Plenary Talks

Abstract

Biography

A practicing physician in the field of healthcare in the state of Kerala in India for the last 30 years and very much interested in basic research. My interest is spread across the fever , inflammation and back pain,. I am a writer. I already printed and published nine books in these subjects. I wrote hundreds of articles in various magazines. After scientific studies we have developed 8000 affirmative cross-checking questions. It can explain all queries related with fever

Speaker
Yacob Mathai / Marma Heatth Centre, India

Abstract

Globally, maternal mortality has remained a public health concern especially in developing countries in which Nigeria is not spared. Birth preparedness is a strategy to promote the timely use of skilled maternal and neonatal care, especially during childbirth, based on the theory that preparing for childbirth reduces delays in obtaining this care. The objective of this study is to assess the awareness of obstetric danger signs and practice of birth preparedness among pregnant women. The study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional design to provide answers to the objectives of the study. Respondents were recruited using simple random sampling technique with a total of 270 pregnant women participating in the study. A structured interviewer -administered questionnaire was used to collect data for a period of three weeks. Almost half of the respondents were young adults, with 78.1% having a tertiary education. There was a significant relationship between their knowledge of obstetric danger signs and level of education as well as the parity (χ2=11.935, df=4, p=0.018); (χ2=35.962, df=3, p=0.001) respectively. Also, a significant relationship was seen between respondents’ birth preparedness and the level of education (χ2=27.201, df=3, p=0.001). The respondents had fair knowledge of the danger signs during pregnancy and likewise practice of birth preparedness was fair. However, proper health education and awareness programme about the danger signs of pregnancy as well as the importance of proper preparedness of birth is still needed to help reduce maternal mortality in the country.

Biography

Dr. Florence Funmilola Folami is the HOD of the Nursing Program at the Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos. She was formally an associate professor at Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois, USA and a Lactation Consultant for St. Mary Hospital, Decatur, Illinois, USA. She is also the President of Cross of Christ Hospital, Akute, Ogun State. She has received several grants, awards and certifications. Among these are Health Care Innovation Challenge Grant, International Course in Traditional Chinese Medicine Award, Global Impact Corps Fellow Award, Certificate in Global Health & Program Delivery, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) - Global Certification for Lactation Consultants.

Speaker
Florence Folami-Adeoye / University of Lagos, Nigeria

Abstract

Biography

Deborah M. Leveille, PhD, RN, CNL is a leader in nursing education. She serves as the National Nursing Curriculum Committee Chair for a 20-campus college system in the United States. She is an expert in curriculum development and active teaching/learning strategies. She has successfully modified curriculums and implemented teaching/learning strategies that have produced immediate improvement in student outcomes and faculty development and satisfaction.

Speaker
Deborah M Leveille / Fortis College-Montgomery Alabama, USA

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Compassion Fatigue (CF) also known as Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS), is presented from the empirical research relating to CF among Care Professionals. The research uncovered, the symptoms, prevalence, risk factors and best practice interventions identified to alleviate individual experiences and symptoms of CF. Populations explored include; nursing, counselling, social work, hospice care, residential care, mental health and military health care professionals. The research and best practice interventions, informed the development of a combined intervention program to risk manage and alleviate experiences of CF among care professional’s. An independent pilot study of the program facilitated using the Eagala Model revealed through the analysis of the variance between the pre and post tests, that ProQOL scores for Compassion Fatigue and Burnout decreased whilst Compassion Satisfaction scores increased in addition to statistically significant improvement in overall emotional intelligence (p<0.05) and statistically significant improvements (p<0.05) in the emotional intelligence factors of emotion self-management, emotional expression, emotion self-control and emotion awareness of others. Understanding the increasing demands, high staff turnover and limited capacity to release care professionals from their workplace for professional development, the program is presented in a new interactive, on-line learning form with a suite of support resources. The program in its new form is mobile friendly; increasing opportunities for care professionals to access contextualised learning, a toolkit of easy to implement resources and provides organisations with a professional development intervention to risk manage and combat compassion fatigue.

Biography

Michelle Black is an Organisational Development Consultant, Educator and EAP Counsellor. An advocate for leveraging the evidence to solve industry problems, Michelle developed Australia’s first evidence based program to combat compassion fatigue among care professionals and has more than 20 years’ experience leading organisational development in the commercial, government and not for profit sectors. Michelle is a registerd Counsellor, a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Training and Development, has a Master of Counselling (behaviour focus), and Graduate Certificate in Corporate Management. Michelle has presented research on Compassion Fatigue at a number of national and international conferences, is passionate about helping people to live thrive and sustain their careers. Michelle is the author of the childrens book, Ellie and the Sunflowers.

Speaker
Michelle Black / Elegrow Pty Ltd., Australia

Abstract

The proper management of documentation in the hospital setting is a paramount duty of healthcare providers, as it greatly affects patient outcome. Nurses, who are in direct care of patient documentation, play a pivotal role in the proper assessment and recording of health data. However, it has come to the attention of healthcare authorities that patient records often have many gaps or deficiencies in information. Many medical records contain inaccurate information, are poorly detailed, or have missing information. This is especially common in patients diagnosed with cancer and elderly patients. For this reason, it is being stressed by researchers that nurses need to strengthen their documentation skills. There are a variety of ways in which to improve nursing assessments, such as training, workplace culture, and proper preparation, which will ultimately result in the improvement of patient well-being. Nursing assessments are an important part of proper diagnoses. The creation of progress notes help nurses evaluate patient intervention strategies (Myklebust, Bjørkly, & Råheim, 2018). The relationship between nurses and patients are an important part of patient care, where the nursing process of correct documentation is an influential part of health services. Documentation that is high quality allows for more consistent and structured communication between healthcare providers and patients, and help support their safety (Instefjord, Aasekjær, Espehaug, & Graverholt, 2014). Lack of consistency in this care, such as inaccurate data and misdiagnosis, can result in a longer hospital stay, poor patient satisfaction, hazardous events, re-admissions, and also delays in treatment (Instefjord et al., 2014). Worst of all, the wrong treatment could be provided for a patient which could threaten their life. Nurses who utilized documented information expressed dissatisfaction with other’s form of record keeping. They believed that it is important to record information to provide patients with a form of protection, and that the system of documentation contains too many duplicates, inaccuracies, and missing data (Charalambous & Goldberg, 2016). The main specialties which seem to have reflected many of these errors are in nursing homes, post-operative care, pain management, wound care and orthopedic care (Instefjord et al., 2014). The fields that seemed to suffer most were the geriatric and cancer disciplines. Geriatric patient medical records often have the most incomplete, inaccurate, or repetitive data. These elderly patients tend to have complex healthcare requirements, which demands more in-depth geriatric assessments (Charalambous & Goldberg, 2016). This documentation is necessary for decision-making and treatment plans between a multi-disciplinary team to tackle the wide range of health problems that plague an elderly individual. However, nurses felt that the quality of documentation for this population is poor. The documentation for patients with terminal cancer also suffers from the same inconsistencies. In a study on patients that had received palliative chemotherapy for advanced pancreatic or lung cancer, it was found that only 4% of these patients had a documented care plan concerning the event of an acute deterioration (Harle, Karim, Raskin, Hopman, & Booth, 2017). These patients in particular had a life expectancy of less than one year. Quality improvement for nursing assessment is crucial for these patients, whether or not they have advanced cancer. It reveals a lack of concern of these patients’ well-being. Similar studies revealed issues in other cancer studies, such as only 6.2% of patients having documentation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation concerning long-term advanced healthcare. Methods of improvement include changes in attitude and the record keeping system. The improvement of workflow helped motivate nurses in their data collection initiatives, where one study revealed a 70% increase in documentation of patient data (Harle et al., 2017). Another study revealed that an important connection existed between intention and nursing documentation behavior (Dewi, 2018). These correlations also existed between intention and attitude, as well as intention and perceived behavioral control. The creation of a system of cycles of review, an expert panel of reviewers, and reflection on inputted information can help improve nursing documentation (Stewart, Doody, Bailey, & Moran, 2017). Accessible practice guidelines for enhanced documentation processes can help create better information systems. Conclusion Documentation of patient data often contains inconsistencies such as inaccurate or missing information. The most effected fields that reveal these issues are geriatric patients and advanced cancer patients. As a result, these patients suffered the most neglect. Ways to overcome this issue are to perform audits of nursing documents, as well as implement new attitudes and workflow systems which can help motivate nurses to allow the reformed intention of creating better assessments.

Biography

Lorrie Blitch has an impressive and diverse career in nursing and as a business owner. She is owner of Magellan Christian Academies for the past 18 years in Phoenix, Arizona and Jacksonville, Florida. Her schools have won numerous awards including Declaration of Magellan Day by the Mayor of Jacksonville, Florida in 2010. Ms. Blitch was awarded the prestigious title of “Top Women in Business” in Jacksonville, Florida by Jacksonville Magazine and recognized in Arbus Magazine as a “Female Entrepreneur” in Jacksonville, Florida. She is a published author of children’s books achieving number one on Amazon. Her experience in nursing is impressive that encompasses critical care, trauma, cardiovascular intensive care, toxicology, administration and management, nursing professor, medical-legal nursing and field hospital nursing. She is a nurse educator for the Banner Health System in Phoenix, Arizona responsible for the education of multiple service lines. Ms. Blitch served her country honorably as a Naval Nurse Corps Officer for 20 years. Ms. Blitch holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing and a master’s degree in nursing education and is pursuing a doctorate degree in nurse anesthesia. She sits on the Board of Directors for the Banyon School, New Delhi, India. She lectures on the dangers of academia's "Indoctrination Establishments” and the importance of returning to traditional academic learning.

Speaker
Lorrie Blitch / Magellan Christian Academies, Florida

Abstract

Govt.has made many efforts to improve the quality of health services for mothers and children from the grass root level itself by implementing primary health care services throughout the country .The present study conducted to identify the utilization of maternal and child health services of a community health centre ,in Kerala, India. The objectives of the study were to assess the utilization of MCH services among mothers and children and to study the factors associated with utilization of services . Materials and methods Research approach was quantitative and a cross sectional study was conducted in 440 sample by taking mothers with under five children as one unit .study was conducted under the field areas of community health centre Puthenthoppu,KERALA. House to house survey was done to assess the utilization and tool used was interview schedule and samples selected using multistage cluster sampling technique .The data were analysed and the results showed that the utilization of MCH service by mothers for antenatal services were 74.11% ,post natal services 62.7%,child health services 80.45%,immunization 98.86%family planning 58.6%.The factors contributing to utilization ,were education ,family system ,and effectiveness of service provided by the centre,and availability and accessibility.

Biography

I am currently working as associate professor in community health nursing ,Ministry of health ,Kerala ,India.I have done masters in community health nursing ,and PhD in nursing from Kerala.I have 30 years. Of experience in teaching UG &P.G nursing students in govt.college of nursing .I am a research guide to P.G and PhD Scholars under university .Organized and participated many international and national conferences.

Speaker
Lucyamma Joseph / Govt. College Of Nursing India

Abstract

There is lack of direction when it comes to physicians and nurses coping with their own grief connected with the loss of a patient. It is unprofessional to cry or show too much emotion. The textbook of medicine teaches their students to distance themselves and create protective boundaries. Being emotional is a sign a weakness. This approach is impractical and damaging. Physicians and nurses are human and experience feelings of helplessness, guilt, uncertainty, isolation, disappointment, and depression after the death of a patient. These feelings can lead to medical errors and burnout if not addressed. There is limited literature that explores physicians’ responses to the death of a patient. Research shows that most people can recover from loss on their own through the passage of time if they have helpful strategies and social support.

Biography

Kimberly Richardson is a Bereavement Speaker and the Founder of Widows of Opportunity™, a 501(c) (3) non-profit organization based in Columbia; SC. Kimberly lost her husband and founded Widows of Opportunity. Kimberly has hosted over 100 educational grief workshops worldwide. She has published numerous educational grief articles in magazines and newspapers. Kimberly had no idea her years as the founder of Widows of Opportunity combined with her love of the stage, would prepare her for something she really could get excited about—speaking. She has spent years educating, motivating and inspiring audiences and has been featured on various events to share her story, life experiences and knowledge with the world. With her engaging, and pleasurable personality, Kimberly connects with her audiences immediately and delivers content that can be used immediately.

Speaker
Kimberly Richardson / Widows of Opportunity, USA

Sessions:

Abstract

Despite evidence that traditional curriculum structure and teaching/learning strategies are ineffective, the majority of programs have made few changes in the last decade since the publication of Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation (2009). Many pre-licensure nursing programs in the United States continue to maintain traditional curriculum structure with large gaps where knowledge and skills are learned and not revisited for prolonged periods of time; and outdated teaching/learning strategies are utilized to teach skills and knowledge in silos. Well-structured curriculums allow students to revisit key concepts and skills throughout the program, developing and refining knowledge and skills prior to program completion.

Biography

Deborah M. Leveille, PhD, RN, CNL is a leader in nursing education. She serves as the National Nursing Curriculum Committee Chair for a 20-campus college system in the United States. She is an expert in curriculum development and active teaching/learning strategies. She has successfully modified curriculums and implemented teaching/learning strategies that have produced immediate improvement in student outcomes and faculty development and satisfaction.

Speaker
Deborah M. Leveille / Fortis College, United States of America

Abstract

Purpose Many nurses did not receive formal Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) education in any nursing program, particularly those who graduated before 2005. This initiative aimed to improve education and support resources for nurses with a variable knowledge base in a large national healthcare system. Relevance/Significance The literature shows EBP fosters high quality healthcare, improves patient outcomes, reduces costs, and promotes high reliability. Yet, nurses do not feel confident or competent to implement EBP into practice. Similarly, while nurse executives (NEs) verbalize the importance of EBP, there is a gap between this understanding and implementation efforts at local facilities. Various studies have identified nursing leadership as both a barrier and a facilitator to EBP implementation efforts. Strategy and Implementation A national healthcare system hired a full-time Program Manager (PM) for EBP in September 2018 to help facilitate implementation across the country. The Chief Nursing Officer charged NEs to develop shared governance and EBP councils at their medical centers by 2020. To enhance success, the central organization set a goal of developing resources to support NE efforts. The EBP PM worked with a Field Advisory Committee (FAC) composed of EBP champions from around the country. They developed a plan for developing or updating EBP resources and tools for use at the facility level. Examples of these resources include a sample charter, a business case for EBP, and a roadmap for EBP initiatives to minimize variability in the process of EBP. Outdated resources were either eliminated or updated to reflect current organizational priorities. Finally, the team revised the process of providing face-to-face consultation services to facilities that desire them. Evaluation/ Outcomes The EBP PM and FAC created a strategy to systematically address needed resources for EBP implementation. The FAC developed an EBP Committee Charter template that facilities can use or individualize. Next, the EBP PM and FAC updated the national EBP website, including the EBP Curriculum, Resources and Tools. The website is a very popular site on the ONS page garnering over 10,000 hits in FY2018. Implications for Practice Implementation of EBP is challenging, but more so for NEs with no background in EBP. In a large healthcare system, central leaders are responsible for providing infrastructure to decrease variability in implementation of evidence-based practices. This work is an exemplar of that responsibility.

Biography

Will be update soon!

Speaker
Sheila Cox Sullivan / U.S Department of Veterans Affairs, USA

Abstract

Value health means the outcome and quality of care for spent each dollar. Presently healthcare service delivery consider as only business commodity ignoring quality, equity and efficiency. It is just offering a package and or range of services for money. To value health nee to shift the view from volume of patients serve in facility to patient centered outcome. The goal in health care must be value for patients (Value = Health outcomes/Costs of delivering the outcomes). Outcomes are the health results that matter for a patient’s condition. Nurses play very vital role for ensure patient focused quality service. Nursing is a profession with high standards and a strong sense of public service for over 150 years. It is the art of caring sick and well individual. It refers to the dynamic skills and methods in assisting sick and well individual in recovery and in the promotion maintenance of health. Nurses have practical knowledge of delivering best health care services. They are the fast and first point of contacting for health services. The inner spirit of nursing is the same-care of people. To be successful in nursing, nurses must enjoy their work. How to solve the problem? Due to lack of reorganization, good payment and decision making power they did not get support for career development. In which the effectiveness of the work will also be less. It is the time to think and execute incentives, payment scale, extend the range of service and well recognition of nurses to value healthcare services.

Biography

After completion of medical graduation, she start profession with different National and international NGO in different position for about seven years. Then switch the profession and start work as an Academician at Institute of Health Economics in University of Dhaka. She published about ten papers and four are in printing. She took classes on Medical Sociology, Introduction to Health Science, Health System, Management in Health Sector and Policy and Planning in Health Sector. Here beside compliance with different task provide from institute also work with UNICEF, SURCH and KOIKA research firm to conduct different research. She is member of Public Health Foundation, Bangladesh and PhD apprentice.

Speaker
Rafia Rahman / University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Abstract

Background: Since the evolution of dentistry, various dental materials have been developed to potentiate the natural pulp healing process and generate the most beneficial tissue response. The goals of vital pulp capping materials include management of bacteria, arrest of caries progression, and stimulation of pulp cells to form new dentin, as well as producing a durable seal that protects dentin-pulp complex. Achieving these goals involve the application of pulp capping agents on a nearly exposed pulp for indirect pulp capping; or on an exposed pulp for direct pulp capping. Effective pulp capping materials should have antibacterial properties and induce dentin bridge formation. With better understanding of repair and regeneration process of dentin-pulp complex, advances in capping materials have emerged for maintaining pulp vitality. Manufacturers continue to change the composition of pulp capping materials in order to improve their efficacy, and satisfy their “easy to use” requirements, and “ideal criteria”. Objectives: This presentation aims to provide a brief history of pulp capping materials and discuss the current and newer classes of such materials. It is also intended to highlight the state-of-the-art science and technology associated with the pulp capping materials.

Biography

Prof. Khier has completed his MSc and PhD at Marquette University, USA. She is the Senior Clinical Consultant at Global Dental Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada. She has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several reputed journals.

Speaker
Salwa E. Khier / Global Dental Centre, Canada

Abstract

Nurses undertake different roles in different circumstances, but they all share in the combination of knowledge, practical skills and values that makes them particularly well placed to meet the needs of the future as well as those of today. While other professions share some or all of these features, the nursing contribution is unique because of its scale and scope work. Nurses are often the first and sometimes the only health professional that people see and the quality of their initial assessment, care and treatment is vital. They are also part of their local community – sharing its culture, strengths and vulnerabilities – and can shape and deliver effective interventions to meet the needs of patients, families and communities. Nurse’s report that they are frequently not permitted to practice to the full extent of their competence; are unable to share their learning; and have too few opportunities to develop leadership, occupy leadership roles and influence wider policy. There is an urgent need globally to raise the profile of nursing and enable nurses to work to their full potential if countries are to achieve universal health coverage. Nursing can and must take the lead on these issues but cannot achieve them without the support of politicians, policy-makers and non-nursing health leaders.

Biography

After complete graduation on finance he start his profession as a businessman. He is CEO of Bangladesh Medical Science Home. A orphan (180) centre is operated by him. Mr Chowdhury is also involved in Bangladesh national politics. As a politician he implementing different BCC activities in local area and placed it at policymaker level. So that each citizen of country can do same practice and enjoy positive health

Speaker
Jewel Ahmed Chowdhury / Medical Science Home Dhaka, Bangladesh

Abstract

Objectives: To measure and compare, in-vitro, the cuspal deflection resulted from using four combinations of composite resin and placement technique. Materials & Methods: Two composite resin materials were used; Tetric N Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) and Filtek Bulk-Fill (3M ESPE, USA). Forty standardized mesio-occluso-distal cavities were prepared on maxillary first premolars. Preparations were acid-etched and bonded with adhesive resin following the same protocol. Cavities were divided into four groups according to resin-technique combination(n=10), as follows: Group(I)–Tetric N-Ceram using bulk technique(TB), Group(II)-Tetric N-Ceram using horizontal increment technique (TH), Group(III)-Tetric N-Ceram using split-increment horizontal technique(TS), and Group(IV)-Filtek Bulk-Fill using bulk-technique(FB). All groups were light-cured with Visilux-2 visible light for the same time. Composite restorations were finished and polished. Digital photographs were made following cavity preparation(P), and also immediately after restoration(R), using Nikon digital camera DXM1200 fitted on Leica-MZ16-FA Stereomicroscope. Measurements for intercuspal distance (DP) and (DR) were recorded in microns using AnalySIS (Soft Imaging System) software. Cuspal deflection data (DR- DP) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test and Kruskal Wallace test for intergroup differences(p=0.05). Results: Mean cuspal deflection (m) for different groups were as follows: Group(I)=7.1±1.9, Group (II)=5.8±2.1, Group (III)=4.8±2.1 and Group (IV)=5.1±1.1. Intergroup comparison revealed statistically significant difference. Conclusions: A measurable amount of cuspal deflection was present in all combination groups. In general, TB showed the highest cusp deflection among all groups. There were no significant differences in cuspal deflection between FB, and TS.

Biography

Prof. Hassan has completed his PhD at Alexandria University, Egypt and postdoctoral studies from Marquette University, USA. He is the Senior Clinical Consultant at Global Dental Centre, Vancouver, BC, Canada. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of several reputed journals.

Speaker
Khamis A. Hassan / Global Dental Centre, Canada

Abstract

Nurses are the front-line staff to play key roles for patients. The fulfillment of nurses is the prerequisite for improve quality and patient-centeredness to increase the efficiency of healthcare delivery. To benefit from the insight and input of nurses, hospitals will need to value their potential contributions. Hospital quality, cost control, and hospital nursing care have often taken place independent of one another. If hospital able to assure the adequacy and performance of nurses that will improve quality, and achieve effective cost control. The staffing and organization of hospital nursing affects both quality and cost as nurses are actively involved in process improvement directed at both quality and efficiency. Improvement in four domains: improving the quality and safety of care; ensuring a high-quality work environment to attract and retain nurses; improving the experience of care for patients and their families; and improving the effectiveness of the entire care team. Association of nurse’s performance and patient outcomes is very high. About 88 percent of the public agreed that making sure there are enough nurses to monitor patient conditions, coordinate care, takes part of efforts to improve quality. Improvement must be institutionalized in the day-to-day work of the front-line health workforce, with adequate time. Getting nurses and other front-line staff actively involved in efforts to simultaneously improve hospital quality and increase efficiency will require action both within institutions and by those who measure their quality and pay for their services. So, hospital should take full advantage of nurses’ knowledge and commitment to their patients and institutions—to increase the safety and reliability, patient-centeredness, and efficiency of care.

Biography

Dr. Sushil Ranjan Howlader was Professor of the Department of Economics in University of Dhaka from 1995 to 1998 and thereafter became professor of the Institute of health Economics of University of Dhaka, Dhaka. He was the founder Director of the Institute of Health Economics of University of Dhaka and worked as Director from 1998 to 2005 and again from 2007 to 2010 . He is also the former Director of the Bureau of Economic Research, University of Dhaka. Dr. Howlader was born in 1950 in Patharghata upazila under Barguna district.. He obtained his B. A. (Hons.) and M. A. degrees in Economics in 1971 and 1972, respectively, from the University of Dhaka. He has carried out his doctoral study as a Winrock scholar on Development Economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, in 1993. Dr. Howlader has considerable experience in social science research. He is the author or co-author of several books, a number of monographs and research reports, numerous articles in journals and chapters in edited books, and a good number of seminar papers. Another book is going to be published shortly.

Speaker
Sushil Ranjan Hawlader / University of Dhaka, Bangladesh

Abstract

Globally, maternal mortality has remained a public health concern especially in developing countries in which Nigeria is not spared. Birth preparedness is a strategy to promote the timely use of skilled maternal and neonatal care, especially during childbirth, based on the theory that preparing for childbirth reduces delays in obtaining this care. The objective of this study is to assess the awareness of obstetric danger signs and practice of birth preparedness among pregnant women. The study adopted a descriptive cross-sectional design to provide answers to the objectives of the study. Respondents were recruited using simple random sampling technique with a total of 270 pregnant women participating in the study. A structured interviewer -administered questionnaire was used to collect data for a period of three weeks. Almost half of the respondents were young adults, with 78.1% having a tertiary education. There was a significant relationship between their knowledge of obstetric danger signs and level of education as well as the parity (χ2=11.935, df=4, p=0.018); (χ2=35.962, df=3, p=0.001) respectively. Also, a significant relationship was seen between respondents’ birth preparedness and the level of education (χ2=27.201, df=3, p=0.001). The respondents had fair knowledge of the danger signs during pregnancy and likewise practice of birth preparedness was fair. However, proper health education and awareness programme about the danger signs of pregnancy as well as the importance of proper preparedness of birth is still needed to help reduce maternal mortality in the country.

Biography

Dr. Florence Funmilola Folami is the HOD of the Nursing Program at the Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi Araba, Lagos. She was formally an associate professor at Millikin University, Decatur, Illinois, USA and a Lactation Consultant for St. Mary Hospital, Decatur, Illinois, USA. She is also the President of Cross of Christ Hospital, Akute, Ogun State. She has received several grants, awards and certifications. Among these are Health Care Innovation Challenge Grant, International Course in Traditional Chinese Medicine Award, Global Impact Corps Fellow Award, Certificate in Global Health & Program Delivery, International Board Certified Lactation Consultant (IBCLC) - Global Certification for Lactation Consultants.

Speaker
Florence Folami-Adeoye / University of Lagos, Nigeria

Abstract

Unpreparedness of caregivers of burn patients can result to several complications at post- discharge period (Zwicker et al, 2010; Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2012). The Alfredo T. Ramirez Burn Center (ATRBC) in the Philippine General Hospital (PGH) has documented several burn morbidity and mortality that occurred post hospital discharge. Psychological condition, contracture, infection and even death can are just a few of many complications. In contrary to the previous practice, current trend in burns involve sending the patients home with a burn dressing and follows-up as outpatient for wound inspection and evaluation. This is favorable to healthcare facility as it can cater for those who sustained major burns and of serious cases in times when it is prudent to discharge the stable ones; furthermore, early discharge can reduce healthcare cost on the part of patient and family. However, this change in burn management requires also a change in the nursing system. At present, there is limited evidence in preparing caregivers of burn patients for home care, and that the ATRBC PGH has no structured discharge teaching program for the caregivers of burn patients that are required to enrich the caregivers with skills for home care of burns. Considering the recommended style and structure of teaching program, the investigator developed the Caregiver-oriented Transitional Care Program (CTCP) and studied its effectiveness in promoting preparedness of caregivers for home care of burn patients. This study aimed to compare the preparedness caregivers before and after conducting the CTCP; to explore relationships between the preparedness and patient and caregiver factors after undergoing the CTCP; and to compare handwashing competency, wound dressing competency and medication administration hassles before and after conducting the CTCP. One-group pre-and-posttest quasi-experimental design was used to study thirty (30) adult caregivers of burn patient that were recruited by convenience sampling in the ATRBC PGH between November 2017 to March 2018. CTCP was conducted in a three-part session using lecture and demonstration with the aid of videos and written instructional materials. Caregivers were evaluated in terms of preparedness using Preparedness for Caregiving Scale (PCS) pre and post CTCP (primary outcome). Secondary outcomes were also obtained such as handwashing competency through Handwashing Accuracy Score (HAS), wound dressing competency utilizing Wound Dressing Accuracy Score (WDAS) and medication administration hassle using Family Medication Administration Hassles Scale (FCMAHS). All the measurement instruments were content valid and reliable. At alpha of 0.05, data analysis revealed statistically significant results favoring the use of CTCP. Preparedness (p 0.000), handwashing competency (0.000), wound dressing competency (p 0.000) and medication administration hassle (0.000) improved after receiving the structured teaching intervention. Furthermore, potential confounders such as caregiver and patient factors failed to establish a significant relationship with preparedness. The study supported the importance and relevance of the interventions to prepare caregivers of burn patients for homecare to help prevent potential complications after hospital discharge. This is therefore recommended to be adopted by burn units in the Philippines.

Biography

Will update soon

Speaker
Jun Jun A Dualan / Capefear Valley Health System, USA

Abstract

Harlequin ichthyosis is the most severe form of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis. The incidence is calculated to be around 1 case in 300,000 births and until now there were approximately only 200 reported cases in the world. The affected infants presents with large plate like scaling of the skin. These thick skin plates causes distorted facial features and tightness around the eyes and mouth causing difficulties in closing these structures. Other features include hypoplasia of the fingers, malformation of the ears and nose, and alopecia. Genetically, there appears to be a mutation in the lipid-transporter gene ABCA12 that encodes adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette transporter (ABC), subfamily A, member 12, in chromosome region 2q35,. Immunohistocytochemical examination of the skin reveals characteristic abnormalities in the structure of lamellar granules and in the expression of epidermal keratin. Although not linked to particular race, the incidence is high amongst parents with history of consanguinity. This presentation will discuss the antenatal events and the sequences following the delivery of the baby. Discussion would also extend on the prenatal diagnosis and management of babies with Harlequin icthyosis.

Biography

Prof. Baathallah was responsible for managing both the Pediatric Department and the Thalassemia Center at the Fujerah Hospital of the Fujerah Medical District, UAE and RAK Hospital,UAE. Dr. Baathallah also participated in continuous medical education activities both inside and outside the hospital in the fields of pediatrics, pediatric hematology and clinical genetics. He has utilized his Ph.D. training in genetics to further educate hospital staff and medical personnel about occurrence of Thalassemia and initiate a regional protocol for working with Thalassemia patients. Because of his involvement, and tireless work, our department has held frequent information and education sessions that were led by Dr. Baathallah.

Speaker
Sherif Baathallah / RAK Hospital,UAE

Abstract

Adenotonsillectomy is the most common operation in ENT Clinic. A frequent indication of tonsillectomy are infections, especially infections with pus. Children who undergo the operative intervention of removal of tonsils are usually small children. They have different pain levels, ranging from very severe pain on the day of operation to lighter pain on the following days. The aim of our study was to make an assessment of post-operative pain in children after tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy since the first hours after surgery until the seventh day. The study was prospective, conducted during the period January to December 2014 at anesthesia unit of ENT Clinic, department of children. Subject of study were the parents of 424 children who underwent operative intervention. Nurse’s monitoring for first two hours after the operation provides data that 91% of operated children have not had pain (evaluation by VAS 0-2) and at all times have been quiet. In telephone interviews, on the seventh day after surgery (evaluation for days 2-7) parents give evidence that the intensity of pain was greater in children operated by the tonsils, whereas in children operated by adenoidectomy was lower. This makes us conclude that numerous studies done by different authors, as well as our research, give us data that our work should be oriented in most qualitative pain treatment (through right dosage), regular (in defined time intervals) and parent’s education. Clear, precise, and accessible explanations should be given to parents for home treatment of pain.

Biography

Flora Gjonbalaj Nurse Anesthetist at University Clinical Center of Prishtina,Kosovo, University of pedagogy in health sciences ,professional in the field of nursing, Master deegre at Management of health Prishtina,Kosovo Teaching assistant for Anesthesia and nursing care

Speaker
Flora Gjonbalaj, / University Clinical Center of Kosovo, Albania

Abstract

There is increasing evidences that favor the prenatal beginning of schizophrenia. These evidences point toward intra-uterine environmental factors that act specifically during the second pregnancy trimester producing a direct damage of the brain of the fetus [1]. The current available technology doesn't allow observing what is happening at cellular level since the human brain is not exposed to a direct analysis in that stage of the life in subjects at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Methods. In 1977 we began a direct electron microscopic research of the brain of fetuses at high risk from schizophrenic mothers in order to finding differences at cellular level in relation to controls. Results. In these studies we have observed within the nuclei of neurons the presence of complete and incomplete viral particles that reacted in positive form with antibodies to herpes simplex hominis type I [HSV1] virus, and mitochondria alterations [2]. Conclusion. The importance of these findings can have practical applications in the prevention of the illness keeping in mind its direct relation to the aetiology and physiopathology of schizophrenia. A study of the gametes or the amniotic fluid cells in women at risk of having a schizophrenic offspring is considered. Of being observed the same alterations that those observed previously in the cells of the brain of the studied foetuses, it would intend to these women in risk of having a schizophrenia descendant, previous information of the results, the voluntary medical interruption of the pregnancy or an early anti HSV1 viral treatment as preventive measure of the later development of the illness.

Biography

Segundo Mesa Castillo. As Specialist in Neurology, he worked for 10 years in the Institute of Neurology of Havana, Cuba. He has worked in Electron Microscopic Studies on Schizophrenia for 32 years. He was awarded with the International Price of the Stanley Foundation Award Program and for the Professional Committee to work as a fellowship position in the Laboratory of the Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke under Dr. Joseph Gibbs for a period of 6 months, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Washington D.C. USA, June 5, 1990. At present he is member of the Scientific Board of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana and give lectures to residents in psychiatry.

Speaker
Segundo Mesa Castillo / Psychiatric Hospital of Havana, Cuba

Abstract

Purpose This study aimed to evaluate women’s healthcare providers’ utilization and beliefs that favor IUD provision, and barriers and facilitators to IUD best practice. Background In the United States, the unintended pregnancy rate is approximately 50%. The IUD is highly effective, with a failure rate of less than 1%, but remains underutilized. Providers restrict the use of IUDs due to misinformation and fear of complications. Methods An educational intervention on evidence-based IUD best practices was presented to 36 providers. IUD usage rates and IUD beliefs were measured pre and post intervention, and participants answered open-ended questions. Billing codes for IUD insertions examined IUD usage two months before and after the education intervention to determine whether there was a change in IUD utilization. Results Eighty-nine percent (n=32) of the participants (N=36) had at least five years of clinical experience. A matched paired t-test was conducted to determine whether provider IUD beliefs and usage varied as a function of the educational intervention. The intervention was effective at increasing provider beliefs that favor IUD use (p =. 000); an increase in IUD insertions was found (p=.023). Qualitative data revealed that in terms of IUD best practices, providers (n=36) felt that they were, “already doing it” but would use the updated IUD information. Providers cited barriers as, “patient resistance.” Conclusion Educating women’s healthcare providers on IUD best practices increased their beliefs and utilization of IUDs. Continuing education enhances provision of the IUD, thereby reducing unintended pregnancies.

Biography

Christa Palancia Esposito, DNP, MSN, CNM is an Assistant Professor at Fairfield University’s Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies in Fairfield, Connecticut. She has practiced midwifery for over twenty years and maintains her clinical practice serving women throughout their lifespan in a collaborative private practice.

Speaker
Christa Palancia Esposito / Fairfield University, United States Of America

Abstract

Non- communicable diseases (NCDs) and their associated risk factors have emerged rapidly and have become a major public health threat globally. The impact of NCDs is devastating in terms of premature morbidity, mortality and economic loss. A growing number of young adults are being affected, prompting the conclusion that the country could lose the next generation to chronic disease. A descriptive survey cum interventional study was done among college students, initially a survey of 200 students selected by stratified random sampling was done to identify the prevalence of number of non-communicable disease risk factors among them and 68 students with 4 and more than 4 number of risk factors were selected for an educational package regarding the prevention of non-communicable diseases. Knowledge and expressed practices regarding prevention of non-communicable diseases was assessed before and after educational package with the help of predesigned, validated structured knowledge questionnaire and expressed practice rating scale. The data in phase II showed that both the knowledge and practice scores were higher than the pre-test scores. Therefore, educational package is an effective tool to help students in NCD prevention.

Biography

I sandhya C has completed my master of nursing in community health nursing speciality from Rajkumari Amrit Kaur College of Nursing under Delhi University, India. I am working in AIIMS (All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi as a Nursing Informatics Specialist, since 2012 February. I did masters by availing study leave from AIIMS. I have presented this paper in AIIMS for nurse’s day competition. I won second prize in oral paper presentation organised by AIIMS CEUTEH (cost effective use of technology in e- Healthcare) Conference 2016.

Speaker
SANDHYA C / RAJKUMARI AMRIT KAUR COLLEGE OF NURSING, INDIA

Abstract

Beside the clinicians nurses are the backbone for healthcare service delivery. They contribute enormously to the improvement of the health of patients by executing the subsequent treatment protocol provided by physician. There are 57 countries with a critical shortage of healthcare workers, a deficit of 2.4 million doctors and nurses. Only 1.3percent of the world health workers care for people who experience 25percent of the global disease burden. It has been proved beyond reasonable doubt that the density of the health workforce is directly correlated with positive health outcomes. About 59 million people make up the health workforce of paid full-time health workers world-wide. Enormous gaps remain between the potential of health systems and their actual performance, and there are far too many inequities in the distribution of health workers between countries and within countries. In most developing countries, the health workforce is concentrated in the major towns and cities, while rural areas can only boast of about 23% and 38% of the country's doctors and nurses respectively. The imbalances exist not only in the total numbers and geographical distribution of health workers, but also in the skills mix of available health workers. Bangladesh suffers from both a shortage of and geographic mal-distribution of HRH. There are an estimated 3.05 physicians per 10,000 population and 1.07 nurses per 10,000 populations (estimates based on MoHFW HRD 2011). Undoubtedly it can be assume the adequate monitoring and compliance of treatment protocol given by physician severely hampered. It leads morbidity, disability and premature death. Nurse’s irresponsibility towards compliance and coordination make the condition worse. It would be not very wrongly said that nurses shortage at hospital will enough to jeopardized the healthcare service delivery system especially for least advantage and developing countries.

Biography

Will be update soon..

Speaker
Maa / Al Hera College, Bangladesh

Abstract

The presence of infection contributes to prolonged and costlier hospitalizations and may even cause death. Surgical site infections, blood stream infections (BSI) and antimicrobial resistance are global health problems. 1,2,3,4 Nitric oxide use is a potential strategy for preventing skin infections, which may be implicated in BSI and antibiotic use. This study tested a new nitric oxide releasing compound in order to measure its effectiveness in decreasing bacterial load on human skin. The efficacy of this new polymer matrix coompoung containing nitric oxide (NO) was compared to the measured microbail activity underneath control sterile Tegaderm® transparent dressings. Three dressings containing the experimental compound (NO) as well as three control dressings were applied without antiseptic preparation to intact skin on the backs of 66 healthy volunteers. Baseline microflora bacterial counts were obtained on day 3 of the study. Subsequent skin cultures were obtained underneath dressing pairs (one experimental and one control) on days 3, 5, and 7 after application. A within subjects design using a sample of convenience was completed to compare the efficacy of bacterial reduction under the experiemental and control dressings. On each removal day the experimental NO dressing demonstrated a statistically significant reduction (p values ranged from <.001 to <.007) in bacterial count when compared to the control dressing. In summary, the nitric oxide compound film dressings had significantly lower bacterial colony counts as compared to the control Tegaderm® on days 3, 5, and 7. Incorporating a nitric oxide compound into a dressing has an antibacterial effect lasting a minimum of seven days.

Biography

Rachel Nye earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from Northern Michigan University. She is a board certified Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP-BC). She has a Masters in Nursing Education from the University of Wyoming and a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Northern Michigan University. She holds national certifications in Inpatient Obstetrics (RNC-OB), Electronic Fetal Monitoring (C-EFM) and as a Nurse Educator (CNE). She has extensive obstetrical nursing experience. She is currently a professor in the School of Nursing at Northern Michigan University.

Speaker
Rachel Nye / Northern Michigan University, USA

Abstract

Occupational hazards are conditions surrounding a work environment, increasing the probability/risk of death, disability, or illness to a worker. Hospitals have being identified as a service delivery industry of high work demand which profoundly depend on staff for efficient delivery of services. The services offered by Nurses bring about a significant positive care to patients with the overall aim of improving their health. However, the process of nurses offering the services brings about exposure to different types of hazards. Hence, this study seeks to assess the knowledge and attitude of Nurses towards the prevention of occupational Hazards in Lagos University Teaching Hospital. The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey of 121 nurses of LUTH selected by systematic sampling technique using interviewer-administered questionnaire. Data was analysed using SPSS 20, with level of significance at 0.05. Ethical approval was given by the Lagos University Teaching Hospital Health Research Ethical Committee. Majority of the respondents are within the age range 26-30 years and predominantly females (90.1%). A larger proportion of respondents (95.6%) believe that physical, psychological, sexual, and/or verbal abuses are forms of occupational hazards. The results obtained further showed an association between nurses’ cadre and the knowledge on occupational health hazards (p = 0.02). In conclusion, occupational health hazards are inevitable, but can be prevented among nurses through provision of protective aids, and strict adherence to safety rules.

Biography

Atinuke Olowe is a lecturer at the Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine University of Lagos, Nigeria. She is a Registered Nurse, Registered Midwife and also a Registered Public Health Nurse. She had her first and second degree in Nursing at the Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. Currently a PhD student at the University of Witwatersrand, South Africa. She is a community health nurse, having research interest in School Nursing.

Speaker
Atinuke Olowe / University of Lagos, Nigeria

Abstract

Background: Despite the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs (AMS), antibiotic resistance are a rising a major global concern, and the burden is estimated increase from 21% to 56% by 2026. Aim: To assess the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship programmes in primary health care. Methods: A case study assessed the effectiveness of implementation of antimicrobial stewardship at 10 primary health care facilities in Windhoek. From 1 to 31 October 2018, a SWOT analysis of each health facility was conducted through an audit and interview of infection control focal persons to assess the level of compliance to good antimicrobial stewardship practices an policies. Results: Of the 10 facilities, 90% of the focal persons were aware of systems and polices for good AMS practice. The level of compliance at hospital based primary health centers was 30.8% compared to clinics (9.1% and 36.4%). The main challenge is lack of policies and systems specific to antimicrobial use as well as commitment of financial and human resources to implement AMS programs in primary health care. Conclusion: The implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs in primary health care is suboptimal. This negatively affects the global efforts to control antimicrobial resistance. There is a need to institutionalise the national guidelines for AMS in primary health care

Biography

Will update soon!

Speaker
Irene Brinkmann / University of Namibia Namibia

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in Senegal. However, there are few data concerning the HPV types inducing neoplasia and cervical cancers and their prevalence, in the general population of Senegal .AIMS: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV infection in Senegalese women aged from 18 years and older. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A study was performed on 498 cervix samples collected from healthy women aged 18 and older in Dakar. 438 other samples were collected from three other regions, Thiès, Saint Louis and Louga. The samples were screened for 21 HPV genotypes using an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG) which is a laboratory-developed method for the detection of HPV. RESULTS: The prevalence for pHR/HR-HPV in the region of Dakar was 20.68%. HPV 52 (3.21%) was the most prevalent HPV type, followed by HPV 16 (3.01%) and HPV 31 (3.01%). In the regions of Thiès, Louga and Saint Louis, the prevalence for pHR/HR-HPV was 29.19%, 23.15% and 20%, respectively CONCLUSION: The study revealed the specificity of the HR-HPV prevalence in Dakar and other regions of Senegal. The patterns differs from the one observed in the other regions of the world and rise the issue of the development of vaccination program in the country. Such a program should take into account the real HPV prevalence for an effective protection of HPV-associated diseases.

Biography

Dr MBAYE has formed for free, more than 250 healthcare professionals for the techniques of cervical cancer screening in Senegal. He has appeared on local media, 2S TV, Mbour TV and Leeral.net. Editorial Board Member of the International Journal of Immunology, Journal of Retro Virology and Anti Retro Virology, Current Scientific Research in Biomedical Sciences (CSRBS), Associate Editors for Journal of Bacteriology & Mycology: Open Access (JBMOA), Pediatrics & Neonatal Biology Open Access (PNBOA), Annals of Advanced Biomedical Sciences (AABSc) and associate membership of the World Society for Virology, and also, member of BCNet International Working Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)/World Health Organization (WHO).

Speaker
El Hadji Seydou Mbaye / International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC/WHO), France

Abstract

Introduction Objective: Educate the school staff to correctly handle epileptic crises increasing the safety of young people at school and promoting the administration of emergency drugs. All this with the aim of reducing resorts to the first aid departments and the distance between hospital and territory. Methods Two-hour training meetings with school staff dedicated to illustrating the illness and the correct handling of seizures. During meetings two questionnaires will be distributed: one ex ante for information on epilepsy, willingness to administer the drug and anxiety in facing crisis; and one ex post to control the knowledge acquired. After a year, we interviewed the trained teachers to ask them if and how they handled seizures in the school environment. Results 740 questionnaires were distributed between January 2016 and November 2018. From the analysis an increase in knowledge of correct behavior to be taken during an epileptic crisis, a reduction in anxiety (average 3.6, average post 2.9, on a scale from 0 to 5) and an increase in willingness to administer drug emerged (from 54% to 89%). From interviews 17 seizure emerged and in 4 cases the drug is administered. In 4 cases teachers called ambulance and in 2 the child was admitted. Conclusions It can be asserted that the training course is efficient to improve knowledge of epilepsy and the handling of seizures with an increased willingness of school staff to handle the illness. We have a reduction in calls to the emergency health number (4/17) and in hospital admissions (2/17).

Biography

Will be update soon!

Speaker
Costanza Calabrese / Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, Italy

Abstract

All treatments for fever are based on the belief that fits is the result of 41 degree Celsius temperature and it damages cells of brain and body. At the same time there is no evidence based tests or concrete diagnosing methods to the belief that fits and brain damage is the result of pyrexia [1]. Necessary ingredients to destroy brain cells and fits cannot be seen in fever.In pyrexia or absence of fever a fainted patient fell on the floor with unconscious state and destroy cells of brain, and necessary ingredients to become conscious are same. When disease increases essential blood circulation and energy level also decreases. The vertical height between heart and brain is more than one feet. When the disease becomes severe, ability to pump the blood to the brain decreases. As a result of this brain cells are damaged. so the patient might be paralyzed or may even die. In pyrexia or absence of fever, when blood flow to the brain decreases and fits are formed. There is no other way than this to increase blood circulation to the brain.It is a sensible and discreet action of brain to protect the life or organ. Recovery from Fits. The patient become conscious before the time to get decreasing the temperature of fever. When the fainted patient lie on the floor, the vertical height between heart and brain is decreased, blood circulation increased to brain. Self checking methods. When the fainted patient lie on the floor,The patient can stand straight and lie on bed alternatively.Then the patient can experience himself the intensity of blood circulation.T he patient can experience when he stand his blood circulation decreases and when lie on the bed the blood circulation decreases.Besides that he can also experience increased blood circulation when lie on the bed raise the foot higher than head.

Biography

A practicing physician in the field of healthcare in the state of Kerala in India for the last 30 years and very much interested in basic research. My interest is spread across the fever , inflammation and back pain,. I am a writer. I already printed and published nine books in these subjects. I wrote hundreds of articles in various magazines. After scientific studies we have developed 8000 affirmative cross checking questions. It can explain all queries related with fever

Speaker
K. M. Yacob / Marma Health Centre,India

Abstract

This study aimed at developing a Rama-chest cryo arm to bronchoscopic cryotherapy, as well as evaluating its effectiveness. The study was conducted in development,and evaluation.The sampleconsisted of 3 bronchoscopist nurses and 13 the bronchoscopist in a tertiary hospital selected by convenience sampling. Instruments were used to elicit the participants’ opinions regarding use of Rama-chest cryo arm. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. The results showed a consensus that the devised Rama chest cryo arm was effective in all aspects. For each aspect, the valuable of the Rama chest cryo arm was rated as the highest mean score, and the ease of the Rama-chest cryo arm does not cause damage to the cryoprobe was rated as the lowest mean score. The Rama chest cryo arm was effective,most efficacy,user satisfaction and the recommendation from user were disseminate the method of this medical device to other hospitals to be used

Biography

Chariya has completed her Master of nursing at the age of 30 years from Mahidol University and started her work on ICU for 10 years and bronchoscopist nurse for 11 yrs. She is the specialist nusre of bronchoscope. She has published more than 5 papers in reputed Nursing journals .

Speaker
Chariya Laohavich / Mahidol University,Thailand

Abstract

Disruptive behavior in healthcare has been shown to negatively impact patient safety, patient satisfaction, and employee engagement. In the high stress world of healthcare where critical situations occur frequently, the pressure can quickly result in disruptive and uncivil behavior. Current research reflect up to 99% of nurses witness incivility, 90% have incivility directed at them, and up to 70% acknowledge participating. These disruptive behaviors impact productivity, harm patients, and continue to be a significant negative aspect of nursing. Many leaders miss the opportunities and overlook the responsibility of ensuring that incivility does not exist on their units and in their departments. Instituting an active leadership approach where there is zero-tolerance for incivility can have a positive impact on the team as well as the leaders. The results of my 2018 DNP quantitative scholarly project reflected that implementing a zero-tolerance approach to addressing incivility resulted in a 10-point improvement in the employees’ perceptions of staff behavior over a 90-day period. A sidebar result was the increase in leadership satisfaction and confidence verbalized by the participants. This zero-tolerance program is a step-by-step process using tools currently existing within most organizations including value statements and behavioral policies. Ending incivility by implementing zero-tolerance and holding team members accountable for disruptive behaviors is achievable. The outcome of this process will be decreased disruptive behavior, increased staff engagement, and a safer environment for patients.

Biography

Dr. Connie Montalbo completed her DNP at the University of Texas Health Science Center Cizek School of Nursing. She has 20 years of nursing leadership experience in a variety of settings and has significant success in achieving top-employee/patient engagement and excellent quality outcomes. She currently works for B.E. Smith as a Regional Director for Physician Practices in Northern California. She has a blog, endincivilitytoday.com, where she discusses leadership issues and offers solutions related to addressing disruptive behavior in the nursing workplace.

Speaker
Connie Montalbo / End Incivility Today, United States

Abstract

Background: Violence in healthcare settings is escalating, predictable, and often underreported. Within the healthcare system, nurses often face the highest risk of assault across professions Aims: To determine the degree and severity, and effects, of violence against nurses in a general hospital Emergency Department (ED). Methods: A 12-item, frequency-weighted, questionnaire was used to measure rates, frequency, and severity of violence during the past one year. The items are arranged in the order of severity of acts of violence beginning with minor verbal insults to more serious acts like shooting with firearms. The effects of violence were measured by the five most commonly reported after-effects by the staff subjected to violence incidents. The reliability of instruments was tested with Cronbach’s alpha. Results: Seventy out of 81 nurses experienced verbal insults or threats of imminent violence and 13 were also physically attacked during the one-year period. Sixty-seven out of 70 suffered from one or more after-effects including flashbacks, sleeplessness, fearfulness, depression, or taking time off work. Comparison with a similar study at the same place suggests that although doctors encountered more violence, the nurses suffer experience more after-effects of violence at workplace. Limitations: The sample-size was relatively small, responses to our questionnaires were subject to recall-bias, and the measures used to determine the after-effects of violence did not include standardized instruments. Conclusions: Further methodologically sound studies are needed to establish severity and effects of violence against nurses. A significant number of nurses experience violence at work and a substantial number of them suffer from its after-effects. Stringent strategies are needed to prevent violence against the nurses and the measures to deal with the after-effects of violence.

Biography

Professor Zahid obtained his basic M.B; B.S degree from King Edward Medical College, Lahore in 1975 and became Member of Royal College of Psychiatrists, UK in 1986. He is the current Chair, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University. He has authored more than 35 publications in renown international journals. He designed a violence measurement scale to determine the prevalence, degree, and effects, of violence against the medical staff. His interest areas include violence against medical staff, Somatic symptoms in Psychologically disturbed patients, and Psychosocial effects of schizophrenia.

Speaker
Mohammed Azmal Zahid / Kuwait University, Kuwait

Abstract

Background: Maternal and child morbidity and mortality is highest in sub Saharan Africa including Ethiopia due to shortfalls in modern hospitals, women improperly use of medicinal plants. About (80%) of the Ethiopia people depend on traditional medicine for their health care and more than 90% traditional medicine preparations are made from plant origin. Materials and methods: Databases (Pub Med, Google Scholar, Research Gate, and Hinari) were searched for published studies on the Ethno-botany of medicinal plants used to treat maternal and child health illnesses in Ethiopia. Studies that did not contain full ethno-botanical data of medicinal plants traditionally used to treat maternal and child health illnesses and those which did not address maternal and child health issues as a disease treated traditionally by the practioners were excluded. Results: In this review, we found a total of 360 articles. After adjustment for duplicates and inclusion and exclusion criteria, 38 articles were found appropriate for the review. None of the medicinal plants traditionally used to treat maternal and child health illnesses in Ethiopia confirmed scientifically. Of the 103 plants identified from the various studies, 25(25.75%) were herbs and the common plant part used was found to be root 40 (41.2%) followed by leaves 32 (32.96%). The most common route of administration was orally 71(73.13%).In this review, medicinal plants which were abundant for maternal illness were treatment of retained placenta 24 (24.72%) whereas in children, milk feeding diarrhea . Conclusion: Most of the plants were herb and the commonly used plant part was root. The most common maternal illness treated by medicinal plant was retained placenta and whereas in children milk feeding diarrhea and Kwashiorkor. There is a need to conduct clinical trials to support traditional claims and to analyze cellular and molecular mechanisms involved.

Biography

Will be update soon

Speaker
Asmare Talie / Debre Markos University, Ethiopia

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Biography

Prof. Eunice Seekoe holds a PhD (UJ), MBA (UFS), M Soc Sc in Nursing Education (UFS). She is the Dean: Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Fort Hare; the Faculty she established in 2016. She is the Director of the Albertina Sisulu Executive Leadership Programme in Health (ASELPH), a partnership amongst the Universities of Fort Hare, Pretoria and Harvard in USA. She is a recipient of several Scholarship Awards from HSRC, NRF and MRC. Prof Seekoe is a Principal Investigator on a MRC funded research titled “Evaluation of Integrated School Health Policy in the Eastern Cape”. She has successfully supervised 23 Masters and 6 PhD students. She presented 23 papers at international conferences, published 40 papers in accredited journals and wrote 6 book chapters. She is a member of different professional organizations. Prof Seekoe is an Editorial Board Member and a reviewer in accredited local and international journals.

Speaker
Eunice Seekoe / University of Fort Hare, South Africa

Sessions:

Abstract

Background: commercial sex work is the provision of sexual services for the exchange of money whether regularly for the purpose of generating income. Despite this unlimited problems, no farther studies done on driving factors of women’s involvement in commercial sex work in the study area Objective: To explore driving factors for engaging commercial sex work among female commercial sex workers at Dejen Town 2017. Methods: The study was conducted on phenomenological study design of qualitative method in the form of in-depth interview for 11 respondents and two focus group discussions with a total of 15 respondents were participated, the transcripts were coded by using manually to identify the major themes that were arisen from the data. Results: This finding showed that primary reasons of women to engage in commercial sex work were: family problems, widowed with children, separation from the family, poverty and peer pressures. Attitude of women to escape from commercial sex work need different supports like; financial support, psycho-social support, administrative support and others were endeavors to come out from prostitution through saving money, trading, marriage and buying of ploughing land. Conclusion: The major reasons of women to engage in commercial sex work were: family problems, widowed with children, separation from the family, poverty and peer pressures. Majority of prostitutes were interested to escape from commercial sex work when they have any opportunities like; financial, psycho-social and administrative supports. So governmental and non-governmental organizations and other charities respect and support commercial sex workers to come out from this horrifying life. Key words: Commercial Sex Work, Involvement, Prostitution, Escape, East Gojjam, Dejen

Biography

Speaker
Mekuanint Taddele / Debremarkos University, Ethiopia

Abstract

Introduction : define what is Quality? what is Safety? what is the method we will use in this presentation? i will Speak about the STEEP , and the description of each part of alone plus the Quality Principle that we describe the ESR from them Methods: Being conducted in 2017, this qualitative study was the first of its type in KSA. Data were collected through in-depth semi-structured interviews with 45 Multidisciplinary Caregivers working in different departments & Hospitals across the Kingdom . The participants were selected using a Random sampling method.Interviews were transcribed and analyzed following a qualitative content analysis approach. Written text was then coded, and themes were extracted from the data. Ethical considerations: The study was conducted with multidisciplinary free informed consent and was approved by Ethics Committee of Enaya Hospital/ Enaya Medical group. Findings: By analyzing the data, we found that distribution for the multidisciplinary over a different committees over 1 year and 2 month has improved the outcome of the achievement of the ESR by 38% as a results from the CPAHI Rounds on july 2017 Conclusion: The distribution for the multidisciplinary over all hospital committees can improve significantly the percentage of ESR when being changed in yearly basis with taking the consideration of the active work for this Committees and number of members.

Biography

Saed Al Nobani still as student in his DNP at the age of 35 years i completed my MSN from Liverpool University and Bachelor degree in Nursing from Jordan university . He is the Manager of Education & life support in Enaya Hospital/ Enaya medical group In KSA-Dammam, he is certified as Patient safety officer from American institution of healthcare Management , He has published more than 3 papers in Jordan about quality, patient safety & waste management.

Speaker
Saed Al Nobani / Cleveland Clinic,Abu Dhabi Dubai

Abstract

The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia was established in 1932. It has the largest and the fastest growing population among the Gulf countries. According to the United Nation projection , it is estimated to reach 39.8 million by 2025 and 54.7 million by 2050 as a natural outcome of the birth rate of 23.7 per 1000 population. Although the government of Saudi Arabia has given high priority for the development of the healthcare services , there are a number of issues pose challenges such a shortage of Saudi health professionals, changing of the diseases pattern, high demand for free services, lack of national health information system and the under utilization of the potential of electronic health strategies. With the fast development of Saudi Arabia specially in the health care field the Nursing Profession and the Education has to meet the demands for ever increasing population and technology in the health care field. The first formal training for nurses was established at a Health Institute in 1958, in Riyadh ( the capital city) as a result of collaborative effort between the Saudi Arabia Ministry of Health and the World Health Organization for one year after they complete six years of elementary schooling. In 1964, two nursing schools for one year training program were established for female who were graduated as Nurse Aides. In 1976 and 1977, the Ministry of Higher Education introduced the Bachelor Degree in Nursing in King Saud and king Abdul Aziz Universities. In 1987, the Master Degree in Nursing was established in king Saud and King Faisal Universities. In 1994 PhD scholarship program was set up by the Ministry of Higher Education for Saudi nurses to study abroad. The challenges facing the health care workers in general and the challenges facing the nursing profession in specific in Saudi Arabia will be discussed in this paper.

Biography

Mrs. Syoty has completed her Master Degree in Health Care Administration in the University of Minnesota, USA. She was the first Saudi female who completed this degree. She started her career in nursing in 1982 after she had her Bachelor Degree of Nursing from King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. She works for the Medical Services of the Ministry of Defense since 1983 as the Director of Nursing, Director of Nursing Education and Training and as a Nurse Consultant till date. She is a mother of two Physicians, one daughter and three grandchildren with a very demanding full time job.

Speaker
Wedad Ahmed Syoty / King Fahd Armed Forces Hospital Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Workplace bullying effects the health and well-being of staff, placing patients at risk for harm. Given the prevalence of workplace bullying and the threats it poses to losing skilled, experienced staff, risk for patient harm, decreasing intent to stay and the negative financial impacts to an organization, awareness and education are key for addressing WPB. Education and awareness will enable nurses to: 1) understand and address bullying and its perpetrators, 2)counter the culture of bullying in their work environments and respond to signs of bullying, 3) identify staff that may be in jeopardy for other emotional or performance issues, and 4)develop the skills needed to create safe workplaces and provide early interventions on detecting risky behaviors by perpetrators. Recent studies have shown that cognitive rehearsing (CR) can increase the likelihood of staff reporting bullying conduct in the work environment. The combination of CR and education can cultivate staff’s confidence by identifying a bully quickly and mentally preparing them when confronted with bullying behaviors.

Biography

Palma Iacovitti has completed her DNP from University of Iowa, USA She is a Clinical Manager overseeing four Specialty Oncology Cancer Clinics within Baptist MD Anderson in Jacksonville, USA. She is teaching workplace bullying to nurse residents, leadership, and other high risk areas of the organization. She has published original articles. Currently serving as advisory board member at a local university. Dr. Iacovitti’s research interests include long-term effects of workplace bullying, health and well-being in toxic work environments and creating successful teams.

Speaker
Dr. Palma Iacovitti / Baptist Medical Center, USA

Will be updated soon...