Scientific Program

Keynote Talks

Abstract

Abstract: Nearly all reservoirs leak. The escaping hydrocarbons eventually migrate to the Earth’s surface along faults or through the pore space and micro-fractures of the overlying seal and basin host rock. Whereas faults are commonly the conduit for macroseepage, and such events typically result in a vertical offset from the surface expression of the seep and the underlying reservoir; the microseepage of wet gas and light oil usually rises directly up from a leaking seal. The detection of seepage is therefore considered a direct hydrocarbon indicator (DHI) and evidence of an active petroleum system. Unfortunately, hydrocarbon seeps are ephemeral, small, discrete, and difficult to sample on the deep seafloor. Discoveries are typically made by satellite slick detection, multibeam sidescan sonar, and seismic surveys that collectively are capable of resolving changes in benthic fauna, the presence of surface features such as mounds or pockmarks, seep carbonates, water column gas flares, and/or the presence of subsurface gas chimneys. Our research group, in association with a Genome Canada funded Genomic Applications Partnership Program (GAPP), is exploring the use of lipidomics as a new techniques for detecting active- and paleo-seeps. Intact polar lipids, core lipids, and various polar lipids derived from the cellular membranes of living and deceased hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria and archaea may constitute a novel indirect hydrocarbon indicator (IHI). These lipids provide information about the community composition and metabolic activity of active, near surface and deeper subsurface microbial ecosystems. As such, subsurface lipid compositions may give evidence of present and past microbial blooms associated with both macro- and micro-hydrocarbon seepage. To test this, surface, gravity, and piston core sediments collected during recent research expeditions using the CCGS Hudson 2015, 2016, 2018; RV Coriolis 2017 to oil and gas prone regions of the Scotian margin of Nova Scotia, Canada are being analyzed. This presentation details our recent finding and the effectiveness of using lipidomics as an IHI in derisking offshore petroleum exploration.

Biography

Biography: Professor G. Todd Ventura is currently heading an organic geochemistry research group at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada. The group is focused on understanding the formation and alteration of oil formed in sedimented hydrothermal vent systems, organic matter preservation of Carboniferous source rocks from the UNESCO fossil cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, and the development of lipidomic techniques for offshore oil exploration. Prior to this, Dr. Ventura was a senior scientist at GNS Science in New Zealand, where he worked on understanding source rock organic matter preservation in New Zealand’s East Coast Basin of the North Island. Following the completion of his PhD from the University of Illinois at Chicago, USA, Dr. Ventura has held postdoctoral positions at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he worked on advanced oil fingerprinting techniques using multidimensional gas.

Speaker
G. Todd Ventura, / Saint Mary’s University, Canada

Abstract

It is three-phase flow rather than single-phase flows when crude oil is extracted from live wells mixed with water and natural gas. The mature multiphase flow measurement devices are mainly divided into three categories: complete separation, semi-separation and non-separation methods. The non-separation method becomes the current research focus due to its convenient installation and small size. Normally, the non-separation method measures flow rates through two parameters, i.e. total pressure drop ∆p and void fraction α. The pressure drop ∆p is directly measured by throttling devices such as orifice plates, Venturi meters and V-cones. Generally, electrical and gamma-ray densitometers are universally accepted methods for void fraction measurement. The electrical method refers to measuring void fraction via electrical parameters, e.g. resistance and capacitance of the multiphase flow. The pipeline cross-section images can be reconstructed by measuring these electrical parameters. It is mainly limited in academic laboratories and less feasible in industry. Other than the electrical method, the gamma-ray method measures each phase distributions in the multiphase flow via the difference in the attenuation coefficient of different media. It is a non-intrusive method that can directly measure the parameters in the pipeline without interfering the flow field. The gamma-ray method has been widely used on non-separation measuring devices in industry with a bright application prospect. In the past decade, the authors have investigated its operation principle, and systematic results by the measurement method of “gamma ray and Venturi” will be provided in this presentation. In the future, new flow meter techniques may be proposed by combining signal processing with the non-separation methods. One-to-one correspondences between different flow patterns and calculation models can improve the measurement accuracy. In summary, how to improve the accuracy and efficiency of the multiphase flow rate measurement will still be a great challenge to researchers.

Biography

Shanfang HUANG is serving as Associate Professor of nuclear engineering at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Science and Engineering Management, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University. In 2001, 2004, and 2008, he received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degree respectively in thermal engineering from Xi’an Jiaotong University. Before joining Tsinghua University in 2010, he did his postdoc research at Shanghai Jiaotong University. In 2011-2012, he visited KAERI and POSTECH and collaborated with visiting Prof. S. T. Revankar from Purdue University. In the past fifteen year, his research interest has been focusing on multiphase flow measurement and instrumentation. He has published more than 80 papers and about half in peer-reviewed publications. More than 20 publications are in good scientific impact. He has applied 6 patents in which 4 have been authorized and the rest are under checking.

Speaker
Shanfang HUANG / Tsinghua University, China

Sessions:

Petrochemistry & Natural Resources oral presentations

Abstract

The quality and assessment of a reservoir can be recognized in details by the presentation of seismo mechanical force. This research targets to calculate fractal dimension from the relationship among seismo mechanical force, maximum seismo mechanical force and wetting phase saturation and to approve it by the fractal dimension derived from the relationship among capillary pressure and wetting phase saturation. In this research, porosity was measured on real collected sandstone samples and permeability was calculated theoretically from capillary pressure profile measured by mercury intrusion contaminating the pores of sandstone samples in consideration. Two equations for calculating the fractal dimensions have been employed. The first one defines the functional relationship between wetting phase saturation, seismo mechanical force, maximum seismo mechanical force and fractal dimension. The second equation involves to the wetting phase saturation as a function of capillary pressure and the fractal dimension. Two procedures for obtaining the fractal dimension have been utilized. The first procedure was done by plotting the logarithm of the ratio between seismo mechanical force and maximum seismo mechanical force versus logarithm wetting phase saturation. The slope of the first procedure = 3- Df (fractal dimension). The second procedure for obtaining the fractal dimension was determined by plotting the logarithm of capillary pressure versus the logarithm of wetting phase saturation. The slope of the second procedure = Df -3. On the basis of the obtained results of the fabricated stratigraphic column and the attained values of the fractal dimension, the sandstones of the Shajara reservoirs of the Shajara Formation were divided here into three units. The gained units from bottom to top are: Lower Shajara seismo mechanical force Fractal Dimension Unit, Middle Shajara seismo mechanical force Fractal dimension Unit, and Upper Shajara seismo mechanical force Fractal Dimension Unit. The results show similarity between seismo mechanical force fractal dimension and capillary pressure fractal dimension. It was also noted that samples with wide range of pore radius were characterized by high values of fractal dimensions due to an increase in their connectivities. In our case, and as conclusions the higher the fractal dimension, the higher the heterogeneity, the higher the permeability, the better the reservoir characteristics.

Biography

To be updated soon

Speaker
Khalid Elyas Mohamed Elameen Alkhidir / King Saud university Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Water and hydrocarbons are resources indispensable for the economy of our planet and which accumulate in carbonate reservoir rocks. Consequently understanding the accumulation modalities, and the porosity and permeability of reservoir rocks, is of fundamental importance. In this context, stylolites, dissolution microstructures play a role in the accumulation of porosity and on the distribution of water and oil in carbonate reservoirs, but it is presently unclear how. Despite numerous studies on reservoir rocks, karst reservoirs in carbonates are incompletely understood. Traditionally (Cucchi, 1988; Bini 1993, Ferrarese, 1992) fluid circulation in marble and limestone proceeds along faults and joints while not much consideration is given to stylolites in this context. Stylolites are planes of dissolution enriched in non-carbonate particles (NCP) that usually form a distinct indentation. They mostly form in a compressional setting, probably by migration of large volumes of water that dissolve the carbonate and leave NCP along the indented stylolite planes. One of the enigmas of stylolites is that, despite the need for large volumes of fluid to migrate along them, they have a relatively low porosity. In this context there are a few previous studies(Alsharhan and Sadd, 2000; Raynaud, 1992) that investigate the dissolution/precipitation process along stylolites and their role in deformation and permeability changes. The focus of the research is to investigate the micromechanisms that act in the fluid-rock system and then we we had carried out, chemical and petrographic analysis (XRD, SEM)to characterize the porosity and permeability near these structures. Recently, fluid-rock interactions and their impact on carbonate rocks is becoming very important as a consequence of a progressive deterioration of the quantity and quality of the groundwater due to increasing pollution phenomena. In fact the aquifers represent about 40% of the drinking water resources and their importance will increase in coming years.

Biography

Silvana is doing her Ph.D, in structural geology, at University of Mainz. Her main interest in the research is to investigate the fluid-rock interaction and especially the micromechanism involved. In particular she ‘s working to understand the true role of the compressional structures in porosity/permeability changing.

Speaker
Silvana Magni / University of Mainz Italy

Abstract

The interaction between zeolite and phase transfer catalysts PTC (cationic surfactants) is of great interest. In this paper, study the influence of various physical and chemical parameters. On the adsorption of PTC on zeolite iscompared according their efficiency on removal PTC at constant conditions. The optimum conditions are studied to removal PTC. Thermodynamic of adsorption are calculated to suggest the mechanism of adsorption. The effectsof different conditions are studied to investigate degree of removal PTC. Furthermore, the effect of hydrophilic and hydrophobic of PTC on efficiency of adsorption on zeolite is discussed according to thermodynamic adsorption parameters. Adsorption isotherm isstudied according Frumkin isotherm.The mechanism of adsorption suggested with respect micellization processes and adsorption at solution/air interface. Furthermore, cross sectional area of phase transfer catalysteffect on degree of its adsorption.The results confirm the effect of pH and chemical structures of PTC efficiency of adsorption by zeolite. Key Words:phase transfercatalyst,zeolite,adsorption Introduction The adsorption of phase transfer catalysts and cationic surfactants on solid surfaces is very important. Such adsorption has been studied to elucidate its mechanism and to determine the significant kinetic and thermodynamic parameters which affect it (1). The performance of phase transfer catalysts at interface depends on the chemical structure of the molecular and their nature (2). The technique of phase transfer catalysis provides a method which avoids the use of solvent. The literature on chemistry related to phase transfer catalysis has grown rapidly during the last few years (3-5). The concept of phase transfer catalysis is not limited to anion transfer system, but is much more general, so that in principle one could also transfer cations, free radicals, whole molecule. Although reactions at phase boundaries, particularly those between organic and inorganic reagents.Menger (6) has reviewed reactions occurring at phase boundaries in the absence of surfactants or phase transfer agents. Reactions occurring at an interface tend to be rate limited by the amount of interfacial area, as well as to the concentration of reactant species at the interface. However, most two phase reactions involving relatively nonpolar organic species do not precede at useful rates in the absence of a catalyst. Micelle-catalyzed reactions are discussed in detailed (7,8). It is well to point phase transfer agents are not necessary surfactants, but small quaternary salt like tetra ethyl ammonium bromide which studied in this research. This catalyst is easily removed from the final product by diluting the organic phase with ether and washing with water. So it is very important to treat this water to remove the used catalyst. Physical adsorption of phase transfer agents at solid –solution interface can involve micelle and hemimicelle formation through association between hydrocarbon chains of the adsorbed molecules (9). For this reason, the interactions between zeolite and cationicagents are very important. In this paper, the existing data on physical adsorption of cationic agents is studied using zeolite and compare with barite mineral. The measured surface adsorptions have been compared with surface tension measurements and adsorption density by zeolite. This paper prepares tetraethyl ammonium bromide (PTC) and confirmed its structure by NMR, IR, and mass spectroscopy.Also study various physical chemical parameters on the adsorption of tetraethyl ammonium bromide catalysis on zeolite and solution air interface. Experimental Adsorbate Tetaethylamine was refluxed with bromoethane in pure ethyle alcohol ate35 C. The resulting was recrystalised and purified according Omar et al with purity about 98.6 %( 10). Surface tension was measured using a Du Nouytensiometer (Kruss type 8451) for various concentrations of the synthesized phase transfer catalysis. Before each measurement, the glass plate was washed by immersion in hot chromic acid followed by washing with doubly distilled water. The accuracy of the surface tension in most cases was about. 0.2mN/m. Adsorbent Synthetic zeolite was used as adsorbent (11). The maximum of the particle size was about 9um, and BET surface about 2.5 m2/g was determined elsewhere (11). Determination of the amount adsorbed by determination the concentration of the cationic phase transfer catalysis (PTC)before and after the adsorption by phase titration (16). Results and Discussions 1-Structure confirmation of tetraethylammonium bromide FTIR spectrum of the catalysis showed the absorption bands 750 cm-1(CH2)n,, 1086 cm (c-n), 1290 CH3 symmetric bending, 1500 CH2 asymmetric bending. FTIR spectrum is shown in Fig.1 and confirmed the functional group. The HNMR tetraethyl ammonium bromide showed the following bands =3 ppm (N-CH2), =1.5 (CH3) as shown in Fig 2. This figure confirmed the chemical structure of the synthesized cationic catalysis. The mass spectrum of the synthesized cationic is more confirmed by mass spectroscopy. The molecular ion peak at m/z 210(Fig. 3). The surface tension against logarithm of concentration of cationic catalysis is used to determine critical micelle concentration at temperature 30 C. (Fig4). The maximum surface excess max and minimum surface area Amin were calculated as described elsewhere (10). These results in table 1 shows large value of surface excess and minimum area, indicating that it adsorbs at solution /air interface. Standard free energies of micellizationGmicwas calculated according to the following equation: Gmic = RTln CMC The value of Gmicis negative, so micellization of the catalysis is spontaneous process. The synthetic solution of tetraethylammonium bromide was prepared and study adsorption of its differentconcentration. Fig. 5 shows the adsorption isotherm cationic catalysis on various concentration of Zeolite at 30C. This isotherm indicates the adsorption increase slightly and tends to steady stable with different concentration.The author suggests adsorption by ion exchange compatible with Omer et al. (12). The adsorption of (PTC) can occur at the external surface depends on cross sectional area of its head group approximately 0.45 nm2 and pore area of zeolite. The adsorption of PTB depends on charge of zeolite surface. Fig.6 shows that, the effect of pH on degree of adsorption PTC. At acidic medium surface of zeolite haspositive charge, also cationic catalysis has positivecharge. As the results, reduced adsorption of catalysis at higher pH, however, the surface of zeolite acquires negative charge at higher pH. So, the adsorption increases with increase concentration of catalysis. As the results the negatively charged zeolite surface lead to the cationic catalysis adsorbed at its surface forming monolayer.Therefore, the ammonium groups are oriented to the zeolite surface beside adsorption through penetration the pores of zeolite. The value of monolayer is reached at pH 10 forming plateau. Hence, particularly in the pH range from 7-8, the more addition of cationic catalysis via the weaker Vander Waals interactions between the alkyl chains. The author suggests at pH 8 and at optimum conditions, the cationic catalysis is ionized in water with a positive with its head nitrogen group whereas the zeolite surface has a negative charge,lead to adsorption through van deer waals force (electros attraction force).In comparison these results with adsorption of cationic catalysis at solution air interface. The surface excess concentration, Г (mol/m2), and the area per molecule, A (nm2) can be calculated according Rosen et al. It is clear that, the surface excess concentration increased with increase PTC concentration until CMC (Fig. 7). These resultsconfirm the free molecules tend to form micelles andmonolayer at CMC. So the density of adsorption increases until the concentration equal CMC to form monolayer. Furthermore, by increasing the PTC concentrations lead adsorption of another layer with other direction and the surface of zeolite. So adsorption on zeolite surface is preferablebefore adsorptionof cationic catalysis PTC at solution / air interface. In fact, in the micellar region, the adsorption density not changes because the cationic catalysis tends to form micelle. After CMC, the adsorption density remains stable, so it enhances on degree of adsorption at zeolite surface. According Frumkin isotherm the result can be analysed according the following equation: (1- θ)nexp(-2n θ) = KC Where the θ is the degree of coverage, a is the lateral interaction coefficient, K is a constant equal to exp(-G0/RT- Ln55.5) G0 is the standard free energy and c is the equilibrium concentration, ln[θ/(1- θ)¬n]=ln K + 2aθ Figs.8 shows the isotherm of adsorption isotherm of cationic catalysis. It can calculatethe parameters (a) and G0. By put the relation of ln[θ/(1- θ)¬n] versus θ gives a straight line with a slope equal to 2a and an intercept of ( - G0/RT- ln 55.5) as in Fig. 8. I t is found that G0 = -26.5 kg/mol, while (a) equal 2.1. These results confirm that adsorption of cationic catalysis on zeolite takes place though zeolite pores. Otherwise, the remaining molecules adsorbed at zeolite surface depending on the lateral interaction values between cationic molecules. On the other hand, the cationic molecules tend to form hemi- micellization process, and the free molecules migrate from bulk solution to form micelle or adsorb on to zeolit surface by pore penetration or at solid surface.The thermodynamic of physical adsorption of cationic catalysis confirm that free molecules tend to form of hemimiclles, then micelle formation in bulk solution.Hemimicelles are difficult forming at lower pH, so cationic molecule prefers adsorption at zeoiltesurface rather than adsorption at solution/ air interface. References 1-Somasundaran, P. (1972), Separation and purification methods, Perry, e.s. Vanoos, C. J., Eds. Marcel Dekker, New York, Vol, 1, p.117 2- Holland, P.M and Rubingh, D.N, (1992) Mixed surfactant system, ACS SYMP.SER. 501, Am. Chem. soc. Washington, DC. 3- J. Dockx, Synthesis 8,441 (1973). 4- W.P. Weber and G.W. Gokel., Phase transfer catalysis in organic synthesis, Springer Verlage. New York, 1977 5- E. V. Dehmlow, Angew. Chem. 89, 521 (1977), New synth. mMethods 1. 1 (1975). 6- F. M. Menger. Chem. Soc. Rev. 1. 229 (1972). 7- L. J. Winter and E. Grumwald. J. am. Chem. Soc. 87. 4608 (1965). 8- E. J. Fendler and J. H. Fendler. Adv. Phys. Org. Chem. 8. 271 (1970). 9- Fuerstenau, D.W. and Wakamatsu, T., (1975). Faraday Discussion of the chemical society, 59, 157-168. 10- Omar, A.M.A and Nagui A. J. Chemical and Engineering Data, Surface and thermodynamic parameters of some cationic surfactants., 43, No.1, pp. 117 – 120 (1998) U.S.A 11-Nora Y Almehbad,A.K.ElMorsiand A.M.A.Omar, Development Of Alkylation Toluene With Methanol On Modified ZSM-5 Zeolites By Amphoteric surfactant , Journal of Surface Engineered Materials and Advanced Technology, 2014, 4, Published Online January 2014 12- A.M.A. Omar and E. Azzam, Adsorption of some anionic surfactant on barite and at solution/air interfaces J. of surfactants and detergents 7.No.2, April, 2004, USA

Biography

To be updated soon

Speaker
NOURA EL MEHBAD / NAJRAN UNIVERSITY Saudi Arabia

Abstract

The Nigeria lead-zinc (Pb-Zn) deposits occur in the Cretaceous sediments of the Benue Trough. The tectonic activities which led to the formation of the Benue Trough are believed to be responsible for the lead-zinc occurrence. The Benue Trough is believed to have originated as a failed arm of an aulacogen, at the time of the breaking of the Gondwanaland into the South American and African plates. The sediments of the Asu-River Group (Albian) which unconformably overlies the Basement Complex in Lower and Middle Benue plays host to the deposits, while the medium-grained arkosic sandstones intercalated by characteristic cross-beddings of the Bima (Upper Albian) and the Yolde formation (Cenomanian) does same in the Upper Benue Trough. Barites (BaSO4), Copper (Cu), Silver (Ag), Chalcopyrites (CuFe2), marcasites (FeS2) are some of the minerals that occur are in association with lead-zinc. The mineralization is restricted to NE-SW trending belt of slightly deformed volcanic and sedimentary Cretaceous sequences. The mining of Pb-Zn deposits in Nigeria which dates back to 1931, experienced a serious decline because of the second world war, drop in price at the international market, Nigeria oil boom in the Niger-delta etc. The lead reserve is estimated to be 10,000,000 tonnes, while zinc reserve is 80,000 tonnes and they are spread across the different states within the Benue Trough. Open cast and underground mining are the mining methods employed in the mining of the deposits.

Biography

Born on the 6th of January in Kaduna, Nigeria, to the family of Engr. and Mrs. C.N. Onyeagba. The author of this paper is currently studying Environmental Geosciences (Master’s degree) at TU Bergakademie, Freiberg, Germany. He obtained his BSc in Geology and Mining at the University of Jos, Jos, Plateau State, Nigeria. Nnaemeka has memberships in various professional bodies which include: Geological Society of America (GSA), American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG), Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG), Nigerian Association of Petroleum Explorationists (NAPE), European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers. The passion to excel academically and professionally has been his driving force. His hobbies are singing (of hymns, sacred and classical songs), traveling, watching interesting matters and loves a bit of politics. He is a lover of God. He is currently single.

Speaker
Nnaemeka C. Onyeagba / TU Bergakademie, Freiberg Germany

Abstract

The effects of α-amino acid on the H2S/CO2 corrosion of carbon steel in oil field brine water were studied using Tafel polarization and anodic polarization measurements. The surface morphology of carbon steel was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). α-amino acid inhibited the H2S/CO2 corrosion of carbon steel in oil field brine water and the inhibition efficiency increased with increasing inhibitor concentration but decreased with increasing temperature. Polarization curves indicate that α-amino acid act as mixed type of inhibitor. Theoretical study involved quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulation is also performed for confirming the inhibition effects of α-amino acid.

Biography

Dr. Mohamed Deyab is a full Professor Researcher at Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute (EPRI). He is also working as Professor Visitor at the department of engineering for innovation of the University of Salent, Italy. In addition, he was appointed as Member of Petroleum and Mineral Resources Research Council (Academy of Scientific Research & Technology). His research interests include: (a) Electrochemistry and Corrosion, (b) Nanotechnology, (c) Energy production (d) coating and nano-caoting, (f) Corrosion inhibitors, (g) Petroleum industries.

Speaker
MOHAMED DEYAB / Egyptian Petroleum Research Institute Egypt

Abstract

The catalytic activity of Pt/γ-Al2O3 and Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was investigated to bring about the complete oxidation of 2-Propanol. Among them, Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 was found to be the most promising catalyst based on activity. The catalysts were characterized by (XRD), (SEM), (TEM) and ICP-AES techniques. Iron loadings on Pt/γ-Al2O3 had a great effect on catalytic activity, and Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 (1.75 wt% Fe) catalyst at calcinations temperature 300°C was observed to be the most active, which might be contributed to the favorable synergetic effects between Pt and Fe, high activity and the well-dispersed bimetallic phase. The combustion of 2-Propanol in vapor phase was carried out in a conventional flow U-shape glass reactor used in the differential mode at atmospheric pressure. 2-Propanol was analyzed by a gas chromatograph VARIAN 3800 CX equipped with a FID. As observed, the better performance and activity was observed for Pt-Fe/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst. These results indicate that the high dispersion on support, gives a positive effect on catalytic activity.

Biography

Faezeh Aghazadeh Dizaji has completed her PhD from University of Tabriz, Iran and postdoctoral studies from University of Helsinki, Finland. She is the head of Feedstock at the Commercial Department of Tabriz Petrochemical Company. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Faezeh Aghazadeh Dizaji / Tabriz Petrochemical Company Iran

Abstract

Here we report the synthesis of thermoresponsive nanocomposite hydrogels which are highly elastic and swellable based on N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM), cationic (3-acrylamidopropyl) trimethylammonium chloride (AMPTMA) and nanoscopic clay. The effect of some salts, chemical crosslinker (BIS), the concentration of AMPTMA, and clay content on the viscoelastic properties, volume phase transition temperature, and the thermal behavior of the prepared hydrogels were investigated as a function of temperature. Cationic copolymer hydrogels based on NIPAM and AMPTMA were prepared by aqueous free radical polymerization. Synthetic clay and anionic groups of the salts such NTf2 and Cl bind to the cationic comonomer units and significantly affected the viscoelasticity and thermal properties of the hydrogels. DSC measurements showed that the volume phase transition temperature and its enthalpy changed with the clay content and with introducing the cationic comonomer (AMPTMA) in the PNIPAM network. By introducing of comonomer, 250 mM solution of NaCl- 15 mM LiNTf2 and laponite clay, a 10-fold, 4-fold and 3.8 fold increase in elastic modulus was obtained, respectively, compared to that of the homopolymer PNIPAM hydrogel. With increasing the temperature from 20 C to 45 C for the homopolymer PNIPAM hydrogel in 15mM LiNTf2, the elastic modulus grew 5 times larger. The rheological properties of the homopolymeric PNIPAM hydrogels were in the order of homo-PNIPAM in mixture of 15 mM LiNTf2 and 250 mM NaCl > homo-PNIPAM in 15 mM LiNTF2 > homo-PNIPAM in 5 mM LiNTF2 > homo-PNIPAM in water > homo-PNIPAM in 250 mM NaCl.

Biography

H.Hosseini has completed his PhD from Moscow State University of Mechanical Engineering, Russia and postdoctoral studies from the University of Helsinki, Finland. He is Head of the Chemical Engineering’s Department at the Islamic Azad University, Iran. He is working as Technical Consultant at some chemical companies such as Chlor Pars Co. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Hossein Hosseini / Islamic Azad University Iran

Abstract

Oil fields south of Baghdad, near a lot of green agriculture areas which are suffering from the lockage of pollutants. In this study, soil and cutting samples were collected from different locations during the period from January to December 2017. HPLC analysis for 16priority pollutant polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were performed,using optimum separation condition on efficient,PAH (50 × 4.6 mm ID),3µm particle sizecolumnfrom supelcoLtd. The summation of PAHs concentrations in soilsamples ranged from 0.991-0.3226 mg/kg, while the total PAH concentrations in cuttings ranged from0.14799 to 0.302 mg/kg. ∑PAH concentrations of the seven carcinogenic PAH compounds in soil varied between 0.0991- 0.3226 mg/kg.In terms of composition of patterns in surface water and soil, the PAHs were dominated by four and three rings. The distribution pattern showed marked predominance by low molecular weight compounds. In comparison with ∑PAHs concentrations in other part of2 the world, the total PAH concentrations of this area were higher than those reported for some urban soils in some regions of the world. The goal of this work is to study the concentrations distribution of the sixteen PAHs and elements in soil samples from Al-Khacheyasite south of Baghdad. Keywords: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; Environmental pollution; Iraqi environment Impact.

Biography

Dr. Salman (scientific deputy dean-Al-Nisour university college), he holds a PhD in chemical engineering, in addition to numerous international certifications in the field of environmental management. Dr. Salman’s achievements span more than three decades of significant leadership in the fields of chemical engineer process, adsorption process, preparation of activated carbons, environmental applications, water, soil, air monitoring and analysis (laboratories & fields), solar energy applications. Dr. Salman published more than 100 scientific manuscript, book and patent, he participated many scientific conferences, meeting and workshop. He got many awards from different national & international sides; the last one was (scientist's medal 2017) from International association for advance materials in Sweden. Dr. Salman has provided critical projects management and implementation services to international private sector companies operating in Iraq in addition to consultation and advisory services to the international companies in Iraq since 2003

Speaker
Jasim Mohammed Salman / Al-Nisour University College Iraq

Abstract

It has been long known that the majority of oil and gas accumulations lose hydrocarbons to the surface. This seepage can be expressed directly as macroseepage (visible oil and gas seeps) or as microseepage (chemically detectible). Hydrocarbon microseepage forms the basis for most geochemical, microbiological, and non-seismic hydrocarbon detection methods. Few explorationists question that hydrocarbons can migrate to the surface in amounts that are detectible, but many remain skeptical how such information is best integrated into exploration and development programs. Hydrocarbon microseepageis common, is predominantly vertical, and is dynamic (responds quickly to changes in reservoir conditions). The surface manifestations of hydrocarbon microseepage can take many forms, including (1) anomalous hydrocarbon concentrations in soils, sediments, waters, and atmosphere; (2) microbiological anomalies; (3) mineralogic changes such as the formation of calcite, pyrite, uranium, elemental sulfur, and certain magnetic iron oxides and sulfides; (4) bleaching of red beds; (5) clay mineral changes; (6) acoustic anomalies; (7) electrochemical changes; (8) radiation anomalies; and (9) biogeochemical and geobotanical anomalies. These varied expressions of hydrocarbon seepage have led to the development of an equally diverse number of hydrocarbon detection methods. Some of these methods are geochemical, some are non-seismic geophysical methods, and some come under the category of remote sensing. Each has its proponents, each claims success, and all compete for the explorationists attention and dollars. Is it any wonder that some explorationists remain confused, or at least skeptical? Specific pplications of hydrocarbon microseepage to petroleum exploration and production include (1) documenting the presence of an active petroleum system in frontier basins or other under-explored regions; (2) high-grading exploration leads and prospects on the basis of their likely hydrocarbon charge; (3) identifying the presence of by-passed pay in old or abandoned fields; (4) tracking hydrocarbon drainage due to production using repeat microseepage surveys over producing fields and waterfloods; and possibly (5) identifying sweet spots in unconventional resource plays, and monitoring hydrocarbon drainage in such plays. Applications such as these require close sample spacing and are most effective when results are integrated with subsurface data. Hydrocarbon microseepage surveys offer a flexible, low risk and low cost technology that naturally complements traditional geologic and seismic methods. Seismic data will continue to be unsurpassed for imaging trap and reservoir geometry, however, in many geological settings seismic data yield little or no information about whether a trap is charged with hydrocarbons, let alone the composition of those hydrocarbons. A review of more than 3300 U.S. and international exploration wells – the majority drilled after completion of microseepage surveys – documents that 80% of wells drilled on prospects with a positive hydrocarbon microseepage anomaly resulted in commercial oil/gas discoveries; in contrast, only 14% of wells drilled on prospects with no associated seepage anomaly yielded a discovery.

Biography

Dr. Schumacher is Vice President for Geosciences and Technology for Paris-based E&PGeoField Services, a provider of surface geochemical exploration surveys and services worldwide. Before joining E&PGeoFieldServices, he was Director of Geochemistry (1997-2012) for USA-based Geo-Microbial Technologies. He received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Geology from Univ. of Wisconsin (Madison) and Ph.D. from Univ. of Missouri (Columbia). Dr. Schumacher has had 10 years in academia, 18 years in exploration with Phillips and Pennzoil, and 20 years in geochemical exploration. Schumacher is a Certified Petroleum Geologist and senior editor of AAPG’s Memoir 66 (1996), “Hydrocarbon Migration and Its Near-Surface Expression”, and “Surface Exploration Case Histories” (2002).He has organized an industry short course, Geochemical Exploration for Oil and Gas, for AAPG and other geological organizations and individual companies worldwide since 1992. Deet is a Certified Petroleum Geologist (CPG 3401), a member of AAPG and CSPG, and a past president of the Houston Geological Society.

Speaker
Dietmar Schumacher / E&P GeoField Services United States

Abstract

LWS (CLWS). Analysis of CLWS demonstrated that potassium (K) is the major active component responsible for the activity of the catalyst in CLWS synthesis, and the transesterification of WUO to WUOB in the presence of methanol shows the catalyst to be suitable for biodiesel production from WUO. To model and optimize the process condition, response surface methodology and Artificial Neural Network was employed in the conversion of WUO to WUOB using CLWS as heterogeneous base catalyst. The modeling was carried out by considering three factors, reaction time (RT), catalyst amount (CA) and the ratio of methanol/oil (M/OR). The optimum conditions that achieved 92.45 (%w/w) for RSM and 98.46 (%w/w) for ANN were RT of 40 mins, CA of 6 g and M/OR of 5.5:1. Characterization of the produced WUOB shows that the WUOB can replace conventional diesel when blends. Nevertheless, statistical analysis showed that the conversion using presoaked CLWS, proved to be a suitable heterogeneous catalyst for transesterification of biodiesel.

Biography

to be updated soon

Speaker
Adepoju Tunde Folorunsho / INSTITUTION Nigeria

Abstract

The catalytic activity of Pt/γ-Al2O3 and Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 catalysts was investigated to bring about the complete oxidation of 2-Propanol. Among them, Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 was found to be the most promising catalyst based on activity. The catalysts were characterized by (XRD), (SEM), (TEM) and ICP-AES techniques. Iron loadings on Pt/γ-Al2O3 had a great effect on catalytic activity, and Pt-Fe/γ-Al2O3 (1.75 wt% Fe) catalyst at calcinations temperature 300°C was observed to be the most active, which might be contributed to the favorable synergetic effects between Pt and Fe, high activity and the well-dispersed bimetallic phase. The combustion of 2-Propanol in vapor phase was carried out in a conventional flow U-shape glass reactor used in the differential mode at atmospheric pressure. 2-Propanol was analyzed by a gas chromatograph VARIAN 3800 CX equipped with a FID. As observed, the better performance and activity was observed for Pt-Fe/Al2O3 bimetallic catalyst. These results indicate that the high dispersion on support, gives a positive effect on catalytic activity.

Biography

Faezeh Aghazadeh Dizaji has completed her PhD from University of Tabriz, Iran and postdoctoral studies from University of Helsinki, Finland. She is the head of Feedstock at the Commercial Department of Tabriz Petrochemical Company. She has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Faezeh Aghazadeh Dizaji / Tabriz Petrochemical Company Iran

Abstract

Abstract: Nearly all reservoirs leak. The escaping hydrocarbons eventually migrate to the Earth’s surface along faults or through the pore space and micro-fractures of the overlying seal and basin host rock. Whereas faults are commonly the conduit for macroseepage, and such events typically result in a vertical offset from the surface expression of the seep and the underlying reservoir; the microseepage of wet gas and light oil usually rises directly up from a leaking seal. The detection of seepage is therefore considered a direct hydrocarbon indicator (DHI) and evidence of an active petroleum system. Unfortunately, hydrocarbon seeps are ephemeral, small, discrete, and difficult to sample on the deep seafloor. Discoveries are typically made by satellite slick detection, multibeam sidescan sonar, and seismic surveys that collectively are capable of resolving changes in benthic fauna, the presence of surface features such as mounds or pockmarks, seep carbonates, water column gas flares, and/or the presence of subsurface gas chimneys. Our research group, in association with a Genome Canada funded Genomic Applications Partnership Program (GAPP), is exploring the use of lipidomics as a new techniques for detecting active- and paleo-seeps. Intact polar lipids, core lipids, and various polar lipids derived from the cellular membranes of living and deceased hydrocarbon oxidizing bacteria and archaea may constitute a novel indirect hydrocarbon indicator (IHI). These lipids provide information about the community composition and metabolic activity of active, near surface and deeper subsurface microbial ecosystems. As such, subsurface lipid compositions may give evidence of present and past microbial blooms associated with both macro- and micro-hydrocarbon seepage. To test this, surface, gravity, and piston core sediments collected during recent research expeditions using the CCGS Hudson 2015, 2016, 2018; RV Coriolis 2017 to oil and gas prone regions of the Scotian margin of Nova Scotia, Canada are being analyzed. This presentation details our recent finding and the effectiveness of using lipidomics as an IHI in derisking offshore petroleum exploration.

Biography

Professor G. Todd Ventura is currently heading an organic geochemistry research group at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia Canada. The group is focused on understanding the formation and alteration of oil formed in sedimented hydrothermal vent systems, organic matter preservation of Carboniferous source rocks from the UNESCO fossil cliffs of Joggins, Nova Scotia, and the development of lipidomic techniques for offshore oil exploration. Prior to this, Dr. Ventura was a senior scientist at GNS Science in New Zealand, where he worked on understanding source rock organic matter preservation in New Zealand’s East Coast Basin of the North Island. Following the completion of his PhD from the University of Illinois at Chicago, USA, Dr. Ventura has held postdoctoral positions at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, where he worked on advanced oil fingerprinting techniques using multidimensional gas chromatography, and at the University of Oxford, England in which he produced the first reproducible determinations of vanadium stable isotope compositions in crude oils using multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

Speaker
G. Todd Ventura / Saint Mary’s University Canada

Abstract

Svarovskaya Lidiya Senior Researcher, PhD thesis defended in National Research Tomsk State University. Leading expert on the implementation of the themes: 1. Analysis of oil production impact factors on the environment. 2. Sensitivity of physiological groups of microorganisms and their enzymatic activity to the chemical composition and concentration of polluting oil. 3. Integrated biotesting for pollution assessment, creation of methods for bioremediation and soil recultivation. Takes part in the work of international conferences with reports on the development of a complex physicochemical and microbiological method for increasing oil recovery, biodegradation of hydrocarbons of viscous oils, bioremediation of oil contaminated soils and enzymatic activity of soil microflora. Published in co-authorship 76 scientific works on petroleum microbiology in peer-reviewed and foreign journals.

Biography

Environmental problems are getting more and more urgent with every passing year. Of particular concern are northern areas of oil production with thousands of kilometers of pipelines laid on watered, hard-to-reach, marshy lands, a situation that leads to a high risk of pollution of vast territories in emergency situations. We have investigated the territories oilfields in the northern districts of the Tomsk oblast; the fields are located in the floodplain of the Middle Ob River and srelate to the watersheds small rivers. Water in most rivers on the territory of oil-producing plays is polluted with oil products, iron, and phenols as a result of emergency situations. Horizontal movement of petroleum products (geochemical migration) occurs with surface runoff during heavy rains, floods, and melting snow. The contamination level was 29–60 g/kg versus 1.8 g/kg for the background. The polluting oil has been found to contain acyclic and aromatic hydrocarbon entities, of which pyrenes, chrysenes, and benzanthracenes are the most toxic. In this connection it is relevant to determine the concentration,the area of contamination, and the volume of runoff of oil products into the river system on the territory ofwatersheds of small rivers. The specific runoff of oil products and their total annual inflow to the river system have been calculated using data of laboratory research, Landsat satellite images, and the software suites ASTER GDEM and SRTM. Oil spill in the watershed affects the ecological safety of water bodies, determining environmental management, social policy, and public health activities

Speaker
L.I. Svarovskaya / Institute of Petroleum Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences Russia

Abstract

The generation of electricity and motor vehicles depend, in most cases, on the burning of fossil fuels whose reserves are not renewable. They are oil and coal. And the high consumption of these fuels produces the polluting gases that contribute strongly to global warming. Dimethyl ether can be produced from natural gas, which is highly available. In addition, costs do not depend on oil price swings. One of the ways of obtaining hydrogen is from the synthesis of methanol, thus allowing the high conversions in a catalytic reaction. The applicability of quasicrystals as catalysts in the heterogeneous reactions occurring in catalytic reactors is intended to expand the production of hydrogen, dimethyl ether and other fuels and biofuels. Investigations by characterization techniques such as; X-ray diffraction (XRD) to monitor the evolution of the alloy phases, SEM-Scanning Electron Microscopy, which allows the study of surface microstructure, and TEM Transmission Electron Microscopy, studies the morphology of internal phases, quasicrystalline nuclei and defects; the catalytic tests for conversion and selectivity of methanol and products formed from this material used as catalyst.

Biography

Doctoral in Chemical Engineering/Masters of Mechanical Engineering-emphasis in Materials Science/Bachelor degree in Physics-Solid state/Bachelor degree in Industrial Chemistry/Bachelor degree in Chemistry/ Specialist in the teaching of Mathematics by IMPA/UFPB/Specialization course in Chemistry EDX/MITX from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/ 22 courses Human Resources in Oil and Natural Gas Program (PRH-28), National Petroleum Agency-Natural Gas (ANP) PETROBRAS (Brazil). More than 55 publications on international and national journals (Environment, Education and Technology of Petroleum)/Reviewer international journal of Elsevier/National scientific Journals and Participation of International Congresses of OMICS on Petrochemicals and Chemical Engineering on 2013 San Antonio / 2014 in Las Vegas/Part of the organizing committee of the World Conference and Expo on Petrochemicals and Natural Resources 2016 Dubai/Two Books with ISBN/One Patent in Catalyst Area. Area research in Heterogeneous catalysis, in the production of "Green Chemistry" catalysts/ Working on research with catalytic reactions (Steam Reform of Methanol to produce Hydrogen, Dehydration of Methanol in Dimethyl Ether)/Two projects were applied to the petrochemical industry/Catalytic reactions of oxidation of methanol using quasicrystallinealloys/Research ofAcoustic spectroscopy system of Minerals in visible.

Speaker
Lourdes Cristina Lucena Agostinho Jamshidi / MG JAM E JAM CLEAN & BIO FUEL CATALYST Co (ltd),Brazil

Abstract

The global technology has generated great diversity in the market and globalization of the economy, but intense environmental impact. Air pollution causes about half a million premature deaths on the planet every year. The particulate materials generate particles of organic compounds, metals, toxic dust, acid rain, mold and pollutant industries, mainly causing respiratory diseases and cardiovascular diseases. Scientific research seeks alternatives to clean and renewable sources and energy, mitigates environmental impacts, as well as having energy and social sustainability. Hydrogen is one of the ideal sources of electric power transformation, thus being able to be used in fuel cell systems for power generation efficiency. The structure of the films from the metal matrix plus Graphene Oxide, observes a barrier in the formation of the layers. This barrier within the film may occur in the rate of permeation of water molecules and oxygen. The potential of Quasicrystalline alloys in catalytic reactions is due to their equilibrium phases are stable even at high temperatures. The quasicrystals catalysts supported with Graphene Nanosheets in reforming methanol steam, are resistant to poisonings and control the variables in the catalytic process. In this work, we used experimental techniques such as X-ray diffraction - XRD to follow the evolution of the alloy phase, scanning electron microscopy- SEM allowing the study of the surface microstructure, transmission electron microscopy - TEM studies the morphology of the internal phases, and defects nuclei. The catalytic tests served to convert the methanol and selectivity of the products obtained

Biography

The Doctoral student in Materials Science at Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE)-Brazil; and had Master Materials Science from Federal University of Pernambuco – Brazil; Master in Civil Engineering with Urban Planning from Islamic Azad University/Iran-Tehran; Bachelor's degree in Social Science and Social Planning from Islamic Azad University/Iran-Tehran and also hold a Graduated in Civil Construction/ Architecture from Islamic Azad University/IranTehran. Currently in Doctoral research is developing nanoparticles of Graphene Oxide/metallic alloys, for the production of electronic sensors, biological sensors, supercapacitors, catalysts for petrochemical industrialists and etc. It uses Reduced Graphene Oxide of low acidity and high in the formation of composites employed in thin films. In the Masters Materials Science projects with the applicability of the petrochemical industry were developed. These projects were formed composites (Graphene oxide + Polymers and metal alloys with the composition based on Aluminum). I was Director and Coordination of Administration and Examination at University City complex of Islamic Azad University/Iran-Tehran and held the position of Associate Professor, at the Islamic Azad University. Participation of extension courses Pyrolysis of Biomass for Biofuel Production; and participation 3th publication of the two International Congresses, OMICS on Petrochemical and Chemical Engineering on November 2013 San Antonio; and on October 2014 Las Vegas; have more 27 articles published in international and national journals (Materials Sciences, Chemical Engineering, and Education). He is a translator of scientific periodicals book and other our articles were published. He has a Patent. Super visor industrial JAM E JAM that is the first international catalyst Metallic Alloys QAUSICRYSTALLINE in petroleum area and renewable energy. Currently in Doctoral research is developing nanoparticles of Graphene Oxide/metallic alloys, for the production of electronic sensors, biological sensors, supercapacitors, catalysts for petrochemical industrialists and etc. It uses Reduced Graphene Oxide of low acidity and high in the formation of composites employed in thin films.

Speaker
Reza Jamshidi Rodbari / MG JAM E JAM CLEAN & BIO FUEL CATALYST Co (ltd),Brazil

Sessions:

Petrochemistry & Natural Resources

Abstract

Abstract: Heavy oil reservoirs in offshore oilfields have occupied different places in China. Steam and multiple thermal fluid stimulation technologies are widely applied in offshore heavy oil reservoirs recovery. During the thermal recoveryof stimulation or displacement of heavy oil reservoirs, channeling phenomena emeraged due to a st of factors, like reservoir heterogeneity. As a result, it may affect the thermal recovery effect of steam stimulation. Considering about the unique requirements for the stimulation of multiple thermal fluids for offshore heavy oil recovery. In this study, transmission, blocking and relieving, heat resistance is been analysied and a comprehensive evaluation of parallel sand tube experiments to conduct a screening evaluation of plugging systems for the stimulation of multiple thermal fluids, screen out a commonly used plugging agent in the current stage and propose corresponding guidance for the selection basis. Different kinds of plugging system is analysied and the results may paly an important role in the offshore heavy oil recovery.

Biography

Yuyang LIU, born in 1991, received the Bachler Degree of Petroleum Engineering at School of Petroleum Engineering of China University of Petroleum (East) in 2015 and worked as a visiting student at University of New South Wales from Jan to Jun, 2015. He is now working as Ph.D. candidate at School of Earth and Space Sciences of Peking University and has his expertise in informational geology, petroleum geology and petroleum engineering, in detail, included stress filed simulation, 3D geological modeling and visualizing, self-adaption meshing method development, hydraulic fracture simulation and related software development.

Speaker
Yuyang.LIU / Peking University, China

Abstract

Selective aerobic oxygenation of CH4 into liquid products without the concomitant formation of CO2 and CO has served as an elusive target reaction. The one-step transformation of CH4 into methanol (CH3 OH) is carried out in nature using methane monooxygenases. However, under chemical conditions, the selective oxygenation of CH4 to CH3OH with molecular oxygen (O2) has been unknown because the oxidation of oxygenated products, CH3OH and formic acid (HCOOH) is much easier than that of CH4, leading to over-oxidation products such as CO and CO2. Here we show that chlorine dioxide radical (ClO2•) acts as an efficient oxidizing agent in the selective oxygenation of methane under photoirradiation. The product yields of CH3OH and HCOOH were 14% and 85%, respectively, without aerobic combustion under ambient conditions (298 K, 1 atm).1 In the case of ethane, the photooxygenation occurred under the otherwise same conditions to form ethanol and acetic acid with the yields of 19% and 80%, respectively. The photochemical oxygenation of methane is initiated by generation of chlorine radical and singlet oxygen from photoexcited state of ClO2•, leading to the final products by aerobic radical chain processes.1 Thus, the present study provides an environmentally benign approach towards the photooxidation of organic compounds. The photochemical oxygenation using ClO2• reported herein could be generalized to provide novel chemical reactions, which may have significant implications in synthetic and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Biography

Prof. Kei Ohkubo has completed his Ph.D in 2001 from Osaka University. He was working as a JSPS fellow and JST research fellow at Osaka University (2001-2005), a designated associate professor in Osaka University (2005-2014) and a specially appointed professor at Osaka University (2014-2017). He has been a full professor at Institute for Advanced Co-Creation Studies, Osaka University since 2017. He has published more than 420 papers. h-index is 63.

Speaker
Kei Ohkubo / Osaka University, Japan

Abstract

Nylons are synthetic polymers that contain recurring amide groups in their main polymer chains. Due to their high strength, elasticity, chemical and thermal resistance, nylons have been used for the production of various fibers and plastics. Particularly, nylon-6 (PA6) and nylon-66 (PA66) account for approximately 90% of the total production of synthetic polyamides. PA6 is composed of a single monomeric unit of 6-aminohexaoate (Ahx), whereas two monomeric units, hexamethylenediamine and adipate, are alternatively combined in PA66. PA6 is industrially obtained by the ring cleavage polymerization of -caprolactam. A major route of -caprolactam production involves oxime formation with NH2OH (prepared from NH3 and H2O2) and a Beckmann rearrangement using cyclohexanone as the starting material in the presence of a strong acid, which generates large amounts of salts as by-products. The chemical reaction responsible for adipate production also requires high temperature and pressure, and produces hazardous substances such as nitrous oxide as a by-product. Attempts to develop the bio-based production of adipate and Ahx using synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have been made as an approach for the construction of a sustainable production system. Moreover, environmental considerations suggest that nylon recycling should be mandatory. However, most nylon wastes are currently disposed of by burning or dumping, although the chemical conversion of PA6 to -caprolactam has been reported. Biochemical studies on the relevant enzymes are important to achieve the biotechnological production and recycling of nylons. Arthrobacter sp. KI72 is a bacterium that can grow on an Ahx-oligomer (designated as “nylon oligomer”) as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. The strain harbors three different plasmids (pOAD1, pOAD2 and pOAD3: small circular DNAs that replicate independently from the host’s chromosomal DNA). Previous biochemical studies have revealed that three enzymes NylA, NylB, and NylC encoded on pOAD2 are responsible for the degradation of the Ahx oligomer to monomers. The Ahx-cyclic dimer hydrolase (NylA; EC3.5.2.12), a member of the amidase signature hydrolase family, specifically hydrolyzes one of the two amide bonds in the Ahx-cyclic dimer to generate an Ahx linear dimer. Ahx dimer hydrolase (NylB; EC3.5.1.46), a member of the penicillin-recognizing family of serine-reactive hydrolases, hydrolyzes the Ahx oligomers by an exo-type mechanism. The Ahx oligomer hydrolase (NylC; EC3.5.-.-) degrades the Ahx-cyclic and -linear oligomers with a degree of polymerization greater than three by an endo-type mechanism. The thermostabilized NylC protein variant degrades thin-layered PA6 (thickness: 0.26 m) almost completely at a constant reaction rate. Regarding the metabolism of Ahx, we confirmed that 6-aminohexanoate aminotransferase (NylD) catalyzes the reaction of Ahx to adipate semialdehyde using -ketoglutarate, pyruvate and glyoxylate as amino acceptors, generating glutamate, alanine and glycine, respectively. The reaction requires pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. For further metabolism, adipate semialdehyde dehydrogenase (NylE) catalyzes the oxidative reaction of adipate semialdehyde to adipate using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate(NADP+) as a cofactor. In addition, we established a NylD/NylE coupled system to quantify the aminotransferase activity and to enable the conversion of Ahx to adipate via adipate semialdehyde with a yield of >90%. We demonstrate that 6-aminohexanoate produced from polymeric nylon-6 and nylon oligomers (i.e., a mixture of 6-aminohexaoate oligomers) by nylon hydrolase (NylC) and 6-aminohexanoate dimer hydrolase (NylB) reactions are sequentially converted to adipate by metabolic engineering technology.

Biography

Will update soon

Speaker
Seiji Negoro / University of Hyogo, Japan

Abstract

Introduction: The electrohydraulic effect is based on the method of processing and utilization of oil sludge, high-viscosity and highcooling petroleum in order to find ways to increase the yield of light and medium oil fractions by means of deeper processing of heavy fractions using high-voltage electroimpulse discharges in an aqueous medium without the use of organic solvents1- 3. The fractional composition of the oil of the Zhangurshi deposit was studied using NMR 1H, 13C methods. The fragmental compositions of the studied raw materials were presented by the method of calculating the integrated intensities of the 1Н, 13С NMR signals of the oil of the Zhangurshi deposit. Results: After cleaning the oil sludge from the mechanical impurity, a sample was taken to determine the substances containing in the oil sludge. Samples were also taken after the electrohydraulic action. 92 samples were identified in the sample without treatment, and 119 substances in the sample after electrohydraulic treatment. After electrohydraulic treatment, the content of cyclic hydrocarbons is higher. The composition of the liquid fractions were paraffins, isoparaffins, aromatic hydrocarbons, naphthenes and ether compounds. According to the data of the light fractions analysis spectra treated with electrohydraulic impacts were very different from the analyzes of the obtained light fractions treated without electrohydraulic impacts, both in quantity and composition.

Biography

will update soon

Speaker
N.B.Mansurov / Kazakh-British Technical University, Kazakhistan

Abstract

Abstract: A big portion of today’s oil reserves contain a significant amount of Sulfur. While Sulfur is useful to an extent, it is highly corrosive and toxic. It can be found in various forms with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) being one of them. It is also formed as a product during hydro-desulfurization process, which is often done to sweeten the crude sources using hydrogen. This hydrogen often comes steam-methane reforming which, while being economically viable, produces a lot of carbon dioxide and is not environmentally friendly. With an objective of reducing the hydrogen sulfide content in the crude sources, and also reduce the environmental impact of hydro-desulfurization process, an alternative hydrogen process is proposed involving decomposition of hydrogen sulfide through an iodine based thermo-chemical cycle. The cycle was expected to go through the following scheme - H2S + I2 → 2HI + S in aqueous medium, but experiments resulted in some unexpected stoichiometry with far more HI (hydrogen iodide) being created than anticipated. It is expected that water reacts with sulfur-iodine intermediates to produce hydrogen iodide. We propose an alternate mechanism with several key sulfur and iodine containing species that explain the formation of excess HI. Ab initio quantum chemistry methods are used to explore the geometries, frequencies for each of these species. Solvation and dissociation effects have been studied using quantum calculations and COSMO-RS. The results are consistent with experimental observations. This work also shows the impact of using alternative solvents such as iso-propanol instead of water.

Biography

will update soon

Speaker
Phalgun Lolur / Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract

Abstract: The porosity of rock is the key factor determining storage and transport properties for oil and gas (i.e. the productivity) in the geological formation. Success of hydraulic fracturing operations is depending on the characterization of pre-operation properties and the creation of new migration pathways in the rock. Modeling approaches in petroleum geosciences need suitable quantitative information on the rock pore network. In that respect bulk porosity values alone are not sufficient. Quantification of the pore network requires different complementary methods working in different scales. Key quantities are size, spatial distribution, heterogeneity and connectivity of the pore network. The combination of different analysis methods can be used to infer novel structural information about rock allowing to assess the permeability of the rock matrix. We have developed a versatile method based on the impregnation of the rock pore space by a methylmethacrylate resin labeled with C-14 (C-14-PMMA method) which is giving 2-D images(which can be combined to 3-D images) of the spatial porosity distribution with a resolution of about 20 µm in samples such as drill cores of up to tens of cm length; the C-14-MMA tracer is filling also nanometer pores. The porosity patterns and their possible anisotropy as obtained by film or electronic autoradiography have been used to model transport processes in heterogeneous rocks. We have applied the C-14-PMMA method to study a variety of crystalline and sedimentary rocks (e.g. claystone and sandstone) as well as various technical geomaterials (e.g. cement/concrete). Results have been compared with those obtained by X-ray tomography and complemented by scanning electron microscopic studies. For the determination of bulk porosities and permeabilities rapid gas methods have been developed. We present here the principles of the method and various applications and modeling approaches. Shale porosity and pore evolution have been studied mainly through direct high resolution imaging techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and bulk characterization techniques such as gas adsorption and mercury intrusion methods (Löhr et al, 2015). Porosity mapping of mostly stratified shales by C-14-PMMA autoradiography means direct measurement of local/mineral-specific porosity and characterization of spatial porosity distribution (pattern and orientation), forming a broader basis for understanding and building models of transport. Sample scale comprises drill core size specimens; thereby the C-14-PMMA technique is a highly useful link between the usual traditional methodologies. Due to the great diversity of shale formations and their geological evolution each shale gas reservoir should be considered as a research project by itself. Also in that respect the advantages of the C-14- PMMA technique with its capability to study relatively large samples in fairly great number become obvious.

Biography

Will update soon

Speaker
Marja Siitari Kauppi / University of Helsinki, Finland

Abstract

Abstract: Artificial photosynthesis has been regarded as a promising method to generate fuels in a much greener way by utilizing inexhaustible solar energy. As visible light accounts for ~ 50% of the solar energy hitting the Earth, efficient strategies to harvest visible photons must be applied to bridge the gap between the current unsatisfactory activity and the 10% conversion efficiency and it remains the key to develop advanced semiconductors with satisfyingbandgaps and photoredox capabilities. In the latest decade, organic semiconductors have been identified as promising photocatalysts due to their low-cost and ease modification of electronic structure. Herein, two novel synthetic pathways have been developed to control the O and N linkers/terminals, which highly influences the bandgap and charge separation. As such, the synthesized polymers can be excited from UV via visible to even near-IR wavelengths, resulting in an order of magnitude higher H¬2/O2 evolution rate (HER) than the widely-reported g-C3N4, with high apparent quantum yield (AQY) in water splitting either via Z-scheme or dual co-catalyst strategy. Further, novel polymers have been applied in photocatalytic CO2 conversion with water. The product selectivity is found highly dependent on the functions of cocatalysts, as rationalized by ultrafast spectroscopic results. By tailoring both organic photocatalysts and co-catalysts, a sustainable and efficient solar energy conversion process has been achieved.

Biography

Biography: Yiou Wang obtained his Ph.D. under the supervision of Prof. Junwang Tang at the Department of Chemical Engineering, UCL in 2018, after receiving his B.Sc. in Chemistry from Peking University, China, in 2014. Yiou’s Ph.D. project focuses on the application of low-cost and tunable polymeric semiconductors for solar energy conversion such as overall water splitting and CO2 conversion. Yiou’s interests also include efficient microwave-assisted synthetic techniques and mechanism investigation via time-resolved spectroscopies.

Speaker
Yiou Wang / University College London, United kingdom

Abstract

Abstract: There are many problems associated with the low absorption and transmission of light, crucial for the performance of optical and electro-optical devices. Recently, there has been huge developments in the area of Anti-reflective surfaces (ARS) subjecting to sub-wavelength ARS with a tapered morphology. Which is a more practical method for ultra-broadband and omnidirectional anti-reflection. These tapered morphologies similar to the pattern of a moth eye, and has overcome the drawbacks of coating AR layered films have been used extensively to reduce surface reflection, but typically validated to suppress reflection at specific wavelength, and at specific incidence angles. The reflectance from a selected sub-wavelength or gradient index structures have come down to below 1% in the visible region of the spectrum and efforts are on to achieve broader bands of such enhanced AR regime. Despite the obvious advantage of nano-patterning devices such as solar cells, flat panel displays and LED lighting, the lack of scalability and capital/running cost of fabrication such as lithography are a major technological hurdle for true exploitation. There are also major technical limitations such as the inability to pattern curved surfaces of optical lenses. To circumvent this problem, we have used block copolymer(BCP) technology to increase antireflection spectral range. BCP technology has tried to achieve “broader-bandwidth” ARS, important for efficient functioning of the photonic devices, and broaden the AR spectrum of moth’s eye structure from (UV-Vis) to near infrared (NIR). We also fabricated hybrid BCP systems with appropriate dimension of patterns for nano-patterning non-plannar objects such as optical lenses. Moreover, nanopatterning is a hot topic not just in optics industry, but also in automotive industry for injection moulding of nanopatterned plastic parts and also biomedical devices.

Biography

Biography: Dr Sajjad Husain Mir, has a Master of Science in Industrial Chemistry from Aligarh Muslim University, India and received his PhD degree in 2016 from Yamagata University, Japan under a prestigious MEXT scholarship. His research focused on the development and fabrication of organicinorganic functional hybrid nanomaterials through self-assembly processes. From 2017, He worked on a Kanagawa Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (KISTEC) project as Postdoctoral Fellow in Yokohama City University, Japan. Where he discovered ferroelasticity in molecular single crystals. He worked at Pusan National University, South Korea. Where, his research focussed on electrochemical sensors for diagnosis of cancer. He joined Intelligent Nanosurface Group at Trinity College Dublin(April 2018) on Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions Fellowship. Here, he is working on self-assembly of block copolymers to fabricate intelligent nanosurfaces for superior anti-reflection properties. He is also Indian Academy of Science Fellow. Research Interests: Synthesis of Polymers, Polymer-metal nanomaterials, Self-assembly, Hollow materials, Cry stallography, Molecular crystals, Conductive inks, and Anti-reflective nanosurfaces

Speaker
Sajjad Husain Mir / Trinity College Dublin, Ireland

Abstract

Abstract: Natural gas as one the most significant fossil fuels, is playing a crucial role in national energy mix in different countries. Nevertheless, its applications have not been limited to energy providing, and has been used widely as the feed stock in production of different varieties of petrochemicals. So that most of new petrochemical complexes around the country are designed and constructed based on natural gas feed. Natural gas was produced as one of the byproducts of crude oil and mostly was burned. Gradually along with increasing volumes of extracted natural gas, planning on gathering and using associated gas resulted in more usage of natural gas in different sectors including petrochemical feed and fuel. Following the developments, National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC) was established in 1965 as one of the subsidiaries of the petroleum ministry with initial capital of 25 million Rials. Since its establishment, NIGC has gradually achieved capabilities and managed to have access to various sources and facilities such as experts and efficient human force equipped with scientific and theoretical vision and knowledge, tools, equipment, machinery and various advanced workshops for implementing its operations proportionate with the economic and social development trend of the country, so that it can independently accomplish all the related tasks complying with the valid international acceptable standards. Today, NIGC as one of the 4 mail subsidiaries of petroleum ministry is supplying more than 70 percent of total energy in the country as well as the feed stock for tens of petrochemical and industrial complexed around the country. The company also is operating one of the biggest high pressure gas transmission and distribution networks of the world facilitating export, import, transit and swap of natural gas in the country. In the point of natural gas treatment and supply, the company has the first position in the Middle East and one of major gas companies around the world. At the time being, the number of the NIGC permanent staff is more than19000official staff and more than 19300 total staff.

Biography

CURRICULUM VITAE Hedayat Omidvar Graduated in Industrial Engineering (MSc) in 2002. He has been working since 1992 as Natural Gas consumption expert in Corporate Planning Dept., National Iranian Gas Company (NIGC), responsible for treatment, transmission, storage and distribution of natural gas. At present, he is Head of Communication Affairs with Science & Research Centers, Research & Technology Dept. Member of Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) since 1992 Member of American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) since 1994 Member of Iran Institute of Industrial Engineering (IIIE) since 2001 Member of Programme Committee A (PGC A) “Sustainable Development” of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2003-2006 Member of Marketing and Communication Committee (PGC E) of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2006-2012 Member of Gas Advocacy Task Force (TF2) of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2012-2015 Secretary of Utilization Committee of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2015-2018 Member of Marketing and Communication committee of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2015-2018 Member of Executive Committee of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2015-2018 Chair of Energy Policy Task Force (TF3) of the International Gas Union (IGU) 2018-2021 Member of Group of Experts on Gas of United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) from 2016 Letter of Commendation As the Exemplary Research Expert Received From the Deputy Petroleum Minister & Managing Director of NIGC 2008 Letter of Commendation Received From the Deputy Petroleum Minister & Managing Director of NIGC 2011 Letter of Commendation Received From the Deputy Petroleum Minister & Managing Director of NIGC 2013

Speaker
Hedayat Omidvar / National Iranian Gas company, Iran

Abstract

Abstract: Detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was done by a large number of studies in different methods and techniques among them are passive samplers because of their unique specifications technically and economically. In this study, passive sampler technique was used for monitoring of VOCs from spill crude oils in deep soil. Mathematical equations were achieved for the determination of time spill crude oil which depends on soil moisture content, soil temperature and wind speed. The mathematical equations were driven from monitoring VOCs during three months. The results illustrated that the concentration of n-Pentane was inversely diffused as compared with n-Nonane.

Biography

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Speaker
Yousif Mustafa Salih / University of Sulaiamni, Iraq

Abstract

Abstract: Extreme High-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA) was developed at Fraunhofer ILT in Aachen in close cooperation with RWTH Aachen University to overcome the drawbacks of conventional coating methods such as hard chrome plating, thermal spraying and other cladding methods in an economical way. With EHLA metallurgically bonded layers measured in tenths of a millimeter can thus be flexibly, efficiently and quickly applied to large surfaces. EHLA is an alternative to chromium (VI) coatings, which require an authorization as of September 2017. For the environment friendly alternative, the novel technology was awarded with the Joseph von Fraunhofer Prize in 2017, as well as the Steel Innovation Award and the Berthold Leibinger Innovation Prize in 2018. EHLA-coated parts are already being used in oil and gas applications and intensive research is currently being done in cooperation with the automotive industry. Besides coating applications, EHLA also offers several other innovative and promising possibilities, such as (hybrid-) additive manufacturing of metal components and a combination with HVOF.

Biography

Biography: Jonathan Schaible studied mechanical engineering at Karlsruhe Institute for Technology (KIT). He wrote his MA thesis at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology ICT in Karlsruhe. In 2017 he began his work as research associate in the laser material deposition group at Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen. His work specializes on Extreme High-speed Laser Material Deposition (EHLA) with unconventional material pairings and as a next step, he aims to realize EHLA 3D technology for precise high-speed additive manufacturing of metal parts.

Speaker
Jonathan Schaible / Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology, Germany

Abstract

Abstract: Soil and water contamination by oil and its byproducts is a concern all over the world.Over the years, considerable attentionhas beenpaid to use microbes and their products in degrading petroleum contaminants for bioremediation. The alkane hydroxylase is a major enzyme involved in the microbial degradation of oil. Itcan perform hydrocarbon oxidation allowingmicroorganisms to utilize alkanes as their source of carbon and energy. However, there is little knowledge about the catalytic locations and residues, the substrate binding pocket and the docking sites for redox reactionsof the enzyme. Moreover, metagenomic study of alkane hydroxylase has not been investigated till date. mgDNA was isolated from the crude oil waste disposal site ofNumaligarh Refinery Limited, Assam, India. The enzyme alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) gene was amplified using the enzyme specific primers. The amplicon was ligated into pTZ57R/T TA cloning vector and transformed into E. coli DH5α and the transformed clones were selected using blue-white screening. The successful insertion was confirmed by restriction digestion and nucleotide sequencing. The gene sequence was deposited in the NCBI GenBank database (Acc No KT896535, uncultured bacterium clone AlkB gene). The putativegene fragments from the pTZ57R/T TA cloning vector was gel extracted, eluted, purified, ligated with pET-32a expression vector and transferred into competent E. coli BL21 (DE3).Protein purification was done from E. coli BL21 (DE3) cells harboringthe expression construct grown on MSM with n-hexadecane supplement. The SDS-PAGE observed the expected single band at ~48 kDawhich is consistent with GPC data. The GC finger-print profile provedsuccessful degradation of diesel oil. Further, the nucleotide sequence analysis revealedsimilarity withthe AlkB gene of other P. aeruginosa strains and uncultured bacteria. The BLAST result indicated97% identity with P. aeruginosa strain IOMTU 133, NCGM 1984, B136-33, M37351 and UCBPP-PA14 referring to horizontal transfer of the gene. The 3D structure of the mgAlkB protein was predicted using the I-TASSER server and Modeller 9.15 program. The best stable and reliable model was assessed using ANOLEA, Ram Page Server and Swiss Model server.The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for RMSD backbone and RMSF in 40 ns revealed the predicted 3D structure to be quite stable and reliable.Molecular docking study against n-alkanes, n-alkenes and n-alkynes revealed effective docking of n-alkanes at the active site of the enzyme.The RMSD backbone of 20 ns MD simulations for the protein-ligand binding complex also confirmed the conformational stability. The Density functional theory (DFT) study on frontier molecular orbital energies (EHOMO and ELUMO) optimized at DFT-B3LYP/6-31G basis set explains the most likely site of n-alkanesto undergo a nucleophilic and electrophilic attack.

Biography

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Speaker
B. K. Konwar / Tezpur University, India

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