evaluated by comprehensive indicators and it is possible to plan the further development. In case of nuclear disaster, for the adequate response to newly emerging threat of various nuclear disaster, new concept and new comprehensive disaster medical system is necessary as well as effective utilization of preexisting resources. For the adequate medical response in disaster, the standard minimal requirement for disaster medical education and training should be developed and disaster medical personnels should participated in this program.

Biography

Doctor Soon-Joo Wanggraduated Seoul National University and has completed emergency medicine fellowship there. He has worked in Hallym University over 20 years as a chief professor and director of emergency center. He is an immediate past president of 3 academic societies - Korean Society of Disaster Medicine, Burn, Geriatric Emergency Medicine. He is an expert advisor of Government in the field of disaster management, social security, emergency medical system.

Speaker
Soon-Joo Wang Hallym University College of Medicine, South Korea

Abstract

Cancer is a disease of cells in which normal cells are transformed into abnormal cells by the genetic mutation of the DNA that may occur in any persons irrespective of their age, sex, socio economic status culture and geographical area. As per a global estimation cancer in children have an incidence of more than 175,000 per year, and a mortality rate of approximately 96,000 per year. The incidence is highest among the 1-4 years age group, but the mortality is highest among the 10-14 years age group. Treatment of childhood cancer is one of the most complex endeavors in Pediatrics. It might include Surgery, Radiotherapy, Chemotherapy, Immunotherapy and Stem cell transplantation/Bone Marrow Transplantation. Childhood cancers, usually respond well to chemotherapy because they tend to be cancers that grow fast (Most forms of chemotherapy affect cells that are growing fast). However, damage to healthy cells is unavoidable and this damage accounts for short and long-term side effects to children. Most commonly these medicines produce toxicity to fast dividing cells of the body such as haemopoietic cells and the mucous cells lining the mouth, stomach and intestines.Oral mucositis is a recurrent and most common side effect of chemotherapy.Topical application of honey on oral mucosa is markedly effective in the reduction of severity (pain, erythema and ulceration) and duration of CIOM.

Biography

Sunil Kumar Bijaraniais 31 years old Nursing Officer atPost Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Chandigarh, India. Academics: Master of Science in Nursing (Pediatrics) from National Institute of Nursing Education (NINE), PGIMER, Chandigarh, India. Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Indira Gandhi National Open University (IGNOU), New Delhi, India.Diploma in Nursing, Karnataka State Nursing Education Board, Bangalore, India

Speaker
Sunil Kumar Bijarania Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Abstract

Introduction: Obesity is a serious and concerning health-related problem in the whole world. Obesity is considered to be related to many life threatening conditions including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, fatty liver and also some cancers. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of acupuncture on weight loss as well as obesity-related biochemical factors in overweight and obese women. Methods: Forty overweight and obese women were included in this clinical trial via convenient sampling method. All samples were asked to sign an informed consent before the study. Participants treated with acupuncture for a period of 6 weeks, twice a week for 20 minutes per session. obesity-related biochemical factors which was evaluated in this study were as follow: Weight, body mass index, fasting blood sugar (FBS), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) and liver enzymes (SGOT, SGPT) measured before and after treatment. T paired and Wilcoxon tests in SPSS software version 22 were used to analyze data. Results: Acupuncture was related to decrease of weight and body mass index (P=0.001), FBS (p=0.01) and SGOT (p=0.01), while HDL was increased with acupuncture (p=0.001). Conclusion: The results show that acupuncture can be one of the limited methods of increasing high density lipoprotein, in addition to weight loss and decreasing BMI. Keywords: Acupuncture, Obesity, Fatty liver

Biography

Speaker
Zeinab Karimi Iran university of medical science,Iran

Abstract

Sana Kliniken AG is a company in which around 32,000 employees care for 2.2 million patients each year in 52 hospitals. As a subsidiary of health insurance, clinical risk management has been an important part of quality management in all our hospitals for more than 10 years, according to since 2004 DIN EN ISO-certified quality management. All our hospitalsheld off regular mortality and morbidity conferences, peer medical reviews, london protocol based case analysis, critical incident reporting systems, and the use of the WHO Safety Checklist are already well established methods. Currently, we are introducing CRM training courses across the board, the aim of which is to improve interdisciplinary and cross-occupational group training by means of simulation training and thus to carry out resuscitation more successfully. To implement the project we have • developed a concept with our specialist working group anesthesia and intensive care • gained a well-known company as a training partner, • provides all executives with basic knowledge about the method, • prepared a guideline for the project coordinators in the individual clinics, • developed a project homepage, • 3 training films lasting 20 minutes each The instruments and the results achieved so far should be reported.

Biography

Dr. Heidemarie Haeske-Seeberg has been in charge of quality management and clinical risk management at Sana Kliniken AG since 2001, where she is also responsible for the development of quality and clinical risk management. The focus is currently on supporting clinics in the development of the handling of medical quality results, the further development of medical and nursing peer reviews, the development of a system for comprehensive quality assessment and the conduct of annual discussions on the quality development of all Sana hospitals. She is a co-developer of the portal Qualitätskliniken.de, which provides the public with understandable and accessible quality results of German hospitals.

Speaker
Heidemarie Haeske-Seeberg Sana Kliniken AG, Oskar-Messter-Straße Ismaning Bayern, Germany

Abstract

We live in a world wherein there are inevitable natural hazards and disasters which can destroy the lives ofthousands of people, as well as disturb the environment. The Philippines experienced the tremendous effect of typhoon Haiyan in 2013. The country being a disaster-pronearea need a responsive public health team in terms of disaster having been traumatized in 2013. When disasters occur, the multidisciplinarypublic health team in healthcare institutions such as rural health units (RHU) or community healthcarefacilities will be among the first to respond because of their accessibility. This is the sole reason why community healthcare institutions should always be available and prepared for disasters in order to save as many lives as possible. The Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of the public health team in rural health units, which consisted of the municipal doctors, nurses, midwives, dentists and other allied health workers were assessed. Using quantitative, descriptive and correlational study design and employing descriptive and inferential statistics, the study found out they have average knowledge level on disaster preparedness and they likewise have positive attitude and practices towards disaster preparedness. Disaster preparedness can mitigate the adverse consequences of disasters and will help curb the high incidence of emergencies resulting from disasters. The presentation will include discussions on other aspects of public health nursing and disaster nursing.

Biography

Prof. Robelita Negradas-Varona is a Nurse-Midwife by profession, with Masters of Arts in Nursing and currently a Bachelor of Science in Midwifery graduate. She has been in the academe for 25 years and she is affiliated with the University of the Philippines Manila – School of Health Sciences, an innovative school of the University of the Philippines offering the ladderized curriculum starting from Midwifery in the first level, then Nursing in the second level and Doctor of Medicine as the last. The school is a community oriented and outcome-based institution;thus, their graduates are mostly working in the community and they are the answer of the country’s problem of brain-drain. She has produced researches related to Disaster and is an active officer of the National Association of Philippine Schools of Midwifery, being the research coordinator of the association

Speaker
Robelita N Varona University of The Philippines Manila, Philippines

Abstract

The Falls Life Cycle Sessions were developed as an initiative to bring together Governance and Clinical Practice with a holistic approach to managing and preventing patient falls. The introduction of a New Falls Bundle within London North West Healthcare NHS Trust provided the basis upon which to structure the initial part of the session. A noticeable reduction in the reporting of incidents within a ward influenced the completion of the Falls Life Cycle by generating a discussion on incident reporting. The target audience for the sessions were staffon one of the Acute Hospital sites and Community Inpatient Bedded Units. The purpose of the sessions was to increase awareness and provide knowledge to staff on how to use the new Falls Bundle documentation. The sessions commenced by using the Falls Bundle as a discussion tool to address the risk management and prevention of a patient fall. Once the use of the Falls Bundle had been discussed an open discussion followed identifying incidents to be reported and how to escalate Serious Incidents thus completing the Life Cycle. Feedback from the sessions suggested better collaborative working and inter-dialogue between multidisciplinary teams and provided an enhanced knowledge of incident reporting and an increased awareness in the use of the New Falls Bundle.

Biography

Speaker
Faisal Ahmed London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust, UK

Abstract

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Stroke survivors are usually left with hemiparesis affecting their functional activities. The acute stage is a critical period, and stroke survivors typically depend on the caregivers to assist them in performing their daily activities which include self-oral hygiene. Daily oral hygiene is commonly affected and neglected. As a result, dental plaque will build up and lead to poor oral health. Oral opportunistic microorganisms will increase in number and therefore, increase the risk of life-threatening infection such as aspiration pneumonia. Moreover, the present of dysphagia as well as cognitive impairment following stroke increase the risk of potential infection to the lung. Thus, oral hygiene care is essential. Stroke survivors require assistance on the oral hygiene care to enable them to maintain good oral hygiene. Therefore, the role of caregivers such as nurses during the hospitalization stage is important to ensure the oral hygiene is maintained and improved. Hence, prevent oral health-related medical complications which affect recovery and stroke rehabilitation. This presentation will cover the importance of oral hygiene care, and factors involve to enhance the practice of oral hygiene care to stroke survivors.

Biography

Stroke is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Stroke survivors are usually left with hemiparesis affecting their functional activities. The acute stage is a critical period, and stroke survivors typically depend on the caregivers to assist them in performing their daily activities which include self-oral hygiene. Daily oral hygiene is commonly affected and neglected. As a result, dental plaque will build up and lead to poor oral health. Oral opportunistic microorganisms will increase in number and therefore, increase the risk of life-threatening infection such as aspiration pneumonia. Moreover, the present of dysphagia as well as cognitive impairment following stroke increase the risk of potential infection to the lung. Thus, oral hygiene care is essential. Stroke survivors require assistance on the oral hygiene care to enable them to maintain good oral hygiene. Therefore, the role of caregivers such as nurses during the hospitalization stage is important to ensure the oral hygiene is maintained and improved. Hence, prevent oral health-related medical complications which affect recovery and stroke rehabilitation. This presentation will cover the importance of oral hygiene care, and factors involve to enhance the practice of oral hygiene care to stroke survivors.

Speaker
Normaliza Ab Malik Universiti Sains Islam Malaysia, Malaysia

Abstract

By 2013, Western countries received roughly 130 million immigrants, with women consisting of more than half the immigrant population. This demographic change highlights the importance of cultural sensitivity and its role in clinical practice. The impact of cultural diversity in the delivery of quality health care is undeniable.Sociocultural differences, e.g., ethnicity, race, and language proficiency, are just a few factors to consider. Furthermore, these differencesdirectly influence a woman’s perspective, behavior, belief, and value incurrent multicultural societies. A true understanding of a woman’s cultural differences is required to establish effective clinician-patient communication and to improve quality of care. Through applied and innovative understanding, it is possible to continue the integration of diversity in women’s health management and establish standards of care for this vulnerable population. Standards to considermay include availability of personalized care, cultural respect, informed consent in medical decision-making and medical procedures, understanding of sexual orientation, use of interpretive services, and regard for all birth rituals and faith-based concerns. The purpose of this presentation is to: • Define cultural diversity in women’s health • Identify obstacles in cross-cultural care • Introduce sensitive models to care for women from other cultures

Biography

Soheyl Asadsangabi studied Midwifery in Iran andcompleted her Doctoral study (DNP) as a midwife from Vanderbilt University. She has been practicing midwifery since 2004 in private and academic settings. As a woman from another culture and a clinician who provides care for a diverse population her focus is on cross cultural women’s health care. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Vanderbilt School of Medicine.

Speaker
Soheyl Asadsangabi Vanderbilt University Medical Center, USA

Abstract

The goal of this study was to measure the size of our areas of improvement using patient inquiries not only patient complaints. Methods: Our Patient affairs team recorded all patient feedbacks into a locally developed database. We set operational definitions for patient feedbacks as follows: Patient Complaints: an 'expression of grievance' and 'dispute within our setting' where patients are waiting for a solution and need a feedback Patient Concerns: an 'expression of grievance' and 'dispute within our setting' where patients aren’t waiting for a solution or doesn’t need a feedback Patient Inquiries: a request for more information or help from our staff to obtain a service in our organization Patient Suggestion: an expression of new idea without grievance Patient Compliment: an expression of gratitude Patient feedbacks were received by face-to-face interactions, via emails, via phone calls or via direct electronic entry through website. Patient Feedbacks were collected from first of January 2016 till 31st of December 2016. Data were extracted on Excel sheet and SPSS analysis was used. Every feedback was linked to one of the clinic’s approved policies, laws or regulations. Results: A total of 1364 patient feedback was received in the period of study.314 patient complaints, 168 patient concern, 845 patient inquiry, 25 patient compliment and 12 patient suggestions. Patient complaints were classified according to the process they are linked to as follows: Process Frequency Appointment 135 Insurance and Charging 46 Staffing 42 Code of Conduct 18 Registration 6 Community Announcements 5 Referral Hospitals 5 Referral Hospital Services 4 ER assessment 3 Radiology Turn around time 3 Release of Information 3 Medication Orders 2 Translation 2 Others 40 Process Frequency Appointment 125 Medical reports from referral hospital 110 Medical reports from the clinic 107 Services delivered from referral hospitals 95 Information about Insurance 64 Translation 48 Referral 47 Information about Referral Hospitals 38 Staffing 35 Information about supplies availability 29 Community Announcements 26 Donation 20 Transfer 16 Sick note 15 Scope of Service 15 Information about safety/security issues 9 Patient Education 8 Medication Refills 6 Registration 4 Training for patients 4 Wheel Chair 3 Involvement in Care Plan 3 Others 18 845 The goal of this study was to check if patient inquiries, not patient complaints, would give us a better insight of our areas of improvement . Our Patient affairs team recorded all patient feedbacks into a locally developed database. We set operational definitions for patient feedbacks as follows: Patient Complaints: an 'expression of grievance' and 'dispute within our setting' where patients are waiting for a solution and need a feedback Patient Concerns: an 'expression of grievance' and 'dispute within our setting' where patients aren’t waiting for a solution or doesn’t need a feedback Patient Inquiries: a request for more information or help from our staff to obtain a service in our organization Patient Suggestion: an expression of new idea without grievance Patient Compliment: an expression of gratitude Patient feedbacks were received by face-to-face interactions, via emails, via phone calls or via direct electronic entry through website. Patient Feedbacks were collected from first of January 2016 till 31st of December 2016. Every feedback was linked to one of the clinic’s approved policies, laws or regulations. Data were extracted on Excel sheet and SPSS analysis was used. A total of 1364 patient feedback was received in the period of study.314 patient complaints, 168 patient concern, 845 patient inquiry, 25 patient compliment and 12 patient suggestions. Patient complaints were classified according to the process they are linked to; the top five affected processes were as follows: Process Frequency Appointment 135 Insurance and Charging 46 Staffing 42 Code of Conduct 18 Registration 6 Patient inquiries were also classified according to the process they are linked to; the top five affected processes were as follows: Process Frequency Appointment 125 Medical reports from referral hospital 110 Medical reports from the clinic 107 Services delivered from referral hospitals 95 Information about Insurance 64 1. Tom W Reader, Alex Gillespie, Jane Roberts, Patient complaints in healthcare systems: a systematic review and coding taxonomy May 29, 2014 2. Donaldson L., An organisation with a memory: Learning from adverse events in the NHS. London: Department of Health, 2000. 3. Clwyd A, Hart T., A review of the NHS hospitals complaints system: putting patients back in the picture. London, England: Department of Health, 2013. Key Words Patient feedback, Quality, Perception

Biography

Speaker
Ahmed Algamal International Medical Consultant, Saudi arabia

Abstract

Background: Various instructional methods and environments are used in nursing education to develop students’ psychomotor and communication skills, reduce their anxiety levels, and enhance their satisfaction. Objectives: To examine the effect of three different instructional environments on the development of the students' psychomotor and communication skills and their levels of anxiety and satisfaction. Design: A prospective study design was used. Methods: The sample of the study consisted of 60 nursing students. Before the implementation of the study, the students' cognitive skills and trait anxiety levels were evaluated. The students were divided into five groups and five nursing activities (Leopold’s maneuvers, teaching breastfeeding, family planning education, teaching vulvar self-examination and teaching breast self-examination) were specified for each group. They implemented these nursing activities under the supervision of a faculty member in the nursing skills laboratory, standardized patient laboratory and clinical practice environment respectively. In each instructional environment, the students' psychomotor and communication skills, state anxiety levels and satisfactions were evaluated. Results: The median scores for psychomotor skills [Nursing Skills Laboratory=73.1; Standardized Patient Laboratory=81.5; Clinical Practice Environment=88.6] and communication skills [Nursing Skills Laboratory=64.9; Standardized Patient Laboratory=71.6; Clinical Practice Environment=79.0] were found to increase as the students went on practicing in a more complicated environment (p<0.05). Similarly, it was determined that the students' anxiety levels decreased as they were practicing incrementally [Nursing Skills Laboratory=33.0; Standardized PatientLaboratory=32.0; Clinical Practice Environment=31.0]. As the instructional environments were getting more similar to the reality, the students' satisfaction levels were found to become higher. Conclusions: Students who deliberately practice in the instructional environments until they are competent develop their psychomotor skills while reducing their anxiety levels, and enhancing their communication skills and satisfaction. For that reason, the development of students' competency areas is thought to be effective for the enhancement of patients and healthcare workers’ safety. Keywords: Nursing education, clinical practice, nursing skills laboratory, standardized patient, psychomotor skill, communication, anxiety, satisfaction

Biography

She graduated in first place from Hacettepe University in 1989. She won the İhsan Dogramacı Superior Merit Award and Science Incentive Award. She earned her pilot’s license from Republic of Turkey Ministry of Transport. She studied about counseling on assisted reproductive techniques at Liverpool Women’s Hospital Reproductive Medicine Unit in United Kingdom on the British Council Research Scholarship. She earned a certificate in management and leadership in nursing. She is an active member of Thematic Network leadership work group. She studied as a research scholar at Kent State University College of Nursing in 2006 for 3 months. In 2007, she worked on a project named “Development of Leadership Skills in Nursing Doctoral Students” at University of Michigan Faculty of Nursing on an international research scholarship which was supported by International Network for Doctoral Education in Nursing (INDEN) and Sigma Theta Tau and provided to only three people around the world every year. She worked as a research assistant at Hacettepe University School of Nursing in the Maternity and Women's Health Nursing Division from 1990 to 1997. She was promoted to assistant professor in 1998, associate professor in 2006 and professor in 2012. She worked as a Co-Head of Nursing Department, Erasmus Department Coordinator, Head of Strategic Planning Group and board member of Hacettepe University Women’s Research and Implementation Center (HUWRICH) between 2009 and 2011. Her interest subjects are sexuality and reproductive health and management and leadership. She is member of national and international nurse’s organizations such as INDEN and Sigma Theta Tau. She has been working as a Director of Nursing Services at Hacettepe University Hospitals between 2012-2016 and Founding Dean of Faculty of Nursing. She has published more than 70 papers, 15 grant projects, eight books as an editor and author, and more than 100 presentation in the national and international congress. She is also invited speaker more than 60 congress and symposium. She has working as a Dean Faculty of Health Science and Director of Nursing of MLPCare in Istinye University

Speaker
Fusun Terzioglu İstinye University, Istanbul, Turkey

Abstract

Ageing of the population is now one of the most important facts that came to the foreground in the 21st century. The rapid growth in the elderly of Bangladesh population after 2040 will challenge existing health care services, family relationships on social security. Because of change in the family structure there will be implications on health care of elderly from the family and unmet need of health care services in the public sector will rapidly increase. the aim of this research is to explore how the aging situation in Bangladesh is addressing and anticipating the challenges of an aging society. A review of program activities suggests that Bangladesh preparedness for an aging population is decidedly mixed. Public policy may have an important influence on the role of family support systems in the future but it is not significant considering the absolute size of the elderly population. Current demographic trends indicate that Bangladesh will very different in the coming decades than is today. Mortality and fertility will be lower, and life expectancy will be rising. Population growth will have slowed substantially as supported by the medium and low variants projections respectively. Strengthening human capital by ensuring empowerment education and employment of all citizens will yield a high return to investment and will help countries reap a demographic dividend that can lift millions out of poverty. Creating hope and opportunity for young people to develop their full potential can drive progress in the years to come and ultimately result in a second demographic dividend of healthy lives, wealthier and more productive older person. Key words: Elderly, Bangladesh, Health, Growth, Population

Biography

Senior Lecturer, Department of Medical Science and Public Health, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, Essex, UK

Speaker
Russell Kabir Anglia Ruskin University,UK

Abstract

Introduction A significant body of studies have demonstrated that patients often exhibit signs and symptoms of clinical deterioration for several hours prior to cardiopulmonary arrest.1 Unintentional harm occurs to patients through failure to recognize and respond to the signs of clinical deterioration.2 Therefore, there is a need to rescue patients early in their decline before a crisis occurs. This necessitates an organized track and trigger approach of early recognition and response to subtle changes in a patient’s condition. Qatar Early warning system is a tool developed to be used by care teams to facilitate early recognition and management of patients at risk of deterioration. Aim/Objectives  To reduce the rate of unexpected cardiac arrests outside ICU & Emergency by 20% over 2 years.  To increase Rapid Response Team (RRT) utilization to 30 calls per 1000 discharges over 2 years. Indirectly, this program also aims to provide a foundation on which to develop other safety systems, such as sepsis pathways. Methods A systems approach was utilized to ensure effective delivery of the program across the organization – establishing and embedding 5 core elements into HMC’s health system. Governance: A corporate steering group and local governance systems for each hospital identified were established. Along with this, a corporate policy on the standards of managing deteriorating patients was authorized.Standardized Calling Criteria: Evidence based track and trigger charts were identified and modified for local use. These were tested using a PDSA approach in various settings. Modifications were made to Cerner to alert clinicians to deterioration. Deteriorating Patient Response System: Clinical Review (CRT) and Rapid response (RRT) teams were identified and structured for each facility. Algorithms and activation pathways for CRT and RRT calls were also designed and localized per facility. Education: A tiered approach to education was utilized: Level 1 – Awareness (eLearning, bedside teaching, and didactics) Level 2 – ALERT Level 3 – Advanced Life Support Evaluation: 2 KPIs were agreed to determine effectiveness: 1. RRT call rate per 1000 discharges 2. CPR rate per 1000 discharges Result The chart below show the performance across HMC of the Qatar Early Warning System (QEWS). The blue line shows the monthly rate of CPR calls per 1000 discharges, for the seven months prior to the QEWS program implementation in November 2015, as well as the overall rates since go-live date. This reveals that during the post-implementation period there has been a significant reduction in the rate of CPR calls. The median for CPR calls shifted from 3.7 to 1.8 calls per 1000 discharges. There has been a 43% reduction in the average number of cardiac arrests across HMC since the implementation of QEWS. The red line identifies the rate of Rapid Response Team activations per 1000 discharges occurring since QEWS implementation across HMC facilities. It is important to note that the objective is to achieve a rate of 30 to 40 RRT activations per 1000 discharges. In addition, the RRT call rate was 19 per 1000 discharges for the last 19 months post QEWS implementation (November 2015 to May 2017) with a range of 13.6 - 24.5 RRT calls per 1000 discharges (median is 18.9 RRT calls / 1000 discharges

Biography

Mr. Awad is registered nurse graduated from Nursing college on 1999. He has completed his Master degree in Quality and Patient Safety in Healthcare Management from Royal Colleague of Surgeons - Ireland. His master thesis was about building a system for early recognition and response to deteriorating patients, he was the first class honor for 2015. Mr. Awad is also Certified Professional in Healthcare Quality (CPHQ) since 2012. He joined Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC) on 2004 in Qatar; he has wide experience in Quality and patient safety. Currently, He is the Manager of Quality Improvement and risk management at HMC. Mr. Awad is one of the key Team members for development and implementation of Qatar Early Warning System across all HMC facilities. He presented many quality improvement projects and articles in international conferences.

Speaker
Awad Amayreh Hamad Medical Corporation (HMC), Qatar

Abstract

Management of behavioral symptoms of dementia poses a challenge to nursing care providers. It is important to realize that there are two most common types of symptoms: agitation/apathy when the patient is solitary and rejection of care when the person is interacting with care providers. Agitation/apathy should be managed by providing stimulation by presence of others in a comfortable environment. An example of this enhanced nursing care is Namaste Care which does not require additional staffing and only minimal modification of an existing facility. Rejection of care should be managed by improved communication and by changes in caregiving strategies (e.g., substituting bed bath for a shower or tub bath). It is important to prevent escalation of rejection of care into a combative behavior that may result in an injury of the care provider or the patient. Both agitation/apathy and rejection of care are increased if the patient is depressed. Depression should be recognized even in advanced dementia and treated by non-pharmacological strategies that may include music therapy, cognitive stimulation and therapeutic conversation. If non-pharmacological methods are not sufficient, treatment with antidepressants is indicated. It is important to realize that antidepressants alone may not be sufficient and that their effect may require augmentation by antipsychotics. However, antipsychotics should not be considered the first line therapy for behavioral symptoms of dementia unless the patient has bothersome delusions and/or hallucinations

Biography

Dr. Volicer is Fellow of the American Nursing Association and is currently Visiting Professor at the 3rd Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, Courtesy Full Professor at the School of Aging Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, and Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Sydney. Twenty-five years ago, he established one of the first Dementia Special Care Units and introduced the concept of structured palliative care for patients with advanced dementia. Dr. Volicer is recognized as an international expert on advanced dementia care. He published over 250 articles and chapters, and edited four books on clinical management of dementia.

Speaker
Ladislav Volicer Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

Abstract

Hospitals are historically unsafe places with higher injury rate at work. Most of the injuries result from slips, trips, and falls or from using incorrect lifting techniques, especially when lifting patients. Hospitals are challenged with maintaining a safe building and environment to provide safe, functional, and supportive facilities for patients, families, staff, and visitors. The hospital compliance with the requirements of Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO), Life Safety Regulations established by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), workplace safety compliance with Occupational Safety Health Administration (OSHA) Standards to provide the best international care. Effective management includes multidisciplinary planning, education,monitoring and risk assessment of the environment for the hazards and develops action plans that will minimize or eliminate risk. All staff should be educated about the facility, how to reduce risks and how to monitor and to report situations that pose risk. Performance criteria are used to evaluate important systems and to identify needed improvements. It is important for medical facilities to ensure service requests are responded to quickly and efficiently and preventive maintenance schedules are set up in order to maintain operations without interruption. It include the assessment of staff safety knowledge and determination of training needs, a proven contractor safety management process, facility safety audits and practical corrective action plans for observed deficiencies, proficient incident investigations that include positive follow-up, experienced technical writing or policies and procedures, advocating safety considerations during the design and construction phases of new facilities and the remodel of existing facilities.

Biography

I am Sarwar Hussain, a safety specialist working with KFMMC the Armed Forces Hospital, Ministry of Defense in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Earlier I worked on Hospital Wide Improvement Programswith the Hamad Medical Corporation a principal public healthcare provider in the State of Qatar and I have worked as a senior consultant with the Astron Healthcare Consultants for the implementation and securing the accreditation awardfor the hospitals in India. I am a post-graduate in hospital management from Osmania University, India and a certified six sigma, project management professional, and FISQua with a decade of experience in Healthcare Quality and Accreditation. I am trained on various healthcare accreditation standards such as NABH, JCI, CBAHI, CAP, and ISO QMS 9001:2015. And I am also trained on OSHA and NFPA 99 Health Care Facilities Code. My main responsibilities include staff education& training, facility risk assessment, process mapping, incident investigation, and reporting.

Speaker
Sarwar Hussain Hospital Safety Specialist at KFMMC Dhahran, KSA

Abstract

Biofilms are problematicin healthcare settings, accounting for 65% of healthcare associated infections including indwelling medical devices, prostheses, etc. However, recent findings of biofilms on dry hospital surfacesemphasises the failures in current cleaning practices and disinfection. We aimed to determine how the protein component varies between traditional hydrated biofilms (wet) and DSB. S. aureus reference strain was grown in tryptic soy broth to produce a 24-hourplanktonic culture, and over 12-days in the Centres for Disease Control biofilm reactor to produce the wet and DSB. TMT-based mass spectrometry (MS) was performed, and protein identification and relative quantitation of protein levelswere performed using Proteome Discoverer (version 1.3). We identified 1636 total biofilm extractomes. Of these, 113 and 134 proteins showed significant abundance variation compared to planktonic bacteria in wet and DSB, respectively. In particular, UDP-N-acetylmuramate-L-alanine ligase (murC), is significantly up-regulated in DSB. This is involved in the peptidoglycan biosynthesis pathway, and is responsible for cell wall formation and might play a role in biofilm formation. This is the first report using high throughput TMT-based MS determining proteins inS. aureus. Current study will be helpful in designing advanced, targeted disinfectants and detergents to remove biofilms from dry environments. Keywords:S. aureus, DSB, Tandem Mass Tag (TMT).

Biography

I started my PhD with prestigiousiMQRESscholarship for 3 years (2016-2019) in the faculty of Medicine and Health Science, Macquarie University, Australia. Recently, I worked as a Pure research management system editor at Macquarie University. I completedMaster of Pharmacy (2013) from Chosun University, South Korea with full scholarship and research assistantship. I have published 6 papers in reputed journals and many conference articles. Recently, I received prestigious BGI-AOHUPO and APS-AOHUPO Travel Fellowship to present my innovation in the 9th AOHUPO Conference in Japan (May-2018). I also received PGRF to present my researchand lab visit in USA, October-2018.

Speaker
Md. Arifur Rahman Macquarie University,Australia

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Contribution of laboratory medicine to health care services has grown over the years. This 3year longitudinal study (2010-2012) analyzed requests for biochemical investigations in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. METHODS: Data were obtained after due process from records in the department of clinical biochemistry and the central medical records of the hospital for biochemical laboratory investigation requests and patients’ attendance records respectively. The analysis covered requests for basic biochemical investigations including electrolyte and urea, liver and renal function tests, lipids profile, plasma glucose estimations, hormonal level determinations, urinalysis and a comprehensive data of the total number of patients that attended the hospital in the years 2010, 2011 and 2012. RESULTS: The total officially recorded number of patients attended to in the period under reference are 243,652.00, 240,136.00 and 284,027.00 in years 2010, 2011 and 2012 respectively. Biochemical investigations were requested for 102,832, 89,122 and 82,242 patients representing 42.2%, 37.1% and 29.0% in years 2010, 2011 and 2012 respectively. The preponderance of these requests which averaged 36.1% per annum was for electrolyte and urea, plasma glucose and basic liver function investigations in that descending order. CONCLUSIONS: Aside from underscoring the possible prevalence of non-communicable diseases, the possible impact of this on the quality of medical care and the economic implication on the finances of this hospital was discussed in this study

Biography

Speaker
Ishiaq Omotosho University of Ibadan, Nigeria

Abstract

INTRODUCTION. The high morbidity and mortality by hypertensive cardiopathy demand the construction and validation of tools to stratify the risk of developing this condition. OBJECTIVE. To design and validate an index, based on risk factors, that permits to predict the development of hypertensive cardiopathy in patients with a diagnosis of essential arterial hypertension. METHODS. A prospective cohort study was done in hypertensive patients assisted at the specialized arterial hypertension physicians’ office of the “Carlos Manuel de Céspedes” Specialty Policlinic attached to the General University Hospital, Bayamo Municipality, Granma Province, Cuba from January 1st, 2010 to December 31, 2016. Internal and external validity and the internal consistency of the index were determined. RESULTS. The index sensitivity was of 97, 20 (IC: 93, 93-94.09) and specificity of 65, 38 (IC: 76, 25-76, 20). Both the index discriminative capacity (area under the ROC curve= 0,944; interval of confidence: 0,932-0,956; p<0, 0005) and calibration (p=0,751) were adequate. CONCLUSIONS. Thepresent study proposes an index to predict the risk of developing hypertensive cardiopathy, with adequate discriminative capacity and calibration (external validity). The index can be used as a tool of clinical and epidemiological surveillance since it permits to identify subjects with greater probability of developing the condition and to stratify the risk.

Biography

I have had an active participation in the scientific days of the center and in those related to the specialty at national and international level. Outstanding achievement of 4 mentions in the annual provincial health award and two prizes. Internationally, I was awarded a prize at the Scientific Conference and Methodological Scientific Conference, Caracas 2012. Principal investigator of 8 regional and national research projects. Participation in national and provincial courses, and I have given postgraduate courses related to the specialty and methodology of scientific research. Linked to teaching in the specialty, I have created several teaching support materials, chairman of numerous state examinations, and member of the court for clinical categorization of teaching staff. I hold the title of Professor in Internal Medicine, Doctor’s degree in Medical Sciences (2013), Master’s degree in infectious diseases(2009).

Speaker
Alexis Alvarez-Aliaga Carlos Manuel de Céspedes” General University Hospital, Cuba

Abstract

Malaysia in its efforts to eradicate the communicable disease of Tuberculosis, undertook several coordinated steps and formulated policies that resulted in not only containing its spread but was also in the process of eradicating it. However, new social migratory changes altered this path and now Malaysia faces new challenges in its effort to eradicate this communicable disease, where there has not only been an increase in the incidences, but Nurses and Health Staff have also contracted the disease. As such, the aim of this article is to probe the challenges that lie ahead in Malaysia’s efforts to control the spread of Tuberculosis. The objective is to find out the shortcomingsthat have affected the planning and implementation of several health policies. The scope is primarily the health policies implemented after independence and the new initiatives, implemented, of late. The methodology is basically relying on secondary data provided by government policies and to an extent, observations of the Author’s seven years experience as a staff of the Malaysian National Tuberculosis Centre, in particular, the Chest Clinic, in a General Hospital. It is hoped that at the end, what affected the detour of the national health policies, come to light as a result of this probe. Important words: Malaysia, Tuberculosis, policy changes, detour

Biography

Independent Researcher. Retired Government Servant of Malaysia, having served the Ministry of Health for almost 40 years, as a Senior Assistant Medical Officer. Bachelor of Social Science (USM), Masters in International Studies and Diplomacy (USM). PhD, Conflict Studies (USM), focusing on Terrorism. Presently Director of Aizat Training Service, giving motivational talks to University students, attending and presenting papers at conferences on Terrorism.

Speaker
Hj. Ahmad Nazzan bin Abdullah Independent Researcher

Abstract

In the health environment“Restraint“is defined as the limitation of the possibility of Spontaneous and autonomous movement of an individual through the use of devices Varied. Containment also exists in the pharmacological and environmental field. This practice violates fundamental human rights, constitutes a violation of Constitutional standards of many countries regarding individual freedom, in addition to be contrary to ethical and professional aspects. In the international literature, prevalence studies have broadly confirmed the Systematic use of the means of containment. The prevalence is still very high at internationally, and in the last two decades several studies have shown this. However, the exact data are difficult to obtain due to the great diversity Methodology used in the studies. In the last ten to fifteen years, interventions aimed at reducing the practice of Restraint have been stimulated, both in the various member countries of the European Union and in the United States, but they have also been addressed in Australia. Even in countries that are in a situation of greater economic development and that they have a good System (such as Great Britain, France, Germany, among others) to the prevalence of systematic use of restraint still remains high [1-3]. The scientific evidence has also demonstrated the damage and harmful effects, related to the use of means of containment as: aggressiveness, falls, injuries, Friction, psychic suffering, malnutrition, incontinence, among others. Unmasking thus, theunsupported beliefs of health professionals regarding the need to restraint in the principles of the safety of the elderly. The elderly person who is frail or has dementia Particularly vulnerable to any type of containment and the many complications that can be observed, not only with regard to organic damage but also by the emotional and psychological component. It is observed at the present time, there is still no awareness on the part of health professionals and Management and control bodies that Restraint is the cause of serious health problems. Thus, it is also associated with high costs concomitant to functional capacity. In view of the predictions of the accelerated demographic increase of the elderly in the coming years, there is a need for Dissemination of the Culture of Non-Containment among health professionals in order to Improve and optimize social and health systems, ensuring the quality of care. Trieste, a northeastern city of Italy with a high prevalence of elderly people (30% over 65), anticipates the future of reality over the next 20 years with regard to the world population growth. With a large number of nursing homes for seniors, a group of nurses developed a fully-fledged nursing model, carrying forward innovative care models.developing a social model and behavior of the resident population in respect of the elderly. For this reason, Trieste in 2010 was declared "Free City from Restraint"

Biography

Nursing Coordinator, Quality Manager of Long-Term Institutions, District 1 of the City of Trieste, Italy. Member of the Committee for the Fight against Restraint , Physics, Mechanics and Pharmacology in the elderly and frail people of the Healthcare Company Integrated University of TRieste(ASUITS). Founding member of the International Group "Triplice Alianca" dedicated to the diffusion of the quality of long-term care and non-containment care, founded in 2014. Teacher in courses for healthcare professionals at Institute of Education ENAIP Trieste.

Speaker
Fabio Cimador Institute of Education ENAIP Trieste,Italy

Abstract

In Uganda, the Health Sector Development Plan (HSDP) 2016-2020 emphasizes the need “to accelerate movement towards Universal Health Coverage (UHC)”. This renewed focus on UHC is in line with Uganda’s second National Health Policy (NHP II), whose overriding aim is: to improve access to the national minimum healthcare package. The health voucher scheme is a demand-side driven subsidy which allows targeted populations to access services. It is a relatively new strategy in addressing unique barriers to accessing quality health services among targeted populations.A voucher increases utilization of services by: removing financial barrier, creating a counselling opportunities during distribution which can influence a health seeking behavior and creating an individual’s self-efficacy to access services they have hitherto self-excluded themselves from. Programme Description: The Maternal Health Voucher (MHV) program is being implemented by the USAID-funded Social Marketing Activity project, whereUganda Health Marketing Group is the prime implementing partner. The program seeks to reach 20,000 poormothers in three years(2016-2019) with safe delivery services. Under this initiative,the voucher scheme covers the whole maternal & child health (MCH) comprehensive package ranging from 1st to 4thAntenatal Care (ANC), delivery, Postnatal Care (PNC), postpartum family planning and referrals for complicated cases. Methodology: The voucher scheme implementation follows a process of facility assessment and accreditation to ensure suitability to provide safe antenatal and delivery services. The clients are assessed using the poverty grading tool to identify suitable clients who are the poorest of the poor. The Voucher Management Agency sells vouchers to distributors (Good Life Promotors) who target clients and refer them to service providers. The voucher service providers offer services to all clients who present vouchers seeking for services and then they are reimbursed expenses incurred while offering services based on the agreed pricing. The vouchers are sold to the voucher distributors atUgx2,500/= while these distributors sell to clients at Ugx4,000/=, earn a commission of Ugx1,500/=. This kind of voucher distribution approach was adapted from the on-going voucher schemes in the country which gave vouchers for free. Results: In year only, 2,752 vouchers have been sold,and6,355pregnant mothers have attended at least one ANC visit, 175 PNC visits, 637 deliveries(normal and assisted deliveries) and 212 referrals for further management. In addition, 201 health workers and 86 Good Life Promoters (GLPs) have beentrained. Lessons Learnt: Vouchers haveconsiderably increaseduptake of maternal services in the private sector. Six of the supported Good Life Clinics (GLCs) have reported increasedANC visits from 25 to 120 mothers monthly, accounting for an increase of 480%. The community health workers also known as GLPsattached to the supported facilities (GLCs) are taking keen interest in their work because of the social entrepreneurial platform provided by trading in the voucher. The GLPs are self-motivated to distribute the vouchers largely because of the commission embedded in the activity.

Biography

Speaker
Geofrey Kasumba Uganda Health Marketing Group, Uganda

Abstract

Acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis (Sweet’s syndrome) is characterized by pyrexia, neutrophilia, and the abrupt appearance of erythematous, painful, cutaneous plaques. We describe the case of an 83-year-old man, who was presented to our hospital with increased frequency of urination, progressive fatigue, weight loss, and fever. Along with this, patient was concerned about the rapidly developing open skin ulcers for about 3-4 weeks. Initial lab-reports showed anemia, leukocytosis and elevated PSA. Imaging was negative for any abnormality. Surgical biopsy of the skin lesion was performed, and it revealed the diagnosis of sweet’s syndrome. Patient was treated with intravenous steroids with rapid improvement in his condition and eventual complete resolution of the skin ulcers. His prostate biopsy and gastro-intestinal evaluation came negative for malignancy. Bone marrow biopsy was done for persistent anemia and thrombocytopenia and the patient was found to have high-grade Myelodysplastic syndrome. Keywords: Sweet syndrome, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Anemia, Rare entity

Biography

Dr Abeer Arain, M.D., M.P.H, is currently a Medical Resident in the department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She completed her Medical Degree from Dow University of Health Sciences, Pakistan and Master’s in Publich Health from University of Oklahoma Health Sciences center, Oklahoma City, OK, United States. She is particularly interested in cancer research and is planning to pursue career in the field of Oncology.

Speaker
Abeer Arain University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA

Abstract

Background: Exercises are categorized as one of non-pharmacological treatments for various diseases. Regular exercises are widely known to be able to reduce fat mass and the inflammation of adipose tissue causing systemic inflammation. As the age increases, human’s physiological functions must be weakened due to the aging process. Old people generally have either inflammation or infection at their digestive tracts. Continuous giving of D-galactose with a minute dose accelerates the aging. D-galactose is a physiological nutrition and reducing sugar that reacts to free amino acids generated from amino acids contained by protein forming advance glycation endproducts (AGE) through non-enzymatic glycation that may accelerate the aging process. Purpose: This research aims to observe and compare indicators of inflammation risks as the mucosal thickness, number of fibrosis cells, and number and size of mucous glands on a controlled group of old, male, Wistar rats inducted with D-galactose and given mild and moderate intensities of physical exercise. Methods: This research is experimental research applying the post-test only group design to observe the comparison of indicators of inflammation risks on the gaster, small intestine, and colon. This research was conducted on 3-months-old male Wistar rats. The rats were then inducted with D-galactose and given 4-weeks physical exercises. Results: The D-galactose induction with the massof 300mg/kgBB continuously given for four weeks triggers aging. Statistical tests indicate that physical exercises cause weight gain and decrease the number of fibrosis cells on old rats (p<0.05). However, such exercises do not have any influence on mucosal thickness as well as the number and sizes of mucous gland (p>0.05). Conclusions: Physical exercises with mild and moderate intensities given to rats inducted with D-galactose decrease the number of fibrosis cells but do not affect the mucosal thickness as well as the number and size of mucous gland. Key words: Physical exercises, Aging, Indicators of inflammation risks, D-galactose

Biography

Dian Murwanigsih is a master student at Biomedical Science, Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia. She graduated from STIKes Qamarul Huda, Mataram, Indonesia. Her research is focused on aging and exercise for elderly people.

Speaker
Dian Murwaningsih Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia

Abstract

Primary care is the first point of access to health care outside of the hospital. It is internationally recognized that health care system which are oriented towards primary care may produce better outcomes, with lower costs and greater patients’ satisfactions. With the prevalence rate of 6.7% to 14.4% of Common Mental Disorder (CMD) in the primary care level in Malaysia, the role of mental health nursing may benefit the community through the introduction of psychological interventions that are timely and time-limited to provide effective and holistic care to primary care patients with mild to moderate CMD. Few studies have indicated that mental health nurses who are trained in utilizing psychological interventions in the primary care services were able to have improved outcomes for patients that are not significantly different to those receiving from the general practitioners’ care. A strong collaborative care involving greater role and value from the mental health nurses is suggested to provide better efficacy and treatment outcome for the primary care patients who have CMD.

Biography

Jeng Mun is a practicing clinical psychologist in Sunway Medical Center and is the honorable assistant secretary of the Malaysian Society of Clinical Psychology. She obtained her Masters in Clinical Psychology from HELP University and currently pursuing her 4th year Ph.D studies at UPM, focusing on depression and anxiety in the primary care level. In the past 5 years, she was lecturing in a private university teaching various health care programmes including nursing.

Speaker
Sam Jeng Mun Universiti Putra Malaysia & Sunway Medical Center, Malaysia

Abstract

Diabetes is currently estimated to affect more than 422 million people globally. This is estimated to continue to increase to over 642 million in 2040. In the UK, diabetes affects more than 4 million people equivalent to 6.2% with more than 10% of NHS budget being spent diabetes management. Diabetes has been reported to affect ethnic minority groups more than the general population. This has been reported to increase the prevalence of diabetes to be more than three times among ethnic minority groups than the White population. In addition, diabetes management outcome have been reported to be poorer among this population than general population. Method: We conducted a systematic review study to compare the diabetes management outcomes among Black-Africans, South Asia and White population. Three clinical outcome measures that indicate diabetes management were compared among the ethnic groups (Blood pressure, HbA1c and Cholesterol). Major databasesPubMed, CIHNAL, Medline, Web of Science, Scopus, and science direct databases were searched from 2007-2018. , 15 studies were retrieved including 10 quantitative and 5 qualitative studies. Result: Out of the 66 articles suitable for full text screening, 15 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. Majority of the articles used cross-sectional quantitative (n=10) and qualitative studies (n=5). Diabetes prevalence outcomes such as blood pressure, HbA1c, cholesterol were reported to be higher among black-Africans than Whites. The data showed significant differences among studies in terms of outcomes among ethnic groups. The findings from this review have highlighted that there is need for better management of diabetes among this group as shown in the studies review. Comparing the data from different studies has highlighted the disparity in diabetes management outcome among Black-Africans when compared to other ethnic groups. Our recommendation to address this health outcome disparity is to work on personalising tailored care for Black-Africans. This is where the contribution of diabetes nurses is needed to improve these outcomes. There is a need for nurses to work with patients from this ethnic group to address their main concerns about living with diabetes. To do this, we will need to understand diabetes management from this group and how issues concerning poor management can be addressed.

Biography

Speaker
Folashade Alloh Bournemouth University, UK

Abstract

Background and Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the lifetime prevalence of emotional/psychological abuse among married female healthcare providers in tertiary care hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods:A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on in a sample of 350 married female nurses and doctors, recruited from three tertiary healthcare hospitals (one public and two private). This study used the self administered modified truncated WHO Multi-country questionnaire. Descriptive and univariate analysis was performed. Results:Of the total sample of 350 female married healthcare providers, 97.7% (n= 342) were reported with one or more forms of domestic violence at some point in their married life, whereby 62.6% (n=214) lifetime prevalence of emotional abuse was found due to any form of violence. The univariate analysis showed that hose female healthcare providers who had done their diploma were more prone to emotional abuse 46.7% (n=100). And, nurses experienced more emotional abuse (57.9%) in their life than doctors. Moreover, there was a significant difference of emotional abuse among those participants’ husband who used and do not use alcohol (p=0.009). The most common study participants responses against emotional abuse were: 62% (n=212,) verbally fighting back, 15.2% (n=52) keeping quiet, 27.2% (n=93) talking to husband, family/friends, 7% (n= 24) returning to parents’ home and 5.8% (n=20) attempting suicide. Conclusions: Domestic violence leads to emotional scars and should be considered as an inhuman act. However, its prevalence exists in every culture and more so in underdeveloped, economically challenged cultures. Emotional abuse is frequent among nurses and doctors. Socio-demographic factors of women have been identified as one of the determinant of emotional abuse among healthcare professionals. Future research should investigate emotional abuse patterns in not only for professional women but also for housewives. Key Words Domestic violence, Violence against women, Pakistan, emotional abuse, demographic factors, married female healthcare providers.

Biography

Speaker
Azmat Jehan Khan Aga Khan University Pakistan

Abstract

Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries have potential for intrinsic healing and several magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported that the PCL healed with continuity but also with residual laxity. According to several studies, femoral tunnel placement should be made at distal (shallow) and anterior position, usually 5-6 mm from articular margin for the anterolateral bundle (ALB) in single bundle reconstruction. This tunnel and the graft alignment should be vertical. May be the remnant PCL fibers will be helpful to prevent killer-turn effect at femoral and tibial tunnel.(Bumper and cushion effect) Therefore how we can do preserve remnant PCL and shrinkage ? May be awling at femoral and tibial insertion of the PCL remnant should be helpful to shrinkage of the remnant PCL.. When we can do single bundle reconstruction? If the remnant PCL is thick enough and have healing potential, we can do single bundle reconstruction using augmentation transtibial tunnel technique in subacute or acute stage. In chronic patient (more than 6-12 months), the remnant PCL is thick and have normal signal in MRI . Remnant tensioning with ALB reconstruction using modified inlay technique in this group of patients will have a tendency better stability than transtibial technique. However, tensioning using modified inlay technique is more technically demanding and need bigger surgical incision. Tibial tunnel should be made as oblique as possible and distal to the PCL remnant fiber and also central or just lateral to the central portion. If there is no or very thin PCL remnant, we should do double bundle reconstruction. Biomechanical studies have shown that double bundle reconstruction is more close to the kinematic of knee with native PCL than single bundle reconstruction. Theoretically, double bundle PCL reconstruction has more advantages, although clinically not enough proven yet. Identification of concomitant injuries of the postero-lateral corner (PLC)is important to get good surgical and clinical outcomes. Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) injuries have more often associated with PLRI injury( 43 %- 80%). The causes of PCL reconstruction failure are multifactorial but one of the most common cause is neglected PLRI( 40 - 56.7 %)and next is tunnel misplacement. Factors contributing to the failure of Posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) operative procedures are similar to those reported for ACL failures, that is, graft placement, tensioning, and fixation issues; use of grafts of sufficient tensile strength and size; and the need to correct associated ligament instabilities and lower limb alignment. Why it is common to miss the diagnosis of the PLRI, especially in grade II PLRI? The reason is that in PCL and PLC combine injury, lateral tibial plateau is subluxated posterolaterally at 90 degree flexion of the knee. At this posterolateral sagging state, when we do dial test ,posterolateral drawer test, it is more difficult to detect the external rotation of the leg or to sublux of the posterolateral tibial plateau. Therefore, reduction of the knee to the normal position is important to diagnose the PLRI using dial test and posterolateral drawer test in the PCL–PLC combined injurys. Our evaluation showed that a reduction of the posterior sagging knee in AP (Anterior-Posterior) direction would increase the degree of tibial external rotation in combined PCL-PLC injury. In my experience, posterolateral corner sling through fibular head technique is one of the good choice of treatment methods in grade II PLRI (KSSTA 2008, Jung et al). But in grade III PLRI, we should do anatomical reconstruction even we need more strong reinforcement for the LCL.

Biography

Speaker
Young Bok Jung Chung Ang University, South Korea

Abstract

What • To provide an overview of Emotional Intelligence (EI) • To demonstrate the value of Emotional Intelligence as part of Leadership • To provide an overview of the 9 personality types (according to Enneagram) and the link it has with Emotional Intelligence (The Reformer, The Helper (Lover), The Achiever, The Individualist, The Investigator (Thinker), The Loyalist (Security Seeker), The Enthusiast (Adventurer). Why According to Goleman, emotional intelligence can be defined as the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managingemotions well within ourselves and in our relationship Emotion are produced in the limbic system which results in experiencing things emotionally before reasoning kicks in. The rational area of the brain and the limbic system influences one another and constant communication are maintained between these two areas which is the physical source of emotional intelligence How Goleman’s model identifies four domains of emotional intelligence with 20 competencies: 1. Self-awareness 2. Self-management 3. Social-awareness 4. Relationship management Where Relevant to all organizations and in the daily living of all individuals Conclusion Understanding the self and the personalities will result in people to be empowered to function optimal in their work place as well as in their personal lives

Biography

Speaker
Hester Steyn Sheikh Khalifa General Hospital, UAE

Abstract

Study design. We conducted a semi-prospective cohort study of 515 spinal metastatic patients who underwent surgical treatments. Objective. To evaluate the clinical outcome of the stratified surgical intervention based on the Aarhus Spinal Metastases Algorithm (ASMA). Summary of background data.While the choice of optimal surgical treatment for spinal metastatic patient remains a significant challenge for spine surgeons. The ASMA, which recommends stratified surgical options, was established to help surgeons choose the optimal surgical intervention. Methods. This study consists of 515 spinal metastatic patients who were surgically treated from December 1992 to June 2012 in Aarhus University Hospital. Surgeons evaluated and classified patients into five surgical groups preoperativelyby using Tokuhashi scoring system and Tomita anatomical classification system. Results. Decompression +pedicle screw system (PSS) implantation surgery had the longest survival time in patients with the worst prognosis (Tokuhashi score 0-4). Reconstruction +decompression +PSS surgery achieved the best survival outcomes in patients with short (Tokuhashi 5-8) or moderate (Tokuhashi 9-11) life expectancy. En bloc- and intralesional vertebrectomy surgery achieved the longest survival time when performed on patients who were recommended by ASMA, but was followed by the highest complication rate, reoperation rate and shorter survival than preoperatively predicted when performed on patients who were not recommended by ASMA. Perioperative mortality rate was 7.5%. Postoperative neurological function has been maintained or regained in 469 patients (92.3%). Overall reoperation- and complication rate were 13.5% and 13.8%. Conclusions. Patients with the worst prognosis may undergo instrumentation fusion without additional survival risks. Patients with predicted short or moderate survival may have longer survival, when treated by decompression + PSS+reconstruction. En bloc- and intralesional vertebrectomy performed in the patients who arerecommended by ASMA could achieve long survival time and avoid highcomplication- and reoperation rate. Surgical interventions based on ASMA may thus prevent additional complications, and improve survival in spinal metastases patients.

Biography

Speaker
Cody Bunger Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark

Will be updated soon...


Change Color