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Plenary Talks

Abstract

Using indentation to obtain mechanical property data is highly attractive. Specimens can be small and require minimal preparation. Testing of components in service is often possible, as is mapping of properties over a surface. On the other hand, the tested volume must be large enough for its response to be representative of “bulk” (continuum) behaviour. While much indentation work has focused on very fine length scales, it is on this “meso” scale (such that the indentation response is representative of the bulk, but small samples and mapping are still possible) that there is major industrial potential. Of course, Young's modulus and hardness values are obtainable from indentation data, using analytical expressions, but these are of limited interest. The complexity of stress and strain fields during indentation has the effect that more substantive material properties, such as values of the parameters characterising plasticity and creep, cannot be obtained analytically. However, iterative FEM simulation of the indentation process, converging on optimal parameter values by optimising the agreement between predicted and measured outcomes, is a viable procedure. Outcomes commonly used include load-displacement-time datasets and residual indent shapes. While conceptually simple, this methodology is challenging in detail, since an automated process is required and it must quickly yield accurate and reliable results. Also, ideally a user should require neither expertise in FEM nor access to FEM resources, so the simulation runs need to take place remotely from direct user involvement. The main issues involved in optimization of experimental conditions and model formulation will be described. Use of spherical indenters has many advantages over other shapes. The indenter radius, R, and the depth of penetration, , are important. Very fine scale operation (“nanoindentation”) is not viable and in general the indenter radius will be of the order of 1 mm and applied loads may be required up to the kN range. Ballistic indentation is also possible, with the incident velocity being an important variable. Techniques for measurement of displacement, and machine compliance, need attention. The possibility of material anisotropy (due to crystallographic texture) may also need to be taken into account. Issues related to the modelling include mesh specification, selection of the constitutive law, simulation of interfacial friction and options for the convergence algorithm. It is shown that, if these aspects are optimised, then reliable parameter values can be obtained for both plasticity and creep, with the latter characterizing both primary and secondary regimes (Miller-Norton law). Software packages implementing these capabilities are now becoming commercially available.

Biography

After completing his first degree and PhD in the Materials Science Department at Cambridge, Bill Clyne held University lecturing posts in Brazil, Switzerland and Surrey (UK), before returning to Cambridge, where he was appointed in 1999 to a chair in Mechanics of Materials. He has been the Director of the Gordon Laboratory (since its opening at that time). His research interests centre on the thermo-mechanics of composites and coatings, particularly processing, numerical modelling and fine scale mechanical interrogation. Details are available at www.ccg.msm.cam.ac.uk. He has authored over 300 papers, two textbooks (on composites) and 10 educational software packages. He is in the original ISI Highly Cited list (www.isihighlycited.com). He has been sole supervisor for over 80 PhD students in Cambridge and has given about 50 Invited Keynote Talks and Colloquia over the past 10 years. He was President of the Federation of European Materials Societies (FEMS - ww.fems.org) and is now an Honorary Member. He has been Principal Investigator for many large projects, with an aggregate value running into several tens of £M, and has chaired 8 large international conferences. He is also the Director of DoITPoMS (www.doitpoms.ac.uk), which maintains a globally-accessed Educational Materials Science website. Current Scientific Council memberships include IMDEA (Madrid), The Materials Science Cluster of Excellence (Erlangen) and the Jülich Helmholtz Centre for Energy and Climate Research. In 2004, he was awarded the Griffith Medal, a premier prize of the Institute of Materials. He was elected Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2008 and Helmholtz International Fellow in 2014.

Speaker
Bill Clyne / University of Cambridge
UK

Abstract

The transfer matrix method for multibody systems (MSTMM), namely the Rui method, is a rather novel approach for analyzing multibody system dynamics, which was firstly presented in 1993 and has been constantly developing in recent 25 years. With features that avoiding the global dynamics equations of the system, keeping high computational speed, and allowing highly formalized programming, this method has been widely used in science research and design of dynamics performance and experiments for various complex mechanical systems. This method has attracted wide attention and over 300 papers have been published by over 200 researchers from many countries. MSTMM has been widely applied in over fifty research directions in science research and key engineering applications including: tank, self-propelled artillery, “metal storm”, shipborne gun, cannon, spin tube gun, antiaircraft gun, vehicular MLRS, shipborne MLRS, airborne MLRS, vehicular missile system, missile, launch vehicle, rocket, feeding platform, parachute-submissile, aerospace aircraft, helicopter, inertial measurement unit system, submarine, underwater towed system, ship, vehicle suspension, truck cranes, heavy duty machine tool, fly-cutting machine tool, five-axis CNC machine tool, machine tool spindle, large-scale rotary machine, piezoelectric actuator, intelligent flexible linkage devices, controlled flexible manipulators, civil structures, immersed tunnel, super long stay cable, robots, mobile concrete truck, vibration compaction, vibration screen, road roller, wind turbine tower, wind turbine, gas turbine, high pressure compressor, low pressure rotor of gas turbine, high pressure gas well, roots blower, diesel engine, floating bridge, wing, servo turret, etc. In this report, the following aspects are systematically reviewed: history, basic principles, formulas, algorithm, automatic deduction theorem of overall transfer equation, software, highlights, tendency, and applications.

Biography

Xiaoting Rui obtained his PhD from Nanjing University of Science and Technology (NUST), China. He is member of Chinese Academy of Sciences, director of Institute of Launch Dynamics in NUST. He is president of Specialized Committee on Launch Dynamics of China Ordnance Society and president of Key Laboratory of System Dynamics of Complex Equipment of Ministry of Industry and Information Technology of China. His research interests include launch dynamics and multibody system dynamics. He proposed the transfer matrix method for multibody systems, which is a novel method of multibody system dynamics with high computational speed, and is called “Rui Method” internationally. He established the theory and technology system of multibody system launch dynamics. He obtained 4 National Technological Invention Awards and National Technology Progress Awards of China. He gained the 3rd Outstanding Talents Award for National Defense Science and Technology Industry of China, and the 1st National Innovation and Pioneer Prize of China.He was awarded National Outstanding Scientific and Technical Worker of China. He has published 8 books and over 400 papers, which have been cited over 2,300 times by others. He is invited as guest editor of special issue of international journal Advanced in Mechanical Engineering. He is member of editorial board of international journal Scientific Word Journal, Journal of ISRN Aerospace Engineering,etc.He was invited by many famous scientists and supported several times by key projects of German Research Council, to give over 50 invited academic lectures in twenty universities and institutes, as well as various international conferences.

Speaker
Xiaoting Rui / Nanjing University of Science and Technology
China

Abstract

In latest machine tools such as CNC,DNC,and Machining Centres there is a need for machining latest materials such as Composite materials and ceramic materials. In these specialized machining processes extra care should be taken to machine the components with the required accuracy and surface finish. Since the entire system consists of Mechanical ,Electrical Electronic ,Hydraulic, Pneumatic etc. Monitoring of those components are vitally important .If any malfunction is occurring in any one of the systems, it will finally reflect on the finished products .For example if the cutting tool is subjected to wear than the permissible limit the surface finish will be affected .One such technique is known as Acoustic Emission Technique.In this case the Pizeo Electric Transducer of high level resonant frequency is mounted on the tool holder and connected to the amplifier .The stress wave emitted during the cutting process is analysed ,amplified and captured in a medium.Either it can be recorded or visually captured .The data may be stored for different values of wear.If the wear is excessive than the permissible value, there should be a mechanism to withdraw the tool so that further damage is not taking place on the product due to the worn out tool.In a similar way it is possible to diagnose other parts such as hydraulic and mechanical components.One common phenomenon is called ‘Stick Slip’ which mostly occurs in Mechanical and hydraulic components.Suitable Mechanisms must be made available to control the occurrence.These latest techniques are to be computerized and kept in data base for future reference to enable us to produce Components with zero error

Biography

Dr.GOPALASAMI SANTHANAM KANDASAMI was born on 19 th Jan 1943 at Tirupur, 30 KM from Coimbatore in Tamil Nadu.After Schooling ,he has got admission in Jamal Mohamed College, Trichy in 1959 to do Pre University Courses and then B.Sc [Physics] from 1959-1963.Then he has joined P.S.G College of Technology to study B.E. Mechanical Engineering and was awarded the degree in 1966.Then he has joined as an Associated Lecturer in the same College till 1976.During this career he has studied M.E. in the branch of Machine Tools Engineering and completed in1973. After he has joined MIT-MADRAS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY at CHROMEPET at CHENNAI,as an Associate LECTURER and then promoted as LECTURERE he has done Ph.D program and awarded the degree in 1990.The title of his Thesis is “Application of Acoustic Emission Technique for Studies of Machining Processes’.He has started his career as an Associate Lecturer in PSG COLLEGE OF TECHNOLOGY AND POLYTECHNIQUE in COIMBATORE from 1967 -1975.He has Joined MIT in 1976 as an Associate Lecturer and promoted as Lecturer ,Assistant Professor and later retired as Professor and HOD of the Dept of Production Technology in 2002. From 2002 to 2013 he was working in reputed self financing engineering colleges in Chennai as Principal , Dean and Advisor.He was an able administrator and gained reputation among students and faculty members.He has guided two candidates for Ph.D program and they have successfully completed the program and awarded the degree in 1996 and 1998 in ANNA UNIVERSITY.He has been the examiner for evaluating the Ph.D Thesis and also for oral examination.During his service he was a member of SYNDICATE OF UNIVERSITY which is a governing body of the University.He has contributed actively in the proceeding of Syndicate. He has been sanctioned Rs 30 Lakhs for establishing MECHATRONICS LABORATORY from AICTE –ALL INDIA COUNCIL FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION Central Government Organization.Even after he is retirement from service he is rendering fruitful contributions for Research

Speaker
Gopalasami Santhanam Kandasami / M.I.T. Anna University
India
Sessions:Keynote

Abstract

Tool & die production is an important phase in the development of new components/product models. This phase determines both the lead time (Time-To-Production/-Market) and the size of the investments required to start the production. This paper is focused on Powder Bed Fusion (PBF) and summarizes the current position of 3D metal printing/additive manufacturing (henceforth called 3D metal printing)of industrial tools & dies. It also exhibits the new possibilities to design the tool/die differently simply because the new shape can be produced. Different types of generative design concepts such as form synthesis, topology optimization and lattice and surface optimization are exemplified. The paper exemplifies business cases, the shorter lead times, the associated improved material utilization degree, reduced weight,etc. Low volume production by 3D metal printing is discussed. High volume production by 3D metal printing of manufacturing tools and dies is described. The paper exhibits some examples of digitalization through virtual tool & die design and optimization of the tool& die production and how it provides greater flexibility, better efficiency, tremendous speed, improved sustainability and increased global competitiveness. 3D metal printing is expected to result in several changes in the supplier chain and generate new business models. The present paper describes some of the changes 3D metal printing has led to and is expected to result in within the engineering and automotive industry in Europe during the coming years.

Biography

Nader Asnafi is a professor of mechanical engineering with extensive experience from various assignments in the industry in addition to his academic career. He has developed a range of new products, manufacturing systems and materials (more recently with the 3D-printing). He has a long industrial experience in leadership positions from the company Esselte Dymo, Sapa Technology, Volvo Cars and Uddeholm. He also worked as director of studies at LTU and Division Chief of Engineering at Blekinge Institute of Technology. He has been the appointed reviewer of several national Swedish R and D Programs and has been the chairman of the board of SWEREA IVF INDUSTRIAL MEMBERS ASSOCIATION from 2007 to 2009. He is also the member of the board of WINGQUIST CENTER OF EXCELLENCE, a national center of excellence focusing on virtual product and production development mainly within the automotive industry and the Council of the Institution of Product and Production Development at CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, Sweden. He has organized several international conferences and seminars.

Speaker
Nader Asnafi / OREBRO UNIVERSITY SWEDEN SWEDEN

Abstract

In the present study, an eco-friendly porous medium power generator is developed for bottom billion community usage. This burner with porous medium (PM) provides lower emissions especially CO and NOx, lower fuel consumption compare to the burner without porous medium. A few objectives have been identified at the beginning of the work which was mainly to develop and improve the PM burner with data acquisition and followed by conducting experimental investigation on the parameters affecting the PM combustion. The research work investigated a PM power generator for indoor and outdoor applications. The PM burner is incorporated with power generation system consisted of thermoelectric cells which can be used to generate electricity. Besides, other parameters such as equivalence ratio of the air fuel mixture have been controlled during experiment while the PM burner used has been tested with different porous medium thickness and equivalent ratio. The results show that PM burner produced better thermal efficiency, sufficient flame temperature and lower emission. The power generator provides lower fuel consumption up to 50% fuel saving and power up to 8W.

Biography

Ir. Dr. M.Z. Abdullah is a Professor and Dean of Aerospace Engineering at Universiti Sains Malaysia. He obtained a bachelor degree in Mechanical Engineering from University of Swansea, U.K. His M.Sc and and PhD degrees are from University of Strathclyde, U.K. He has numerous publications in international journals and conference proceedings. His areas of research are CFD, heat transfer, electronic packaging, electronic cooling and porous medium combustion

Speaker
Mohd Zulkifly Abdullah / Universiti Sains Malaysia

Abstract

The development of textile machines in VÚTS, a.s., and the pressure on ever-increasing productivity has ensured a high level of application research in the field of technical mechanics, especially in the area of application research of cam mechanisms and linkages. With the rapid development of computer technology over the past twenty years, mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, electronicsand software engineering have been unprecedented in success. However, the named disciplines, in their theoretical demandingness, are moving away from each other. Nevertheless, technical practice still raises demands on productivity, quality, variability and flexible production automation. This results in requirements for increased performances of working machines (working periods or speeds), perfect respect of the positioning functions of working links (the dynamics of mechanisms with flexible links), versatilityin small series production (a possibility of an economically advantageous change of motion functions) and structural modularity of machines (flexible automation). The demanding production requirements can meet the knowledge of the above-mentioned fields in mutual combination with the resulting synergistic effect. This creates a new discipline, called mechatronics. As this is a very large field, the term mechatronicsin the conditions of VÚTS, a.s., will be explained from the point of view of the drives of working links of processing and handling machine mechanisms. One of the options in solving the specific problems of the drives of mechanism working links with a defined technological motion function is the implementation of working motions by cam mechanisms or linkages with conventional or electronic cams. While the applications of conventional cams in machine mechanisms are already well-known, electronic cams are being launched in different forms in the last ten years. This is due to the theoretical demands of the above-mentioned disciplines and the associated various skills of the development team staff. The described long-term activity of VÚTS, a.s., in the „cam“issue results in a unifying look at this area where conventional and electronic cam systems do not distinguish from each other in main features in their applications because both serve one purpose, namely the drive of mechanism working links of processing and handling machines. For this reason, conventional and electronic cams cannot be separated from each other but, on the contrary, it is useful to combine them into one specialized mechatronic area, which is, however, very extensive and complicated. In cross-section, the paper deals with approximately 10 years of application research of such defined mechatronics of the drives of mechanism working links.

Biography

Prof. Miroslav VÁCLAVÍK is born in 1943. He is a Faculty of Mechanical Engineeringof the Technical University of Liberec– 1966. He done this Ph.D.in – Prague Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of ČVUT Prague (Czech TechnicalUniversity in Prague)– 1972. He was professor in mechanical Engineering of the Technical University of Liberec – 2000. He is a General Director of the Research Institute VÚTS Liberec.

Speaker
Miroslav VÁCLAVÍK / Institute VÚTS Liberec Czech Republic

Abstract

Multiple slender structures in cross flow are widely seen in engineering. Typical examples are high-rise buildings or skyscrapers, chimney stacks, overhead power-line bundles, submarine communication system, undersea pipelines, electronic components on boards, marine risers, tube bundles in heat exchangers, bridge piers, stays, masts and chemical-reaction towers. The structures may of square or circular section. While a single square cylinder may experience galloping vibrations, a single circular cylinder does not. The wake of a single structure is very complex, the flow interference between the multiple structures, making the wake more complex, leads to a very high fluctuating forces, structural vibrations, acoustic noise, or resonance, which in some cases can trigger failure. As such, though a single circular cylinder does not experience galloping, two circular cylinders in close proximity do. Two square cylinders in close proximity may have an opposite scenario. This lecture will encompass galloping vibration problems associated with two circular cylinders and with one and two square cylinders, casting light upon the mechanisms behind the galloping vibration and its sustainability. In addition, the roles of added mass, flow-induced damping and physical aspects in the process of initiating the vibration will be paid attention.

Biography

Alam Md. Mahbub is a professor at HIT Shenzehn (China) since 2012, having more than 200 technical articles including 85 journal papers, most of which have been published in the top-notched journals, He is the author of two books and has edited two special issues in ‘Wind and Structures. Prof Alam has received a number of awards including South Africa NRF rating (Promising Young Researcher), China 1000-young-talent scholar and 2015 Shenzhen Outstanding Teacher. He is an editorial board member of ‘Wind and Structures, an International Journal’.

Speaker
MD MAHBUB ALAM / Harbin Institute of Technology China

Abstract

Control of vibration and sound radiation from structures is very important in design of quieter mechanical systems. Recently a geometrical modification for design of structures by embedding “Acoustic Black Holes” (ABH) is used to control vibration and hence sound radiation. An acoustic black hole is a power-law tapered profile to reduce phase and group velocities of wave propagation to zero, which makes the vibration energy to concentrate at the location of ABH. The major applications of this passive structural modification method are vibration control, noise reduction and vibration energy harvesting. Vibration control is achieved by placing damping material at the locations of acoustic black holes where vibration energies are concentrated. This will avoid using damping layers for the full structure. This method not only reduces the cost of damping material but also decreases the weight of host structure. This feature satisfies the design reqirement for light weight sturcture. The suppression of structural vibration reduces sound in the near field which results in the noise reduction. The recent developments in vibration energy harvesting is based on the use of piezoelectric material as transducer to produce electrical output. In the case of either machined metal or 3D printed vibrating structures, piezoelectric material can be attached at the ABH locations due to which the electrical energy output increases for harvesting. Also, ABH concentation effect can be tuned by adjusting its geometrical parameters. This presentation includes recent developments in theory and applications of acoustic black holes to structural vibration control, noise reduction and energy harvesting.

Biography

Marehalli .G. Prasad is a Professor Emeritus in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey, USA. He has been a faculty member at Stevens since 1980. In the areas of his specialization namely Acoustics, Vibration and Noise Control, Dr. Prasad has more than 100 publications in journals and conference proceedings. He has written chapters in handbooks and encyclopedia. He has received several awards for his research papers. He has presented several invited lectures at national and international conferences. He delivered the M.S. Narayanan Memorial Lecture at the International Conference ACOUSTICS 2013 organized by the Acoustical Societies of India and France in New Delhi. He has served as UNDP expert in Noise Control for projects in Romania and India. He is a consultant for several industries. Prof. Prasad was the recipient of 2015 Outstanding Educator Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Noise Control Engineering. He is a Fellow of four professional societies namely the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Acoustical Society of America, the Acoustical Society of India and the Institute of Noise Control Engineering (USA). He received 2017 Albert Nelson Marquis Lifetime Achievement Award from Who’s Who Publications Board.

Speaker
Marehalli G. Prasad / Stevens Institute of Technology
USA

Abstract

Engineering computing can be classified into hard computing and soft computing. In hard computing, the prime desiderata are precision, certainty and vigor. In contrast, in soft computing the principal notion is that precision and certainty carry a cost; and that computation, reasoning, and decision-making should exploit (whenever possible) the tolerance for imprecision, uncertainty, approximate reasoning, and partial truth for obtaining low cost solutions. Fuzzy logic and neural networks, the two major soft computing techniques, are the backbones for building an intelligent system. Fuzzy systems are appropriate if sufficient expert knowledge about the process is available, while neural systems are useful if sufficient data are available or measurable. Furthermore, neural networks possess the ability to learn the input-output relationship. A trained neural network provides instantly input-to-output mapping with reasonably good accuracy, but without knowledge representation. This presentation describes development of two projects: intelligent system monitoring and fast multidisciplinary design optimization. The system monitoring used soft computing techniques to automate the monitoring process, followed by the real-world application of such technique to monitoring the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) seeks to improve design methodology to rapidly and efficiently explore multiple-dimension design spaces with the goal of increasing system performance significantly, thereby reducing end-product cost substantially. Search-based and simulation-based are the two major system design approaches. The former is traditional and mathematical, and has existed for a long time. The optimum solution has to do with the selected starting point, and the optimization method used. A possibility of divergence in solution seeking is a major drawback in this approach. In this application, the most challenging task of multidisciplinary design

Biography

Paul P Lin is Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate Dean of Engineering at the Cleveland State University, USA. His main research areas are Intelligent Mechatronic Systems and Multidisciplinary System Optimization. He made a significant contribution to developing an intelligent system for NASA to monitor the microgravity environment onboard the US Lab inside the International Space Station. He also helped the US Air Force to develop a special optical measuring technique to quantify the aircraft tire deformation during takeoff and landing. In 2008 he was elected as a lifetime Fellow of ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers), the highest honor and recognition for his achievements by the professional society. He has served as Editor-inChief, Associate Editor, Journal Paper Reviewer and Conference Program Committee member. His research achievements have been well recognized nationally and internationally, which resulted in becoming the Keynote Speaker of seven (7) international conferences.

Speaker
Paul P Lin / Cleveland State University USA
Sessions:Speaker

Abstract

Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) encompasses a range of methods that replace or complement speech of individuals with complex communication needs. Predominant AAC methods rely on the interpretation of purposeful gestures or digitized inputs for interaction; however, such systems present limitations in terms of flexibility and portability. To address this shortfall, an alternative AAC solution, based on encoded modulated breathing, is being researched at Loughborough University [1]. It aims at aiding the communication of a wide range of speech-impaired individuals, including those with limited motor movements and patients in locked-in syndrome. Breathing, which consists of inhalation and exhalation, can be modulated in the inhalation and/or exhalation phases producing a set of distinguishable patterns. This study researches the interpretation of modulated breathing patterns (MBPs) to enable/restore the communication of speech-impaired individuals through different signal sensing modalities and processing algorithms. MBPs are used to interactively encode words and phrases with minimal effort. Users learn to generate MBPs to be translated to their selection of synthesised machine-spoken words (SMSW), gradually building up a vocabulary. Simultaneously, the system learns to recognize the incoming MBPs to output the corresponding SMSW whenever a specific breathing pattern is triggered. The system is linked to a pattern recognition algorithm designed for the production of SMSW. Approved protocols were generated to acquire user-selected analogue MBPs. Mean interpretation reliabilities of 86% to 90% were obtained with different sensing modalities. The system is undergoing further developments to increase its robustness, investigate different MBP recording modalities, and address portability advancements.

Biography

Kaddour Bouazza-Marouf completed his BSc and PhD from Newcastle University (UK); he is a Reader in Mechatronics in Medicine at Loughborough University, and teaches Robotics and Control Engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer (CEng), Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (FIMechE), and Associate Editor of The IFAC Journal of Mechatronics.

Speaker
Kaddour Bouazza-Marouf / Loughborough University UK

Abstract

An experimental approach for determination of structural flaws in cantilever beams is developed. The presented method is capable of detecting location of cracks and other possible structural flows on a beam using its first two natural frequencies measured by an accelerometer on a moveable mass on the beam at several locations along the beam. To verify the validity of the proposed method, vibration response of a cracked cantilever beam with a stationary roving mass is investigated. The beam is modeled by using Euler-Bernoulli beam with a rectangular cross section. The developed technique is used to determine analytical solutions for the variation of natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cracked cantilever beam versus the position of the roving mass. The analysis indicates that the variation of the natural frequencies versus position of the roving mass can drastically change when the roving mass is close to the position of a flaw. Moreover, the effects of the location and depth of the crack, the location and the weight of the roving mass on the natural frequencies, and mode shapes of the beam are investigated.

Biography

Hamid R. Hamidzadeh is Professor and Head of the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Tennessee State University. Before joining TSU, he was Professor of Mechanical Engineering at South Dakota State University for many years. He was a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from Imperial College-University of London in 1978. Dr. Hamidzadeh is an active teacher and researcher in vibrations, dynamic systems, composite cylinders, and inflated thin-film structures. He has been principal investigator of many research projects and contracts, and has published numerous technical articles. He was actively involved in research projects with NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. He has served the ASME as a member of NSSC and as chair of different Committees at Region VII for many years. He has served as a member of ASME Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound. He has organized and chaired several ASME Symposia. He was chair of the 20th ASME Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, and the General Co-Chair of the 2005 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers

Speaker
Hamid R. Hamidzadeh / Tennessee State University USA

Abstract

Professional Science Master’s (PSM) degree programs were established to educate students in both advanced STEM knowledge and business skills. The Master of Science in Professional Science (MSPS) program at Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) was established in a partnership between science and business faculty to provide middle Tennessee with a highly trained, business-savvy workforce in three concentrations: Biostatistics, Biotechnology, and Health Care Informatics. Since then, it has added Actuarial Sciences, Geosciences, and Engineering Management. The Engineering Management MSPS concentration is a highly attractive career opportunity for students from a mechanical and mechatronics engineering background. The leading-edge engineering courses provide students with certifications in PMI Project Management, Six Sigma, and lean manufacturing, as well as providing additional education in safety processes and engineering management. The business courses–which are required of all MSPS students–prepare students for leadership and management roles, so that engineering management students graduate ready to both design the solutions and lead the their implementation. Students put all of their skills to practice in their capstone internship in industry, where more than 70% are eventually offered jobs. These graduates are then on a fast-track for the kinds of high-paying, in-demand manufacturing management jobs.

Biography

Dr. Saeed Foroudastan is the Associate Dean for the College of Basic and Applied Sciences and professor of Mechatronics Engineering and Program Director of the MS-PS Program at Middle Tennessee State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. in civil engineering, and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Tennessee Technological University. He has six years of industrial experience as a Senior Engineer and 20 years of academic experience teaching. He has also served as an advisor, performed extensive research, published numerous technical papers, received multiple awards, and secured more the $2 million in the form of internal and external grants and research funding including an NSF Mechatronics and another NSF msps grants.

Speaker
Saeed Foroudastan / Middle Tennessee State University, USA

Abstract

The micromirror is a typical MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) device. It can be a single micromirror or a device consisting of an array of a large number of micromirrors. Due to its small size (ranging from 10 m to 1mm), suitability for the low cost batch production, and capability of integrating driving/control circuit on the same chip, the micromirror has been and will potentially penetrate into many optical mechatronics systems. These systems include micromirror display systems such as projectors, automotive HUD (head-up display), laser scanning systems for Lidar (light detection and ranging) and depth measurement using structure light, laser marking/etching system, spectrometers, etc. This talk is to introduce a few micromirror based mechatronics systems developed in our group, which include the micromirror laser automotive HUD system, the micromirror laser pointer, the micromirror laser marking system, the micromirror Lidar and depth sensing system. Those systems are based on two innovative micromirrors developed in our group, i.e., the repulsive-force electrostatic micromirror and FPCB (Flexible Printed Circuit Board) electromagnetic and electrostatic micromirrors. The presentation will introduce the working principle, advantages and disadvantages, as well as the current development status of each system.

Biography

Siyuan He, Professor with the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, Canada. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Toronto, Canada. His research fields include microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) (microactuator, micromirror, and microfabrication), piezoelectric motors and actuators, and energy harvesting.

Speaker
Siyuan / Ryerson University
Canada

Abstract

In this communication impact of heat generation/absorption on nano-liquid flow near a stagnation point is conversed. The flow analysis is done in attendance of magnetohydrodynamics and mixed convection past an exponential stretched surface. Special effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis are also considered. The series solution is extracted for the coupled differential equations with high nonlinearity of the modeled mathematical problem via renowned Homotopy Analysis method. Graphical illustrations depicting the influence of sundry parameters on involved profiles like velocity, temperature, and concentration are also given. Numerically erected table of skin drag coefficient, the rate of heat and mass transfers with the necessary discussion is a part of the presented problem. It is comprehended that temperature distribution is an escalating function of heat generation parameter. Furthermore, the temperature field is a growing function of Brownian motion parameter.

Biography

Dr. Muhammad Ramzan (Professor) has completed his Ph.D. from Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan in 2010. He is the Senior Professor (Mathematics) and has a vast experience of 24 years teaching/research in varied educational institutions. He has published more than 55 papers in reputed International journals.

Speaker
Muhammad Ramzan / Bahria University
Pakistan

Abstract

To improve the reliability of compressor subjected to repetitive pressure loading, a reliability methodology for parametric accelerated life testing (ALT) was suggested. It consisted of a parametric ALT plan, a generalized life-stress failure model with a new effort concept, an acceleration factor, and a sample size equation. Based on failure analysis, this parametric ALT should help an engineer uncover the design parameters affecting reliability during the design process of a compressor. As a test case, a compressor with a newly designed crankshaft subjected to repetitive pressure loading was studied. Using a mass and energy balance analysis, the pressure loads of compressor were analyzed. In the first ALT and field, the failure mode was compressor locking due to crankshaft wear. The missing design parameter of the crankshaft was the improper lubrication structure in the crankshaft. As a corrective action plan, the crankshafts were redesigned. In the second ALT, wear in the compressor crankshaft occurred. The minimum clearance between the crankshaft and thrust washer was then modified. After another parametric ALT with corrective action plans, the reliability of the newly designed compressor was expected to have a life of 10 years with a failure rate of 0.1%/year

Biography

To improve the reliability of compressor subjected to repetitive pressure loading, a reliability methodology for parametric accelerated life testing (ALT) was suggested. It consisted of a parametric ALT plan, a generalized life-stress failure model with a new effort concept, an acceleration factor, and a sample size equation. Based on failure analysis, this parametric ALT should help an engineer uncover the design parameters affecting reliability during the design process of a compressor. As a test case, a compressor with a newly designed crankshaft subjected to repetitive pressure loading was studied. Using a mass and energy balance analysis, the pressure loads of compressor were analyzed. In the first ALT and field, the failure mode was compressor locking due to crankshaft wear. The missing design parameter of the crankshaft was the improper lubrication structure in the crankshaft. As a corrective action plan, the crankshafts were redesigned. In the second ALT, wear in the compressor crankshaft occurred. The minimum clearance between the crankshaft and thrust washer was then modified. After another parametric ALT with corrective action plans, the reliability of the newly designed compressor was expected to have a life of 10 years with a failure rate of 0.1%/year Dr Woo has a BS and MS in Mechanical Engineering, and he has obtained PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Texas A&M. He major in energy system such as HVAC and its heat transfer, optimal design and control of refrigerator, reliability design of thermal components, and failure Analysis of thermal components in marketplace using the Non-destructive such as SEM & XRAY. In 1992.03–1997 he worked in Agency for Defense Development, Chinhae, South Korea, where he has researcher in charge of Development of Naval weapon System. Now he is working as a Senior Reliability Engineer in Side-by-Side Refrigerator Division, Digital Appliance, SAMSUNG Electronics, and focus on enhancing the life of refrigerator as using the accelerating life testing. He also has experience about Side-by-Side Refrigerator Design for Best Buy, Lowe’s, Cabinet-depth Refrigerator Design for General Electrics.

Speaker
Seong-woo Woo / Reliability Association of Korea

Abstract

Nowadays, the Internet of Things (IoT), Unmanned Arial Vehicle (UAV) and Autonomous Vehicle demand low-power consumption. Low power consumption & low cost can be obtained from the use of low processing CPU devices. But, running deep learning models efficiently on low capacity graph processors is quite impossible. In order to resolve this problem in this paper, we integrated low capacity CPU devices with Neural Compute stick which prevail and optimize large object detection model to make it operable in low capacity CPU. In our system, we integrated latte panda (small development board with Intel quad-core processor) [1] with Intel Movidius (neural compute stick) [2]. Similarly, we integrated raspberry pi (single board computer of ARM processor) [3] with Intel Movidius to compare the performance. In both cases, we used Movidius NCS, same OS(Ubuntu) and similar object detection API(YOLO) [4]. Latte Panda and Raspberry Pi both devices are interference constrained in case of any deep learning object detection API. By integrating Movidius NCS in both cases for real-time object detection, we obtained a result of approximately 0.45s to process each frame in case of Latte panda and approximately 1.01s to process each frame in case of Raspberry Pie. The performance increased and the result also indicates that the real-time speed to process per frame varies from device to device. This low-cost system can be easily built for security monitoring, aerial monitoring, facial detection, object detection, etc.

Biography

Deok-Jin Lee received the Ph.D. degrees in Aerospace Engineering from Texas A&M University in May 2005. He worked for Agency for Defense Development (ADD) from 2006 to 2007, and Korean Air R&D Center from 2009 to 2011. He was also a research professor at the Center for Autonomous Vehicle Research (CAVR), Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, U.S.A. Currently, he is an associate professor at the School of Mechanical & Automotive Engineering, and also the director of the center of Artificial Intelligence & Autonomous Systems in Kunsan National University, South Korea. His research interests include intelligent autonomous systems, machine learning, deep reinforcement learning, sensor fusion and sensor networks, adaptive estimation and control, and integrated navigation and localization, multi-agent control.

Speaker
Deok-jin Lee / Kunsan National University
Republic Of Korea

Abstract

The report demonstrates experience in implementing two-phase flow-meters for helium, hydrogen, liquefied natural gas (LNG), and oil-salty/formation water mixtures. Two types of such devices are presented. The first type is flow-meters based on combination of a void fraction RF-sensor and a narrowing device. They can be applied for superconducting accelerators cooled with two-phase helium, refueling hydrogen system for space ships and oil production industry. A feature of the cryogenic RF-sensor is that its sensitive part is made of metal-ceramic tube. A combination of a gamma-densitometer and a narrowing device is employed for the second one. These systems can be used for the diagnostics of LNG and oil-formation water flows. Temperature sensors for wide range of application (1.5÷325 K) and a measuring system based on a modular industrial computer are presented as well. In particular, the composite TVO sensor is made of nanoscale grains of carbon within micronized alumina oxide substrate. The obtained characteristics for different flow-meters are discussed. It is shown that the experience gained allows separationless flow-meters for three-phase oil-gas-formation water flows to be produced. Some features of its operation are also considered.

Biography

Filippov Yury has completed his PhD from Moscow Power Energy Institute, USSR. He is the head of cryophysics department of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow Region. He has published more than 120 papers in reputed journals and proceedings of different international conferences. His field of activity concerns cryogenic materials, hydrodynamics and heat regimes of superconducting devices cooled with two-phase helium flows, temperature sensors and systems to monitor multiphase flows for cryogenics, LNG and oil production.

Speaker
Filippov Yury / Joint Institute for Nuclear Research
Russia

Abstract

Challenging problems of computational mechanics may often be characterized by large deformations that are common in manufacturing processes such as forging. The finite element method faces difficulties in simulating large deformations, due to severe mesh distortion. A solution to overcome these difficulties is to use meshless methods like Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). This paper presents a thermomechanical SPH in total Lagrangian formulation to simulate efficiently large deformations thermomechanical problems. The continuum is modeled as a Hamiltonian system of particles (energy-based framework) when dissipative effects are considered where the constitutive equation is represented via an internal energy term. A comparison with an Eulerian SPH formulation and FEM is presented to assess the accuracy of the total Lagrangian formulation through examples of high velocity Taylor impact test and hot forging test.

Biography

Speaker
Kadiata Ba / University of Quebec
Canada

Abstract

In this work, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) combined with the smoothed profile method (SPM) is used for simulating the sedimentation process of an elliptical cylinder in a viscous fluid. LBM is used to evaluate the flow field while the no-slip boundary condition on the elliptical surface is treated with SPM. The coupling of LBM and SPM is done by introducing a body force term to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. Simulations are performed at different Reynolds number, Re. The simulation results of sedimentation velocity and the trajectory of the elliptical cylinder obtained with the present method are in good agrement with previously published data in all Re cases.

Biography

Suresh Alapati received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Dong-A university, Busan, Korea in 2011. Dr. Suresh is presently is an Assistant Professor in Department of Mechatronics Engineering in Kyungsung university, Busan, Korea. His research interests include computational fluid dynamics and simulation of micro/nano biological flows using the lattice Boltzmann & Brownian dynamics methods. He has published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

Speaker
Suresh Alapati / Kyungsung University, Korea

Plenary Talks

Abstract

Magnesium is the lightest metallic material that is currently the most potential candidate for weight critical structural applications in engineering sectors such as transportation sector (including aerospace, automobile, marine, sports and space industries). With a capability to reduce ~33% weight over aluminum components, car makers are in a process of increasing the magnesium content in their cars including commercial aircrafts to realize fuel economy and to minimize environmental contamination from greenhouse gases. Besides, the potential of magnesium-based materials in UAVs, drones, air-taxis, and personal mobility devices is significant, undeniable and not yet fully tapped. Accordingly, the current presentation aims to highlight the importance of magnesium in engineering applications with a focus on dispelling the myth that magnesium can catch fire easily and simultaneously highlighting the recent theories proposed to explain ignition behavior.

Biography

Dr Manoj Gupta was a former Head of Materials Division of the Mechanical Engineering Department and Director designate of Materials Science and Engineering Initiative at NUS, Singapore. He did his Ph.D. from University of California, Irvine, USA (1992), and postdoctoral research at University of Alberta, Canada (1992). In August 2017 he was highlighted among Top 1 percent Scientist of the World Position by The Universal Scientific Education and Research Network. To his credit are: (1) Disintegrated Melt Deposition technique and (2) Hybrid Microwave Sintering technique, an energy efficient solid‐state processing method to synthesize alloys/micro/nano‐composites. He has published over 455 peer reviewed journal papers and owns two US patents. His current h‐index is 56, RG index is 46 and citations are greater than 12500. He has also co‐authored six books, published by John Wiley, Springer and MRF ‐ USA. A multiple award winner, he actively collaborate and visit Japan, France, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, China, USA and India.

Speaker
Manoj Gupta / National University of Singapore
Singapore

Abstract

For the design of quartz crystal resonators, finding and determining the vibration modes have always been very important and useful. Vibration modes are usually identified through plotting displacement patterns of each coupled modes. Over the years, there is not much improvement in the identification procedure while tremendous efforts have been made in refining the equations of Mindlin plate theory to obtain more accurate results, such as the adoption of the finite element method (FEM) by implementing the high-order Mindlin plate equations for efficient analysis. However, due to the old fashioned mode identification method, the FEM application is still inadequate and cannot be fully automated for this part. In order tohave this situation improved, we propose a new method by using the proportions of strain and kinetic energies to characterize the energy level of each vibration mode. Instead of using the displacements, we calculate the energy distribution of each vibration mode and designate the mode with the highest energy concentration at a specific frequency as the dominant mode. Then the thermal effect on vibrations including mode variation and conversion are also included to enable a more detailed analysis for quartz crystal resonators. Eventually, all these methods and procedures are implemented in our FEM program for quartz crystal resonators to enable the optimized and improved functions for efficient visualization of frequency spectra and mode shapes. These results have been validated with the traditional approach by plotting mode shapes at each frequency. Clearly, this energy approach will be advantageous with the finite element analysis for vibration mode identification with minimal human interaction.

Biography

Professor Ji Wang has been a Qianjiang Fellow of ZhejiangProvince at NingboUniversity since 2002. Professor Ji Wang is the founding director of the Piezoelectric Device Laboratory, which is a designated Key Laboratory of City of Ningbo. Professor Ji Wang was employed atSaRonix, Menlo Park, CA, as a senior engineer from 2001 to 2002; NetFront Communications, Sunnyvale, CA, as senior engineer and manager from 1999 to 2001; Epson Palo Alto Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA, as Senior Member of Technical Staff from 1995 to 1999. Professor Ji Wang also held visiting positions at Chiba University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and Argonne National Laboratory. He received his PhD and Master degrees from Princeton University in 1996 and 1993 and bachelor from Gansu University of Technology in 1983. Professor Wang has been working on acoustic waves in piezoelectric solids for resonator design and analysis in his research with US and Chinese patents and over 120 journal papers. Professor Wang has been a member of many international conference committees and currently serving the IEEE UFFC Technical Program Committees of the Frequency Control and Ultrasonics Symposia, the IEEE MTT-S, and the IEC TC-49. From 2015, Profess Wang is the editor-in-chief of Structural Longevity.

Speaker
Ji Wang / Ningbo University
China

Keynote Talks

Abstract

This investigation is focused on the stamping behaviour of boron steel, the properties of which are modified by selective laser heat treatment. Both CO2 and fibre lasers are tested. By using different laser processing parameters, the hardening depth in the 1 mm thick boron steel sheet Boloc 02 is varied. Four routes are tested and verified. The forming operation (in which a so-called flexrail beam is produced) in all four routes is conducted at ambient (room) temperature. The Reference route comprises stamping of the sheet. The GridBlank route starts with selective laser heat treatment of the blank, after which the blank is allowed to cool down, moved to a hydraulic press and stamped. In the GridTube route, the blank is first stamped, after which the part is moved to a laser cell and selectively laser heat treated. The fourth route, the RapidLaser route, is similar to the GridBlank route, but a higher laser speed is used to promote higher total productivity. The GridBlank route results in the highest hardness values and the best shape accuracy. The initial sheet material exhibits a hardness of 200 HV, while the parts produced in the GridBlank route exhibit a hardness of 700 HV.

Biography

Nader Asnafi is a professor of mechanical engineering with extensive experience from various assignments in the industry in addition to his academic career. He has developed a range of new products, manufacturing systems and materials (more recently with the 3D-printing). He has a long industrial experience in leadership positions from the company Esselte Dymo, Sapa Technology, Volvo Cars and Uddeholm. He also worked as director of studies at LTU and Division Chief of Engineering at Blekinge Institute of Technology. He has been the appointed reviewer of several national Swedish R and D Programs and has been the chairman of the board of SWEREA IVF INDUSTRIAL MEMBERS ASSOCIATION from 2007 to 2009. He is also the member of the board of WINGQUIST CENTER OF EXCELLENCE, a national center of excellence focusing on virtual product and production development mainly within the automotive industry and the Council of the Institution of Product and Production Development at CHALMERS UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY, Sweden. He has organized several international conferences and seminars.

Speaker
Nader Asnafi / OREBRO UNIVERSITY
SWEDEN

Abstract

Extruded products are widely used in the construction, automobile, and aerospace industries. Many product defects in extrusion have their root in problems related to the die and tooling. Some of these are related to die design, die material, and die manufacturing; while others occur during the service life of the die. These in-service die problems include improper support tooling, improper temperature, erosion, pitting, billet quality, friction, etc. Die problems can be prevented by controlling billet quality and extrusion process parameters. Many of the routine die problems are repairable, and are addressed through various types of die correction operations. After some time, die corrections are no more possible, and the die has to be scrapped. No published literature is available on correctable die defects in a metal extrusion plant. The focus of the current study is on these repairable die defects, and the related die correction operations. It is based on a thorough literature review, and detailed discussions and meetings with engineers and technicians in actual aluminum extrusion plants. Definitions and causes of all relevant die defects are presented, together with details of die correction operations needed to rectify these problems. A brief statistical analysis (frequency charts) of die defects and corrections occurring over a three-year period in a regional extrusion facility is also conducted. This study is of direct utility for engineers and technical staff in the extrusion industry, and for researchers and academics in the area of metal forming.

Biography

Zahid Qamar, Sayyad is currently associated with the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Sultan Qaboos University (SQU), Muscat, Oman. He has over 20 years of academic and research experience in different international universities. He has also worked as a professional mechanical engineer in the field for over 6 years in the heavy engineering and fabrication industry (Manager Research and Development; Deputy Manager Design; Production Engineer; Quality Control Engineer). On top of his experience as a researcher/academician, he has been actively involved in research and accreditation work related to engineering education. His technical research areas are Applied materials and manufacturing; Applied mechanics and design; Reliability engineering; and Engineering education. As part of the Applied Mechanics and Advanced Materials Research group (AM2R) at SQU, he has been involved in different applied research funded projects in excess of 4 million dollars. He has around 200 research/technical publications to his credit (2 research monographs/books, 2 edited book volumes, 5 book chapters, 145 publications in refereed international journals and conferences, and 32 technical reports). He is currently editing one volume (Renewability of Synthetic Materials) for the Elsevier Encyclopedia of Renewable and Sustainable Materials. He has served as Associate editor, Guest editor, and Member editorial board for different research journals (including Materials and Manufacturing Processes, Journal of Elastomers and Plastics, the Journal of Engineering Research, American Journal of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering).

Speaker
Sayyad Zahid Qamar / Sultan Qaboos University
Oman

Abstract

Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are basically solid state of MR fluids (MRFs) in which micron-sized ferromagnetic particles are dispersed into an elastomeric medium. These novel magneto-active materials can instantly and reversibly change their dynamic properties (stiffness and damping) in the presence of an external magnetic field. The adaptive properties of MREs provide a unique opportunity to utilize them for the development of next generation of wide bandwidth adaptive tuned vibration absorbers (ATVAs) for vibration and noise control applications. There are generally two types of MREs known as isotropic and anisotropic MREs. Anisotropic MREs are cured in the presence of an external magnetic field while curing in the absence of the magnetic field make MREs to have isotropic behaviour. In this talk, linear and nonlinear viscoelastic properties of different types of in-house fabricated isotropic MREs under wide range of frequency and amplitude oscillatory shear motion have been experimentally investigated. The effects of strain amplitude, excitation frequency and magnetic field flux density on the stress-strain hysteresis loops as well as storage and loss moduli of MREs are then discussed.

Biography

Ramin Sedaghati is a full professor in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, at Concordia University. He received the B.Eng. and M.A.Scdegrees in Mechanical Engineering from Amirkabir University of Technology , Tehran in 1988 and 1990 respectively and his PhD degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Victoria , British Columbia in 2000. After completing his Ph.D., Dr. Sedaghati was awarded Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Post-Doctoral Fellowship and worked in the Canadian Space Agency , Spacecraft Engineering Branch, Saint-Hubert, Quebec. In August 2001, Dr. Sedaghati joined Concordia University as an assistant professor and then became associate professor in 2006 and promoted to the rank of full professor in 2011. Dr. Sedaghati is currently a registered professional engineer (PEO), Fellow of the Canadian Society of Mechanical Engineering (CSME), Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and serves as the associate editor of the Journal of Intelligent Material Systems and Structures (JIMSS). Dr. Sedaghati main areas of expertise are: Smart materials and structures specially Magneto-rheological (MR) and Electro-rheological (ER) fluid based adaptive structures; vibration analysis and vibration control using smart materials; passive and semi-active energy absorption systems; structural design optimization and computational mechanics

Speaker
Ramin Sedaghtai / Concordia University
Canada

Abstract

Quadcopters are very convenient to use for the possibility to take off and land vertically. However, currently most commercial quadcopters can fly only around 25 minutes, so their flight zone is limited to small areas. Extending the flight time is thus vert attractive. On the other hand, the progress of battery technologies is slow, so using the battery cannot solve the limitation of flight time soon. Here we turn to the alternative energy of sunlight, which has several advantages. First, sunlight distributes over the sky, so it does not need to be carried by the quadcopter. Second, sunlight is used instantaneously, so no charging is required. Third, sunlight is free and gives rise to no green-house gases. Nonetheless, to harvest sufficient solar power, the area has to be large. Conventional quadcopters do not have the space to install huge solar panels. Hence the entire copters have to be re-designed. Several factors need to considered, including the area and the weight of the solar panels, the torque from the air pressure, the stability of the large copter frame, and so on. In addition, because the quadcopters have to adjust their orientation frequently to maintain flying on the air, the solar panels on the copter receive varying solar power, leading to huge fluctuation of the current, voltage, and the power. The electronics on board will get damaged then. In any cases, those issues are solved eventually. We achieved a flight time of over 3 hours, the record of flight time for quadcopters without using chemical fuels. The details will be reported in the presentation.

Biography

Ching-Fuh Lin obtained the B.S. degree from National Taiwan University in 1983, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, in 1989 and 1993, respectively, all in electrical engineering. He is the founding Director of Innovative Photonics Advanced Research Center (i-PARC) and a joint distinguished professor in the Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, and Department of Electrical Engineering at National Taiwan University. His major research area is in photonics, including solar cells and applications for drones, Si-based photonics, micro-LED technologies, broadband semiconductor lasers & optical amplifiers, etc. He is a Fellow of IEEE, a Fellow of SPIE, and Member of Asia-Pacific Academy of Materials. He has publishedover 180 journal papers and500 conference papers and holdsmore than 70 patents. He is the author of several books and obtainedmany awards. He has also served in the International Scientific Committee ofEuropean PhotovoltaicSolar Energy Conferenceand Exhibitionfor several years and other photonics societies.

Speaker
Ching-Fuh Lin / National Taiwan University Taiwan

Sessions:

Speaker

Abstract

A novel technique has been developed to passively orientate small lightweight circular components with hollow internal structures and symmetrical external tapers using vibratory bowl feeders (VBF). VBFs can be ‘tooled’ in specific ways to allow components to have a desired orientation. The complexity and possibility of the tooling depends on the specific features of the component. Examples of complex shapes include cylindrical components with symmetrical external tapers. These can experience ‘pinching’ which causes components to rise from the surface of the track, supported by their neighbouring components. Such features cause complications when combined with internal features. For example, conventional VBF tooling for the orientation of cylindrical components with internal features utilises cut outs and grooves on the VBF track to reject incorrectly orientated components. However, ifpinching of an incorrectly orientated component occurs between two correctly orientated components, then traditional methods cannot guarantee successful orientation filtering. A common solution to components not in a single layer is to use a height restrictor, but this is not a generic solution as it is functional only for components with a large height to diameter ratio. To overcome this issue a novel tooling method has been developed which causes the components to dislocate from one another by forcing the components to go up a slop and then tilt to level, ensuring a separation of the components. The components then undergo an orientation filtering process, followed by a step drop to prevent back pressure from upstream components disrupting the orientation filtering process. The dimensions of the tooling are calculated from the specific component geometry. This unique tooling design has been successfully tested on an industrial rig.

Biography

Toby Williams is currently undertaking his PhD in mechatronics in medicine and obtained his Master of Engineering in mechanical engineering from Loughborough University (UK). Kaddour Bouazza-Marouf completed his BSc and PhD from Newcastle University (UK); he is a Reader in Mechatronics in Medicine at Loughborough University, and teaches Robotics and Control Engineering. He is a Chartered Engineer (CEng), Fellow of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (FIMechE), and Associate Editor of The IFAC Journal of Mechatronics.

Speaker
Kaddour Bouazza-Marouf / Loughborough University
UK

Abstract

Analytical method is presented for determination of modal vibration characteristics of high speed viscoelastic rotating disks. In development of this analytical solution, two dimensional elastodynamic theory is employed and the viscoelastic material for the medium is allowed by assuming complex elastic moduli. The general governing equations of motion are derived and a solution for a single rotating disk with different boundary conditions is developed for a wide range of rotating speeds and any radius ratios, such as those for solid disks or thin rings. The proposed solution is used to investigate the influences of hysteretic material damping on dimensionless natural frequencies and modal loss factors for the rotating disks. Furthermore, the solution is expanded to consider the effect of adding disk segment with different material on the inner or outer sides of a disk on the natural frequencies and critical speeds of the equivalent single disk. The dimensionless results for these cases are presented for a wide range of rotational speeds.

Biography

Hamid R. Hamidzadeh is Professor and Head of the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at Tennessee State University. Before joining TSU, he was Professor of Mechanical Engineering at South Dakota State University for many years. He was a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley and Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in Applied Mechanics from Imperial College-University of London in 1978. Dr. Hamidzadeh is an active teacher and researcher in vibrations, dynamic systems, composite cylinders, and inflated thin-film structures. He has been principal investigator of many research projects and contracts, and has published numerous technical articles. He was actively involved in research projects with NASA Marshal Space Flight Center. He has served the ASME as a member of NSSC and as chair of different Committees at Region VII for many years. He has served as a member of ASME Technical Committee on Vibration and Sound. He has organized and chaired several ASME Symposia. He was chair of the 20th ASME Biennial Conference on Mechanical Vibration and Noise, and the General Co-Chair of the 2005 ASME International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers

Speaker
Hamid R. Hamidzadeh / Tennessee State University
USA

Abstract

Neurocritical care combinesthe management of extremely complex disease stateswith the inherent limitations of clinically assessing patients with brain injury. Multimodality monitoring (MMM) has created a wealth of data in the setting of neurocritical care1. Ventilation, intracranial pressure, hemodynamics, body temperature, fluid intake-output, serial neurological examinations, and other neurophysiologic parameters are examples of some of the information gathered with MMM. While MMM has transformed care by centralizing patient data, more exciting is the prospect of implementing artificial intelligence (AI) in automating basic care utilizing data accumulated by MMM. Recent advances in AI have made it possible for AI to move from the experimental realm and become integrated into the actual clinical setting. AI systems that demonstrate ambient intelligence interact with humans and are embedded, context aware, personalized, adaptive, and anticipatory. Using these traits, an AI system with ambient intelligence could be used for continuous real-time monitoring as well as treatment of neurocritical care patients. Early signs of neurological deterioration could be detected more quickly and appropriately managed, improving patient outcomes. Additionally, AI could reduce costs and help patients in remote areas where the expertise of a neurocritical care physician may not be present.2Increasingly, societal trends such as the aging population coupled with geographic and relative disparities in provider populations will increase the search for novel ways to care for critically ill patients. In this presentation we review the promise of existing technologies in shaping automated care and discuss the future potential directions towards a more integrated AI system in neurocritical care. The Promise of Artificial Intelligence AI systems have made great progress in the realm of data analysis of high resolution neurocritical care data as well as algorithmic decision making.2 Alongside advances in this decision making, there has also been the development of technology that allow for these decisions to constantly be informed by the patient’s health status.3 Closed-loop AI systems may monitor parameters of patients, then directly treat patients and induce changes in those very parameters they may be monitoring. These systems may make direct real-time adjustments to patient care without any human input.4, 5 Examples of some of the patient care modalities they may modify are anesthetics/analgesics, antiepileptic drugs, blood pressure, glucose, fluids/electrolytes, neuromuscular blockade, and ventilator settings.6-17 When decision making is combined with the ability to execute those decisions, it would not be unrealistic to foresee a future where AI systems are able to completely manage neurocritical care patients with little or even no supervision. Below we discuss he different commonly-measured parameters in neurocritical care, innovations that alreadyallow for the automation of analysis and management, and potential applications for AI.

Biography

Speaker
Fawaz Al-Mufti / New York Medical College
USA

Abstract

Occupational Safety, Hazard Identification and Accident Prevention is an area of deliberation, studies and ongoing researches. Conventional Safety Techniques in organizations place core responsibility of safety coordination and accident prevention on the shoulders of senior management. Nowadays, an alternative concept adopted by industries to involve employees / front line workers and identifying at risk behaviors to promote safety culture is Behavior Based Safety Program. BBS program is widely implemented in developed countries for identification of hazards and at risk behaviors, however, some studies and applications are conducted in Pakistan. This research investigates the approach toward safety awareness and accident prevention in an oil and gas energy utility company. Data collection, Steps involved in establishing BBS culture and safety index trend chart are established to evaluate safety awareness and accident prevention. Results shows that after implementing BBS program a significant performance is enhanced as the safety index (SI) progressively increased up to 17% in period of two months. Employees demonstrated positive concerns towards safety and provide suggestion to strengthen BBS program as well. Findings determine that BBS program is able to minimize accident in energy utility industries along with improving quality and creating safety environment.

Biography

Speaker
Muhammad Hassaan Shoukat / Sui Southern Gas Company Limited
Pakistan

Abstract

In a recent work, authors have developed a novel approach to model the tribocorrosion material degradation. Components of the model were introduced and the ability to capture the dynamics of electrochemical current in a tribocorrosive environment was tested. The model incorporates mechanical and corrosive wear of asperities and calculates the real area of contact with a deterministic contact mechanics simulation. The individual components of the tribocorrosive wear was calculated and a new Archard-type tribocorrosion equation was proposed. In this paper, the sensitivity of the model to a set of parameters used in the model were examined and their effects on the mechanical, corrosive and total tribocorrosive wear was investigated. The parameters used in this study were physical (load, velocity, and initial surface roughness), mechanical (hardness, elastic modulus) and electrochemical (share of current, applied potential). The results indicate that both mechanical wear andcorrosion linearly vary with the applied load. Results also show that mechanical wear is proportional to the (1/H) and corrosion is proportional to (1/H2) which is in line with the previous work in the literature. Applied potential and the charge transfer coefficient significantly affect the corrosion but their influence on the mechanical wear is negligible. Both the mechanical wear and corrosion vary almost linearly with the sliding velocity.

Biography

Speaker
Ali Ghanbarzadeh / University of Leeds
U.K

Abstract

Many actuators used in spacecraft applications rely on electromechanical principles for their function. However, in comparison to other industrial sectors, the actuator design and development is often focused on very specialized and one-of-a-kind tasks, relying on very few hardware prototypes only. Therefore, the optimization of electromagnetic design features in their interaction with other physical effects and the resulting performance has become a promising area for a model-based approach. State-of-the-art software tools for the modelling and simulation of electromagnetic problems allow for technical consolidation very early in the overall design & development process. This is particularly powerful for highly customized designs and feasibility studies for new concepts when design heritage and prototype hardware test results are not available yet. The paper will address recent multi-physics type investigations on brushless DC motors and other actuators performed by the Mechanisms Section of the European Space Agency (ESA). A typical application of custom-design electric motors can be found with reaction wheels for spacecraft attitude control. As a specific problem, the eddy current related losses have been studied in order to quantify their contribution to the total resistive torque. Supporting this work, a simplified experimental set-up has been devised and built. The test results have been used to correlate simulation output obtained from basic linearized models up to transient nonlinear representations of eddy current effects in complex geometries. The high sensitivity of the simulation results to critical model parameters, for instance the electrical conductivity of materials vs. temperature, will be particularly emphasized in the paper

Biography

Rene Seiler graduated in electrical & mechanical engineering at Dresden University of Technology (Germany). Furthermore, he pursued complementary studies on space systems engineering at Delft University of Technology (The Netherlands) and signal processing at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton (United Kingdom). Currently, he is working as senior mechanisms expert at the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC). Over more than 20 years, he has done research and development on reaction wheel technology for spacecraft attitude control and other areas of mechatronics for many satellite missions of the European Space Agency

Speaker
Rene Seiler / European Space Agency
Netherlands

Abstract

Nanostructured metals (Ti and Ti alloys, stainless steels, Mg alloys) with enhanced static and fatigue strengths are promising materials for medical implants. The use of severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods leads to significant strengthening of the metallic materials due to their nanostructuring when the formation of ultrafine grains is combined with the formation of nanostructural features – nano-phased precipitations, grain boundary segregations, nano-twins, etc. In the present article the recent developments from author and his colleagues on continuous SPD processing, i.e. equal channel angular pressing (ECAP)- Conform techniques, for producing nanostructured CP titanium are considered. The use of nanoTi rods with enhanced strength and fatigue life has enabled the fabrication of implants with improved design for dentistry and orthopedics. Furthermore, surface modification of nanoTi through chemical etching and bioactive coatings allows for considerable improvement of its biomedical properties. As a result of conducted studies, miniaturized dental implants and nanoTi plates with reduced thickness and enhanced osseointegration were manufactured and successfully tested in clinical trials.

Biography

Ruslan Z. Valiev - doctor of physical and mathematical sciences, Professor. Director of Scientific Research Institute of physics of advanced materials of Ufa State Aviation Technical University (Russia), Head of the laboratory of mechanics of advanced massive nanomaterials for innovative engineering applications Saint Petersburg State University (Russia). Author of more than 600 papers, 12 monographs and books, more than 35 patents in the area of bulk nanostructuring and nanoSPD. Total citation amount of his works exceeds 23000. Co-founder and chairman of Steering Committee “nanoSPD”: Bulk Nanomaterials through Severe Plastic Deformation; International Committee on Nanostructured Materials. Member of editorial boards of: Materials Science and Engineering: A, Acta Metallurgica Slovaca, Journal of Materials Research and Technology, Materials Research Letters, Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Materials.

Speaker
Ruslan Z. Valiev / Saint Petersburg State University
Russia

Abstract

The large scale promotion of intermittent renewable energies create the need of hydropower generating unit (HGU) to operating more at off design conditions. However, the occurring of various draft tube pressure pulsations (DTPPs) in the Francis turbine limits the operating range of the turbine. Aiming at the identification of pressure fluctuation components together with the evaluation of their impact, a novel method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the synchronous component of the DTPP is identified based on the multi-measuring points' pressure pulsation data measured from the turbine upstream and the propagation characteristic of it. Secondly, rotating components of the DTPP are separated by removal of the synchronous component from the frequency-domain of DTPP. Then, the contribution of these different components to the severity of DTPP are quantitative analyzed by a correlation analysis method based on multiple frequency-bands' energy. Lastly, an index for the evaluation of their impacts on the mechanical stability of the HGU is established. This method is verified the onsite experiment data of a large prototype Francis turbine. Results shows that it is useful for the identification of the components in the DTPP, and the evaluation of the impact of them.

Biography

Weiyu Wang is a PhD student of Wuhan University, China and bachelor studies from Northwest Agriculture & Forestry University, China. He is a student member of IAHR. He has published three papers in reputed journals included in SCI index, including an article in the TOP Q2 of JCR (MSSP, impact factor 4.370).

Speaker
Qijuan Chen / Wuhan University
China

Abstract

Extensive wear appears in the case of dry contacts, or when the lubrication of the contacting surfaces is not appropriate. The aim of this research is to improve the mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication in hypoid gears by the optimization of manufacture parameters for tooth surface processing. A full numerical analysis of the thermal mixed EHL in hypoid gears is applied. The equation system and the numerical procedure are unified for a full coverage of all the lubrication regions including the full film, mixed, and boundary lubrication. In the hydrodynamically lubricated areas the calculation method employed is based on the simultaneous solution of the Reynolds, elasticity, energy, and Laplace's equations. In the asperity contact areas the Reynolds equation is reduced to an expression equivalent to the mathematical description of dry contact problem. The real geometry and kinematics of the gear pair based on the manufacturing procedure is applied, thus the exact geometrical separation of the mating tooth surfaces is included in the oil film shape, and the real velocities of these surfaces are used in the Reynolds and energy equations.The transient nature of gear tooth mesh is included. The oil viscosity variation with respect to pressure and temperature and the density variation with respect to pressure are included. The non-Newtonian behaviour of the lubricant is considered. Using this model, the pressures, film thickness, temperatures, and power losses in the mixed lubrication regime are predicted. By using the developed method, the influence of the manufacturing parameters on the conditions of mixed elastohydrodynamic lubrication is investigated. On the basis of the obtained results recommendations are formulated to improve the mixed EHL and the efficiency of face-milled hypoid gears.

Biography

Speaker
Vilmos V. Simon / Budapest University of Technology and Economics
Hungary

Abstract

Indian Economy is gearing up globally under “MAKE IN INDIA” concept movement to promote Innovation, Entrepreneurship and up gradation in professional academic system with digital technology to meet and face globle challenges in most of the business sectors. Strength of India is 60% plus population of young minds having age group between 25-35. India is on track of technological development inclusive of infrastructure, communication, road &transport thro implementation and application of collaborative western technology and western countries look INDIA as BIG BUSINESS MARKET so foreign investment is also smoothly and steadily increases .Average Indian mindsets are adoptive to change and accepts life style change culture with least resistance and converted as consumers of import ed technology so make in india out put’s main consumers will be Indian only .Thus western technology penetration to Indian market created a concept of “Make in India” to create job opportunities for qualified youngsters. To promote Make In India, Indian Government also designed and implemented “Start-up” to promote self employment and entrepreneurship for the interested people who have IDEAS & INNOVATIONS. Public-PrivateParternership [PPP]scheme is also mechanism to get financial and infrastructural support from Government and under this scheme various annually event takes place in each state of India to attract investor from ‘the globe. “Digital India” movements has improved business transparency resulted in better ranking of Indian Market by global economist’ Innovation promotion to brand “INDIA” is also geared up thro top national level institutes[IITs,IIMs,NITs..] under provision of various research-Grant and joint research provision scheme with western countries to design & develop products to suit Indian requirements. Health sectors ,Agriculture, Textile and Automotive sectors are the expected significant economy drivers to elevate GDP in coming years along with e. market..

Biography

Dr. D V Bhatt is a professor in Mechanical Engineering Department, Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology (One of the NITs) located at SURAT Gujarat India. He is also Chairman- centre for continuing education- and former Dean ( Alumni & Resource generation ), Chairman Anchor Institute cell and professor in charge E D cell. He possess more than 39 years of Industry (10 yrs), Entrepreneur (2 yrs) and academic (27 yrs) experience. He joined academia in 1990. He did his Ph. D. In area of engine Tribology from VNSGU in 2005. He has guided five Ph. D. Scholars and 36 M. Tech students. He is having rich experience of bearing, automobile, Textile industries along with project execution. His research area is broadly Dynamics of mechanics with respect to Tribological applications. He has published 75 + International/ National Journal and conferences papers. He has filed eight national patents and one International patent. He is fellow member of IE(I), life member of ISTE, QCFI, TSI, SGPC. He has delivered expert lecturers at University of Saskatchewan Canada, IIT Roorki. He has executed funded projects to establish Tribology Lab, Incubation centre and E. D. Call. He has organised more than 30 technical events in the form of conferences, workshops, STTPs and seminars.

Speaker
D V Bhatt / Sardar Vallabhbhai National Institute of Technology
India

Abstract

One of the important tasks of modern materials science is the development of new composites with improved functional properties. Theoretical and experimental backgrounds of synthesis of a new class of nanocomposite materials based on a metal matrix are substantiated (iron, aluminum) with TiC nanofibers as the disperse phase. A new combined method for producing metal-based (iron, aluminum) composites is considered, including powder metallurgy and surface nanostructuring of the dispersed phase. The following stages of material synthesis are investigated: (1) preparation of porous metal matrix; (2) ALDassisted surface structuring of porous metal matrix by TIC nanostructures 1-50 nm in size; (3) pressing and sintering of samples to produce solid metal composites materials with TIC nanofibers in the bulk. This material can be presented in the form of "frame in the frame", i.e. metal frame, pierced by the frame of TiC nanowires. It is shown that despite the presence of residual porosity, the properties of the obtained samples are comparable with the properties of the mold-produced best steel grades containing expensive dopants. In the future, this approach will solve the problem of creating a new generation of nanostructured metal composites with improved mechanical properties for various fields of engineering (mechanical engineering, engine building).

Biography

Elena Zemtsova – Ph.D, associate professor in Saint Petersburg State University, Institute of Chemistry. Author of more than 40 scientific papers in reputed journals and 5 student’s manuals, book chapters in the area of composite materials. Also, one of the areas of scientific work is related to the design of smart materials for targeted drug delivery.

Speaker
Elena Zemtsova / Saint Petersburg State University
Russia

Abstract

People face the problem of reducing living space along with the growth of population. Therefore, many people will choose multi-functional furniture in a limited housing capacity so as to solve the problem of insufficient living space. This study presents a conceptual mechanism design of a pull-out sofa bed. The mechanism adopts an eight-bar-ten-joint 1-DOF linkage. Through pulling out the seat-cushion link to lift up the stored intermediate bed-board link under the seat-cushion, at the same time, the sliding bed-board link slides down along with the sliding groove and then completes the process of converting a sofa into a bed. The 2D model of this conceptual design is constructed via SolidWorks software and has performed its interference check and kinematic simulation as well. The preliminary result has confirmed its feasibility.

Biography

Rong-Cheng Huang currently is a graduate student at Institute of Manufacturing Technology, National Taipei University of Technology(NTUT), Taiwan. His major is mechanism design and analysis

Speaker
Rong-Cheng Huang / National Taipei University of Technology
Taiwan

Abstract

This paper presents a conceptual mechanism design for conversion between round table and square table. Convenient and simple to operate is the main principle of the design. This design applies four sets of crank-slider in which the slider is the input link that the extendable table board rigidly attached, and the output link of each set is connected together. A user, therefore, can move any piece of the four extendable boards stored under the round table board to drive the other three boards to lift outward simultaneously and become the square table. This design also includes a mechanism to reduce the gap between the round table board and the extendable table boards by forcing the extendable boards to move toward the round table board. Similarly, by pushing any single extendable board inward after a short pull outward, can simultaneously drive the other extendable boards to go down under the round table, and therefore return to round table. The dimensional synthesis of the required slider-crank is obtained by analytical approach, and then constructs the corresponding 3D model via SolidWorks software. The kinematic simulation and interference check are also performed via the functions of SolidWorks. The preliminary results have confirmed its correctness of this conceptual design

Biography

Chuen-Yu Cheng currently is a graduate student at Institute of Mechatronic Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology( NTUT), Taiwan. His major is mechanism design and analysis

Speaker
Chuen-Yu Cheng / National Taipei University of Technology
Taiwan

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