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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Novel therapeutics are desperately needed to fight cancer in general and more specifically liver cancer. That stems out from the fact that liver cancer has poor prognosis that translates well in being the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. This talk is to bring the audience up to speed on our research using saffron and its active biomolecules to prevent and most recently treat liver cancer using in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches. Although saffron is a quite expensive spice, I hope after this brief introduction of its health promoting benefits you would always make the effort to have it in your kitchen.

Biography

Amr Amin has completed his PhD at University of Illinois at Chicago, and received a post-doctoral training in the field of molecular genetics at University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He started his academic career at UAE University where he serves now as a Full Professor of Cell & Molecular Biology. Amr’s research focuses on ways to control cancer, particularly liver cancer. He published many research articles, reviews, and serves as ad hoc reviewer and as an editorial member of many specialized peer-reviewed journals. He is also a member of many specialized societies and the sole recipient of many national and international scientific awards; Khalifa Award for Research being the most recent.

Speaker
Amr Amin / UAE University, UAE

Abstract

The skin is an extraordinary barrier. It does not only physically encapsulate the living body to act as a multifunctional interface between us and external environment, but it is also always engaged in assembly of the highly efficient formidable barrier that prevents the outward loss of body fluids and their contents. The physico-/bio-chemical natures of the skin substantially limit the number of molecules that are believed to be real candidates for transdermal delivery (TDD). Overcoming of such barrier function for the aim of TDD represents a major challenging task. Generally, TDD is neither suited to all drugs nor justified for all therapies. Moreover, there is some sort of restrictions in the TDD technologies. Recently, pharmaceutical scientists have concentrated on the development of non-passive systems to facilitate the delivery of macromolecules, such as peptides and nucleotides. TDD that remained limited to the application of creams, gels or patches for long period of time is now-a-day being revolutionized after introducing various advanced TDD techniques. These techniques include; the use of microneedles array, ultrasound, radio waves and metered dose sprays, powderJet and others. Further, the cumulative legacy of knowledge about drug-vehicle interplays (i.e., drug/prodrug-, vehicle-, formulation- and formulation-related factors have significantly affected the TDD revolution. Moreover, modifications of the stratum corneum (SC) by hydration, chemical enhancers, or SC bypassed or removed via microneedles, follicular delivery as well as electrically assisted methods (i.e., ultrasound, iontophoresis, electroporation, magnetophoresis, and photomechanical waves) have potentially increased the amount of drug that transports the skin barrier. Interestingly, careful combinations between two (or more) chemical enhancers could further substantiate the drug delivery through the biomembrane such as polymeric in nature penetration enhancers that act as gelating agents, matrices in patches, wound dressings and anti-nucleants. The objectives of this workshop are; i) to highlight the barrier function of the skin and how to overcome it, ii) to explore the criteria that merit consideration of TDD, iii) to review the issues confronting TDD therapeutic candidate, iv) to investigate the nature and extent of the possibility of interplay between the physico/biochemical properties of the skin, drug, vehicle and the currently available technologies iv) to explore the future prospective in TDD.

Biography

Dr. Mohsen Afouna working as a Professor and Chariman in Al-Azhar University, Egypt.Highly motivated scientist (teacher, researcher) with expertise in development of oral, topical, transdermal and sterile (ocular & parenteral) drug delivery systems. In addition to extensive experienced in development, physico- (chemical/-mechanical) and in vivo characterization of noano-pharmaceutical drug delivery systems. Outstanding teaching & research experience in pharmaceutical sciences, development and management of scientific research projects combined with fluency in English and Arabic. High experience regarding chirality, physical & clinical pharmacy, biopharmaceutics & pharmacokinetics. Excellent written and oral communication skills with supervisory and teaching experience. Author of several recent articles, review articles and chapter in textbooks. Driven pharmaceutical scientist, love to work in a dynamic teaching, research and development environment.

Speaker
Mohsen I. Afouna / Al-Azhar University
Egypt

Abstract

Local anesthetics (LA) reversely block the propagation of nerve stimuli by binding to the voltage-gated sodium channel of membranes. An interesting approach to prolong the effect without increasing LA toxicity is given by drug-delivery systems. Here we will show results obtained with different kinds of (conventional, ionic-gradient, hybrid) liposomes, and other nanostructured lipid–based carriers (solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, lipid nanocapsules), employed to deliver LA. First, factorial design was used to obtain optimized formulations. Data on the structural organization of the nanoparticles and LA-lipid interaction were obtained by different techniques (Electron/Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Dynamic Light Scattering, Nanotracking Analysis). The formulations were then tested for their drug upload, shelf stability, cyto/tissue toxicity and antinociceptive effect. This approach resulted in prolonged and less toxic LA formulations for application in buccal, topical and infiltrative anesthesia.

Biography

E. de Paula has completed her MSc at University of Campinas (Unicamp) and PhD from University of São Paulo (USP) Brazil, and postdoctoral studies from University of Parma/Italy. Full professor of Biochemistry at Institute of Biology, University of Campinas (Campinas), SP, Brazil. She has published more than 140 papers (ISIS WOScience, H index = 25) in reputed journals. She has supervisioned research projects of undergraduate students (52), master (22), Ph.D (12) and post-doc (12) in the Biochemistry, Biophysics and Pharmacy .

Speaker
Eneida de Paula / University of Campinas
Brazil

Keynote Talks

Abstract

A new systems approach to diseased states and wellness result in a new branch in the healthcare services, namely, personalized& precision medicine (PPM). To achieve the implementation of PPM concept, it is necessary to create a fundamentally new strategy based upon the subclinical and predictiverecognition of biopredictors of hidden abnormalities long before the disease clinically manifests itself. Each decision-maker values the impact of their decision to use PPM on their own budget and well-being, which may not necessarily be optimal for society as a whole. It would be extremely useful to integrate data harvesting from different databanks for applications such as prediction and personalization of further treatment to thus provide more tailored measures for the patients resulting in improved patient outcomes, reduced adverse events, and more cost effective use of health care resources. A lack of medical guidelines has been identified by the majority of responders as the predominant barrier for adoption, indicating a need for the development of best practices and guidelines to support the implementation of PPM! PPM as being the Grand Challenge to forecast, to predict and to prevent is rooted in a big and a new science generated by the achievements of systems biology and translational Medicine (TM). NIH,Bethesda, MD, USA whilst being a strategic center of International Medical Research and Practice has included PPMT into a List of The Greatest Priorities in XXI Century. Who is expected to be responsible for getting PPM Model armed? TM and its applications! to be focused on “bench to bedside and back” research!!! Implementation of PPM requires a lot before the current model “physician-patient” could be gradually displaced by a new model “medical advisor-healthy person-at-risk”. This is the reason for developing global scientific, clinical, social, and educational projects in the area of PPM to elicit the content of the new branch.

Biography

Sergey Suchkov graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and awarded with MD, then in 1985 maintained his PhD at the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and in 2001, maintained his Doctorship Degree at the Nat Inst of Immunology, Russia. From 1987 through 1989, he was a senior Researcher, Kolt-zov Inst of Developmental Biology. From 1989 through 1995, he was a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology, Helmholtz Eye Research Institute in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004, a Chair of the Dept for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute (MONIKI.DrSuchkov has been trained at: NIH; Wills Eye Hospital, PA, USA; Univ of Florida in Gainesville; UCSF, S-F, CA, USA; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. He was an Exe Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. At present, Dr Sergey Suchkov is a Chair, Dept for Personalized and Translational Medicine, I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. He is a member of the: New York Academy of Sciences, USA; American Chemical Society (ACS), USA; American Heart Association (AHA), USA; EPMA (European Association for Pre-dictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine), Brussels, EU; ARVO (American Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology); ISER (International Society for Eye Research); PMC (Personalized Medicine Coalition), Washington, USA.

Speaker
Sergey Suchkov / I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University
Russia

Abstract

Liposomes as nanoparticulate drug delivery systems can be used to effectively deliver gene to the diseased cells. Cationic lipids are the most suitable as non-viral vectors to transfect (negatively charged) cells. Liposomes using cationic lipids, cholesterol in different rations were produced using thin film hydration and microfluidic methods. Then, lipoplexes were formulated by adding plasmid DNA to the prepared liposomes and characterised for their effectiveness to cell transfection. Characterisation techniques include size determination, zeta potential measurement, gel electrophoresis, gene encapsulation efficiency and cell transfection using two different cell lines. Results show the difference in size for liposomes prepared by microfluidic, produced smaller sizes, and thin film hydration methods. Liposomes’Zeta potential data exhibited that formulations were mostly positively charged. Gel electrophoresis confirmed protection of the gene inside the liposomes. The prepared liposomes successfully transfect COS7 and SH-SY5Y cell lines.

Biography

Amal Ali Elkordy is a Reader in Pharmaceutics; Amal earned her PhD from Bradford University, UK. She currently supervises PhD students and also supervised PhD students till successful completion. She is a reviewer for many reputable scientific journals. Her current research interests include the use of polymers and surfactants as drug delivery systems to enhance the performance of the large and small drug candidates. Dr.Elkordyhas over 100 publications including peer review articles, book chapters and conference proceedings. She has been the recipient of many awards from different conferences and symposia.

Speaker
Amal Ali Elkordy / University of Sunderland
UK

Abstract

A low viscosity fluoride containing liquid was investigated, that would undergo a sol-gel transition at physiological temperatures.Hypromellose(HPMC) is non-toxic, relatively inexpensive, has a range of viscosities and substitution types, and demonstrates thermal sol-gel transitions. As a result, HPMChas been used widely in pharmaceutical applications. The thermal gelation temperature (TGel) of HPMC solutions can depend on its substitution type, concentration, and the use gelling aid additives. The TGel depends on the nature and concentration of the gelling aid for a given HPMC solution: sodium chloride (NaCl) reduces the TGel (a gelling aid),converselysodium iodide (NaI) increases TGel. In these studies, we have investigated the use of the strong electrolyte sodium fluoride (NaF) compared to NaClwith HPMC 2910.The sol-gel transition was investigated in terms of viscosity, storage modulus, and the loss modulus of HPMC/electrolyte binary solutions.Results indicated that both NaCl and NaF reduced the gelation temperature of HPMC linearly,in a concentration dependent fashion. However, the effect of NaFwas significantly greater (approx.. 3.6x) in reducing the gelation temperature compared to NaCl. The results corresponded with the higher electronegativity of the fluoride ion compared to the chloride ion. WhenNaFwas included as the gelling aid at 1.6% w/v with 2% w/v HPMC 2910, itwas able to reduce the gelation temperature of HPMC from 60 ˚C to 37 ˚C, in a linear fashion. In conclusion, the sol-gel transition of hypromellose can be greatly influenced by the use of highly electronegative ions; this may be exploited for a variety of manufacturing and drug delivery opportunities.

Biography

McConville earned his Ph.D. at the University of Strathclyde, Scotland in 2002 in the area of chronopharmaceutics. He moved to Austin, TX in 2002 as a post-doctoral fellow before being appointed to Assistant Professor. He joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico in June 2012 as an Associate Professor. His research interests include: nanotechnology, pulmonary targeting, and chronopharmaceutics. Dr. McConville is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Pharmaceutical Technology at the University of Bonn. Germany and has published more than 40 papers in the field of pharmaceutics.

Speaker
Jason McConville / University of New Mexico
USA

Abstract

Medical Devices (MDs) are nowadays more and more important in the healthcare industry and the related processes for worldwide regulation and certification are a topic of great interest. In particular, the need for regulation harmonization between the European Countries (new EU Regulation 745/2017) and worldwide, is very important both for Regulatory Authorities and for the industry world. A typical process for an MD development and industrialization phase is covered, providing some case studies and taking into consideration all steps from design up to start-up of the production phase and process validation. All these activities are necessary for the product certification process. The aspects related to the Quality System, Production, Validation and Quality Control are emphasized, proposing an integrated approach, which combines the GMP and ISO requirements (e.g., ISO 13485 and ISO 14971), following a Quality Risk Management (ICH Q9) and, where applicable, an integrated Pharmaceutical Quality System (ICH Q10) structure.

Biography

Dr. Fabio Geremia, graduated in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Qualified Person;he has worked in italian and multinational pharmaceutical companies, in Quality and Production field. 11 years ago he joined CTP System group, the biggest italian company of pharmaceuticals, healthcare and life science consultancy, now part of the multinational group Akka Technologies, where he is a senior consultant and a Qualified Person auditor and the responsible for Process & Quality Business Area, Northern Italy. Since many years he collaborates with the italian association AFI for medical devices and borderline products, for the preparation of publications and presentations.

Speaker
Fabio Geremia / CTP System
Akka Life Sciences
Italy

Abstract

Controlling the interaction of drug delivery systems (DDS) with biological tissues is critical for the success of therapies. Specifically in cancer, due to the high density of the tumors, tissue penetration of DDS is critical and may be challenging. We show that polymer nanoparticles can be used efficiently to deliver small molecule drugs into cancer cells and tissues. Our recent work show the effect of mechanical cues of drug vehicle on their interactions with tumor cells and tissue-like 3D structures ex-vivo. Using polymer micelles we compared flexible "Wet Polymer Micelles" (WPM) to semi-solid "Solidified Polymer Micelles" (SPMs) for their physiochemical properties and their interactions with cancer cells. The composition of the polymer micelles, both flexible and rigid remained the same while the only difference was their mechanical properties. For that we have performed detailed characterization of SPM compared to WPM, including examinations of particle size, stability, drug release kinetics and cell transcytosis, in melanoma cells. Cell uptake measurements show enhanced abilities of SPMs to penetrate cells and tissues. A simple physical model is presented that well agrees with the experiments and provides insight about the role of particle rigidity in the engulfment mechanism. We conclude that particle rigidity can enhances cellular uptake and tissue penetration and that mechanical properties of DDS be used as a selective principle for drug uptake. We also introduced SPMs as a promising and effective, highly permeable DDS. Our findings can be important in future rational design of DDS for particle adjustment to specific tissues and pathology, and for personalized Nanomedicine.

Biography

Dr. Benny received her Ph.D in Biotechnology Engineering from the Technion in Israel, and joined as a postdoctoral fellow the lab of the late Dr. Judah Folkman, in Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School. Currently Dr. Ofra Benny heads the research laboratory at the Institute for Drug Research, School of Pharmacy, and Faculty of Medicine in the Hebrew University in Israel. Her laboratory focuses on cancer research and drug development based on synthetic and natural compounds. Dr. Benny was awarded with the ERC-starting grant and holds many other grants and awards including the Marie Curie CIG and M-Era-Net.

Speaker
Ofra Benny / The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Israel
Sessions:

Abstract

Catalytic Abs (catAbs) are multivalent immunoglobulins (Igs) with a capacity to hydrolyze the antigenic (Ag) substrate. In this sense, pro-teolytic Abs (Ab-proteases) represent Abs to provide proteolytic effects. Abs against myelin basic protein/MBP with proteolytic activity exhibiting sequence-specific cleavage of MBP are of great value to monitor demyelination whilst in MS.The activity of Ab-proteases was first registered at the subclinical stages 1-2 years prior to the clinical ill-ness.And the activity of the Ab-proteases revealed significant correlation with scales of demyelination and the disability of the patients as well. So, the activity of Ab-proteases and its dynamics tested would confirm a high subclinical and predictive (translational) value of the tools as applicable for personalized monitoring protocols. Similar results have been gained by our team in autoimmune myocarditis and thyroid autoimmunity conditions to get a presence of thyroid and cardiac autoAgs-associated proteolytic activityocurred. Of tremendous value are Ab-proteases directly affecting remodeling of tissues with multilevel architectonics (for instance, myelin, cardiac and thyroid tissues). By changing sequence specificity one may reach reduction of a density of the negative proteolytic effects within the myelin sheath and thus minimizing scales of demyelination. Ab-proteases can be programmed and re-programmed to suit the needs of the body metabolism or could be designed for the development of new catalysts with no natural counterparts. Further studies are needed tosecure artificial or edited Ab-proteases as translational tools of the newest generation to diagnose, to monitor, to control and to treat and rehabilitate MS patients at clinical stages and to prevent the disorder at subclinical stages in persons-at-risks to secure the efficacy of regenerative manipulations.

Biography

Sergey Suchkov graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and awarded with MD, then in 1985 maintained his PhD at the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and in 2001, maintained his Doctorship Degree at the Nat Inst of Immunology, Russia. From 1987 through 1989, he was a senior Researcher, Kolt-zov Inst of Developmental Biology. From 1989 through 1995, he was a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology, Helmholtz Eye Research Institute in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004, a Chair of the Dept for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute (MONIKI.DrSuchkov has been trained at: NIH; Wills Eye Hospital, PA, USA; Univ of Florida in Gainesville; UCSF, S-F, CA, USA; Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA. He was an Exe Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. At present, Dr Sergey Suchkov is a Chair, Dept for Personalized and Translational Medicine, I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. He is a member of the: New York Academy of Sciences, USA; American Chemical Society (ACS), USA; American Heart Association (AHA), USA; EPMA (European Association for Pre-dictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine), Brussels, EU; ARVO (American Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology); ISER (International Society for Eye Research); PMC (Personalized Medicine Coalition), Washington, USA.

Speaker
Sergey Suchkov / I.M.Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University
Russia

Abstract

The global pharmaceutical industry is worth $300 billion dollars per annum and nearly a third is spent on drug delivery. It is estimated it could be worth nearly $1.6 trillion by 2020. Medicated chewing gum is a new developing drug delivery method, with a promising future. Its potential has not yet been fully exploited because current in-vitro apparatus/chewing machines cannot simulate the human chewing action and forces accurately to influence drug release rate because of the complexities involved in mastication. Also, most of these devices do not have the ability to combine mastication, saliva and chewing gum similar to human and subsequently measure the release of compounds from chewing gums. The aim of this study is to validate the use of the newly developed humanoid chewing simulator to extract xylitol from commercially available chewing gum in-vivo using human participants* and in-vitro by quantifying its release over time.

Biography

Kazem Alemzadeh has completed his PhD from the University of Bradford, United Kingdom. He is a senior lecturer in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Bristol and he is being part of the Clinical Trails Unit at the Bristol School of Oral and Dental Sciences. He has carried a wide research and has numerous scientific publications and has been serving as an editorial board member.

Speaker
Kazem Alemzadeh / University of Bristol
UK

Abstract

In recent years, with the improvement of cancer survival through more effective treatment, the emphasis has been in trying to minimize the side effects caused by chemo- and radiotherapy, to ensure that patients have the best quality of life throughout their cancer journey. The tumour suppressor p53 is widely implicated in a broad range of cancers. Indeed, p53 is either mutated or inactivated in the majority of cancers. Abundant evidence indicates that toxicity caused by DNA-damaging anticancer therapies in normal tissues is also mainly mediated by p53. p53 accumulates in the cells shortly after anticancer challenges and acts as a nuclear transcription factor that modulates the expression of numerous p53-responsive genes (e.g. p21Waf1, 14-3-3-σ, Mdm2, cyclin G, Bax). This initiates a cascade of events leading to massive programmed cell death in specific normal tissues during the systemic genotoxic stress associated with chemo- and radiotherapies. This makes p53 a target for therapeutic suppression: an approach to reduce side effects associated with treatment of p53-deficient cancers. Here I summarise the role of p53 and the possibilities of its manipulation to improve side effects during active treatment through survivorship.

Biography

After her MD from Medical school of University Kunming, China and her PhD thesis on inner ear cell degeneration and therapies from University of Montpellier, France. Jing Wang is the team leader of “Sensory loss and rescue” group at the Institute of Neurosciences of Montpellier, Montpellier, France. ). During her career, Jing Wang has more than 42 research publications and supervised 7 PhD students and 3 Postdoctoral researchers, 9 book chapters and more than 150 communications or posters. She is member of the Editorial Boards of international journals. In addition to basic research, she took out 3 patents for tinnitus and deafness treatments and promoted translational research.

Speaker
Jing Wang / Institute of Neurosciences of Montpellier
France

Abstract

Unprecedented growth in popularity of complementary medicines raised concerns about their quality and safety. So, there is need to develop methods for their sensitive, specific and accurate analysis. Authenticity and similarity of medicinal nutrients and strict procedures of material handling are significant features to maintain the quality of herbal preparations. Genome based methods to authenticate these plants revolutionized the authentication process. Developing DNA molecular markers by sequencing a standard zone of the DNA is the best technique to identify the adulterants as well as to authenticate the required species of medicinal plants. Application of molecular biological technique serves as one of the very consistent system for authentication of natural herbal materials. The progress of authentic analytical methods is a major challenge to scientists as natural products are optimized as drug like molecules. This research work is based on the application of PCR technique for authentication of Glycyrrhiza glabra L. in its crude form as well as in final dosage form, i.e., Hamdard’s Joshanda, Marhaba’s Joshanda, GNC herbal supplement and Joshaba Sadar (Chest tea) available in market, provided isolated DNA from dried roots of the sample was used as templates in PCR. All the products gave the desired results except one. It proved to be a complementary tool to control quality of herbal materials alone and in different marketable herbal product having Glycyrrhiza spp. as their active ingredient.

Biography

Juwairiya Butt corresponding author of this paper has completed her MPhill degree in Pharmacy (Pharmacognosy) from Punjab University College of Pharmacy, Lahore , Pakistan. Now will take admission in Phd this year in computational phytochemistry in Liverpool John Moores University, UK. Currently working as an assisstant professor in Faculty of Pharmacy, The University of Lahore, Lahore, Pakistan. She is having seven publications in well reputed journals. She always work on new ideas like , Translational Research rolls, Drug –Poison enigma, Molecular techniques applications on alternative medicine.

Speaker
Juwairiya Zulfiqar Butt / University of Lahore
Pakistan

Abstract

68Ga radiopharmaceuticals are gaining more attention thanks to the decay characteristics of 68Ga and to the recent spreading of reliable, hospital suited 68Ge/68Ga generators. The use of 68Ga could provide the greater spatial resolution and patient convenience of PET tomography over several SPECT clinical practices. Among those, 68Ga labelling of autologous white blood cells (WBC) was investigated as alternative to 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT labelling. A kit –type approach was considered for the formulation of 68Ga-PET Nanoparticles (NP), as the use of pH sensitive NP could take advantage of the endocytosis trafficking, instead of the passive partitioning of conventional chelating agents. Two types of operator friendly formulations were compared, with the intention of radiolabelling within a short time (10min), under mild conditions (physiological pH, room temperature) and in agreement with the actual clinically applied guidelines. Pharmaceutical grade carboxymethylcellulose-based NP were labelled by directly using the acid elution medium of 68Ge/68Ga generator. 68Ga labelling was performed in absence of chelator, either by applying 68Ga3+ as ionotropic gelation agent for in-situ forming NP, or through re-hydration of a proper freeze-dried injectable NP powder. NP with 250nm average diameter were obtained, with 80% labelling efficacy. The NP dispersant medium, including also crioprotective agents, was formulated to optimize the Zeta potential value (-18mV), minimize the NP interaction with serum proteins and guarantee a physiological environment for WBC during NP incubation. Time-dependent WBC radiolabelling was correlated to NP uptake by using both confocal and ATR FT-IR microscopies. The ready to use lyophilized NP formulation approach appears promising as straightforward 68Ga-WBC labelling tool for PET imaging applications.

Biography

Anna Maria Piras has completed her PhD from University of Pisa, Italy and has worked in the field of polymer-based nanomedicine since 2002. She is presently assistant professor at the University of Pisa, Italy, in the field of pharmaceutical technology. She is coauthor of 40 papers in peer reviewed journals, 8 national patents, 5 book chapters and more tha 80 contributions to national and international conferences.

Speaker
Anna Maria Piras / University of Pisa
Italy

Abstract

Carbazoles are aromatic heterocyclic compounds derived from the fusion of a benzene ring with an indole nucleus in position 2,3 General structure of carbazoles: Today, many carbazole derivatives are widely used as antioxidants,anti-fungal, photoconductor, antimalarials, anti-bacterial, anti-tuberculosis, anti-HIV agents and for the treatment of obesity. Some of them, differently substituted, have been synthetized and their biological activity have been evaluated.1 The purpose of this work is the study of the biological activity of a new series of carbazoles in which the carbazole nitrogen has been functionalized with alkyl-thiol chains. General chemical structures of the synthetized carbazole derivatives: These derivatives have been used as binders for gold nanoparticles synthesized in an organic solvent. The bond between the ligand and the nanoparticle exploits the known affinity of S atoms to the Au, with the formation of dynamic covalent bonds. In this way, the formation of self-assembled monolayers of these ligands is obtained on the spherical surface of gold nanoparticles, with a stabilizing effect against aggregation. These systems might present a double innovative function, matching an antitumoral activity typical of carbazoles, with the photothermal effects of gold nanoparticles.

Biography

Carmela Saturnino, professor in Medicinal Chemistry University of Basilicata. 1989 University L. Pasteur in Strasbourg (F) (.DEA - Pharmacologie et Pharmacochimie, option = Pharmacochimie. Supervisors prof.C.G.Wermuth and J.J.Bourguignon. 1991-1993: Fellow of the pharmaceutical industry -Servier in Paris and later the University of Caen (F).

Speaker
Carmela Saturnino / University of Basilicata
Italy

Abstract

One of the main struggles faced when developing a clinical study protocol is the choice of endpoints best suited to evaluate a study hypothesis. Ideally, the chosen endpoint would be clinically relevant, objective, sensitive and easily quantifiable. Execution of the clinical trials also leave place to improvements and optimization. Existant technology can be employed in inovative ways (out of the box thinking) in order to improve clinical trials endpoints assessment. Some examples of innovative use of known techniques are: doppler detection of veins in order to avoid the accidental injection of an i.m. depot product in a vein, emplyment of an electric stabdardised pill crusher for the testing of the bioavailability of tablets as crushed tablets, endoscopic monitoring of the nasal mucosa during prolonged treatment with intra-nasal gels or sprays, and most important, the adhesion performance monitoring for transdermal systemts by thermography. The technology used for adhesion data acquisition is called Medical Infrared Thermography (MIT), a non-invasive, non-radiating imaging technique for surface temperature mapping. The use of this technology in an adhesion performance study was based on the rationale that the surface of a transdermal patch reaches a temperature in equilibrium with that of the body area where it is applied and whenever a discontinuity exists, the temperature of the patches decrease. The thermograms were acquired in standardized conditions This novel approach for automated and unbiased analysis of adhesion performance was shown to be highly reliable and reproducible, attributes that recommend it for future use as primary adhesion assessment tool.

Biography

Luigi Silvestro graduated in Medicine in Turin (Italy) in 1984 and specialized in Pharmacology in 1988. From 1989 he is applying HPLC-MS in quantitation of bioanalytical samples as well as identification of drug metabolites. In 1996, he co-founded 3S-Pharmacological Consultation & Research GmbH, a consultation company and CRO, in Germany and is still actively involved in the development of innovative analytical methods. From 1998 the company has expanded the activity in East Europe (Romania, Moldavia) creating an analytical laboratory in Romania (Bucharest). In his scientific activity he has contributed to more than 50 articles in international scientific journals.

Speaker
Luigi Silvestro / 3S Pharmacological Consultation & Research GmbH
Germany

Abstract

Talipariti elatum is native to the islands of Cuba, Jamaica, US Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico and Martinica. In wetter areas it will grow in a wide range of elevations, up to 1200 meters (3900 Ft.) and is often used in reforestation. It is the national tree of Jamaica. Talipariti elatum tree is quite attractive with its straight trunk, broad green leaves and hibiscus-like flowers. The attractive flower changes color as it matures, going from bright yellow to orange, red and finally to crimson. It grows quite rapidly, often attaining 20 meters (66 Ft.) or more in height. The name mahoe is derived from a Caribe word. The “blue” refers to blue-green streaks in the polished wood, giving it a distinctive appearance. Whereas the pattern of flavonoids and polyphenol derivatives in T. elatumhas been studied in detail and showed qualitative conformity among these species, only very few data on flavonoids in T. elatum are available. Until now, only gossypitrin (gossypetin-7-O-β-D-glucoside) has been reported. In 2016, both Martinican and Cuban team researchers isolated and identified another chemical component in the ethanolic extracts of the petals of the flowers from this spice. The metabolite was reported for the first time in this medicinal plant, although it was reported in others spices that belongs to Hibiscus gender. The molecule is an isomeric form of gossypitrin, named gossypetin-3’-O-glucoside with the same UV, IR and MS spectrums but with different NMR spectral data and different retention times after HPLC and UHPLC analysis.

Biography

Dr. José González Yaque has completed his PhD from Institute of Pharmacy and Foods at Havana University, Cuba in 2017. He is teaching Pharmacognosy and Chemistry of Natural Products. He has published more than 60 papers in reputed journals. He has received the two most important prizes in 2017: Cuban Academy of Sciences Award and Best PhD. Thesis in the field of Natural Sciences. He has participated in more than 50 Academic and Scientific Events. In 2015 he went to Martinica as researcher to complete the investigation related with the development of a phytomedication from the flowers of T. elatum.

Speaker
José González Yaque / Havana University
Cuba

Abstract

Hyperfibrinolysis contributes to massive post-traumatic bleeding in most patients but its management remains a major challenge. Under physiological conditions there is a sensitive balance between clot formation and fibrinolysis. Following trauma, tPA is rapidly released from endothelial granules causing excessive activation of fibrinolysis, premature lysis of blood clots and consumption of coagulation factors, all of which contribute to life threatening bleeding. Patients are treated with red blood cells, platelets andplasma to replace coagulation factors lost during massive bleeding and consumed by excessive plasminogen activation. Yet, many patients in whom vascular injury has been repaired, continue to bleed even after having had replacement of several fold their blood volume. Although lysine analogues such astranxamic acid (TXA) that inhibit fibrinolysis by inhibiting the binding of plasminogen to fibrin have been used in other bleeding setting for over 50 years, their use in massive trauma has been understudied. In CRASH II study, mortality from bleeding was increased in patients who received TXA more than 3 hours after injury( ). In a recent study, giving TXA to patients with intracranial bleeding, hemorrhage decreased hemorrhage size, but with no clinically significant effect on long-term neurological outcome. We recently reported that one reason behind the seemingly deleterious side effects of TXA on bleeding is its capacity to activate urokinase-mediated fibrinolysis in addition to its well-described neurotoxicity. Therefore, we developed a new approach to target and neutralize plasminogen without administering TXA to patients. Our approach uses TXA to clear plasminogen from the plasma using a plasmapheresis system in which plasma is passed over columns containing immobilized TXA. Plasminogen binds to immobilized TXA and the plasminogen-free plasma, which is not subject to plasminogen activation,can be returned back to the patient. Our in vivo data in pigs in liver transection model show that plasminogen depletion decreases bleeding by more than 90% without evidence of thromboembolism or other over side effects. We believe that our approach to target plasminogen will prove to be an effective and safe methods to treat massive bleeding and bleeding in other settings where fibrinolysis is active.

Biography

Will be updated soon...

Speaker
Abd Al-Roof Higazi / Hadassah-Hebrew University
Israel

Abstract

A long overdue revolution is in progress for drug design. The classical approach is inadequate and most of our current drugs have toxicities, especially for prolonged use for degenerative diseases. Peptides and proteins are particularly adapted for these applications and the peptide backbone is the non-toxic scaffold for drug design. Design of novel peptides with novel biological activity profiles requires the application of state of the art computer assisted drug design, asymmetric synthesis of novel constrained amino acids, design of novel cyclic scaffolds, design in topographical space, and often design of multiple pharmacophores in a single molecule. We will illustrate this approach with the design of multivalent ligands for the treatment of pain without the toxic side effects of current drugs for pain or development of addiction or tolerance. As time permits, receptor selective design of ligands for the melanocortin systems will also be discussed. Supported in part by grants from the U.S. Public Health Service, National Institutes of Health and Tech Launch Arizona

Biography

Victor J. Hruby received his Ph.D. from Cornell University and did Postdoctoral studies with Noble Laureate Vincent du Vigneaud. He currently is Regents Professor at the University of Arizona, with major research interests in peptide hormones and neurotransmitters and their GPCR receptors, and their relationships to health and disease. He has over 1300 publications, chapters and reviews and over 25 patents. He has received numerous awards for his research, has been an editor and associate editor and on the editorial boards of several journals. He has served on several NIH Study Sections and been a consultant for many drug companies.

Speaker
Victor J. Hruby / University of Arizona
USA

Abstract

Seeking effective treatments of melanoma is very hot in current era of science and technology. However, prevention of melanoma has been neglected. Here, we propose developing selective hMC1R selective ligands for the melanoma prevention agents. We have been very successful in developing selective hMC1R ligands. Lately we first successfully developed only natural amino acid made peptide, [Leu3, Leu7, Phe8]-γ-MSH-NH2, which is a potent selective hMC1R agonist; and many other hMC1R selective agonists which are more druggable and bioavailable. In vivo studies demonstrated these peptides can cause immediately pigmentation. The natural skin color can be resumed less than 20 hours. The high selectivity of the [Leu3, Leu7, Phe8]-γ-MSH-NH2 for the hMC1R and shorter half-life provides a safer and reduced side-effect agent for the prevention of melanoma skin cancer. This research will be more applicable and benefit for most of people for skin cancer prevention.

Biography

Dr. Minying Cai is currently a research professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at the University of Arizona. She has been working with Prof. Hruby for 13 years in the area of novel drug discovery for obesity, diabetes, cancer and pain. She is working on projects at the interface of chemical biology, molecular pharmacology and molecular biology within the areas of 1. Structure based drug design and synthesis of GPCR ligands, including developing selective human melanocortin receptors (hMCRs) ligands; 2. Developing novel biophysics tools for molecular imaging; novel molecular biomarker; high-throughput screening system, etc. 3. Exploiting novel scaffold via computational chemistry for small molecule therapeutics for energy balance and cancer study; 4. Exploring the novel physiological functions of melanocortin system involved. In collaboration with other investigators worldwide, we aim to identify and develop molecule modulators of GPCRs for the therapeutic treatment of metabolic and CNS disorders.

Speaker
Minying Cai / University of Arizona
USA

Abstract

Gemcitabine is one of the nucleoside analogues that acts against a wide range of solid tumors. Gemcitabine possesses a rapid body clearance and metabolism by the plasmatic enzyme cytidine-deaminase that limits its efficacy. Thus, frequent administration schedule at high drug doses is required leading to significant side effects. Viral nanoparticles are one of the biggest groups of natural nanoparticles applied in drug delivery and imaging. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a plant virus with rod shape structure that is 300 nm in length and 18 nm in diameter. In this study, chemical conjugation of gemcitabine and this virus has been investigated through the creation of amide bond and the percentage of conjugation was calculated using UV spectroscopy. The drug release from conjugate was pH-dependent and, at acidic pH, the drug release was almost complete. The percentage of hemolysis caused by the virus and the conjugate was also proved to be very small compared with positive control. The results of cytotoxic studies at 24 and 48 hours showed that there was no significant difference between the free drug and drug conjugate in HepG2 and MCF7 cell lines, but the results of the toxicity study were better on HepG2 cell line. In both cell lines, the observed cytotoxicity of the conjugate was higher after 48 hours which is due to enough time for drug release. It can be concluded that these viral nanoparticles are expected to make better in vivo drug delivery, pharmacokinetics improvement and reduced dose related toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents.

Biography

Dr Fatemeh Ahmadi, Pharm D, PhD in Pharmaceutics, is an academic staff at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. She has received her PhD degree from Isfahan University of Medical Sciences in 2010. As a part of her PhD Thesis, she has worked on budesonide-dextran conjugates as prodrugs for colon specific drug delivery. She is experienced on anticancer drug delivery systems such as polymeric nanoparticles and drug-polymer conjugates and has published 30 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Fatemeh Ahmadi / Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
Iran

Abstract

The community pharmacists (CPs) are potentially to be the first spot that the patients seek advice particularly the medication use. Also, the patients are approaching the CPs to have a counselling session about the benefits of consuming a specific vitamin or supplement. The scenario puts in a picture the need among the CPs to determine their patient’s drug-related need. For that reason, it is essential that the CPs assess the patient-related information, make an appropriate triage action plan, and establish a follow-up session to review the outcome of the plan. The course of action ensures the CPs are having the chance to identify the drug-related problems as well as document the efficacies of the therapy plan particularly the method of administering a pharmaceutical compound to achieve a specific therapeutic effect. However, the action acquires a structured and systematic approach to help out the CPs to perform the roles. The tool should have the feasibility to implement in the actual practice regardless the social and geographic background. Foremost, its’ contents should have the competent to measure the exact elements in the practice. For that reason, the tool is known as ‘STARZ-DRP’ is brought to attention as the potential approach. It is reflected in a printed form to assist the CPs to perform the action in a proper manner. The tool is ensuring the CPs’ image as a medication protector in the healthcare system.

Biography

Nazri Nordin has completed Ph.D from Universiti Sains Malaysia. Currently, he is a registered pharmacist and researcher in the university, paying particularly attention to enhance the image of community pharmacists as a medication protector in the healthcare system. He has published 15 papers in reputed journals related to a structured and systematic approach is known as ‘STARZ-DRP’ to help the community pharmacists to make an accurate triage action plan and determine the drug-related problems.

Speaker
Nazri Nordin / Universiti Sains Malaysia
Malaysia

Abstract

Purpose: Prescription drug abuse is among the fastest-growing drug problems in the nation. Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs) have been implemented to track controlled substances prescribed by authorized practitioners that is dispensed by pharmacies. PDMPs help providing early warning signs of drug epidemics and detecting drug diversion. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the compliance and opinions of practicing pharmacists on the PDMP in West Virginia and the Tri-State (Kentucky and Ohio) area. The data collected from this project seek to provide recommendations that could be used to help improve compliance and ease the use of the PDMP programs. Methods: Board certified pharmacists were invited to complete an online survey created in Qualtrics (licensed by Marshall University) to evaluate their current compliance and opinions of the PDMP in their state that is used to track controlled substances prescribed by authorized practitioners and dispensed by pharmacies. Non-practicing pharmacists were excluded from the study. Respondents were asked their gender, age, ethnicity, primary state of practice, years of experience as a pharmacist, current role, how many prescriptions are dispensed daily, whether if they have access to the state PDMP program or not, and questions to assess their opinions, level of compliance and finally any recommendations on how to improve their state PDMP program. All data were collected, recorded, de-identified and analyzed directly onto a secure password protected data sheet built within Qualtrics. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the results. The project was approved by the IRB prior to the deployment of the survey to collect the data. Results: All the respondents (66) stated that they have access to their state’s PDMP but only 92 percent have access on terminals where they process prescriptions. The results showed that 92 percent indicated that PDMP programs helped them identify issues with control substances prescriptions. The majority of respondents (85 percent) agreed that PDMP helps in the reduction of control substance abuse. Using Likert scale survey items, respondents were asked about the barriers of the program. Most of the respondents (32 percent) stated that the PDMP is inconvenient while only 8 percent said that it was very convenient. The majority of the respondents (82 percent) thought that the program need some to significant improvement in the completeness aspect. Accuracy comes as a close second to be improved. Asking the participants for when to use the program; over 80 percent indicated that they should always check in cases that involve patients with multiple providers in the last 3 months, out of town or unfamiliar prescribers and potential signs of abuse and diversion. The recommendations from the participants almost took the same theme which is to have the system integrate between all states and include updates in real time. Conclusion: Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs are very valuable tool to help prescribers and pharmacists track control substance use, which in turn assists with the efforts to decrease abuse of control substances. The findings of the study provide evidence to suggest the importance and effectiveness of the PDMPs in preventing drug abuse and verifyingprescriptions to differentiate between prescriptions that are prescribed for legitimate medical use. These programs allow patients to fill controlled substance prescriptions for legitimate uses.

Biography

Will be updated Soon

Speaker
Roubir R. Moawad / Marshall University
USA

Abstract

The work present here shows the combined effects of anticancer drug along with probiotics to circumvent the side effects associated with chemotherapy and to ehance the therapeutic effect. Suppositories with drug and probiotic were prepared by melt mold method using the blend of PEG’s. The suppositories were characterized for various parameters. % cell viability was performed by MTT assay. The free radical scavenging activity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus by NO assay was observed to be 60.77 μg/mL The mean weight variation, melting time, content uniformity , friability and hardness of the prepared suppositories were 1.25± 0.025mg, 10.86 ± 0.64 min, 99.89±0.74, 0.25%, 2.2 kg/cm2. The release kinetics followed peppas model. MTT assay presented that the formulation showed higher cytotoxicity when compared with plain cisplatin. Tumour regression displayed that formulation caused notable reduction in tumour volume.Histopathology studies presented that the developed formulation is safe for local delivery of cisplatin. The cytotoxic action of the drug and probiotic loaded formulation is quite higher which could be because of the antitumour effect of the probiotics. Biosurfactants released from the probiotic biomass might help in increasing the permeability and can result in an enhancement in in-vitro antitumour activity This study provides the basis for a combination of local delivery approach along with the beneficial effects of probiotic strain which could help to resolve the problems caused with traditional chemotherapy.

Biography

Dr. Neeraj Mishra is working as Professor in Department of Pharmaceutics at ISF College of Pharmacy, Moga (Punjab). He has completed his B. Pharm (2000), M. Pharm (2003) and Ph.D.(2011) in Pharmaceutical Sciences from Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). He was qualified in National Level Test GATE conducted by IIT, Kanpur in 2001. He is having more than fifteen years teaching/ industrial/ research experience at post graduate and under graduate level. He is also having four years of research experience in Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Dr. H.S. Gour Central University, Sagar (M.P.). (2006-2010). He is also having one year of industry experience as production chemist in Symbiotec Pvt. Ltd., Indore (2000-2001). He was recipient of ICMR- SRF (New Delhi, India) (Grant: 45/02/2007-BMS/ PHA Dated 06\07\2007\H.S.Gour) during his Ph.D. tenure. He is working as brand ambassador of bentham Science,USA.

Speaker
Neeraj Mishra / ISF College of Pharmacy
India

Abstract

Development of efficient delivery system for hydrophobic drugs remains a major concern in chemotherapy. The objective of the current study is to develop polymeric drug-delivery system for etoposide from amphiphilic derivatives of glycol chitosan, capable to improve the pharmacokinetics and to reduce the adverse effects of etoposide due to various organic solvents used in commercial formulations for solubilisation of etoposide. As a promising carrier, amphiphilic derivatives of glycol chitosanweresynthesized by chemical grafting of palmitic acid N-hydroxysuccinimideand quaternisationto glycol chitosan backbone.To this end a 7.9 kDa glycol chitosan was modified by palmitoylation and quaternisation into 13 kDa. Nano sized micelles prepared from this amphiphilic polymerhad the capability to encapsulate up to 3 mg/ml etoposide. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that GCPQ based etoposide formulation transformed the biodistribution pattern. AUC 0.5-24 hr showed statistically significant difference in ETP-GCPQ vs. commercial preparation in liver (25 vs 70, p<0.001), spleen (27 vs. 36, P<0.05), lungs (42 vs. 136, p<0.001), kidneys (25 vs. 30, p<0.05) and brain (19 vs. 9,p<0.001)Using the hydrophobic fluorescent dyeNile red, we showed that micelles efficiently delivered their payload to MCF7 and A2780 cancer cells in-vitro and to A431 xenografttumorin-vivo, suggesting these systems could deliver hydrophobic anti- cancer drugs such as etoposide to tumors. The pharmacokinetic results indicated that the GCPQ micelles transformed the biodistribution pattern and increased etoposide concentration in the brain significantly compared to free drug after intravenous administration. GCPQ based formulations not only reducedside effects associated with current available formulations but alsoincreasedtheir transport through the biological barriers, thus making it a good delivery system.

Biography

Dr.Akhtar Aman has completed his PhD at the age of 30 years from Peshawar University under Hec Scholarship. During his Ph.D studies, Dr.Akhtar also worked as visiting Scientist at Center for Cancer Medicine,School of Pharmacy, University college London,UK. He is currently serving as Assistant Professor of Pharmaceutics at Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University,Sheringal Pakistran. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Akhtar Aman / Shaheed Benazir Bhutto University
Pakistan

Plenary Talks

Abstract

In 2012, Congress created the breakthrough-therapy designation to expedite the testing and approval by the FDA of medications with potential to provide substantial improvement over existing treatments. According to the FDA “Breakthrough Therapy designation is a process designed to expedite the development and review of drugs that are intended to treat a serious condition and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the drug may demonstrate substantial improvement over available therapy on a clinically significant endpoint(s). To determine whether the improvement over available therapy is substantial is a matter of judgment and depends on both the magnitude of the treatment effect, which could include duration of the effect, and the importance of the observed clinical outcome. In general, the preliminary clinical evidence should show a clear advantage over available therapy.” What does it take to qualify for this expedited approval and how is this impacting the global drug development?

Biography

Aruna Dontabhaktuni is an internationally renowned pharmaceutical professional with 23 years of experience across all phases of drug development. She received her Pharmacy degree from Karnataka Pharmacy College, India and PhD from Long Island University, New York City. She is the founder and CEO of PharmaPro consulting, her company specializes in clinical pharmacology, and regulatory submissions. She also serves on the scientific board for several pharmaceutical and biotech companies as a subject matter expert in clinical pharmacology. In her carrier, she has supported 30+ compounds from early, to late-stage of drug development, in oncology & immunology, other rare diseases including breakthrough therapy designations application for Olaratumab (LARTRUVO™). She has played the pivotal role in mentoring the next generation of scientists, thorough her managerial responsibilities. Her 50+ publications including posters, manuscripts and conference presentations as a keynote speaker at national and international conferences, are a clear testament to her achievements.

Speaker
Aruna Dontabhaktuni / PharmaPro Consulting
USA

Abstract

Will be updated soon

Biography

Prof.Dr. Esra KUPELI AKKOL was born in Turkey. She got her Bachelor of Science degree in Faculty of Pharmacy, Gazi University, Turkey and got her Ph.D. degree in Pharmacognosy Department from the University of Gazi. She is currently Professor in the Gazi University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacognosy. She served in many capacities in her field including service on several editorial boards and numerous review committees for journals such as Journal of Ethnopharmacology, Journal of Pharmacy Sciences, The Internet Journal of Herbal and Plant Medicine, International Journal of Genuine Traditional Medicine, Advances in Pharmacological Sciences, Evidence Based Complementary Alternative Medicine and The Open Pain Journal. She has conducted 38 projects and 11 thesis in Gazi University. She has 149 published articles in SCI International Journals, 13 articles in National Journals and 9 chapters in International books.

Speaker
Esra KÜPELİ AKKOL / Gazi Üniversity
Turkey

Sessions:

Abstract

For over two decades now, plants have been explored for their potential to act as production platforms for biopharmaceuticals, such as vaccines and monoclonal antibodies. Without a doubt, the development of plant viruses as expression vectors for pharmaceutical production have played an integral role in the emergence of plants as inexpensive and facile systems for the generation of therapeutic proteins. More recently, plant viruses have been designed as non-toxic nanoparticles which can target a variety of cancers and thus empower the immune system to slow or even reverse tumor progression. The following presentation describes the employment of plant virus expression vectors for the treatment of some of the most challenging diseases known today. The presentation concludes with a projection of the multiple avenues by which virus nanoparticles could impact developing countries.

Biography

Kathleen Hefferon received her PhD from the Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto and completed her postdoctoral fellowship at Cornell University. Kathleen has published multiple research papers, chapters and reviews, and has written three books. Kathleen is the Fulbright Canada Research Chair of Global Food Security and has been a visiting professor at the University of Toronto over the past year. Her research interests include virus expression vectors, food security agricultural biotechnology and global health. Kathleen lives in New York with her husband and two children.

Speaker
Kathleen Hefferon / Cornell University
USA

Abstract

The bioscience industry innovation can be seen with the development of unique products and services. This industry is beginning to have more interest toward incorporating reimbursement earlier in the development process of its innovation phase. Actuaries and clinicians who work in decision making roles within the payer market are looking at these innovative products through a specific assessments. In the US, Medicare and commercial payers, are adopting alterative payment models to influence the cost of care especially with the innovation from the bioscience space. Organizations’ efforts might need to be modified to account and engage these decision makers who influence reimbursement earlier in the development phase. The bioscience industry might consider emphasizing value and reimbursement in addition to marketing efforts to garner better uptake of their products or services. The presenter will provide an overview of the US payer market, assess alternative payment models, and review opportunities for the bioscience organizations’ to meet the growth of alternative payment models.

Biography

Dr Stephen George is a consultant to payers, health plans, employers, and bioscience organizations in the US. He is active in conducting research for the bioscience industry.

Speaker
Stephen George / Milliman
USA

Abstract

Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed and deadliest cancer type among males. It’s also the leading cause of cancer deaths in developed countries among females. In addition, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type as it makes up of 80-85% of all lung cancer cases. New approaches including the targeted drug delivery systems and combined treatment protocols have critical importance because clinical imaging and treatment methods are often inadequate. In this study, only Vinorelbine (VNB)-encapsulated (as hydrophlic drug in aqueous core), only Paclitaxel (PCX)-encapsulated (as hydrophobic drug in lipid bilayer), and PCX+VNB co-encapsulated nanosized liposomes were formulated and actively targeted with folate to be radiolabeled with Tc-99m for SPECT imaging and treatment of NSCLC. After characaterization studies of liposome formulations; their cytotoxic evaluation in A549 and H1299 cell lines were performed. Both two cell lines were found appropriate for active targeting with folate according to the flow cytometry analysis. All liposome formulations showed proper characterization with VNB encapsulation efficiency of about 20% and PCX encapsulation efficiency of about 15%, mean particle size of around 120 nm; zeta potential of around -10 mV and phospholipid efficiency of about 85%. According to the results of MTT studies; co-encapsulated, theranostic liposome formulation was observed to be the most cytotoxic one for both two cell lines when compared to the only PCX- and only VNB-encapsulated liposomes. Promising characterization and cytotoxic profiles were obtained with nanosized, active targeted, co-encapsulated theranostic liposomes and further in-vivo studies will be carried out.

Biography

Merve Karpuz, oral presenter, has a degree in Faculty of Pharmacy from Ege University (İzmir, Turkey). She has an ongoing PhD in Radiopharmacy at Hacettepe University. She contributedto the preparation of Turkish Pharmacopoeia 2018 by Turkish Ministry of Health.She has been taking part as researcher at a university project about theranostic liposomes formulations since 2016. She has published several articles in national and international journals and presantations in proceedings of international conferences about drug delivery systems, radiopharmacy and gamma radiation sterilization studies.

Speaker
Merve Karpuz / Hacettepe University
Turkey

Abstract

Crassula multicava and C. ovataaremedicinal plants claimed to be potent against a variety of ailments including some infectious and oxidative stress-related diseases by traditional health practitioners in South Africa.We aimed to investigate the antioxidant, antibacterial and cytotoxic properties of the essential oil (EO) of the two Crassulaspeciesfrom South Africa. The antibacterial, antioxidant and cytotoxic properties were examined by micro-dilution, spectrophotometric and haemolytic techniques respectively, while EO was characterised by GC/MS. TheMICs value for C. multicava and C. ovata EOs against Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Mycobacterium smegmatis, Listeria ivanovii, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and Vibrio paraheamolyticusrange from 0.125–0.30 and 0.25–0.50 mg/mL respectively.The C. multicava EOwas bactericidal at below 0.36 mg/mL against five of the test pathogens. The C. multicava EO IC50 value (0.02 mg/mL) was significantly different (P < 0.05) from C. ovata in scavenging 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radicals (DPPH•). The EOs efficiently reduced three other different radicals in dose-dependent fashion. Octan-3-ol, (21.70%),cyclooctatetraiene (21.65%), farnesol (13.70%), pinocarvone (12.70%) and linoleic acid (9.83%) were the prominent in the two Crassula species. None of the EO was toxic at < 0.70mg/mL.Our results indicate that, in addition to the native uses of C. multicava, the night harvested leaf contains effective phytochemicalswith bioactive properties and may be a new option in the hunt for lead constituents as potent antibiotics source in this current era of emerging multi-drug-resistant bacterial strains; likewise as a novel antioxidant agent.

Biography

Dr S O Okoh is a young emerging academic and research expert in pharmaceutical chemistry. Currently he is a Postdoctoral research fellow at the Biochemistry and Microbiology Department, University of Fort Hare, Alice, South Africa. He is knowledgeable with vast experiences in organic/natural products, analytical chemistry; pure and pharmaceutical chemistry. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and has been an editorial board member of many journals.

Speaker
Sunday Okoh / Fort Hare University
South Africa

Abstract

Evaluation of safety of drugs already on the market is among top public health priorities. Pharmacovigillance studies that assess if the use of specific drugs is associated with an increased risk of adverse events increasignly rely on large population-based health databases [Abrahamowicz & Tamblyn, Encyclopedia Biostatstics 2005]. However, these databases are typically created for administrative (e.g. insurance) rather than research purposes and do not record many important clinical characteristics that are likely to affect both the drug prescriptions and the risk of adverse events. The resulting unmeasured confounding bias is considered the Achilles heel of population-based studies of adverse drug effects [Avorn, NEJM 2007]. This bias occurs because medication users tend to be less healthy than non-users, but illness severity is typically not recorded in the study database. I will provide an overview of the two new statistical methods, recently developed by my research team, that address such biases, each of which is developed for different data structures and under different assumptions. Firstly, our new ‘missing cause’ approach [Abrahamowicz, Stat Med 2016] is applicable whenever treatment choice partly reflects physicians subjective prescribing preferences [Brookhart, Epidemiology 2006]. This method uses the discrepancy between the observed vs. expected treatment to detect and control for unmeasured confounding bias. Secondly, our martingale residuals-based methods largely reduce confounding bias in large database studies by imputing additional confounders, measured only in small validation samples [Burne & Abrahamowicz, Stat Med 2016]. These methods will be applied to re-assess an association between use of oral glucocorticoids and diabetes.

Biography

Michal Abrahamowicz has completed his PhD in Statistics from the Academy of Economics in Krakow, Poland and postdoctoral studies training at McGill University in Montreal, Canada. He holds the James McGill Professorship in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the McGill Faculty of Medicine, the top-ranked medical school in Canada. He is the Nominated Principal Investigator of the CAnadian Network for Advanced Interdisciplinary Methods for prospective studies of Drug Safety, that comprises > 30 investigators across 12 Canadian universities. He has published 350 peer-reviewed statistical and clinical papers, and was the Primary Supervisor of 21 PhD students and 7 post-doctoral fellows.

Speaker
Michal Abrahamowicz / McGill University
Canada

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to fabricate chemically cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol-co-poly (methacrylic acid) hydrogel for pH responsive delivery of Perindopril Erbumine. Polymeric microparticulate systems was prepared by chemical cross-linking method that swells when in contact with water thereby offering excellent mechanical strength as well as stability. After the formation of cross linked polymeric network the drug Perindopril Erbumine was loaded at pH buffer of 7.4 or pH 6.8.The prepared samples was subjected to DSC, TGA, X-ray Diffraction studies, Energy Dispersive spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Zeta Sizer and Zeta potential. Furthermore, optimized formulation was toxicologically evaluated on the model animal (rabbit). Toxicity studies were conducted on albino rabbits where two groups will be designed. These will divide into I and II. Group I was control and treated with water. Group II was treated with 2.5 g/kg orally (PE)-PVP based hydrogel microparticles. Animals were observed physically and corporally for variations in dermal layers, hair, mucosal layers, eyes, sleep duration, salivation frequency, comma, diarrhea, death rate, change in body weight, food and water intake for 14-16 days on regular basis. After 14-16 days, blood samples were collected for hematological and biochemical analysis. Vital organs i.e. heart, liver, kidney, spleen, liver and lungs were detached, weighed and shifted into containers filled with formalin for Histology studies. Afterwards results will be statistically concluded by analyzing the data through statistical tools. Our investigations indicate that PVA‐co‐poly(MAA) hydrogel is safe and suitable delivery system, developed for oral delivery of Perindopril Erbumine.

Biography

Farooq Azam has completed his PhD from Faculty of Pharmacy, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan, Pakistan. He is the Head of department of Pharmacy (Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology) University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan. He has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals with one book chapter. He has been serving as reviewer and member editorial board of different journals. Hira Ijaz is doing PhD from Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Sargodha, Sargodha, Punjab, Pakistan and serving Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan as lecturer. He has published more than 44 papers and 1 book chapter and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute journals.

Speaker
Farooq Azam / Institute of Pharmacy, Physiology and Pharmacology
University of Agriculture
Pakistan

Abstract

A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of amoxicillin trihydrate (AMXT) based on the diazo-coupling reaction was studied. Sulphanilic acid diazotizes with nitrite ion in acidic medium to produce a water soluble, colorless diazonium ion, which subsequently coupled with AMXT to form a colored azo dye in the alkaline medium, having maximum absorption at 455 nm. The calibration graph showed that Beer's law is obeyed over the concentration range of 0.3 – 30.0 μg/mL of AMXT, with the detection limit of 0.15 μg/mL and molar absorptivity was 2.3 × 104 L/mol.cm. The accuracy and the precision were acceptable depending upon the values of error percentage and relative standard deviation. The influence of common interferences was studied and the method was applied with good recovery for the determination of AMXT in pure form and different pharmaceutical formulations, which commercially available in Erbil market.

Biography

Hemn A. Qader was born in Sulaimani, Iraq, in 1979. He received the B.Sc. degree in Chemistry from the University of Salahaddin, Erbil, Iraq, in 2002, and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Analytical Chemistry from the Salahaddin University, Erbil, Iraq, in 2007 and 2013, respectively. In 2007, he joined the Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, Hawler Medical University, as Assistant lecturer, and in 2013 became a lecturer. His main areas of research interest are normal and derivative spectrophotometry, pharmaceutical analysis, environmental pollution analysis, and chemometric techniques namely PLS and ANN techniques. Dr. Hemn is a faculty staff of college of Pharmacy/HMU and the member of Kurdistan Chemist Syndicate and he taught different subjects and topics for undergraduate and postgraduate (M.Sc. & Ph.D.) students of different colleges and universities. He was participating in different national and international conferences and workshops, he has published some scientific papers and now he is a Assist. Professor in Analytical Chemistry and head of Postgraduate studies unit in his college.

Speaker
Hemn A. Qader / Hawler Medical University
Iraq

Abstract

The evaluation of pharmaceutical raw materials and finished products for impurities and degradation products is an essential part of the drug development and manufacturing testing process. Additionally, toxicological information must be obtained on any drug-related impurity that is present at a concentration of greater than 0.1% of that of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). In pharmaceutical QC and manufacturing, impurity analysis has traditionally been performed by HPLC with UV, PDA, or MS detection. As it is essential to detect and measure all of the impurities in the sample, it is necessary to have a high resolution separation process. This usually involves long analysis times resulting in low throughput. As candidate pharmaceutical compounds become more potent and are dosed at lower and lower levels, ever more sensitive assays are needed to detect and measure impurities. The low throughput of HPLC can become the rate-limiting step in product release testing or process evaluation. Since much of the process of impurity identification involves the coupling of LC to sophisticated MS, any reduction in analysis time will result in a more efficient use of these significant investments. Analytical technology advances such as UPLC and UPC offer significant improvements in throughput and sensitivity, with benefits to the process of product release and identification of drug-related impurities. The most characteristic feature of the development in the methodology of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis during the past 25 years is that HPLC became undoubtedly the most important analytical method for identification and quantification of drugs, either in their active pharmaceutical ingredient or in their formulations during the process of their discovery, development and manufacturing.

Biography

Muhammad Jehangir has 13 years diversified experience of Quality Control, Quality Assurance, Registration Affairs, Product development and Pharmaceutical manufacturing, Process Planning, Method development, Method validation, Statistical Methodology, Process & Cleaning Validation, Equipment Validation etc. Certificate Courses on cGMP, cGLP, Process Validation, CTD Documents, ISO 9001:2008, 13485-2003,14001-2004 have strong scientific, analytical, statistical, managerial and training skills. Currently he is working as a Senior Manager Quality Control and validation for Novamed Pharmaceuticals.It is toll manufacturing oriented company, manufacturing of companies like Getz Pharma, ICI, SEARLE, Macter, Ray, and for Sanofi-Aventis. He is also looking after the Quality of Novamed Healthcare, the nutraceutical and cosmeceutical manufacturing plant.

Speaker
Muhammad Jehangir / Novamed Pharmaceuticals
Pakistan

Abstract

Medicinal plants are the natural reservoir of many antiviral, antimicrobial and anticancer agents. Pakistan has a diverse flora which potentially offers many unique phytochemicals against number of human diseases. Although there is need for scientific analysis and research to be conducted on these medicinal plants used by the indigenous people from centuries. Hepatitis C virus infection is a serious health problem which causes liver damage, hepatocellular carcinoma and ultimately leads to death. So far, it has affected more than 170 million individual worldwide and 10 million people in Pakistan are living with Hepatitis C virus. HCV genotype identification is most important for prediction of treatment response and to determine the duration of antiviral therapy. The present HCV regime has limited efficacy, severe adverse effects, and high cost. The present study is designed to synthesize anti-HCV phytochemicals and study their synergistic effect with standard drug, which will provide potential for future HCV drug development. Therefore, in-vitro cell viability assay and HCV sub genomic replicon assay will be perform to assess the inhibition potential of each compound at HCV replication. HCV NS3 depsipeptidecleavage assays, Helicase assay and Molecular modeling assay will developed for studying the activity of compounds on HCV genotype 1a and 3a into Huh-7.5 cell.The HCV viral titer was analyzed through Quantitative Real Time PCR.Active compound will than tested to find 50% Effective concentration (EC50),dose response and synergistic effect if any. Therefore, these findings may suggest that medicinal plants contain potential antiviral agents against HCV and combination of these antiviral agents present clinical regime can be better option for future HCV therapy.

Biography

Dr Tariq Javed, PhD (Scholarship Higher Education Commission of Pakistan), is Associate Professor and Director Research, Head of Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department, Lahore Pharmacy College, University of Health Sciences Lahore. Member Board of Studies (BOS), University of Health Science,. He has developing state of the art Pharmacy laboratories at Lahore Pharmacy College (LMDC). He has isolated and analyzed anti-HCV phytochemicals with specific emphasis on HCV NS3 gene by knock-down approach along with cell culture techniques, lipofectamine transfection, Real Time PCR For Hepatitis Diagnosis and Western blotting. He has supervised/Co-supervised MPhil and PhD researchers with more than 28 International research publication and 4 International books focusing Recent techniques in Pharmaceutical Drug Development against Infectious diseases.

Speaker
Tariq Javed / Lahore Pharmacy College
Pakistan

Abstract

CDK2 is considered as a potential target for cancer therapy. In order to find novel CDK2 inhibitors which have different scaffolds, a training set of 17 compounds and a test set of 39 compounds were collected from the published literatures. Pharmacophore models were built and validated by different methods. The hypotheses chosen were then used for chemical databases virtual screening, the selected compounds were further analyzed and refined using drug-like filters and ADMET analysis. Finally, forty five hits with different scaffolds were picked out for docking studies to find tophits. These hits were predicted to have high inhibitory activity and good ADMET properties; they may act as novel leads for CDK2 inhibitors designing.

Biography

Will be updated soon...

Speaker
Hussam Abdulghani / Tishreen University
Syria

Abstract

Suaedamaritima and Suaeda vermiculate are common species of the chenopodia family of herbal mangroves. They can store inorganic ions and have highosmotic potential to absorb water. They can improve blood physiology and immunity. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) isused as the common method for preconcentration and separation ofinorganic and organic species. SPE enhances the selectivity and sensitivityof a method by allowing discriminatory binding of an analyte toa solid support where it accumulates and subsequently elutes with asmall volume of solvent. In our study, a simple and sensitive method was proposed for determination of three vitamins (B6, B9 and B12)in leaves of SuaedamaritimaandSuaeda vermiculate (Halophytes) by HPLC-DAD with solid-phaseextraction (SPE) as the preconcentration step. The variables affecting the extraction and determination conditions were investigated and optimized. A preconcentration step based on SPE is necessary to remove interfering components. The limit of detection obtained was <5 mg kg−1, the relative standard deviation (RSD) was <6%, and the recovery was in the range of 87–94%. The method was successfully applied to determine group B vitamins in the halophyte samples. As a whole, these findings may confirm the interesting potentialof this halophyte as a valuable source of natural bioactive molecules.

Biography

NargesChamkouri was born in Iran. She has completed herPhD Analytical Chemistry inIran.She is currently Professor in the Abadan School of Medical Sciences.She has published more than 10 papers in ISI journals.

Speaker
Narges Chamkouri / Abadan School of Medical Sciences
Iran

Abstract

The increasing prevalence of several diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, cancer, and diabetes, in humans in recent decades worldwide, accompanied by rising concern regarding the safety of many synthetic chemistry-based pharmaceuticals, has raised public demand for phytochemical-based medicines. This in turn has led to increasing interest in metabolic engineering as an approach to produce such natural products on an industrial scale, which has the potential to decrease production costs of, e.g. desired dihydrochalcones. We note that fruits accumulating high level of phytochemicals including flavonoids and dihydrochalcones that may play a key role in reducing chronic disease risk. We have developed a novel concept to produce a new-style phytochemical agent of benefit for humansby genetic transformation of three characterized genes in plant cells, bacterial, and yeast systems. We have applied a set of molecular and biochemical tools to identified reactions and enzymes leading to the biosynthesis of dihydrochalcones. We recently cloned and biochemically characterized three key enzymes in the dihydrochalcone biosynthesis pathway; a p-coumaroyl-CoA double bond reductase that converts p-coumaroyl-CoA into p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA, chalcone synthase that accepted p-dihydrocoumaroyl-CoA, in the presence of malonyl-CoA, leading to production of phloretin, and a specialized phloretin-4'-O-glycosyltransferse which glycosylated phloretin in the presence of UDP-glucose into trilobatin. The production of the phytochemical trilobatin was achived by overexpression of these genes in microbial cell factory. The proof of our concept have open the possibility for developing new-style of natural phytochemical for a growing market of population suffering from "modern" diseases.

Biography

Mwafaq Ibdah has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from Martin Luther University, Hale/Salle, Germany and postdoctoral studies from Michigan State Universtity and Wahsingion State University. He is tenured researcher at Newe Ya’ar Research Center, The Agriculture Research Organization (ARO), in Isarel . He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Mwafaq Ibdah / NeweYaar Research Center
Israel

Abstract

Patient compliance is a key factor in recovery or healing,and hard-to-swallow tablets are one of barriers against patient compliance.The purpose of this study is to formulate and evaluate different formulations of Orally Disintegrating Tablets (ODTs) of Chlorpheniramine Maleate. The targeted tablets should disintegrate in mouth within seconds, releasing the active pharmaceutical ingredients rapidly without the need of water, and they may be a good choice for many patients especially children and elderlies who have difficulties in swallowing conventional tablets and capsules. In addition to that, the rapid release of Chlorepheniramine maleate from ODTs gives a quicker effect than that of conventional tablets, making it a better choice in treating the dermatologic and respiratory symptoms of allergic attacks. Tablets were preparedby the direct compression method. Three types of diluents were used: lactose(group A), Mannitol (group B), Glucose (group C). For each group we used 40 mg of five different disintegrants such as Crospovidon(KollidonCL®:PolyPlasdonXL-10),Microcrystalline Cellulose(AvicelPH 102®), Microcrystalline Cellulose(AvicelPH 101®), Sodium Starch Glycolate(Primojel®), Sodium Croscarmillose(As-di-sol®). The lowest disintegration time was found in formulation C1 (17±2.5 sec.)which contains glucose as a diluent and kollidon-cl® as a disintgrant. Followed by formulation B1 (21.16±3.5 sec.)which contains mannitol as a diluent and kollidon-cl® as a disintgrant. These formulations also showed the highest dissolution rate, compared to other formulations. The disintegration times of other formulations werebetween(33.83±2.92 sec. and3:13 min. ±16.32 sec.) The tablets of each formulation Had a uniform weight and content. They had good mechanical strength, and all of them released 80% of their content of chlorpheniramine maleate in 30 minutes or less. Tablets with lower disintegrating time released their active ingredient in less time.

Biography

Will be updated soon...

Speaker
Tamim Hammad / Tishreen university
Syria

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