Call Us: +91-779-979-0002/+91-779-979-0003

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation are responsible for several serious pathological conditions (like type II diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases etc.) and protein drugs ineffectiveness. Therefore, a molecule that can inhibit the amyloid fibrillation and potentially clear amyloid fibrils is of great therapeutic value.In this manuscript,we investigated the antiamyloidogenic, fibril disaggregating, as well as cell protective effect of an anti-tuberculosis drug, Capreomycin (CN). Aggregation kinetics data, as monitored by ThT fluorescence, inferred that CN retards the insulin amyloid fibrillation by primarily targeting the fibril elongation step with little effect on lag time. Increasing the dose of CN boosted its inhibitory potency. Strikingly, CN arrested the growth of fibrils when added during the elongation phase, and disaggregated mature insulin fibrils. Our Circular Dichroism (CD) results showed that, although CN is not able to maintain the alpha helical structure of protein during fibrillation, reduces the formation of beta sheet rich structure. Furthermore, Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that CN treated samples exhibited different size distribution and morphology, respectively. In addition, molecular docking results revealed that CN interacts with insulin through hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding, and the Hemolytic assay confirmed the non-hemolytic activity of CN on human RBCs. For future research, this study may assist in the rational designing of molecules against amyloid formation.

Biography

Professor, Rizwan Hasan Khan has received his Ph.D. in Biotechnology from Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India in 1996. His research focus is centered on protein biophysics, protein folding, misfolding and amyloid fibrils. He has worked with Prof. I.J.Goldstein at University of Michigan USA as BOYSCAST Fellow and with Prof. Steve Perkins at University of London as Commonwealth Fellow. He had published around 290 papers in the journals of international repute with h-index of 45; citation 7988. He is fellow of Biotech Research Society, India and also serving as Bentham Ambassador. He is also editor of several international journals.

Speaker
Rizwan Hasan KHAN / Aligarh Muslim University, India

Abstract

Recent advances on molecular imaging withhigh resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and ultra high field MRI fusion System will be discussed. The PET-MRI of Ultra high resolution system began to provide submillimeter resolution molecular imaging at brain’s cortical areas as well as brainstem areas, once thought impossible. Super resolution PET-MRI fusion system aimed for brain-imaging will be discussed in particular respect to the brainstem serotonergic neuronal sites together with some preliminary study performed for the sleep disorder in correlation with Raphe nuclei. Future potentials of the super-Resolution PET-MRI will discussed in conjunction with molecular and celler imaging.

Biography

Dr. Cho was the Professor of Radiological Science as well as Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at University of California at Irvine. From 2005, Prof. Cho served as University Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine & Science, Incheon, till he joined as a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Adavanced Institute of Convergence Technology (AICT), Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Since 2017, Professor Cho is concurrently serving as a director of Neuroscience Research Institute, Suwon University, Suwon, Korea. Prof. Cho was the one who pioneered world’s first "Ring PET", the molecular imaging device, in 1975. Professor Cho has also been pioneer in the field of MRI. In 2005, 7.0T MRI coupling with super resolution PET (HRRT) ,the world’s first PET-MRI fusion system was developed at GachonUniversity, Inchon, Korea. Among the many honors and awards, Professor Cho was elected as a member of US National Academy of Science, Institute of Medicine in 1997 (Now US National Academy of Medicine).

Speaker
Zang Hee Cho / Seoul National University, Seoul Korea

Sessions:

Abstract

Proteomics is an advanced methodology to understand protein functions compared to the traditional and conventional chemical based characterization methods such as Chromatography and Immunoassays. Advanced techniques like the Multi-marker profiling and Mass spectrometry are the next generation of protein in-vitro diagnostics and the knowledge derived from itis expected to enhance the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of diseases. We, at Yashraj Biotechnology Limited (YBL), perform Proteomics and Genomics analyses using Bioinformatic tools for discovering biomarkers from various complex biological fluids in a high-throughput manner. Additionally, with the help of proteomic techniques, we are looking to understand i) the effect of glycosylation and other post-translational modifications on the stability of proteins ii) how glycosylation patterns differ between folded and mis-folded proteins? iii) Identify reasons of precipitation in proteins isolated from Human fluids iv) New biomarker discovery and v) Molecular characterization of the pluripotent stem cell utilizing genomics and epigenetics studies vi) Protein/peptide chain confirmation, purity testings and characterization as a measure of QC analyses.

Biography

Dr. Gauri Awasthi completed her PhD from National Institute of Malaria Research (Indian Council of Medical Research), India and Post-Doctoral studies from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-Bombay). She has worked as an independent scientist at the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU), Munich, Germany in the Department of Evolutionary Biology. Transitioning from Academia to Industry, Dr. Awasthi worked as a Scientist (Bioinformatics) at SciGenom Labs, India where she was part of the team to sequence the whole genome of the Asiatic Lion. She is currently working as Manager (Proteomics & Bioinformatics) at Yashraj Biotechnology Limited, a premier Biotechnology company based in Mumbai, India on a collaborative project with Department of Proteomics, Indian Institute of Technology (IIT-Bombay), Mumbai, India. She has more than 12 years’ experience in Genomics, Proteomics, Bio-informatics and Computational analyses and has published her work in several reputed international journals.

Speaker
Gauri Awasthi / National Institute of Malaria Research, India

Abstract

Background: Adrenal glands are essential endocrine organs composed of two embryological distinct tissues.Morphological changes during their development are well described, but less is understood with regards to theirmolecular mechanisms. To identify proteins and pathways, which drive the initial steps of the specification of theendocrine function of the adrenal gland, rat’s adrenal glands were isolated at different embryonic days (E): E14, E16,E18, E19 and postnatal day 1 (P1). Results: The alteration of the proteome during the stages E16, E19 and P1 was investigated by combining twodimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis. Out of 594 excised protein spots, 464 spots wereidentified, resulting in 203 non-redundant proteins. The ontogenic classification of the identified proteins accordingto their molecular function resulted in 10 different categories, whereas the classification of their biological processesresulted in 19 different groups. This gives an insight into the complex mechanisms underlying adrenal glanddevelopment. Interestingly, the expression of retinoic acid pathway proteins was decreased during the developmentof the adrenal gland, suggesting that this pathway is only important at early stages. On the other hand, key proteins ofthe cholesterol synthesis increased their expression significantly at E19 revealing the initiation of the endocrinespecialization of the adrenal glands. Conclusions: This study presents the first comprehensive wide proteome analysis of three different stages ofembryonic adrenal gland development. The identified proteins, which were expressed in early stages of development,will shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying embryonic development of the adrenal gland.

Biography

Marwa Eltoweissy has completed her PhD through a scholarship and cooperation work between the faculty of Science, Alexandria University, Egypt and Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-University Medical Center, Institute for Physiology II, Bonn, Germany. During her stay, she obtained her “Biologin Diplom” grade from the same University. She achieved Postdoctoral studies at the Gastroenterology and Endocrinology department, Georg-August University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany. She received the Doctor of Natural Sciences (Dr. rer. nat.) degree through her work at the Nephrology and Rheumatology department, Georg-August University Medical Center, Göttingen, Germany. She worked as a major Scientific Researcher at the same department. Currently, she is a Professor of Molecular biology and Head of the Molecular biology section at the Zoology department, Alexandria University, Egypt. She has published more than 40 papers in reputed journals and is serving as a reviewer for privileged journals. She has been involved in many international conferences and workshops as a speaker, member of Scientific Program Committee, Organizer, and Session Chair/Co S chair and in conferences moderation. She is a member of the Editorial Board of two journals in the Proteomics field.

Speaker
Marwa Eltoweissy / Alexandria University, Egypt

Abstract

Advances in the field of mass spectrometry (MS) has led to expansion of targeted MS, enabling precise quantification of protein-specific peptide sequences, the most commonly utilized form being multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). MRM-based assays provide direct measurement of the analyte and are recognized for yielding reliable output that can be reproduced independent of laboratory. Compared with other techniques, these assays are highly specific, easily multiplexable, and comparatively quick and cheap. MRM assays have become the tool of choice to quantitatively assess a large number of candidates and to derive a focused panel of relevant biomarkers. In recent years, we have developed and analytically validated a collection of MRM assays to quantitatively measure many disease-associated proteins. Most of these assays have been optimized for a high-throughput format to handle hundreds of samples simultaneously.

Biography

Prof. Wang is a Professor at Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, a Chinese-British joint higher educational venture in China. He earned his PhD in Bio-Organic Chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis, USA, and was an NIH-NRSA postdoctoral fellow studying mechanisms of DNA repair in mammalian system. He joined the faculty of Indiana University School of Medicine in 2001 and served as a Proteomics Core director for 16 years. His research centers around biomarkers and drug target discovery, and deciphering the protein interaction networks in complex human diseases with the use of high throughput omics technologies and bioinformatics.

Speaker
Mu Wang / Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, China

Abstract

Recent advances on molecular imaging withhigh resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and ultra high field MRI fusion System will be discussed. The PET-MRI of Ultra high resolution system began to provide submillimeter resolution molecular imaging at brain’s cortical areas as well as brainstem areas, once thought impossible. Super resolution PET-MRI fusion system aimed for brain-imaging will be discussed in particular respect to the brainstem serotonergic neuronal sites together with some preliminary study performed for the sleep disorder in correlation with Raphe nuclei. Future potentials of the super-Resolution PET-MRI will discussed in conjunction with molecular and celler imaging.

Biography

Dr. Cho was the Professor of Radiological Science as well as Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at University of California at Irvine. From 2005, Prof. Cho served as University Professor and Director of the Neuroscience Research Institute, Gachon University of Medicine & Science, Incheon, till he joined as a Distinguished Research Fellow at the Adavanced Institute of Convergence Technology (AICT), Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. Since 2017, Professor Cho is concurrently serving as a director of Neuroscience Research Institute, Suwon University, Suwon, Korea. Prof. Cho was the one who pioneered world’s first "Ring PET", the molecular imaging device, in 1975. Professor Cho has also been pioneer in the field of MRI. In 2005, 7.0T MRI coupling with super resolution PET (HRRT) ,the world’s first PET-MRI fusion system was developed at GachonUniversity, Inchon, Korea. Among the many honors and awards, Professor Cho was elected as a member of US National Academy of Science, Institute of Medicine in 1997 (Now US National Academy of Medicine).

Speaker
Zang Hee Cho / Seoul National University, South Korea

Abstract

Catalytic Abs (catAbs) are multivalent immunoglobulins (Igs) with a capacity to hydrolyze the antigenic (Ag) substrate. In this sense, proteolytic Abs (Ab-proteases) represent Abs to provide proteolytic effects. Abs against myelin basic protein/MBP with proteolytic activity exhibiting se-quence-specific cleavage of MBP are of great value to monitor demyelination whilst in MS.The activity of Ab-proteases was first registered at the subclinical stages 1-2 years prior to the clinical illness.And the activity of the Ab-proteases revealed significant correlation with scales of demyelination and the disability of the patients as well. So, the activity of Ab-proteases and its dynamics tested would confirm a high subclinical and predictive (translational) value of the tools as applicable for personalized monitoring protocols. Of tremendous value are Ab-proteases directly affecting remodeling of tissues with multilevel architectonics (for instance, myelin). By changing sequence specificity one may reach reduction of a density of the negative proteolytic effects within the myelin sheath and thus minimizing scales of demyelination. Ab-proteases can be programmed and re-programmed to suit the needs of the body metabolism or could be designed for the development of new catalysts with no natural counterparts. Further studies are needed tosecure artificial or edited Ab-proteases as translational tools of the newest generation to diagnose, to monitor, to control and to treat and rehabilitate MS patients at clinical stages and to prevent the disorder at subclinical stages in persons-at-risks to secure the efficacy of regenerative manipulations. Publications 1. Mysikov V.K., Pronina O.A., Gnuchev N.V., Stepanenko R.N., Du-rova O.M., Gabibov A.G., Kotov S.V. (2002) Humoral immunity in patients with multiple sclerosis. European Journal of Neurol-ogy, 2002, V.9, Suppl. 2, N 2103, P. 136. 2. Ponomarenko N.A., Durova O.M., Vorobiev I.I., Aleksandrova E.S., Telegin G.B., Chamborant O.G., Sidorik L.L., Suchkov S.V., Alekberova Z.S., Gnuchev N.V., Gabibov A.G. (2002)Catalytic an-tibodies in clinical and experimental pathology: human and mouse models. Journal of Immunological Methods, 2002, N 269, PP. 197-211 3. Ponomarenko N.A., Durova O.M., Vorobiev I.I., Belogurov A.A., Telegin G.B., Suchkov S.V., A.G. Gabibov (2005) Catalytic activity of autoantibodies toward myelin basic protein correlates with the scores on the multiple sclerosis expanded disability status scale. Immunol. Lett., 2005, Vol. 103, N1, P. 45-50 4. Gabibov A.G., Ponomarenko N.A., Tretyak E.B., Paltsev M.A., Suchkov S.V. (2006) Catalytic autoantibodies in clinical autoimmunity and modern medicine. Autoimmunity Reviews, 2006, N5, P. 324-330 5. Gabibov A.A., Paltsev M.A., Suchkov S.V. (2011) Antibody-associated proteolysis in surveillance of autoimmune demyelina-tion: clinical and preclinical issues Future Neurology, 2011, Vol. 6, N3, P. 303-305 6. D. Kostyushev, I. Tsarev, D. Gnatenko, M. Paltsev, S. Suchkov (2011) Myelin-associated serological targets as applicable to diagnostic tools to be used at the preclinical and transient stages of multiple sclerosis progression. Open J Immunology, 2011, Vol. 1, №3, PP. 80-86

Biography

Sergey Suchkov was born in the City of Astrakhan, Russia, in a family of dynasty medical doctors. In 1980, graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and was awarded with MD. In 1985, maintained his PhD as a PhD student of the I.M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy and Institute of Medical Enzymology, USSR Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, Russia. In 2001, finished the PostDoc Research Fellowship Program and maintained his Doctor Degree at the National Institute of Immunology, Russia. From 1985 through 1987, worked at Inst of Med Enzymology, USSR Academy of Medical Sciences. From 1987 through 1989, was a senior Researcher, Koltzov Inst of Developmental Biology, USSR Academy of Sciences. From 1989 through 1995, was being a Head of the Lab of Clinical Immunology and Immunobiotechnology, Helmholtz Eye Research Inst in Moscow. From 1995 through 2004, was being a Chairman of the Dept for Clinical Immunology, Moscow Clinical Research Institute (MONIKI) and the Immunologist-in-Chief of the Moscow Regional Ministry of Health. In 1993-1996, was an Executice Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. Dr Suchkov is a Co-Supervisor over the Russian-American Agreement on scientific and clinical collaboration in the field of ocular immunology between Russian Academy of Sciences and National Institutes of Health (NIH); in 1991-1995 – a member of The Reciprocal Exchange Fellowship Program between Russian Immunological Society and British Society for Immunology. Dr Suchkov is a member of the Editorial Boards of many international journals including EPMA Journal (Springer, Brussels) and “Personalized Medicine Universe” (Elsevier, Japan). Dr Sergey Suchkov, MD, PhD Director, Center for Personalized Medicine and Professor, Department of Pathology, Sechenov University, Chair, Department for Translational Medicine, Moscow Engineering Physical Institute (MEPhI), Professor, Dept for Immunology, A.I.Evdokimov Moscow State University of Medicine & Dentistry, Moscow, Russia Member, New York Academy of Sciences, NY, USA Secretary General, UCC (United Cultural Convention), Cambridge, UK Member, EPMA (European Association for Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine), Brus-sels, EU; Member, ISPM (International Society for Personalized Medicine), Tokyo, Japan; Member, PMC (Personalized Medicine Coalition), Washington, USA; Member, American Chemical Society (ACS), USA; Member, American Heart Association (AHA), USA; Secretary General, UCC (United Cultural Convention), Cambridge, UK

Speaker
Sergey Suchkov / Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, Russia

Abstract

Boron is important for plants. Fine line between the deficiency and toxicity as per requirement of plants make it more important subject of study. First visible symptom of boron toxicity is chlorotic and necrotic patches on leaves. Hence, we examine the effect of boron toxicity on chlorophyll pigment synthesis. This led us to investigate the other photosynthetic and related parameters. To study the effect of boron stress on protein modification due to oxidative stress, carbonylation and thiolation was evaluated. To examine the response of rice to boron stress, changes in protein expression were analyzed using a proteomic approach. To dissect dose dependent responses, rice seedlings were exposed to 0.05 and1.5 mM boron for 8 days. Proteins were extracted from leaf sheath and separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-TOF. Fifteen proteins showed upto three fold down-regulation in leaf sheath, in response to 1.5mM boron for 8 days while five proteins showed upto three fold up-regulation. Proteins were modelled using RCSB software. Protein spots were analyzed and identified as components of several important metabolic pathways. The major pathways affected were, photosynthesis, electron transport chain, glycolysis and stress metabolism.

Biography

Dr. Anjana Rani is Ph.D. from Banaras Hindu University, Department of Biochemistry. She has been designated as DST-WOS-A. She has published 6 papers in reputed journals and served as Principle investigator of a project funded by Department of Science and Technology. The major area of her research covers stress physiology and proteomics in plants as well as the understanding molecular mechanism of the genes involved in boron toxicity tolerance.

Speaker
Anjana Rani / Banaras Hindu University, India

Abstract

There is increasing evidences that favor the prenatal beginning of schizophrenia. These evidences point toward intra-uterine environmental factors that act specifically during the second pregnancy trimester producing a direct damage of the brain of the fetus [1]. The current available technology doesn't allow observing what is happening at cellular level since the human brain is not exposed to a direct analysis in that stage of the life in subjects at high risk of developing schizophrenia. Methods. In 1977 we began a direct electron microscopic research of the brain of fetuses at high risk from schizophrenic mothers in order to finding differences at cellular level in relation to controls. Results. In these studies we have observed within the nuclei of neurons the presence of complete and incomplete viral particles that reacted in positive form with antibodies to herpes simplex hominis type I [HSV1] virus, and mitochondria alterations [2]. Conclusion. The importance of these findings can have practical applications in the prevention of the illness keeping in mind its direct relation to the aetiology and physiopathology of schizophrenia. A study of the gametes or the amniotic fluid cells in women at risk of having a schizophrenic offspring is considered. Of being observed the same alterations that those observed previously in the cells of the brain of the studied foetuses, it would intend to these women in risk of having a schizophrenia descendant, previous information of the results, the voluntary medical interruption of the pregnancy or an early anti HSV1 viral treatment as preventive measure of the later development of the illness. 1. Yolken RH, Torrey EF. Viruses, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Clin Microbiol Rev 1995; 8: 131-145. 2. Mesa CS. An ultrastructural study of the temporal lobe and peripheral blood in schizophrenic patients. Rev Neurol 2001; 33: 619-623.

Biography

Segundo Mesa Castillo. As Specialist in Neurology, he worked for 10 years in the Institute of Neurology of Havana, Cuba. He has worked in Electron Microscopic Studies on Schizophrenia for 32 years. He was awarded with the International Price of the Stanley Foundation Award Program and for the Professional Committee to work as a fellowship position in the Laboratory of the Central Nervous System Studies, National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke under Dr. Joseph Gibbs for a period of 6 months, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, Washington D.C. USA, June 5, 1990. At present he is member of the Scientific Board of the Psychiatric Hospital of Havana and give lectures to residents in psychiatry.

Speaker
Segundo Mesa Castillo / Psychiatric Hospital of Havana, CA 10800, Cuba

Abstract

Protein aggregation and amyloid fibrillation are responsible for several serious pathological conditions (like type II diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases etc.) and protein drugs ineffectiveness. Therefore, a molecule that can inhibit the amyloid fibrillation and potentially clear amyloid fibrils is of great therapeutic value.In this manuscript,we investigated the antiamyloidogenic, fibril disaggregating, as well as cell protective effect of an anti-tuberculosis drug, Capreomycin (CN). Aggregation kinetics data, as monitored by ThT fluorescence, inferred that CN retards the insulin amyloid fibrillation by primarily targeting the fibril elongation step with little effect on lag time. Increasing the dose of CN boosted its inhibitory potency. Strikingly, CN arrested the growth of fibrils when added during the elongation phase, and disaggregated mature insulin fibrils. Our Circular Dichroism (CD) results showed that, although CN is not able to maintain the alpha helical structure of protein during fibrillation, reduces the formation of beta sheet rich structure. Furthermore, Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) analysis confirmed that CN treated samples exhibited different size distribution and morphology, respectively. In addition, molecular docking results revealed that CN interacts with insulin through hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding, and the Hemolytic assay confirmed the non-hemolytic activity of CN on human RBCs. For future research, this study may assist in the rational designing of molecules against amyloid formation.

Biography

Professor, Rizwan Hasan Khan has received his Ph.D. in Biotechnology from Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, India in 1996. His research focus is centered on protein biophysics, protein folding, misfolding and amyloid fibrils. He has worked with Prof. I.J.Goldstein at University of Michigan USA as BOYSCAST Fellow and with Prof. Steve Perkins at University of London as Commonwealth Fellow. He had published around 290 papers in the journals of international repute with h-index of 45; citation 7988. He is fellow of Biotech Research Society, India and also serving as Bentham Ambassador. He is also editor of several international journals.

Speaker
Rizwan Hasan Khan / Aligarh Muslim University, Uttar Pradesh, India

Abstract

Almost all of Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) hits come from non-coding DNA elements. Data from chromatin interaction analyses suggest a long-range interaction with a putative enhancer upstream of TNFAIP3. Disrupting the enhancer may impair TNFAIP3 expression and enhance SLE risk. Two variants, rs10499197 and rs58905141 carried on the SLE risk haplotype are situated near this enhancer and could affect its function. Cloning the regulatory region surrounding rs10499197 into an expression plasmid containing a CRISPR-Cas9 backbone, and then performing a genome editing assay, we found that the variant is located near an enhancer. And any changes to the SNP region might impair enhancer and its ability to regulate TNFAIP3 expression.

Biography

Ajay Nair has completed his PhD from University of Otago, New Zealand and postdoctoral studies from Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, USA. He has published in several reputed peer-reviewed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of repute.

Speaker
Ajay Nair / Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation,USA

Abstract

Oil exploration and waste disposal activities have been reported to cause water pollution in the Niger-Delta region. The indigenous bacterial community from a crude oil bunkering activity in Delta State, Nigeriawas investigated. Metagenomic analysis was performed using 16S rRNAamplicon sequencing. Oil composition of the water bodies were determined by Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry analysis.Proteobacteria(75.8 %), Bacteroidetes(9.2 %) andActinobacteria (7.5 %) were the most abundant in the water body studied and representgenera of known oil degraders. Methylotenera, Novosphingobium, and Flavobacterium were the most abundant having percentages of 16.1 %, 8.7 % and 3.2 %). Novosphingobium was most abundant in the early rainy and late rainy season (16.0 %; 8.3 %) than when compared with the early dry and late dry seasons (2.6 %; 7.0 %). Methylotenerawas the most abundant in the early rainy season and late dry season (20.2 %; 18.6 %) than when compared with the early dry and late rainy seasons (10.9 %; 14.8 %). Flavobacterium was most abundant in the early rainy season and late rainy season (3.7 %; 3.3 %) than when compared with the early dry and late dry seasons (3.0 %; 2.9 %). Actinobacteria had lower population observed during the early dry and early rainy season (1.3 %, 1.8 %).GC-MS revealed petroleum hydrocarbons (C1-C30) concentrations of saturated aliphatics, unsaturated aliphatics, and polyaromatics. The indigenous bacterial community included oil degraders with Methylotenera as the major genus which corresponds to the biodegradation of the oil contents.

Biography

Dr. Joyce E.Idomeh obtained her PhD from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta. She is an Early Career Scientist serving presently as the Head of Department of Marine Environment and Pollution Control in the Nigeria Maritime University, Okerenkoko.

Speaker
Joyce E. Idomeh1 / Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta

Sessions:

Abstract

Mutations which cause disruption to the postsynaptic proteome are involved in many brain diseases. These comprise common and infrequent neurological, and developmental disorders. Synapses are essential components of neurons that needed for the travel of information throughout the nervous system to adjust different behaviors. Thus, optimal synaptic communication is necessary for proper brain physiology, and trivial deviation of synapse function early in life can lead to brain dysfunction. Synaptic disease or Synaptopathy is now recognized as a key reason of neurodevelopmental disorders. Autism as a complex neurodevelopmental disorder is characterized by social interaction impairment, poor communication skills, and repetitive or stereotypic behaviors. Synaptopathy arises from alterations that affecting the integrity and/or functionality of synapses, can contribute to synaptic pathologies as etiological mechanism of autism. Based upon the blood biomarkers of autism, increased platelet serotonin (5-HT), suggest that increased 5-HT uptake by 5-HT transporters or storage in the presynaptic neuron would lead to decreased brain 5-HT. A relationship between autistic behavior and dysfunctions in the midbrain dopaminergic system was also hypothesized. While dysfunction of the nigrostriatal circuit leads to stereotyped behaviors, a dysfunction in mesocorticolimbic circuit leads to social deficits. Multiple studies demonstrate that postsynaptic receptors, such as GABA receptors and glutamate receptors, and glutamate transporters have been associated with glutamate excitotoxicity as etiological mechanism repeatedly reported in autism. Our most recent study proved that GABA synaptopathy promotes caspase 3 and caspase 9 as pro-apoptotic markers. In this talk, relationship between synaptopathies, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impaired gut microbiota as etiological mechanisms of autism will be discussed. Understanding common causes and mechanisms of autism‐associated synaptic dysfunction could help to suggest novel synapse‐based treatment strategies and early intervention of autism.

Biography

Afaf El-Ansary, female, biochemist, graduated from biochemistry department, Ain Shams University, Egypt in 1974. She worked in the National Research Centre, Egypt from 1976-2000, During 2001-2016, she worked as professor, Biochemistry Department, Science College, King Saud University, KSA. Since 2016- till now, she joined the Central laboratory as senior scientist to supervise the Biochemistry, Proteomic and biomarkers units. She has published more than 45 papers related to metabolic integration between schistosome parasite and mollusca hosts. She recorded a patent on the" use of sub lethal concentration of solanum nigrum plant for the control of schistosomiasis". She was recognized by the Marquis Who's Who in science and engineering, Eight's edition, 2005-2006. She is member in number of national and international societies and she is recorded as reviewer and Editorial board member in many international journals. In recent years she focused on the screening of biochemical markers related to autism and she got another 70 published papers in high impact factor Journals related to this research interest. She is member in the European Society of Predictive, Preventive and Personalized Medicine Society (Moscow). Most recently, she is the head of The Saudi group related to the nutritional Council for Nutritional and Environmental Medicine (CONEM)

Speaker
Afaf El-Ansary / King Saud University, Saudi Arabia

Abstract

Acidocalcisomes have been linked with polyfunctional polymers of prokaryots, protozoa and eukaryots cells, including of cations and phosphorus, polyphosphate, acid calcium; they have a role in pH homeostasis, osmoregulation and are of other important theoretical and practical significance. The subjects of investigation were Salmonella typhi strain 199, Salmonella typhimurium 564 in macrophage culture (penicillin and mpicillin 4000 unit/mL), Candida guilliermondii NP-4 under X radiation (LD50 720 Gy), Entamoeba moshkovskii strain ER under γ-ionizing radiation (Lethal dose of 1000 Gy) and Leishmania hertigi strain RP. For routine electron microscopy cell suspensions of bacteria, yeasts and protozoa fixed with 2.5% glutaraldehyde, postfixation was realized with 1% tetraoxid osmium and after dehydratation embedding in araldit. Ultrathin and cryoultrathin sections were studied by transmission electron microscope. The morphometric parameters were determined using the program "Video-Test-5 Structure of nanotechnology." As a result of complex electron microscopic studies of morphogenesis, in some species of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotic organisms the formation of new structures of electrodens granules of volutin-acidocalcisomes has been established within cell cytoplasm. In addition, under influence of ionizing irradiation, as well as in presence of some antibiotics, the morphometric changes in properties of granules acidocalcisomes have been shown. In the case of C. guilliermondii, Ent. moshkovskii X-rays and gamma ionizing radiation have undergone dimensional changes of acidocalcisomes, exhibiting an image of stage reparations and cellular resistance. These targets that are relevant to the cell responses to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs should be suggested, in addition to DNA or to the cellular defense systems. In our opinion, the high methodological and theoretical level of proteomics and bioinformatics in the field of molecular biology prompts the urgent discussion of volutin. Docampo and Moreno [2,3] mentioned using of phosphoproteomicsosomes terminology in combination with important cellular body volutins, acidocalcisomes.

Biography

Dr. Karlen O. Hovnanyan, Dr. Sc., M.D., Senior Researcher of the Technological Center of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences (NAS) of the Republic of Armenia (RA), doctorant of Department of Anatomy of Pathogen Microorganisms of the Hamaleya Institute of Microbiology and Epidemiology of RAMS of USSR, Moscow. Since 1968 till 1998 - Head of Laboratory of Electron Microscopy in the Institute of Epidemiology, Virology and Parasitology of Health Ministry of Armenia. Since 1998 till 2016 - Head of Laboratory of Electron Microscopy of the Institute of Molecular Biology, NAS RA. Presently - President of Armenian Electron Microscopy Society (AEMS), full member of the IFSM and EMS. 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003 - Editorial Chief of International Conferences of AEMS, etc. Has more than 220 publications. Honor of Rudolf Virchow Medal of European Academy of Natural Sciences, Medals "The Excellent of Health" and ”The Veteran of Labour”.

Speaker
Dr. Karlen O.Hovnanyan / 1Scientific Technological Center of Organic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Armenia

Abstract

Opioid addiction is recognized as a chronic relapsing brain disease resulting from repeated exposure to opioid drugs. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the ability of organism return back to the physiological norm after cessation of drug supply are not fully understood. The aim of our work was to study the effect of chronic morphine treatment and withdrawal in the rat forebrain cortex and hippocampus. Gel-based proteomic approach and label-free quantification (MaxLFQ) were used to compare protein composition of post-nuclear supernatant fraction prepared from forebrain cortex (FBC) and hippocampus of rats exposed to morphine for 10 days and sacrificed 24 hours (groups +M10 and −M10) or 20 days after the last dose of morphine (groups +M10/−M20 and −M10/−M20). In FBC, the number of significantly altered proteins (≥2-fold) was decreased from 28 (±M10) to 14 (±M10/−M20) when analyzed in 2D gels or from 113 to 19 when identified by LFQ. Unlike FBC, 2D-DIGE analysis of our hippocampal samples resulted in identification of 6 altered proteins in groups (±M10) and this number was increased to 13 in (±M10/−M20). LFQ analysis determined 19 proteins with significantly changed expression level in groups (±M10). The 19 altered proteins were also detected after 20-day drug withdrawal (±M10/−M20). Our results indicate that morphine-induced change of protein composition in rat hippocampus is opposite to that observed in forebrain cortex. The two functionally distinct parts of CNS respond to the pathological situation caused by drug addiction in a different manner with the aim to restore the physiological norm.

Biography

Dr. Hana Ujcikova has completed her PhD from Charles University in Prague and The Institute of Physiology CAS. During her postdoctoral studies, she was a visiting scientist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. She has published in reputed journals.

Speaker
Hana ujukova / Institute of Physiology of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic

Will be updated soon...